Terrorist Attack Shooting Kills 5 and Injures 8 At Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, Terminal 2 Lower Level Baggage Claim — Shooter in Custody — Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter Fighting For ISIS and Mentally Disturbed Former Iraq Veteran — Videos

Posted on January 6, 2017. Filed under: Articles, Blogroll, Communications, Crime, Faith, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Federal Government, government, Homicide, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Radio, Strategy, Success, Talk Radio, Terrorism, Video, Wealth, Weather, Wisdom, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

Image result for january 6, 2017 fort lauderdale airport Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

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Image result for january 6, 2017 fort lauderdale airport Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

Image result for january 6, 2017 fort lauderdale airport Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

Image result for january 6, 2017 fort lauderdale airport Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

Image result for january 6, 2017 fort lauderdale airport Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

The Truth About The Ft. Lauderdale Shooting

The Truth About Esteban Santiago and the Fort Lauderdale Shooting

Fort Lauderdale shooting: Gunman known to FBI

More Information on Ft. Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport Shooting Suspect

Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooting Details Released: Full Press Conference

Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooting: Esteban Santiago Identified as Suspect

WebExtra: Deadly Shooting At Ft. Lauderdale – Hollywood Airport

Airport, Florida Terminal 2 Shooting

shooting Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooting in Florida 1/6/2017

Pictured: The Fort Lauderdale ‘air rage’ gunman who ‘argued with passengers’ on his flight before he retrieved his handgun from checked luggage and then executed five people in baggage claim

  • Five people are dead and eight injured after gunman opened fire Florida’s Ft. Lauderdale-Hollywood Airport 
  • The gunman was taken into custody and identified as 26-year-old Iraq army veteran Esteban Santiago
  • Santiago flew into the Florida airport from Anchorage, Alaska and had checked his gun for the flight
  • He loaded his gun in the bathroom after landing and was silent as he shot dead victims in baggage claim area
  • Santiago was reportedly from New Jersey but his most recent address was in Anchorage, Alaska
  • He reportedly had a history of mental health problems and family say he returned from Iraq acting strangely 
  • Sources say he walked into an FBI office in Alaska last year claiming he was being forced to fight for ISIS   

Five people are dead and at least eight people injured after a shooting at the Ft. Lauderdale-Hollywood Airport in Florida.

The incident happened around 1pm at the lower level baggage claim area of Terminal 2. The gunman – wearing a Star Wars T-shirt – was taken into custody and has since been identified as 26-year-old Esteban Santiago.

Santiago flew into the airport from Anchorage, Alaska (with a layover in Minneapolis, St. Paul) on Delta flight 2182, and checked a gun for the flight.

After claiming his bag, he loaded the gun in a bathroom and then opened fire in the baggage claim area, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca said.

NBC News reports that Santiago had a history of mental problems.

Sources have told CBS news that Santiago walked into an FBI office in Anchorage in November last year claiming he was being forced to fight for ISIS. After that incident, Santiago started getting treatment for his mental health issues.

He was also contacted by the FBI after an employer back in Alaska raised concerns about certain things he had said, according to ABC News.

Scroll down for video

Esteban Santiago, 26 (pictured), has been identified as the gunman in the Ft. Lauderdale-Hollywood airport shooting. He is said to have a girlfriend and child back in Alaska

His most recent address was in Naples, but he lived in Anchorage from 2014 to 2016, where his girlfriend and child continue to live. He is also from New Jersey.

Santiago was an Iraq veteran having been deploying to the country for one year in April 2010. He was honorably discharged in August last year, the Army Criminal Investigation Division confirmed. He had also been a combat engineer in the Alaska Army National Guard and prior to that was in the U. S. Army Reserve.

His aunt Maria Ruiz told NorthJersey.com that Santiago had returned from Iraq acting strangely but had seemed happy after the birth of his child last year.

Santiago’s brother Bryan Santiago said he could have suffered a ‘flashback’ from his time in Iraq, despite never being diagnosed with PTSD, NBC reports.

The motive for the shooting is still not known, but Florida Sen. Marco Rubio told CNN that Santiago may have gotten into an altercation on his flight earlier that morning.

‘I know that was mentioned as a potential cause and they wanted to kind of look into that a little further and get to that point,’ Rubio said.

Santiago’s brother said he had been fighting with people back in Alaska, including his girlfriend who he was having relationship issues with.

He said Santiago, who was ‘was pro-America’, has not spoken to his family for several weeks, which was unusual.

A picture shared on social media allegedly showed one of the people who was shot by a gunman

A video posted on Instagram by user Islandvinesnsports showed four officers around one man who had been shot 

A picture shared on social media allegedly showed one of the people who was shot by a gunman

A shooting victim is taken into Broward Health Trauma Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

A shooting victim is taken into Broward Health Trauma Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

A shooting victim is seen in the back of an ambulance after arriving at the Broward Health Trauma Center on Friday

A shooting victim is seen in the back of an ambulance after arriving at the Broward Health Trauma Center on Friday

An armed police officer with his handgun drawn is seen helping a woman evacuate during the chaos

An armed police officer with his handgun drawn is seen helping a woman evacuate during the chaos

People were seen on the floor trying to comfort loved ones (left), while others appeared to be shielding others (right)

People leave a garage area with their hands up in the air outside the airport after the shooting on Friday

People leave a garage area with their hands up in the air outside the airport after the shooting on Friday

Other details about the shooter are now being released.

Court records in that state show he had a minor criminal record for traffic violations. He was also evicted by his landlord for failing to pay rent in February 2015.

Santiago was charged with fourth-degree assault and damage of property in January 2016, stemming from a domestic violence incident.

In March, Santiago settled the charges by agreeing to complete unknown requirements demanded by prosecutors in exchange for dismissing the case.

About 90 minutes after the shooting, chaos broke out again when police officers were seen rushing into the parking garage with their guns drawn while bystanders sought shelter behind vehicles.

But the Broward County Sheriff said at an afternoon press conference that the only shooting that happened was in Terminal 2 and that he currently believes only one gunman was involved.

People take cover outside Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, Friday, Jan. 6

Police assist people seeking cover outside of Terminal 2 at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport

This picture shows what may be the weapon that was used by the gunman in the shooting on Friday

People are seen desperately running across the tarmac after the shooting earlier in the afternoon

Law enforcement personnel arrive in an armored car at the airport after the deadly shooting that saw five killed

Passengers are hurried onto the tarmac during the evacuation after the gunman opened fire

People stand on the tarmac at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport

Police question people who are evacuating from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport near the tarmac

Police question people who are evacuating from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport near the tarmac

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel spoke to the media about 3:30pm and provided more details on the incident

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel spoke to the media about 3:30pm and provided more details on the incident

Another witness told NBC Miami that the shooter was silent and didn’t appear to be targeting anyone in particular – ‘popping off bullets at random’.

John Schlicher, who told MSNBC he saw the attack, described the shooter as a ‘slender man’ who was ‘directly firing at us’ while passengers waited for their bags to come off the carousel.

In another interview with Fox News, Schlicher said that the shooter was aiming at people’s heads.

‘All the people seemed to be shot in the head,’ Schlicher said. ‘He was shooting people who were down on the ground too.’

The shooter reloaded once for a second burst of shooting, Schlicher said, but he could not say how many bullets were fired.

Shocking video has emerged from inside the terminal where a gunman opened fire on Friday

One woman walked towards the camera and said there had been bullets 'flying everywhere' during the shooting

Shocking video has emerged from inside the terminal where a gunman opened fire on Friday

Terrified people were seen running across the tarmac about 2:30pm – more than an hour after the shooting was reported

Mark Lea, a 53-year-old financian adviser from Minneapolis, says he was in baggage claim when the shooting started.

TIMELINE OF THE SHOOTING

12:57pm – Reports of the shooting emerged. Former White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer said: ‘everyone is running’

1:16pm – Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport released a statement confirming there was an ‘ongoing incident’ at the baggage claim in Terminal 2

1:37pm – Pictures and videos emerged of passengers being evacuated out onto the tarmac

1:50pm – Officials said all services at the airport had been temporarily suspended

2:33pm – TSA issued a second warning. ‘Update: Active shooter. Shelter in place.’ There were reports of an incident in Terminal 1, where a pilot said they smelled gun powder

2:37pm –  Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca said the shooter had landed at the airport on an international flight and collected the gun – which he had checked into his luggage. He then, according to LaMarca, walked into the bathroom, loaded his weapon, then walked back out into the baggage claim and opened fire.

3:33pm – Broward Sheriff Scott Israel said only one person had been arrested in the shooting.

‘I was dodging bullets and trying to help people get out of the way,’ Lea said.

‘At first we thought it was firecrackers,’ he said. ‘Everyone started screaming and running. The shooter made his way down through baggage claim. He had what looked like a 9mm and emptied his entire clip. People were trying to run.’

But the Broward County Sheriff said at an afternoon press conference that the only shooting that happened was in Terminal 2 and that he currently believes only one gunman was involved.

Another witness told NBC Miami that the shooter was silent and didn’t appear to be targeting anyone in particular – ‘popping off bullets at random’.

John Schlicher, who told MSNBC he saw the attack, described the shooter as a ‘slender man’ who was ‘directly firing at us’ while passengers waited for their bags to come off the carousel.

In another interview with Fox News, Schlicher said that the shooter was aiming at people’s heads.

‘All the people seemed to be shot in the head,’ Schlicher said. ‘He was shooting people who were down on the ground too.’

The shooter reloaded once for a second burst of shooting, Schlicher said, but he could not say how many bullets were fired.

The Florida attack was the latest in a series of mass shootings that have plagued the United States in recent years, some inspired by militants with an extreme view of Islam, others who are loners or mentally disturbed who have easy access to weapons under U.S. gun laws.

Video from the airport Friday afternoon showed hundreds of passengers corralled together on the tarmac with emergency vehicles parked outside the terminal with lights flashing.

Former White House press secretary to President George W. Bush, Ari Fleischer, was at the airport at the time of the shooting and tweeted about the chaos.

Just after 1pm, he wrote that ‘shots have been fired. Everyone is running’.

Donald Trump tweeted that he was monitoring the situation at the airport about an hour after it happened

Donald Trump tweeted that he was monitoring the situation at the airport about an hour after it happened

Police assist a woman seeking cover outside Terminal 2 at the Florida airport on Friday

Two heavily-armed law enforcement officials are seen standing outside the garage at the airport. There had been reports of a potential second incident

Law enforcement personnel stand outside a garage at the airport and bark instructions 

A group of people are seen walking out of a parking garage with their hands in the air after the shooting

A law enforcement helicopter is seen flying over a garage at the airport after it was put into lockdown

People take cover outside Terminal 2 of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International. One woman is openly weeping as she hides behind the barrier

An official is seen directing people who were running on the tarmac in Florida on Friday afternoon

Police evacuate a civilian from an area at Fort Lauderdale Airport about 3pm on Friday after the shooting

Footage showed police officers in a stairwell as the airport remained a crime scene into the afternoon 

Photo courtesy of Taylor Elenburg shows passengers gathering on the tarmac of the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood airport in Florida after a gunman opened fire

Travelers and airport workers are evacuated out of the terminal after airport shooting at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Florida

An aerial view taken on April 20, 2016 shows the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood airport in Florida, where a gunman opened fire on Friday

An aerial view taken on April 20, 2016 shows the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood airport in Florida, where a gunman opened fire on Friday

People who were evacuated onto the tarmac were put onto buses and moved. The airport has since been shut down

People who were evacuated onto the tarmac were put onto buses and moved. The airport has since been shut down

News cameras appeared to capture the moment one person was rushed into an ambulance

News cameras appeared to capture the moment one person was rushed into an ambulance

Minutes later, he said police told him there was just one shooter. By 1:30pm, the scene had settled.

‘All seems calm now but the police aren’t letting anyone out of the airport – at least not the area where I am,’ Fleischer wrote.

The airport is one of the top 25 busiest airports in the nation, and is located about 25 miles north of Miami.

All services were temporarily suspended, the airport’s Twitter feed said.

Gov. Rick Scott is traveling to Ft. Lauderdale to be briefed on the situation.

Former White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer was in the airport at the time of the shooting and tweeted about what was happening

Former White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer was in the airport at the time of the shooting and tweeted about what was happening

Fleischer said police had told him there were five victims. That number has now reportedly risen 

Fleischer said police had told him there were five victims. That number has now reportedly risen

The former White House Press Secretary said it appeared as thought the situation had been controlled, but people were still in the airport

The former White House Press Secretary said it appeared as thought the situation had been controlled, but people were still in the airport

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4095720/Nine-shot-one-dead-shooting-Ft-Lauderdale-Hollywood-Airport.html#ixzz4V1k7OpKs
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Fort Lauderdale airport shooting: 5 dead, suspect had gun in bag

(CNN)Five people were shot dead and eight wounded in the baggage claim area at Fort Lauderdale’s airport, and law enforcement sources tell CNN the suspect had brought the firearm in his checked luggage.

Authorities said it was too early to understand why the suspected gunman, who was taken into custody without incident, opened fire at the Florida airport.
Here’s the latest on what we know:
• Thirteen people were shot and eight were taken to hospitals, Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said. Five died from their wounds.
• Law enforcement sources told CNN that the suspect flew to Florida from Alaska and had declared the firearm. When he arrived at the airport, the suspect retrieved a bag at baggage claim, took out the gun and started firing, the sources said. One source said he went to the bathroom to get the gun out of his luggage and emerged firing.
• Israel said the gunman likely acted alone. The sheriff said it was too early to say whether terrorism was the motive.
• Gov. Rick Scott told reporters at the airport: “The citizens of Florida will not tolerate senseless acts of evil. Whoever is responsible will held accountable to the fullest extent of the law.” The governor said that now was time to mourn the dead and pray for hospitalized victims, not talk about gun laws.
• Multiple reports on social media — including tweets from former White House spokesman Ari Fleischer — described the shooting.
• Gene Messina told CNN he’d arrived at the airport as people were being evacuated from the terminal. “I got off the plane and I saw people running and screaming,” he said. “At first I was in shock but when I saw TSA agents running, I booked.”
• Florida investigators haven’t released the suspected shooter’s name or detailed the events leading up to the shooting.
• The incident occurred in the baggage claim area of Terminal 2, officials said. There are four terminals at the airport, which ranks 21st in the US in terms of total passengers.

• Parts of the airport were evacuated. Aerial footage from CNN affiliates showed large groups of people standing outside on the tarmac.
• More than an hour after the shooting, tensions were still running high, a witness told CNN. “Everyone sprinted outside again. We are back out on the tarmac,” Judah Fernandez said, adding that it was unclear why people had rushed outside.
• The first call about the shooting came in at 12:55 p.m. ET.
• Most flights scheduled to land at the airport will be delayed or diverted, the FAA said. The airport had not resumed operations by 5 p.m ET.
• In November 2016, nearly 2.5 million travelers passed through Fort Lauderdale’s airport, according to a government report on the facility.
• Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport serves about 30 airlines. Many passengers use it because of its convenience to nearby cruise ship terminals.

Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter

Santiago, 26, was carrying military ID when he was arrested

Law enforcement sources identified the Fort Lauderdale Airport shooter as Esteban Santiago, a 26-year-old man born in New Jersey who appears to have acted alone.

Federal sources told NBC News the shootings did not appear to be an act of terrorism, and both federal and family sources said Santiago had some mental health issues.

Santiago, born in March 1990, had military ID on him when he was arrested, multiple senior law enforcement sources told NBC.

Sources said Santiago took Delta flight no. 1088 from Anchorage to Minneapolis-St. Paul Thursday night. He landed Friday morning, and then took Delta flight no. 2182 from Minneapolis-St. Paul to Fort Lauderdale.

Esteban Santiago
Photo credit: NBC News

After arriving at Fort Lauderdale, he picked up his gun at baggage claim in the airport’s Terminal 2 and then began firing, sources said.

He was taken into custody unharmed.

Santiago’s brother, Bryan Santiago, spoke with NBC News over the phone from Puerto Rico Friday afternoon.

He said Esteban was born in New Jersey but moved to Penuela, Puerto Rico, where Bryan and their mother still live. Esteban served in the National Guard in Puerto Rico for six years, and went to Iraq for about a year, Bryan said.

Raw Footage: People Hide Behind a Car at Florida Airport

[NY] Raw Footage: People Hide Behind a Car at Fort Lauderdale Airport

Raw footage shows people hiding in fear behind a car after five people were shot dead at Fort Lauderdale Airport. (Published 3 hours ago)

“He was pro-America,” Bryan said.

Esteban moved to Alaska two years ago for work, and had been employed as a security guard, according to his brother. He had a girlfriend and a child there.

A spokeswoman for the Alaska National Guard confirmed to NBC News that Esteban Santiago joined the Puerto Rico National Guard on Dec. 14, 2007, and was deployed to Iraq from April 23, 2010 to Feb. 19, 2011.

He was then in the Army Reserves before joining the Alaska Army National Guard on Nov. 21, 2014. He received a general discharge from the Alaska Army National Guard on Aug. 16, 2016, for unsatisfactory performance, the spokeswoman said.

Terrified Travelers Run Across Tarmac After Gunfire Erupts

[NY] Raw Footage: Passengers Run Across Tarmac During Airport Shooting

Passengers were seen running across the tarmac at Fort Lauderdale / Hollywood International Airport during an active shooter situation that saw five people shot dead. (Published 3 hours ago)

Esteban Santiago was a combat engineer and his rank was private first class when he was discharged.

Esteban was “fighting with a lot of people” during his time in Alaska, Bryan Santiago told NBC News, saying he was having relationship issues and arguing with his girlfriend and others. The girlfriend told Bryan that his brother was “receiving psychological counseling in Anchorage.”

Esteban did have a handgun, his brother said.

Bryan said he could not imagine his brother committing the crime, and speculated that perhaps he had a “flashback” from his military experience, although he said there was no PTSD diagnosis or other post-Iraq issues.

Bryan said he had not heard form Esteban for several weeks, which is unusual, and that the family was worried about him.

“He is a regular person, spiritual, a good person,” he said.

Alaskan court records show an Esteban Santiago with the same date of birth was charged with two misdemeanors last year; one count was dismissed and Santiago was due back in court on the second this coming March.

The Broward Sheriff’s Office said they received a call about the shooting around 12:55 p.m. Live video more than an hour after the attack showed people running across the tarmac between terminals while others took cover behind car.

President-elect Donald Trump tweeted, “Monitoring the terrible situation in Florida. Just spoke to Governor Scott. Thoughts and prayers for all. Stay safe!” Florida Gov. Rick Scott was traveling to Fort Lauderdale to be briefed by law enforcement, his office said.

Esteban Santiago Identified as Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter | NBC New Yorkhttp://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/NJ-Shooter-Esteban-Santiago-who-was-fort-lauderdale-409914655.html#ixzz4V1f3AgrL

THE LATEST: SUSPECT DISCHARGED LAST YEAR FROM NATIONAL GUARD

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the shooting at the Fort Lauderdale airport (all times local):

5:45 p.m.

A military spokeswoman says the suspect in a deadly shooting at the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, airport received a general discharge from the Alaska Army National Guard last year for unsatisfactory performance.

Lt. Col. Candis Olmstead did not release details about 26-year-old Esteban Santiago’s discharge in August 2016. Olmstead said that he joined the Guard in November 2014.

Puerto Rico National Guard spokesman Maj. Paul Dahlen said that Santiago was deployed to Iraq in 2010 and spent a year there with the 130th Engineer Battalion, the 1013th engineer company out of Aguadilla.

Olmstead also said that Santiago had served in the Army Reserves prior to joining the Alaska Army National Guard.

5:45 p.m.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has arrived at the Fort Lauderdale airport and is asking people to pray for the families of those slain and wounded in a mass shooting at a baggage claim area.

Scott said Friday during a news conference that he had reached out and spoken several times to President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence and they promised to help with whatever resources the state needs.

Trump doesn’t officially take over the White until later this month, so it’s not clear what sort of federal resources he could authorize.

Scott, a Republican like Trump and Pence, said he didn’t call President Barack Obama, a Democrat, and he hadn’t spoken with him.

White House National Security Council spokesman Ned Price says Obama was briefed about the shooting and will be kept updated.

Scott did not answer questions about gun rights, instead saying it was not the time to be political.

5:30 p.m.

The brother of the man who has been tentatively named as the suspect in a deadly shooting at a Florida airport says the suspect had been receiving psychological treatment while living in Alaska.

Bryan Santiago tells The Associated Press that his family got a call in recent months from 26-year-old Esteban Santiago’s girlfriend alerting them to the situation.

Bryan Santiago said he didn’t know what his brother was being treated for and that they never talked about it over the phone.

He said Esteban Santiago was born in New Jersey but moved to the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico when he was 2 years old. He said Esteban Santiago grew up in the southern coastal town of Penuelas and served with the island’s National Guard for a couple of years. Puerto Rico National Guard spokesman Maj. Paul Dahlen said that Santiago was deployed to Iraq in 2010 and spent a year there with the 130th Engineer Battalion, the 1013th engineer company out of Aguadilla.

Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida said that the gunman was carrying a military ID that identified him as Esteban Santiago, but that it was unclear whether the ID was his. Nelson gave no further information on the suspect.

5 p.m.

A spokeswoman from the Canadian Embassy says the suspect in the shooting at the international airport in Fort Lauderdale has no connection to the country and did not fly to Florida from there.

Embassy spokeswoman Christine Constantin said in an email to The Associated Press that the suspect did not travel from Canada and was not on an Air Canada flight. She says the suspect has no connection to Canada.

The shooting happened at the airport’s terminal 2, where Air Canada and Delta operate flights. Five were killed and eight wounded.

Constantin’s email says, “We understand from officials he was on a flight originating in Anchorage, transiting through Minneapolis and landing in Ft. Lauderdale.”

3:35 p.m.

A county official says the Fort Lauderdale airport shooter pulled a gun out of a checked bag, loaded in a bathroom and started shooting, killing five people and wounding at least eight.

Chip LaMarca, a Broward County commissioner, was briefed on the airport shooting by Broward Sheriff’s office. He told The Associated Press by phone that the shooter was a passenger on a Canadian flight and had checked a gun.

LaMarca says the shooter pulled out the gun in the bathroom after claiming his bag.

Sheriff Scott Israel says the gunman was not harmed and that law enforcement did not fire any shots. He says it is not yet known if the shooting was an act of terror.

Israel also says there was nothing to substantiate reports of a second shooting at the airport.

3:15 p.m.

A passenger says he heard the first gunshots as he picked up his luggage from a baggage claim carousel in a shooting at a Florida airport that left five dead and eight wounded.

John Schilcher told Fox News the person next to him fell to the ground Friday. He says other people started falling, and he then dropped to the ground with his wife and mother-in-law. Schilcher says “the firing just went on and on.”

He says the shooter emptied his weapon and reloaded during an eerily quiet lull in the gunfire. Schilcher says he didn’t assume it was safe until he saw a police officer standing over him at the Fort Lauderdale international airport.

He says he remained on the ground and was told not to move as authorities investigated unconfirmed reports of a second shooting.

3 p.m.

Officials say there have been unconfirmed reports of additional shots fired at the international airport in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after a gunman killed five people and wounded eight there.

On Friday afternoon, the Broward County sheriff’s office said on its Twitter account: “Active search: Unconfirmed reports of addt’l shots fired on airport property.”

Earlier in the afternoon, the shooting stopped all traffic at the airport. Passengers were evacuated from the terminal 2 baggage claim area. Passengers returned to the airport as officials said the lone gunman was in custody. But TV reports showed some passengers evacuating again, several looking panicked and ducking behind cars or hiding.

Witness Judah Fernandez told CNN he heard what he believes were the first shots, re-entered the airport, but then rushed out again shortly later to the tarmac. He said: “Everyone’s running now.” He said both security officials and passengers were running.

2:50 p.m.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson says the Fort Lauderdale airport gunman was carrying a military ID with the name Esteban Santiago, though it’s not clear if it belonged to him or to someone else.

Nelson did not spell the name for reporters during a news conference Friday. Nelson says the baggage claim area is a “soft target.” The airport had initially reported an “incident” in the baggage claim area.

Authorities say five people were killed and eight wounded in the shooting.

Nelson says a motive still hasn’t been determined.

2:30 p.m.

Authorities say five people were killed and eight were wounded after a lone suspect opened fire at the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, international airport.

The Broward County Sheriff’s Office tweeted the information following Friday afternoon’s shooting.

Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief told CNN that authorities “have an active crime scene investigation involving terminal 2.”

News stations showed video of medics taking care of a bleeding victim outside the airport. Helicopters hovering over the scene showed hundreds of people standing on the tarmac as an ambulance drove by and numerous law enforcement officers, including tactical units, rushed to the scene.

Former White House spokesman Ari Fleischer tweeted that he was at the airport when shots were fired and “everyone is running.”

1:50 p.m.

Authorities say multiple people have died after a lone suspect opened fire at the Fort Lauderdale, Florida, international airport.

The Broward County Sheriff’s Office tweeted the information following Friday afternoon’s shooting.

Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief told CNN that authorities “have an active crime scene investigation involving terminal 2.”

Miami area television stations reported that at least six people were shot. News stations showed video of medics taking care of a bleeding victim outside the airport. News helicopters hovering over the scene showed hundreds of people standing on the tarmac as an ambulance drove by and numerous law enforcement officers, including tactical units, rushed to the scene.

Former White House spokesman Ari Fleischer tweeted that he was at the airport when shots were fired and “everyone is running.”

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_AIRPORT_SHOOTING_FLORIDA_THE_LATEST?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2017-01-06-17-21-36

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The War on Drugs–The War Like No Other–The War That Never Ends –Gold, Silver or Lead Bullet?

Posted on May 12, 2010. Filed under: Biology, Blogroll, Books, Chemistry, Communications, Crime, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Farming, Federal Government, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, Health Care, history, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Medicine, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Religion, Resources, Reviews, Science, Security, Strategy, Technology, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“[The] war like no other, … a colossal absurdity.” 

~Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War

“One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.”

~Milton Friedman

 

The War on Drugs with John Stossel 1 of 6 Introduction and Police Baiting

The War on Drugs with John Stossel 2 of 6 Introduction and Police Baiting

The War on Drugs with John Stossel 3 of 6 Introduction and Police Baiting

The War on Drugs with John Stossel 4 of 6 Introduction and Police Baiting

The War on Drugs with John Stossel 5 of 6 Introduction and Police Baiting

The War on Drugs with John Stossel 6 of 6 Introduction and Police Baiting

Legal Drugs vs. Illegal Drugs 1 of 4

Legal Drugs vs. Illegal Drugs 2 of 4

Legal Drugs vs. Illegal Drugs 3 of 4

Legal Drugs vs. Illegal Drugs 4 of 4

Inside USA – Mexico’s drug war – 25 July 08 Part 1

Inside USA – Mexico’s drug war – 25 July 08 Part 2

Mexican Drug Cartel Threatens to Kill Texas News Reporters

Glenn Beck: Zeta Gang Takes Control of Border

Drug War’s Racist Roots? – Ethan Nadelmann

Ethan Nadelmann: True Obstacles to Drug Law Reform

http://fora.tv/2009/09/09/CONNECTIONS_Ethan_Nadelmann_on_Legalizing_Drugs 

Illegal Drugs & How They Got That Way – crack & cocaine

Illegal drugs and how they got that way – opium, heron

Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way – Marijuana Part 1 of 5

Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way – Marijuana Part 2 of 5

Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way – Marijuana Part 3 of 5

Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way – Marijuana Part 4 of 5

Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way – Marijuana Part 5 of 5

History Channel (Hooked)- LSD, Ecstasy and Raves 1/5

History Channel (Hooked)- LSD, Ecstasy and Raves 2/5

History Channel (Hooked)- LSD, Ecstasy and Raves 3/5

History Channel (Hooked)- LSD, Ecstasy and Raves 4/5

History Channel (Hooked)- LSD, Ecstasy and Raves 5/5

Milton Friedman on America’s Drug Forum pt.1 of 3

Milton Friedman on America’s Drug Forum pt. 2 of3

Milton Friedman on America’s Drug Forum pt.3 of 3

Harvard Economist on why marijuana should be legalized

Those who favor the endless war on drugs usually focus on the drug user and point out that if society should  legalize drugs that are now illegal to use and sell, we would have more drug users. 

The war on drug has failed:

Table 8.1A – Types of Illicit Drug Use in Lifetime among Persons Aged 12 or Older: Numbers in Thousands, 2002-2008
Drug 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
*Low precision; no estimate reported.
a Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
b Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.01 level.
1 Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically. Illicit Drugs Other Than Marijuana include cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically. The estimates for Nonmedical Use of Psychotherapeutics, Stimulants, and Methamphetamine incorporated in these summary estimates do not include data from the methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006. See Section B.4.8 in Appendix B of the Results from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings.
2 Nonmedical use of prescription-type psychotherapeutics includes the nonmedical use of pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, or sedatives and does not include over-the-counter drugs.
3 Estimates of Nonmedical Use of Psychotherapeutics, Stimulants, and Methamphetamine in the designated rows include data from methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006 and are not comparable with estimates presented in NSDUH reports prior to the 2007 National Findings report. For the 2002 through 2005 survey years, a Bernoulli stochastic imputation procedure was used to generate adjusted estimates comparable with estimates for survey years 2006 and later. See Section B.4.8 in Appendix B of the Results from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008.
ILLICIT DRUGS1 108,255b 110,205b 110,057b 112,085b 111,774b 114,275a 117,325
Marijuana and Hashish 94,946b 96,611b 96,772b 97,545b 97,825b 100,518 102,404
Cocaine 33,910b 34,891a 34,153b 33,673b 35,298 35,882 36,773
Crack 8,402 7,949 7,840 7,928 8,554 8,581 8,445
Heroin 3,668 3,744 3,145a 3,534 3,785 3,780 3,788
Hallucinogens 34,314 34,363 34,333 33,728a 35,281 34,215a 35,963
LSD 24,516 24,424 23,398 22,433 23,346 22,656 23,547
PCP 7,418 7,107 6,762 6,603 6,618 6,140 6,631
Ecstasy 10,150b 10,904b 11,130b 11,495b 12,262 12,426 12,924
Inhalants 22,870 22,995 22,798 22,745 22,879 22,477 22,274
Nonmedical Use of Psychotherapeutics2,3 47,958b 49,001b 49,157b 49,571a 50,965 50,415 51,970
Pain Relievers 29,611b 31,207b 31,768b 32,692b 33,472 33,060a 34,861
OxyContin® 1,924b 2,832b 3,072b 3,481b 4,098b 4,354 4,842
Tranquilizers 19,267b 20,220 19,852a 21,041 21,303 20,208 21,476
Stimulants3 23,496b 23,004a 22,297 20,983 22,468 21,654 21,206
Methamphetamine3 15,365b 15,139b 14,512b 12,663 14,206b 13,065 12,598
Sedatives 9,960a 9,510 9,891 8,982 8,822 8,396 8,882
ILLICIT DRUGS OTHER THAN MARIJUANA1 70,300b 71,128b 70,657b 71,822b 72,906a 73,494 75,573

http://oas.samhsa.gov/NSDUH/2K8NSDUH/tabs/Sect8peTabs1to43.htm#Tab8.1A

Table 8.1B – Types of Illicit Drug Use in Lifetime among Persons Aged 12 or Older: Percentages, 2002-2008
Drug 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
*Low precision; no estimate reported.
a Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
b Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.01 level.
1 Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically. Illicit Drugs Other Than Marijuana include cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically. The estimates for Nonmedical Use of Psychotherapeutics, Stimulants, and Methamphetamine incorporated in these summary estimates do not include data from the methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006. See Section B.4.8 in Appendix B of the Results from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings.
2 Nonmedical use of prescription-type psychotherapeutics includes the nonmedical use of pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, or sedatives and does not include over-the-counter drugs.
3 Estimates of Nonmedical Use of Psychotherapeutics, Stimulants, and Methamphetamine in the designated rows include data from methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006 and are not comparable with estimates presented in NSDUH reports prior to the 2007 National Findings report. For the 2002 through 2005 survey years, a Bernoulli stochastic imputation procedure was used to generate adjusted estimates comparable with estimates for survey years 2006 and later. See Section B.4.8 in Appendix B of the Results from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008.
ILLICIT DRUGS1 46.0 46.4 45.8a 46.1 45.4b 46.1 47.0
Marijuana and Hashish 40.4 40.6 40.2 40.1 39.8a 40.6 41.0
Cocaine 14.4 14.7 14.2 13.8a 14.3 14.5 14.7
Crack 3.6 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.5 3.4
Heroin 1.6 1.6 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5
Hallucinogens 14.6 14.5 14.3 13.9 14.3 13.8 14.4
LSD 10.4b 10.3b 9.7 9.2 9.5 9.1 9.4
PCP 3.2b 3.0 2.8 2.7 2.7 2.5 2.7
Ecstasy 4.3b 4.6b 4.6b 4.7a 5.0 5.0 5.2
Inhalants 9.7b 9.7b 9.5a 9.4 9.3 9.1 8.9
Nonmedical Use of Psychotherapeutics2,3 20.4 20.6 20.4 20.4 20.7 20.3 20.8
Pain Relievers 12.6b 13.1a 13.2a 13.4 13.6 13.3 14.0
OxyContin® 0.8b 1.2b 1.3b 1.4b 1.7b 1.8 1.9
Tranquilizers 8.2 8.5 8.3 8.7 8.7 8.2 8.6
Stimulants3 10.0b 9.7b 9.3b 8.6 9.1a 8.7 8.5
Methamphetamine3 6.5b 6.4b 6.0b 5.2 5.8b 5.3 5.0
Sedatives 4.2b 4.0a 4.1a 3.7 3.6 3.4 3.6
ILLICIT DRUGS OTHER THAN MARIJUANA1 29.9 29.9 29.4 29.5 29.6 29.7 30.3

Government intervention to make legal drugs such as tobacco and alcohol products  more expensive by plaicng higher excise or sales taxes on them has failed as well:

Table 8.22A – Tobacco Product and Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Persons Aged 12 or Older, by Gender: Numbers in Thousands, 2002-2008
Gender/Substance 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
*Low precision; no estimate reported.
a Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
b Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.01 level.
1 Tobacco Products include cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (i.e., chewing tobacco or snuff), cigars, or pipe tobacco.
2 Binge Alcohol Use is defined as drinking five or more drinks on the same occasion (i.e., at the same time or within a couple of hours of each other) on at least 1 day in the past 30 days. Heavy Alcohol Use is defined as drinking five or more drinks on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days; all heavy alcohol users are also binge alcohol users.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008.
TOTAL              
TOBACCO PRODUCTS1 71,499 70,757 70,257 71,519 72,873 70,939 70,868
Cigarettes 61,136 60,434 59,896 60,532 61,565 60,069 59,781
Smokeless Tobacco 7,787a 7,725a 7,154b 7,682a 8,231 8,051 8,670
Cigars 12,751 12,837 13,727 13,640 13,708 13,263 13,126
Pipe Tobacco 1,816 1,619 1,835 2,190 2,321a 2,046 1,877
ALCOHOL 119,820b 118,965b 120,934b 126,028a 125,309b 126,760 128,974
Binge Alcohol Use2 53,787b 53,770b 54,725b 55,090b 56,575 57,778 58,096
Heavy Alcohol Use2 15,860a 16,144a 16,689 16,035a 16,946 17,010 17,292
MALE              
TOBACCO PRODUCTS1 41,991 41,288 41,569 42,175 43,389 42,369 41,881
Cigarettes 32,636 32,263 32,278 32,312 33,220 32,607 31,942
Smokeless Tobacco 7,242a 7,096b 6,730b 7,174b 7,843 7,589 8,215
Cigars 10,669 10,372 11,375 11,355 11,092 10,940 10,900
Pipe Tobacco 1,487 1,400 1,579 1,877a 2,023a 1,797 1,486
ALCOHOL 65,210b 65,927b 66,317b 68,497 68,025a 68,088a 69,989
Binge Alcohol Use2 35,456b 35,565b 36,195b 36,025b 37,298 38,128 38,292
Heavy Alcohol Use2 12,216 11,958 12,388 12,172 12,775 12,786 12,882
FEMALE              
TOBACCO PRODUCTS1 29,509 29,469 28,688 29,344 29,484 28,570 28,986
Cigarettes 28,500 28,171 27,618 28,220 28,345 27,462 27,839
Smokeless Tobacco 545 628 424 508 388 461 455
Cigars 2,082 2,465 2,352 2,285 2,616a 2,323 2,226
Pipe Tobacco 330 219b 256 313 298 249a 391
ALCOHOL 54,610b 53,038b 54,616b 57,531 57,283 58,672 58,986
Binge Alcohol Use2 18,331a 18,205b 18,530a 19,065 19,276 19,651 19,805
Heavy Alcohol Use2 3,645b 4,186 4,301 3,863a 4,172 4,225 4,410
Table 8.22B – Tobacco Product and Alcohol Use in the Past Month among Persons Aged 12 or Older, by Gender: Percentages, 2002-2008
Gender/Substance 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
*Low precision; no estimate reported.
a Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
b Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.01 level.
1 Tobacco Products include cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (i.e., chewing tobacco or snuff), cigars, or pipe tobacco.
2 Binge Alcohol Use is defined as drinking five or more drinks on the same occasion (i.e., at the same time or within a couple of hours of each other) on at least 1 day in the past 30 days. Heavy Alcohol Use is defined as drinking five or more drinks on the same occasion on each of 5 or more days in the past 30 days; all heavy alcohol users are also binge alcohol users.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008.
TOTAL              
TOBACCO PRODUCTS1 30.4b 29.8b 29.2 29.4a 29.6a 28.6 28.4
Cigarettes 26.0b 25.4b 24.9a 24.9a 25.0a 24.2 23.9
Smokeless Tobacco 3.3 3.3 3.0b 3.2 3.3 3.2 3.5
Cigars 5.4 5.4 5.7a 5.6 5.6 5.4 5.3
Pipe Tobacco 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9a 0.8 0.8
ALCOHOL 51.0 50.1b 50.3a 51.8 50.9 51.1 51.6
Binge Alcohol Use2 22.9 22.6 22.8 22.7 23.0 23.3 23.3
Heavy Alcohol Use2 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.6 6.9 6.9 6.9
MALE              
TOBACCO PRODUCTS1 37.0b 35.9 35.7 35.8 36.4a 35.2 34.5
Cigarettes 28.7b 28.1b 27.7a 27.4 27.8a 27.1 26.3
Smokeless Tobacco 6.4 6.2 5.8b 6.1a 6.6 6.3 6.8
Cigars 9.4 9.0 9.8a 9.6 9.3 9.1 9.0
Pipe Tobacco 1.3 1.2 1.4 1.6a 1.7b 1.5 1.2
ALCOHOL 57.4 57.3 56.9 58.1 57.0 56.6 57.7
Binge Alcohol Use2 31.2 30.9 31.1 30.5 31.2 31.7 31.6
Heavy Alcohol Use2 10.8 10.4 10.6 10.3 10.7 10.6 10.6
FEMALE              
TOBACCO PRODUCTS1 24.3b 24.0a 23.1 23.4 23.3 22.4 22.5
Cigarettes 23.4b 23.0a 22.3 22.5 22.4 21.5 21.7
Smokeless Tobacco 0.4 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4
Cigars 1.7 2.0a 1.9 1.8 2.1a 1.8 1.7
Pipe Tobacco 0.3 0.2a 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.2a 0.3
ALCOHOL 44.9 43.2b 44.0a 45.9 45.2 46.0 45.9
Binge Alcohol Use2 15.1 14.8 14.9 15.2 15.2 15.4 15.4
Heavy Alcohol Use2 3.0a 3.4 3.5 3.1 3.3 3.3 3.4

Individuals not governments should decide which products and services including drugs they want to consume and at what price. 

Individuals should decide when they need treatment for their consumption decisions. 

Let individuals regulate themselves. 

Government  regulation has failed and continues to fail. 

How many Americans will be in U.S. prisons and at what cost for drug use and selling, until the American people say to themselves this war is ” a colossal absurdity”.

Table 8.41A – Received Illicit Drug Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among Persons Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Treatment in the Past Year, by Demographic and Socioeconomic Characteristics: Numbers in Thousands, 2002-2008
Demographic/Socioeconomic Characteristic 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
*Low precision; no estimate reported.
— Not available.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for an illicit drug problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on illicit drugs; (2) abuse of illicit drugs; or (3) received treatment for illicit drug use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient], or mental health center). Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically, based on data from original questions not including methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006.
NOTE: Estimates shown on this table correspond to Healthy People 2010 Objective Number 26-18a (http://www.healthypeople.gov/).
a Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
b Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.01 level.
1 These racial categories do not distinguish among ethnic origin (i.e., Hispanic or Latino origin), so they include respondents who are either Hispanic or not Hispanic.
2 Estimates are based on a definition of Poverty Level that incorporates information on family income, size, and composition and is calculated as a percentage of the U.S. Census Bureau’s poverty thresholds.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008.
TOTAL 1,412 1,103 1,427 1,280 1,576a 1,343 1,209
RACE1              
American Indian or Alaska Native * * 8 * * * *
Asian or Pacific Islander 13 * * * * * *
Asian Only * * * * * * *
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Only * * * * * * *
Black or African American 289 205 336a 345a 361a 249 163
White 1,056 829 983 892 1,155 1,024 987
Two or More Races * * * * * * *
HISPANIC ORIGIN AND RACE              
Hispanic or Latino 172 89 142 182 304a 91 130
Not Hispanic or Latino 1,240 1,014 1,285 1,098 1,272 1,253 1,079
Black or African American 285 202 334a 343a 299a 245 162
White 894 757 845 722 919 943 867
GENDER              
Male 826 732 914 748 979a 917 712
Female 587 371 513 532 597 427 497
POVERTY LEVEL (% of Census Bureau Poverty
Threshold)2
             
Less Than 100% 451 524 387 384
100-199% 301 361 272 333
200% or More 522 689 682 490
AGE GROUP              
12-17 142 113 134 142 136 111 111
18 or Older 1,270 990 1,293 1,139 1,440a 1,232 1,098
Table 8.41B – Received Illicit Drug Treatment at a Specialty Facility in the Past Year among Persons Aged 12 or Older Who Needed Illicit Drug Treatment in the Past Year, by Demographic and Socioeconomic Characteristics: Percentages, 2002-2008
Demographic/Socioeconomic Characteristic 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
*Low precision; no estimate reported.
— Not available.
NOTE: Respondents were classified as needing treatment for an illicit drug problem if they met at least one of three criteria during the past year: (1) dependent on illicit drugs; (2) abuse of illicit drugs; or (3) received treatment for illicit drug use at a specialty facility (i.e., drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility [inpatient or outpatient], hospital [inpatient], or mental health center). Illicit Drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or prescription-type psychotherapeutics used nonmedically, based on data from original questions not including methamphetamine items added in 2005 and 2006.
NOTE: Estimates shown on this table correspond to Healthy People 2010 Objective Number 26-18a (http://www.healthypeople.gov/).
a Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.05 level.
b Difference between estimate and 2008 estimate is statistically significant at the 0.01 level.
1 These racial categories do not distinguish among ethnic origin (i.e., Hispanic or Latino origin), so they include respondents who are either Hispanic or not Hispanic.
2 Estimates are based on a definition of Poverty Level that incorporates information on family income, size, and composition and is calculated as a percentage of the U.S. Census Bureau’s poverty thresholds.
Source: SAMHSA, Office of Applied Studies, National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008.
TOTAL 18.2 15.0 17.7 17.0 20.3a 17.8 16.0
RACE1              
American Indian or Alaska Native * * 5.8 * * * *
Asian or Pacific Islander 9.0 * * * * * *
Asian Only * * * * * * *
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Only * * * * * * *
Black or African American 22.1 21.1 26.2a 24.7a 25.8a 20.8 13.8
White 17.4 14.0 15.8 15.6 19.6 17.3 16.4
Two or More Races * * * * * * *
HISPANIC ORIGIN AND RACE              
Hispanic or Latino 14.9 8.4 12.7 19.4 24.0a 9.6 12.0
Not Hispanic or Latino 18.8 16.1 18.5 16.6 19.6 19.0 16.6
Black or African American 22.8 21.4 26.4a 25.0a 22.9 20.9 14.1
White 17.9 15.3 16.4 14.9 19.2 18.7 17.2
GENDER              
Male 17.0 16.0 18.1 16.2 19.8 18.4 16.2
Female 20.4 13.4 17.1 18.2 21.3a 16.8 15.7
POVERTY LEVEL (% of Census Bureau Poverty
Threshold)2
             
Less Than 100% 24.3 28.2 22.6 23.2
100-199% 17.7 20.8 17.9 19.1
200% or More 13.3 16.8a 16.1 12.0
AGE GROUP              
12-17 10.1 8.5 9.6 11.3 11.2 9.9 9.3
18 or Older 20.1 16.5 19.4 18.1 22.0a 19.2 17.2

While the number of drug users has gone down in the United States, the number of individuals in prisons has gone up. 

 

As a classical liberal or libertarian my concern is not on the drug users but the consequences of the war on drugs on individuals who do not consume or use illegal drugs. 

When any substance is made illegal to use or sell, the suppliers of these illegal drugs can earn substantial profits for assuming the risk of distributing. 

The result is criminal gangs or cartels fighting to monopilize the illegal drug trade. 

When you legalize drugs and take away most if not all of the high profits to be made in the distriubtion and sale of the drugs, the criminal gangs or cartels  look towards another activity to make money. 

As long as these drugs are illegal, the criminal gangs will be attracted to its sale and distribution. 

The results in violence to those not involved in the sale and use of the drugs as well as the corruption of public officials. 

Good intentions are not enough. 

Make the drugs legal and you will put many of the drug gangs out of business. 

Then the police can focus their attention on violent criminals. 

By far overeating, tobacco, and alcohol use or abuse leads to bigger health and medical  problems than illegal drugs. 

Government intervention in the form of prohibition, like wage and price controls, never works, and does more long term harm than good. 

Ron Paul debates Stephen Baldwin on Legalizing Marijuana

Glenn Beck Legalize Marijuana & Stop The Violence

“…The proper role of government is exactly what John Stuart Mill said in the middle of the 19th century in On Liberty. The proper role of government is to prevent other people from harming an individual. Government, he said, never has any right to interfere with an individual for that individual’s own good. 

The case for prohibiting drugs is exactly as strong and as weak as the case for prohibiting people from overeating. We all know that overeating causes more deaths than drugs do. 

If it’s in principle OK for the government to say you must not consume drugs because they’ll do you harm, why isn’t it all right to say you must not eat too much because you’ll do harm? Why isn’t it all right to say you must not try to go in for skydiving because you’re likely to die? Why isn’t it all right to say, “Oh, skiing, that’s no good, that’s a very dangerous sport, you’ll hurt yourself”? Where do you draw the line?…” 

~Milton Friedman

Background Articles and Videos

Thucydides

“…Thucydides (c. 460 BC – c. 395 BC) (Greek Θουκυδίδης, Thoukydídēs) was a Greek historian and author of the History of the Peloponnesian War, which recounts the 5th century BC war between Sparta and Athens to the year 411 BC. Thucydides has been dubbed the father of “scientific history” because of his strict standards of evidence-gathering and analysis in terms of cause and effect without reference to intervention by the gods, as outlined in his introduction to his work.[1] 

He has also been called the father of the school of political realism, which views the relations between nations as based on might rather than right.[2] His classical text is still studied at advanced military colleges worldwide, and the Melian dialogue remains a seminal work of international relations theory. 

More generally, Thucydides showed an interest in developing an understanding of human nature to explain behaviour in such crises as plague, massacres, as in that of the Melians, and civil war. …” 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thucydides 

Overview of Drug Use in the United States

 

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), estimates the prevalence of illicit drug use in the United States. Some of the more notable statistics from the 2004 study follow. 

  • An estimated 19.1 million Americans age 12 years or older were current users of illicit drugs in 2004, meaning they used an illicit drug at least once during the 30 days prior to being interviewed. This represents 7.9% of the population 12–17 years. The rate declined slightly between 2002 and 2004 (8.3% in 2002 and 8.2% in 2003).
  • Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug, with a rate of 6.1% (14.6 million current users). There were 2.0 million current cocaine users, 467,000 of whom used crack. Hallucinogens were used by 929,000 people, and there were an estimated 166,000 heroin users. All of these estimates are similar to estimates for 2003.
  • Between 2002 and 2004, past-month marijuana use declined for male youths aged 12 to 17 (9.1% in 2002, 8.6% in 2003, and 8.1% in 2004), but it remained level for female youths (7.2%, 7.2%, and 7.1%, respectively) during the same time span.
  • The number of current users of Ecstasy (MDMA) had decreased between 2002 and 2003, from 676,000 to 470,000, but the number did not change between 2003 and 2004 (450,000).
  • In 2004, 6.0 million persons were current users of psychotherapeutic drugs taken nonmedically (2.5%). These include 4.4 million who used pain relievers, 1.6 million who used tranquilizers, 1.2 million who used stimulants, and 0.3 million who used sedatives. These estimates are all similar to the corresponding estimates for 2003.
  • Among youths aged 12 to 17, rates of current illicit drug use varied significantly by major racial/ethnic groups in 2004. The rate was highest among American Indian or Alaska Native youths (26.0%). Rates were 12.2% for youths reporting two or more races, 11.1% for white youths, 10.2% for Hispanic youths, 9.3% for black youths, and 6.0% for Asian youths.
  • In 2004, 19.2% of unemployed adults aged 18 or older were current illicit drug users compared with 8.0% of those employed full time and 10.3% of those employed part time. However, of the 16.4 million illicit drug users aged 18 or older in 2004, 12.3 million (75.2%) were employed either full or part time.
  • About 22.5 million Americans aged 12 or older in 2004 were classified with past year substance dependence or abuse (9.4% of the population), about the same number as in 2002 and 2003. Of these, 3.4 million were classified with dependence on or abuse of both alcohol and illicit drugs, 3.9 million were dependent on or abused illicit drugs but not alcohol, and 15.2 million were dependent on or abused alcohol but not illicit drugs.

Information Please® Database, © 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0880105.html 

The economics of drug prohibition and drug legalization

Social Research, Fall, 2001 by Jeffrey A. Miron

“…the paper first presents an economic analysis of drug prohibition and demonstrates how drug markets under prohibition compare to drug markets under legalization. The analysis shows that many negative outcomes typically attributed to drugs are the result of prohibition, and it explains why these outcomes would be reduced or eliminated under legalization. This analysis does not by itself imply that legalization is preferable to prohibition; the analysis suggests that one effect of prohibition is reduced consumption of drugs, and under some views this is a desirable outcome. The analysis simply makes clear that some features of drug markets and drug use are the result of drug prohibition–independent of the physical or pharmacological properties of drugs–and it provides a framework for thinking about the consequences of alternative policies. 

The second part of the paper discusses the conditions under which drug prohibition is likely to be the right public policy response to the negative outcomes that can accompany drug use. Since most effects of prohibition are undesirable, the main potential benefit of prohibition is any reduction in drug consumption relative to what would occur under legalization. I discuss different perspectives on drug consumption and how these relate to the virtues, or not, of prohibition. The discussion explains that standard arguments used to justify policies to reduce drug consumption are less compelling than commonly asserted, even though drug use causes substantial harm in some cases. The discussion also explains that, even if reducing drug use is an appropriate public policy goal, other methods for reducing drug consumption are available that potentially achieve a better balance between the harms of drug use and the harms of drug policy. 

The paper’s third section discusses alternatives to prohibition and legalization, such as sin taxation, subsidized treatment, medical provision of drugs, needle exchanges, and public health campaigns. Many of these policies can and do coexist with prohibition or legalization, but they are distinct policies that require separate analysis. I show that each policy has positive and negative aspects, and that evaluation of each depends on views about drug consumption and on relevant evidence. …” 

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2267/is_3_68/ai_80310014/ 

Consumer Sovereignty

Consumer sovereignty is a term which is used in economics to refer to the rule or sovereignty of consumers in markets as to production of goods. It is the power of consumers to decide what gets produced. People use the this term to describe the consumer as the “king,” or ruler, of the market, the one who determines what products will be produced. [1] Also, this term denotes the way in which a consumer ideologically chooses to buy a good or service. Furthermore, the term can be used as either a norm (as to what consumers should be permitted) or a description (as to what consumers are permitted). 

In unrestricted markets, those with income or wealth are able to use their purchasing power to motivate producers as what to produce (and how much). Customers do not necessarily have to buy and, if dissatisfied, can take their business elsewhere, while the profit-seeking sellers find that they can make the greatest profit by trying to provide the best possible products for the price (or the lowest possible price for a given product). In the language of cliché, “The one with the gold makes the rules.” 

To most neoclassical economists, complete consumer sovereignty is an ideal rather than a reality because of the existence — or even the ubiquity — of market failure. Some economists of the Chicago school and the Austrian school see consumer sovereignty as a reality in a free market economy without interference from government or other non-market institutions, or anti-market institutions such as monopolies or cartels. That is, alleged market failures are seen as being a result of non-market forces. 

The term “consumer sovereignty” was coined by William Hutt who firstly used it in his 1936 book “Economists and the Public”. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consumer_sovereignty

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