Unconditional Positive Regard — Anticipation –You Can Get What You Want — Change Your Expectations — Choose What You Want! — Commit To Mastery — Love — Videos

Posted on December 16, 2016. Filed under: Babies, Blogroll, Communications, Entertainment, Faith, Family, Friends, Heroes, liberty, Life, Literacy, Love, Mastery, media, Music, Music, People, Philosophy, Programming, Radio, Raves, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Success, Television, Video, Wealth, Wisdom, Work, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The first 20 hours — how to learn anything | Josh Kaufman | TEDxCSU

Unconditional positive regard — the power of self acceptance | Michelle Charfen | TEDxRedondoBeach

After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver

Why you don’t get what you want; it’s not what you expect | Jennice Vilhauer | TEDxPeachtree

Bill Gates on Expertise: 10,000 Hours and a Lifetime of Fanaticism

CHANGE YOUR MIND AND BECOME SUCCESSFUL – Best Motivational Videos Compilation for 2017

Malcolm Gladwell: Outliers

Tim Ferriss Scoffs at Gladwell’s 10,000 Hours

Tim Ferriss shares how to master any skill by deconstructing it | The Next Web

The Rolling Stones – You Can’t Always Get What You Want (TV Show ’69)

I saw her today at the reception
A glass of wine in her hand
I knew she would meet her connection
At her feet was a footloose man
No, you can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometime you find
You get what you need
I saw her today at the reception
A glass of wine in her hand
I knew she was gonna meet her connection
At her feet was a footloose man
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometimes well you might find
You get what you need
And I went down to the demonstration
To get my fair share of abuse
Singing, “We’re gonna vent our frustration
If we don’t we’re gonna blow a 50-amp fuse”
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometimes well you just might find
You get what you need
I went down to the Chelsea drugstore
To get your prescription filled
I was standing in line with Mr. Jimmy
And man, did he look pretty ill
We decided that we would have a soda
My favorite flavor, cherry red
I sung my song to Mr. Jimmy
Yeah, and he said one word to me, and that was “dead”
I said to him
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometimes you just might find
You get what you need
You get what you need–yeah, oh baby
I saw her today at the reception
In her glass was a bleeding man
She was practiced at the art of deception
Well I could tell by her blood-stained hands
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometimes you just might find
You just might find
You get what you need
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometimes you just might find
You just might find
You get what you need

Carly Simon – Anticipation

Lyrics

We can never know about the days to come
But we think about them anyway, yay
And I wonder if I’m really with you now
Or just chasin’ after some finer day

Anticipation, anticipation
Is makin’ me late
Is keepin’ me waitin’

And I tell you how easy it feels to be with you
And how right your arms feel around me
But I, I rehearsed those lines just late last night
When I was thinkin’ about how right tonight might be

Anticipation, anticipation
Is makin’ me late
Is keepin’ me waitin’

And tomorrow we might not be together
I’m no prophet and I don’t know nature’s ways
So I’ll try and see into your eyes right now
And stay right here ’cause these are the good old days

And stay right here ’cause these are the good old days
(These are the good old days)
(These are the good old days)
(These are the good old days)
(These are…..the good old days)

Paul McCartney, Joe Cocker, Eric Clapton & Rod Stewart – All You Need Is Love (LIVE) HD

“All You Need Is Love”

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, love

There’s nothing you can do that can’t be done
Nothing you can sing that can’t be sung
Nothing you can say but you can learn how to play the game
It’s easy

Nothing you can make that can’t be made
No one you can save that can’t be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It’s easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, love

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Nothing you can know that isn’t known
Nothing you can see that isn’t shown
Nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be
It’s easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

All you need is love (All together, now!)
All you need is love (Everybody!)
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Yee-hai! (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)

Yesterday (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Oh yeah! (Love is all you need)
She loves you, yeah yeah yeah (Love is all you need)
She loves you, yeah yeah yeah (Love is all you need)

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Pleasantville–Videos

Posted on June 28, 2010. Filed under: Art, Biology, Blogroll, Books, Comedy, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, government, Homes, Language, Law, liberty, Life, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Rants, Raves, Religion, Reviews, Science, Sports, Technology, Transportation, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 1

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 2

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 3

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 4

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 5

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 6

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 7

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 8

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 9

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 10

Pleasantville (film) 1998 Part 11

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The Wisdom of The Founding Fathers–Videos

Posted on June 18, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Books, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Farming, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

“The good Education of Youth has been esteemed by wise Men in all Ages, as the surest Foundation of the Happiness both of private Families and of Common-wealths. Almost all Governments have therefore made it a principal Object of their Attention, to establish and endow with proper Revenues, such Seminaries of Learning, as might supply the succeeding Age with Men qualified to serve the Publick with Honour to themselves, and to their Country. ”

~Benjamin Franklin, Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pennsylvania, 1749

 

Glenn Beck-06/18/10-A 

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“Give up money, give up fame, give up science, give the earth itself and all it contains rather than do an immoral act. And never suppose that in any possible situation, or under any circumstances, it is best for you to do a dishonorable thing, however slightly so it may appear to you… From the practice of the purest virtue, you may be assured you will derive the most sublime comforts in every moment of life, and in the moment of death.”

Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, August 19, 1785

Background Articles and Videos

  

America’s Prophet

 Who’s more American, Moses or Jesus?

The Council of Dads by Bruce Feiler

Bruce Feiler Reads “The Council of Dads”

TEDxEast – Bruce Feiler – 05/07/10

Celebration of Life Keynote Address by Bruce Feiler – Part 1

Celebration of Life Keynote Address by Bruce Feiler – Part 2

Celebration of Life Keynote Address by Bruce Feiler – Part 3

Walking the Bible – PBS

 

Bruce Feiler

 

 

Bruce Feiler: A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths 

 

Bruce Feiler 

“…Bruce Feiler (born October 25, 1964) is a popular American writer on faith, family, and finding meaning in everyday life. He is the best-selling author of nine books, including Walking the Bible, Abraham, and America’s Prophet, and one of only a handful of writers to have four consecutive New York Times nonfiction best-sellers in the last decade. He is also the writer/presenter of the PBS miniseries Walking the Bible.[1]

His latest book, The Council of Dads: My Daughters, My Illness, and the Men Who Could Be Me, describes how he responded to a diagnosis of cancer by asking six men from all passages of his life to be present through the passages of his young daughters’ lives.

Feiler is credited with formulating the Feiler Faster Thesis[2]: the increasing pace of society and journalists’ ability to report it is matched by the public’s desire for more information.

He has written for numerous publications including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, and Gourmet magazine[3], where he won three James Beard Awards.[4] He is also a frequent contributor to National Public Radio, CNN, and Fox News. Feiler was the guest on the November 2, 2005 episode of Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report.[5]

A native of Savannah, Georgia, Feiler lives in New York with his wife, Linda Rottenberg, and their twin daughters. Rottenberg, who frequently appears in his books, is co-founder and CEO of Endeavor, a nonprofit that supports High-Impact Entrepreneurs.

Feiler completed his undergraduate degree at Yale University where he was a member of Ezra Stiles College, before spending time teaching English in Japan as part of the JET Program. This experience led to his first book, Learning to Bow: Inside the Heart of Japan, a popular portrait of life in a small Japanese town. Upon his return he earned a masters degree in international relations from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, which he chronicled in his book Looking for Class. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Feiler

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Glenn Beck–A Forgotten Founding Father–George Whitefield–Videos

Posted on May 15, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, College, Communications, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, government, government spending, history, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Religion, Resources, Reviews, Strategy, Uncategorized, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

Glenn Beck-05/14/10-A

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George Whitefield – On the Method of Grace

George Whitefield – (1714-1770), Methodist evangelist

George Whitefield was born on December 16, 1714, in Gloucester, England. The youngest of seven children, he was born in the Bell Inn where his father, Thomas, was a wine merchant and innkeeper. His father died when George was two and his widowed mother Elizabeth struggled to provide for her family. Because he thought he would never make much use of his education, at about age 15 George persuaded his mother to let him leave school and work in the inn. However, sitting up late at night, George became a diligent student of the Bible. A visit to his Mother by an Oxford student who worked his way through college encouraged George to pursue a university education. He returned to grammar school to finish his preparation to enter Oxford, losing only about one year of school.

In 1732 at age 17, George entered Pembroke College at Oxford. He was gradually drawn into a group called the “Holy Club” where he met John and Charles Wesley. Charles Wesley loaned him the book, The Life of God in the Soul of Man. The reading of this book, after a long and painful struggle which even affected him physically, finally resulted in George’s conversion in 1735. He said many years later: “I know the place…. Whenever I go to Oxford, I cannot help running to the spot where Jesus Christ first revealed himself to me and gave me the new birth.”

Forced to leave school because of poor health, George returned home for nine months of recuperation. Far from idle, his activity attracted the attention of the bishop of Gloucester, who ordained Whitefield as a deacon, and later as a priest, in the Church of England. Whitefield finished his degree at Oxford and on June 20, 1736, Bishop Benson ordained him. The Bishop, placing his hands upon George’s head, resulted in George’s later declaration that “My heart was melted down and I offered my whole spirit, soul, and body to the service of God’s sanctuary.”

Whitefield was an astounding preacher from the beginning. Though he was slender in build, he stormed in the pulpit as if he were a giant. Within a year it was said that “his voice startled England like a trumpet blast.” At a time when London had a population of less than 700,000, he could hold spellbound 20,000 people at a time at Moorfields and Kennington Common. For thirty-four years his preaching resounded throughout England and America. In his preaching ministry he crossed the Atlantic thirteen times and became known as the ‘apostle of the British empire.’

He was a firm Calvinist in his theology yet unrivaled as an aggressive evangelist. Though a clergyman of the Church of England, he cooperated with and had a profound impact on people and churches of many traditions, including Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and Baptists. Whitefield, along with the Wesleys, inspired the movement that became known as the Methodists. Whitefield preached more than 18,000 sermons in his lifetime, an average of 500 a year or ten a week. Many of them were given over and over again. Fewer than 90 have survived in any form.

The Story of Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace – Judy Collins and the choir

Amazing Grace Movie Trailer

Hayley Westenra – Amazing Grace (Live)

Background Articles and Videos

George Whitefield

“…George Whitefield (pronounced /ˈhwɪtfiːld/) (December 16, 1714 – September 30, 1770), also known as George Whitfield, was an Anglican itinerant minister who helped spread the Great Awakening in Great Britain and, especially, in the British North American colonies.

Early life

Whitefield was born at the bell Inn, Southgate Street, Gloucester[1] in England. An influential figure in the establishment of Methodism, Whitefield was famous for his preaching in British North America, which was a significant factor in an 18th-century movement of Christian revivals there sometimes called “The Great Awakening.”

Whitefield was the son of a widow who kept an inn at Gloucester. At an early age, he found that he had a passion and talent for acting in the theatre, a passion that he would carry on through the very theatrical re-enactments of Bible stories that he told during his sermons. He was educated at the Crypt School, Gloucester, and Pembroke College, Oxford. Because Whitefield came from a poor background, he did not have the means to pay for his tuition. He therefore entered Oxford as a servitor, the lowest rank of students at Oxford. In return for free tuition, he was assigned as a servant to a number of higher ranked students. His duties included waking them in the morning, polishing their shoes, carrying their books and even assisting with required written assignments.[2] He was a part of the ‘Holy Club’ at Oxford University with the Wesley brothers, John and Charles. After reading Henry Scougal’s The Life of God in the Soul of Man he became very religious. Following a religious conversion, he became very passionate for preaching his new-found faith. The Bishop of Gloucester ordained him before the canonical age.

Travels and evangelism

“Whitefield was a celebrity in his time and is considered by many to be the founder of the evangelical movement.”[3] Whitefield preached his first sermon in the Crypt Church in his home town of Gloucester a week after his ordination. He had earlier become the leader of the Holy Club at Oxford when the Wesley brothers departed for Georgia. He adopted the practice of Howell Harris of preaching in the open-air at Hanham Mount, near Kingswood, Bristol. In 1738, before going to America, where he became parish priest of Savannah, Georgia he invited John Wesley to preach in the open-air for the first time at Kingswood and then Blackheath, London. After a short stay in Georgia he returned home in the following year to receive priest’s orders, resuming his open-air evangelistic activities.

Whitefield accepted the Church of England doctrine of predestination but disagreed with the Wesley brothers views on slavery and of the doctrine of Arminianism. As a result the Wesley brothers pursued their own religious movement.[citation needed] Whitefield formed and was the president of the first Methodist conference. At an early date Whitefield decided to concentrate on evangelistic work and relinquished the position.

Three churches were established in England in his name: one in Bristol and two others, the “Moorfields Tabernacle” and the “Tottenham Court Road Chapel”, in London. Later the society meeting at the second Kingswood School at Kingswood, a town on the eastern edge of Bristol, was also called Whitefield’s Tabernacle. Whitefield acted as chaplain to Selina, Countess of Huntingdon and some of his followers joined the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion, whose chapels were paid for at her sole expense and where a form of Calvinistic Methodism similar to Whitefield’s could be spread. Many of these chapels were built in the English counties and Wales, and one was erected in London — the Spa Fields Chapel.

In 1739 Whitefield returned to England to raise funds to establish the Bethesda Orphanage, which is the oldest extant charity in North America. On returning to North America he preached a series of revivals that came to be known as the Great Awakening of 1740. He preached nearly every day for months to large crowds of sometimes several thousand people as he travelled throughout the colonies, especially New England. His journey on horseback from New York City to Charleston was the longest then undertaken in North America by a white man.

Like his contemporary and acquaintance, Jonathan Edwards, Whitefield preached with a staunchly Calvinist theology that was in line with the “moderate Calvinism” of the Thirty-nine Articles.[4] While explicitly affirming God’s sole agency in salvation, Whitefield would freely offer the Gospel, saying near the end of most of his published sermons something like: “Come poor, lost, undone sinner, come just as you are to Christ.”[5] …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Whitefield

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