Ella Fitzgerald — Videos

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Ella Fitzgerald – My Funny Valentine (High Quality – Remastered)

Benny Goodman & Ella Fitzgerald – Goodnight My Love (1937)

Manhattan – Ella Fitzgerald lyrics

Ella Fitzgerald – The Very Thought Of You (lyrics on screen)

Ella Fitzgerald- “It Don’t Mean A Thing If It Ain’t Got That Swing” 1957 (RITY Archives)

Ella Fitzgerald – Midnight Sun – LIVE 1958

Ella Fitzgerald in Copenhagen 1965

Ella Fitzgerald – Summertime (1968)

Summertime,
And the livin’ is easy
Fish are jumpin’
And the cotton is high

Oh, Your daddy’s rich
And your mamma’s good lookin’
So hush little baby
Don’t you cry

One of these mornings
You’re going to rise up singing
Then you’ll spread your wings
And you’ll take to the sky

But ’til that morning
There’s a’nothing can harm you
With your daddy and mammy
Standing by
Don’t you cry

Ella Fitzgerald How High is the moon

Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong – Summertime

Ella & Louis – Cheek to Cheek

Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong: Dream A Little Dream Of Me

Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong – Stars Fell On Alabama (1956)

Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong – Tenderly (Verve Records 1956)

E.Fitzgerald & L.Armstrong, Duets and more (full album)

Let’s Do It (Let’s Fall In Love) by Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald – Mack The Knife (High Quality)

Ella Fitzgerald – Misty

Ella Fitzgerald and The Inkspots – Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall

Ella Fitzgerald – Hello Dolly (live)

Ella Fitzgerald – The Girl From Ipanema

Ella Fitzgerald – For Once In My Life (Live in Berlin 1968)

Ella Fitzgerald – Live At Ronnie Scott’s (!974)

ELLA FITZGERALD LIVE IN TOKYO (1983)

Ella Fitzgerald LIVE IN MILANO, ITALY 1984

Ella Fitzgerald – Night and Day (w/ lyrics)

Frank Sinatra – The Lady Is A Tramp ft. Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald – Blue Skies (High Quality – Remastered)

Ella Fitzgerald – Cry me a river

Ella Fitzgerald-How deep is the ocean?

Ella Fitzgerald “One Note Samba”

How High The Moon 1958

Ella Fitzgerald British TV 1961 Mr Paganini

Mr Paganini

Ella Fitzgerald – Round Midnight

Ella Fitzgerald The Man I love

Ella sings “Stormy Weather” with Joe Pass, Hannover 1975

Ella Fitzgerald – Sammy Davis Jr. 60th Anniversary Celebration (1990)

Karen Carpenter/Ella Fitzgerald medley, recorded for “Music,Music,Music

Ella Fitzgerald & Joe Pass – Once in a While

Ella Fitzgerald – My Heart Belongs to Daddy

Marilyn Monroe and Ella Fitzgerald sing “My Heart Belongs To Daddy”

Marilyn Monroe And Ella Fitzgerald Sing LAZY Together

Marilyn Monroe Talking About Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra And Sammy Davis jr

The Best Of Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald – All the Best (FULL ALBUM)

Ella Fitzgerald Greatest hits playlist – Collection HD/HQ

Ella Fitzgerald Interview 1974 Brian Linehan’s City Lights

Ella Fitzgerald kicked off a plane because of her race: CBC Archives | CBC

What’s My Line? – Ella Fitzgerald

Kennedy Center Honors Ella Fitzgerald 1979

ELLA FITZGERALD RECEIVES THE PRESIDENT’S AWARD

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 1

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 2

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 3

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 4

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 5

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 6

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 7

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 8

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 9

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 10

ELLA FITZGERALD BIOGRAPHY PART 11

Ella Fitzgerald

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ella Fitzgerald
Ella Fitzgerald (Gottlieb 02871).jpg

Fitzgerald in November 1946
Born Ella Jane Fitzgerald
April 25, 1917
Newport News, Virginia, U.S.
Died June 15, 1996 (aged 79)
Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
Cause of death Diabetes mellitus
Spouse(s) Benny Kornegay
(m. 1941; annulled 1943)
Ray Brown
(m. 1947; div. 1953)
Children Ray Brown Jr.
Musical career
Genres
Occupation(s) Singer, actress
Instruments Vocals
Years active 1934–1994
Labels
Website ellafitzgerald.com

Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996) was an American jazzsinger often referred to as the First Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz and Lady Ella. She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing and intonation, and a “horn-like” improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing.

After tumultuous teenage years, Fitzgerald found stability in musical success with the Chick Webb Orchestra, performing across the country, but most often associated with the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. Fitzgerald’s rendition of the nursery rhymeA-Tisket, A-Tasket” helped boost both her and Webb to national fame. Taking over the band after Webb died, Fitzgerald left it behind in 1942 to start a solo career that would last effectively the rest of her life.

Signed with manager and Savoy co-founder Moe Gale[1] from early in her career, she eventually gave managerial control for her performance and recording career to Norman Granz, who built up the label Verve Records based in part on Fitzgerald’s vocal abilities. With Verve she recorded some of her more widely noted works, particularly her interpretation of the Great American Songbook.

While Fitzgerald appeared in movies and as a guest on popular television shows in the second half of the twentieth century, her musical collaborations with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and The Ink Spots were some of her most notable acts outside of her solo career. These partnerships produced recognizable songs like “Dream a Little Dream of Me“, “Cheek to Cheek“, “Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall“, and “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)“. In 1993, Fitzgerald capped off her sixty-year career with her last public performance. Three years later, she died at the age of 79, following years of decline in her health. After her passing, Fitzgerald’s influence lived on through her fourteen Grammy Awards, National Medal of Arts, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and tributes in the form of stamps, music festivals, and theater namesakes.

Early life

Fitzgerald was born on April 25, 1917, in Newport News, Virginia, the daughter of William Fitzgerald and Temperance “Tempie” Fitzgerald.[2] Her parents were unmarried but lived together for at least two and a half years after she was born. In the early 1920s Fitzgerald’s mother and her new partner, a Portuguese immigrant named Joseph Da Silva,[2] moved to the city of Yonkers, in Westchester County, New York, as part of the first Great Migration of African Americans.[2] Initially living in a single room, her mother and Da Silva soon found jobs. Her half-sister, Frances Da Silva, was born in 1923.[3] By 1925, Fitzgerald and her family had moved to nearby School Street, then a predominantly poor Italian area.[3] She began her formal education at the age of six and proved to be an outstanding student, moving through a variety of schools before attending Benjamin Franklin Junior High School from 1929.[4]

Fitzgerald had been passionate about dancing from third grade, being a fan of Earl “Snakehips” Tucker in particular, and would perform for her peers on the way to school and at lunchtime.[5] Fitzgerald and her family were Methodists and were active in the Bethany African Methodist Episcopal Church, and she regularly attended worship services, Bible study, and Sunday school.[5] The church provided Fitzgerald with her earliest experiences in formal music making, and she may also have had a short series of piano lessons during this period.[6]

During this period Fitzgerald listened to jazz recordings by Louis Armstrong, Bing Crosby, and The Boswell Sisters. Fitzgerald idolized the Boswell Sisters’ lead singer Connee Boswell, later saying, “My mother brought home one of her records, and I fell in love with it….I tried so hard to sound just like her.”[7]

In 1932, her mother died from serious injuries she received in a car accident [8] when Fitzgerald was 15 years of age. This left her at first in the care of her stepfather but before the end of April 1933, she had moved in with her aunt in Harlem.[9]This seemingly swift change in her circumstances, reinforced by what Fitzgerald biographer Stuart Nicholson describes as rumors of her stepfather’s “ill treatment” of Fitzgerald, leaves him to speculate that Da Silva might have abused her.[9]

Regardless, following these traumas, Fitzgerald began skipping school and letting her grades suffer. During this period she worked at times as a lookout at a bordello and with a Mafia-affiliated numbers runner.[10] Ella Fitzgerald never talked publicly about this time in her life.[11] When the authorities caught up with her, she was first placed in the Colored Orphan Asylum in Riverdale, Bronx.[12] However, when the orphanage proved too crowded, she was moved to the New York Training School for Girls in Hudson, New York, a state reformatory located about 120 miles north of New York City. Eventually she escaped and for a time she was homeless.

Early career

A young Fitzgerald, photographed by Carl Van Vechten in 1940

While she seems to have survived during 1933 and 1934 in part from singing on the streets of Harlem, Fitzgerald made her most important amateur singing debut at age 17 on November 21, 1934, in one of the earliest of the famous Amateur Nights at the Apollo Theater.[13][14] She had originally intended to go on stage and dance, but, intimidated by a local dance duo called the Edwards Sisters, she opted to sing instead.[14][15] Performing in the style of Connee Boswell, she sang “Judy” and “The Object of My Affection” and won the first prize of $25.00.[16] In theory, she also won the chance to perform at the Apollo for a week but, seemingly because of her disheveled appearance, the theater never gave her that part of her prize.[17]

In January 1935 Fitzgerald won the chance to perform for a week with the Tiny Bradshaw band at the Harlem Opera House.[13] Around this same time, she was introduced to the drummer and bandleader Chick Webb, who had asked his recently signed singer Charlie Linton to help find him a female singer. Though Webb was, as The New York Times later wrote, “reluctant to sign her….because she was gawky and unkempt, a ‘diamond in the rough,'”[7] he offered her the opportunity to test with his band when they played a dance at Yale University.[13]

Met with approval by both audiences and her fellow musicians, Fitzgerald was asked to join Webb’s orchestra and soon gained acclaim as part of the group’s renowned performances at Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom.[13] Fitzgerald recorded several hit songs with them, including “Love and Kisses” and “(If You Can’t Sing It) You’ll Have to Swing It (Mr. Paganini)“.[13] But it was her 1938 version of the nursery rhyme, “A-Tisket, A-Tasket,” a song she co-wrote, that brought her wide public acclaim.[18][19] Later that year Ella recorded her second hit, “I Found My Yellow Basket.”

Webb died of spinal tuberculosis on June 16, 1939,[20] and his band was renamed Ella and her Famous Orchestra, with Fitzgerald taking on the role of nominal bandleader.[21] Fitzgerald recorded nearly 150 songs with Webb’s orchestra between 1935 and its final end in 1942. In her New York Times obituary of 1996, Stephen Holder echoed the conventional critical view of the time in describing “the majority” of her recordings during this period as “novelties and disposable pop fluff”.[7] In addition to her work with Webb, Fitzgerald performed and recorded with the Benny Goodman Orchestra. She had her own side project, too, known as Ella Fitzgerald and Her Savoy Eight.

Decca years

Fitzgerald performing with Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Brown, Milt Jackson and Timme Rosenkrantz in September 1947, New York

In 1942, Fitzgerald left the band to begin a solo career.[22] Continuing under contract to the Decca label that she had worked with while part of Webb’s orchestra, she had several popular hits while recording with such artists as Bill Kenny & the Ink Spots,[23] Louis Jordan,[24] and the Delta Rhythm Boys.[25]

With Decca’s Milt Gabler as her manager, Fitzgerald began working regularly for the jazz impresario Norman Granz and appeared regularly in his Jazz at the Philharmonic (JATP) concerts. Her relationship with Granz was further cemented when he became her manager, although it would be nearly a decade before he could record her on one of his many record labels.

With the demise of the Swing era and the decline of the great touring big bands, a major change in jazz music occurred. The advent of bebop led to new developments in Fitzgerald’s vocal style, influenced by her work with Dizzy Gillespie‘s big band. It was in this period that Fitzgerald started including scat singing as a major part of her performance repertoire. While singing with Gillespie, Fitzgerald recalled, “I just tried to do [with my voice] what I heard the horns in the band doing.”[16]

Her 1945 scat recording of “Flying Home” arranged by Vic Schoen would later be described by The New York Times as “one of the most influential vocal jazz records of the decade….Where other singers, most notably Louis Armstrong, had tried similar improvisation, no one before Miss Fitzgerald employed the technique with such dazzling inventiveness.”[7] Her bebop recording of “Oh, Lady Be Good!” (1947) was similarly popular and increased her reputation as one of the leading jazz vocalists.[26]

Verve years

Fitzgerald was still performing at Granz’s JATP concerts by 1955. She left Decca and Granz, now her manager, created Verve Records around her. She later described the period as strategically crucial, saying, “I had gotten to the point where I was only singing be-bop. I thought be-bop was ‘it’, and that all I had to do was go some place and sing bop. But it finally got to the point where I had no place to sing. I realized then that there was more to music than bop. Norman … felt that I should do other things, so he produced The Cole Porter Songbook with me. It was a turning point in my life.”[7]

On March 15, 1955[27] Ella Fitzgerald opened her initial engagement at the Mocambo nightclub in Hollywood,[28] after Marilyn Monroe lobbied the owner for the booking.[29] The booking was instrumental in Fitzgerald’s career. Bonnie Greer dramatized the incident as the musical drama, Marilyn and Ella, in 2008. It had previously been widely reported that Fitzgerald was the first black performer to play the Mocambo, following Monroe’s intervention, but this is not true. African-American singers Herb Jeffries,[30] Eartha Kitt,[31] and Joyce Bryant[32] all played the Mocambo in 1952 and 1953, according to stories published at the time in Jet magazine and Billboard.

Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Songbook, released in 1956, was the first of eight Songbook sets Fitzgerald would record for Verve at irregular intervals from 1956 to 1964. The composers and lyricists spotlighted on each set, taken together, represent the greatest part of the cultural canon known as the Great American Songbook. Her song selections ranged from standards to rarities and represented an attempt by Fitzgerald to cross over into a non-jazz audience. The sets are the most well-known items in her discography.

Fitzgerald in 1968, courtesy of the Fraser MacPherson estate

Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book was the only Songbook on which the composer she interpreted played with her. Duke Ellington and his longtime collaborator Billy Strayhorn both appeared on exactly half the set’s 38 tracks and wrote two new pieces of music for the album: “The E and D Blues” and a four-movement musical portrait of Fitzgerald (the only Songbook track on which Fitzgerald does not sing). The Songbook series ended up becoming the singer’s most critically acclaimed and commercially successful work, and probably her most significant offering to American culture. The New York Times wrote in 1996, “These albums were among the first pop records to devote such serious attention to individual songwriters, and they were instrumental in establishing the pop album as a vehicle for serious musical exploration.”[7]

Days after Fitzgerald’s death, The New York Times columnist Frank Rich wrote that in the Songbook series Fitzgerald “performed a cultural transaction as extraordinary as Elvis‘ contemporaneous integration of white and African American soul. Here was a black woman popularizing urban songs often written by immigrant Jews to a national audience of predominantly white Christians.”[10] Frank Sinatra, out of respect for Fitzgerald, prohibited Capitol Records from re-releasing his own recordings in separate albums for individual composers in the same way.[citation needed]

Fitzgerald also recorded albums exclusively devoted to the songs of Porter and Gershwin in 1972 and 1983; the albums being, respectively, Ella Loves Cole and Nice Work If You Can Get It. A later collection devoted to a single composer was released during her time with Pablo Records, Ella Abraça Jobim, featuring the songs of Antônio Carlos Jobim.

While recording the Songbooks and the occasional studio album, Fitzgerald toured 40 to 45 weeks per year in the United States and internationally, under the tutelage of Norman Granz. Granz helped solidify her position as one of the leading live jazz performers.[7] In 1961 Fitzgerald bought a house in the Klampenborg district of Copenhagen, Denmark, after she began a relationship with a Danish man. Though the relationship ended after a year, Fitzgerald regularly returned to Denmark over the next three years, and even considered buying a jazz club there. The house was sold in 1963, and Fitzgerald permanently returned to the United States.[33]

There are several live albums on Verve that are highly regarded by critics. Ella at the Opera House shows a typical JATP set from Fitzgerald. Ella in Rome and Twelve Nights in Hollywood display her vocal jazz canon. Ella in Berlin is still one of her best-selling albums; it includes a Grammy-winning performance of “Mack the Knife” in which she forgets the lyrics but improvises magnificently to compensate.

Verve Records was sold to MGM in 1963 for $3 million and in 1967 MGM failed to renew Fitzgerald’s contract. Over the next five years she flitted between Atlantic, Capitol and Reprise. Her material at this time represented a departure from her typical jazz repertoire. For Capitol she recorded Brighten the Corner, an album of hymns, Ella Fitzgerald’s Christmas, an album of traditional Christmas carols, Misty Blue, a country and western-influenced album, and 30 by Ella, a series of six medleys that fulfilled her obligations for the label. During this period, she had her last US chart single with a cover of Smokey Robinson‘s “Get Ready“, previously a hit for the Temptations, and some months later a top-five hit for Rare Earth.

The surprise success of the 1972 album Jazz at Santa Monica Civic ’72 led Granz to found Pablo Records, his first record label since the sale of Verve. Fitzgerald recorded some 20 albums for the label. Ella in London recorded live in 1974 with pianist Tommy Flanagan, guitarist Joe Pass, bassist Keter Betts and drummer Bobby Durham, was considered by many to be some of her best work. The following year she again performed with Joe Pass on German television station NDR in Hamburg. Her years with Pablo Records also documented the decline in her voice. “She frequently used shorter, stabbing phrases, and her voice was harder, with a wider vibrato”, one biographer wrote.[34] Plagued by health problems, Fitzgerald made her last recording in 1991 and her last public performances in 1993.[35]

Film and television

Fitzgerald shakes hands with President Ronald Reagan after performing in the White House, 1981

In her most notable screen role, Fitzgerald played the part of singer Maggie Jackson in Jack Webb‘s 1955 jazz film Pete Kelly’s Blues.[36] The film costarred Janet Leigh and singer Peggy Lee.[37] Even though she had already worked in the movies (she had sung briefly in the 1942 Abbott and Costello film Ride ‘Em Cowboy),[38] she was “delighted” when Norman Granz negotiated the role for her, and, “at the time….considered her role in the Warner Brothers movie the biggest thing ever to have happened to her.”[34] Amid The New York Times pan of the film when it opened in August 1955, the reviewer wrote, “About five minutes (out of ninety-five) suggest the picture this might have been. Take the ingenious prologue … [or] take the fleeting scenes when the wonderful Ella Fitzgerald, allotted a few spoken lines, fills the screen and sound track with her strong mobile features and voice.”[39]Fitzgerald’s race precluded major big-screen success. After Pete Kelly’s Blues, she appeared in sporadic movie cameos, in St. Louis Blues (1958),[40] and Let No Man Write My Epitaph (1960).[41] Much later, she appeared in the 1980s television drama The White Shadow.

She made numerous guest appearances on television shows, singing on The Frank Sinatra Show, The Andy Williams Show, The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom, and alongside other greats Nat King Cole, Dean Martin, Mel Tormé, and many others. She was also frequently featured on The Ed Sullivan Show. Perhaps her most unusual and intriguing performance was of the “Three Little Maids” song from Gilbert and Sullivan‘s comic operetta The Mikado alongside Joan Sutherland and Dinah Shore on Shore’s weekly variety series in 1963. A performance at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in London was filmed and shown on the BBC. Fitzgerald also made a one-off appearance alongside Sarah Vaughan and Pearl Bailey on a 1979 television special honoring Bailey. In 1980, she performed a medley of standards in a duet with Karen Carpenter on the Carpenters’ television program Music, Music, Music.[42]

Fitzgerald also appeared in TV commercials, her most memorable being an ad for Memorex.[43] In the commercials, she sang a note that shattered a glass while being recorded on a Memorex cassette tape.[44] The tape was played back and the recording also broke the glass, asking: “Is it live, or is it Memorex?”[44] She also starred in a number of commercials for Kentucky Fried Chicken, singing and scatting to the fast-food chain’s longtime slogan, “We do chicken right!”[45] Her final commercial campaign was for American Express, in which she was photographed by Annie Leibovitz.[46]

Collaborations

Fitzgerald’s most famous collaborations were with the vocal quartet Bill Kenny & the Ink Spots, trumpeter Louis Armstrong, the guitarist Joe Pass, and the bandleaders Count Basie and Duke Ellington.

  • From 1943 to 1950, Fitzgerald recorded seven songs with the Ink Spots featuring Bill Kenny. Out of all seven recordings, four reached the top of the pop charts including “I’m Making Believe” and “Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall” which both reached #1.
  • Fitzgerald recorded three Verve studio albums with Armstrong, two albums of standards (1956’s Ella and Louis and 1957’s Ella and Louis Again), and a third album featured music from the Gershwin musical Porgy and Bess. Fitzgerald also recorded a number of sides with Armstrong for Decca in the early 1950s.
  • Fitzgerald is sometimes referred to as the quintessential swing singer, and her meetings with Count Basie are highly regarded by critics. Fitzgerald features on one track on Basie’s 1957 album One O’Clock Jump, while her 1963 album Ella and Basie! is remembered as one of her greatest recordings. With the ‘New Testament’ Basie band in full swing, and arrangements written by a young Quincy Jones, this album proved a respite from the ‘Songbook’ recordings and constant touring that Fitzgerald was engaged in during this period. Fitzgerald and Basie also collaborated on the 1972 album Jazz at Santa Monica Civic ’72, and on the 1979 albums Digital III at Montreux, A Classy Pair and A Perfect Match.
  • Fitzgerald and Joe Pass recorded four albums together toward the end of Fitzgerald’s career. She recorded several albums with piano accompaniment, but a guitar proved the perfect melodic foil for her. Fitzgerald and Pass appeared together on the albums Take Love Easy (1973), Easy Living (1986), Speak Love (1983) and Fitzgerald and Pass… Again (1976).
  • Fitzgerald and Duke Ellington recorded two live albums and two studio albums. Her Duke Ellington Songbook placed Ellington firmly in the canon known as the Great American Songbook, and the 1960s saw Fitzgerald and the ‘Duke’ meet on the Côte d’Azur for the 1966 album Ella and Duke at the Cote D’Azur, and in Sweden for The Stockholm Concert, 1966. Their 1965 album Ella at Duke’s Place is also extremely well received.

Fitzgerald had a number of famous jazz musicians and soloists as sidemen over her long career. The trumpeters Roy Eldridge and Dizzy Gillespie, the guitarist Herb Ellis, and the pianists Tommy Flanagan, Oscar Peterson, Lou Levy, Paul Smith, Jimmy Rowles, and Ellis Larkins all worked with Ella mostly in live, small group settings.

Possibly Fitzgerald’s greatest unrealized collaboration (in terms of popular music) was a studio or live album with Frank Sinatra. The two appeared on the same stage only periodically over the years, in television specials in 1958 and 1959, and again on 1967’s A Man and His Music + Ella + Jobim, a show that also featured Antônio Carlos Jobim. Pianist Paul Smith has said, “Ella loved working with [Frank]. Sinatra gave her his dressing-room on A Man and His Music and couldn’t do enough for her.” When asked, Norman Granz would cite “complex contractual reasons” for the fact that the two artists never recorded together.[34] Fitzgerald’s appearance with Sinatra and Count Basie in June 1974 for a series of concerts at Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, was seen as an important incentive for Sinatra to return from his self-imposed retirement of the early 1970s. The shows were a great success, and September 1975 saw them gross $1,000,000 in two weeks on Broadway, in a triumvirate with the Count Basie Orchestra.

Later life and death

Fitzgerald had suffered from diabetes for several years of her later life, which had led to numerous complications.[7] In 1985, Fitzgerald was hospitalized briefly for respiratory problems,[47] in 1986 for congestive heart failure,[48] and in 1990 for exhaustion.[49] In March 1990 she appeared at the Royal Albert Hall in London, England with the Count Basie Orchestra for the launch of Jazz FM, plus a gala dinner at the Grosvenor House Hotel at which she performed.[50] In 1993, she had to have both of her legs amputated below the knee due to the effects of diabetes.[51] Her eyesight was affected as well.[7]

In 1996, tired of being in the hospital, she wished to spend her last days at home. Confined to a wheelchair, she spent her final days in her backyard of her Beverly Hills mansion on Whittier, with her son Ray and 12-year-old granddaughter, Alice. “I just want to smell the air, listen to the birds and hear Alice laugh,” she reportedly said. On her last day, she was wheeled outside one last time, and sat there for about an hour. When she was taken back in, she looked up with a soft smile on her face and said, “I’m ready to go now.” She died in her home on June 15, 1996 at the age of 79.[7] A few hours after her death, the Playboy Jazz Festival was launched at the Hollywood Bowl. In tribute, the marquee read: “Ella We Will Miss You.”[52] Her funeral was private,[52] and she was buried at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Los Angeles.

Personal life

Fitzgerald married at least twice, and there is evidence that she may have married a third time. Her first marriage was in 1941, to Benny Kornegay, a convicted drug dealer and local dockworker. The marriage was annulled in 1942.[53]

Her second marriage was in December 1947, to the famous bass player Ray Brown, whom she had met while on tour with Dizzy Gillespie’s band a year earlier. Together they adopted a child born to Fitzgerald’s half-sister, Frances, whom they christened Ray Brown, Jr. With Fitzgerald and Brown often busy touring and recording, the child was largely raised by his mother’s aunt, Virginia. Fitzgerald and Brown divorced in 1953, bowing to the various career pressures both were experiencing at the time, though they would continue to perform together.[7]

In July 1957, Reuters reported that Fitzgerald had secretly married Thor Einar Larsen, a young Norwegian, in Oslo. She had even gone as far as furnishing an apartment in Oslo, but the affair was quickly forgotten when Larsen was sentenced to five months’ hard labor in Sweden for stealing money from a young woman to whom he had previously been engaged.[54]

Fitzgerald was also notoriously shy. Trumpet player Mario Bauzá, who played behind Fitzgerald in her early years with Chick Webb, remembered that “she didn’t hang out much. When she got into the band, she was dedicated to her music….She was a lonely girl around New York, just kept herself to herself, for the gig.”[34] When, later in her career, the Society of Singers named an award after her, Fitzgerald explained, “I don’t want to say the wrong thing, which I always do but I think I do better when I sing.”[16]

Fitzgerald was a quiet but ardent supporter of many charities and non-profit organizations, including the American Heart Association and the City of Hope Medical Center. In 1993, she established the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation.[55]

Discography and collections

Further information: Ella Fitzgerald discography

The primary collections of Fitzgerald’s media and memorabilia reside at and are shared between the Smithsonian Institution and the US Library of Congress [56]

Awards, citations and honors

Fitzgerald won thirteen Grammy Awards,[57] and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1967.[58]

In 1958 Fitzgerald was the first African American female to win at the inaugural show.[59]

Other major awards and honors she received during her career were the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Medal of Honor Award, National Medal of Art, first Society of Singers Lifetime Achievement Award, named “Ella” in her honor, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the George and Ira Gershwin Award for Lifetime Musical Achievement, UCLA Spring Sing, and the UCLA Medal (1987).[60] Across town at the University of Southern California, she received the USC “Magnum Opus” Award which hangs in the office of the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation. In 1990, she received an honorary doctorate of Music from Harvard University.[61]

Tributes and legacy

Fitzgerald in 1960 by Erling Mandelmann

The career history and archival material from Ella’s long career are housed in the Archives Center at the Smithsonian‘s National Museum of American History, while her personal music arrangements are at the Library of Congress. Her extensive cookbook collection was donated to the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University, and her extensive collection of published sheet music was donated to UCLA.

In 1997, Newport News, Virginia created a music festival with Christopher Newport University to honor Ella Fitzgerald in her birth city. Past performers at the week-long festival include: Diana Krall, Arturo Sandoval, Jean Carne, Phil Woods, Aretha Franklin, Victoria Wyndham, Charles Keating, Freda Payne, Cassandra Wilson, Ethel Ennis, David Sanborn, Jane Monheit, Dianne Reeves, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Ramsey Lewis, Patti Austin, Lalah Hathaway, Ledisi, Chrisette Michele, Natalie Cole, Freddie Jackson, Joe Harnell, Roy Ayers and Ann Hampton Callaway.

Callaway, Dee Dee Bridgewater, and Patti Austin have all recorded albums in tribute to Fitzgerald. Callaway’s album To Ella with Love (1996) features fourteen jazz standards made popular by Fitzgerald, and the album also features the trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. Bridgewater’s album Dear Ella (1997) featured many musicians that were closely associated with Fitzgerald during her career, including the pianist Lou Levy, the trumpeter Benny Powell, and Fitzgerald’s second husband, double bassist Ray Brown. Bridgewater’s following album, Live at Yoshi’s, was recorded live on April 25, 1998, what would have been Fitzgerald’s 81st birthday.

Austin’s album, For Ella (2002) features 11 songs most immediately associated with Fitzgerald, and a twelfth song, “Hearing Ella Sing” is Austin’s tribute to Fitzgerald. The album was nominated for a Grammy. In 2007, We All Love Ella, was released, a tribute album recorded for the 90th anniversary of Fitzgerald’s birth. It featured artists such as Michael Bublé, Natalie Cole, Chaka Khan, Gladys Knight, Diana Krall, k.d. lang, Queen Latifah, Ledisi, Dianne Reeves, Linda Ronstadt, and Lizz Wright, collating songs most readily associated with the “First Lady of Song”. Folk singer Odetta‘s album To Ella (1998) is dedicated to Fitzgerald, but features no songs associated with her. Her accompanist Tommy Flanagan affectionately remembered Fitzgerald on his album Lady be Good … For Ella (1994).

Ella, elle l’a“, a tribute to Fitzgerald written by Michel Berger and performed by French singer France Gall, was a hit in Europe in 1987 and 1988.[62] Fitzgerald is also referred to in the 1976 Stevie Wonder hit “Sir Duke” from his album Songs in the Key of Life, and the song “I Love Being Here With You”, written by Peggy Lee and Bill Schluger. Sinatra’s 1986 recording of “Mack the Knife” from his album L.A. Is My Lady (1984) includes a homage to some of the song’s previous performers, including ‘Lady Ella’ herself. She is also honored in the song “First Lady” by Canadian artist Nikki Yanofsky.

In 2008, the Downing-Gross Cultural Arts Center in Newport News named its brand new 276-seat theater the Ella Fitzgerald Theater. The theater is located several blocks away from her birthplace on Marshall Avenue. The Grand Opening performers (October 11 and 12, 2008) were Roberta Flack and Queen Esther Marrow.

In 2012, Rod Stewart performed a “virtual duet” with Ella Fitzgerald on his Christmas album Merry Christmas, Baby, and his television special of the same name.[63]

There is a bronze sculpture of Fitzgerald in Yonkers, the city in which she grew up, created by American artist Vinnie Bagwell. It is located southeast of the main entrance to the Amtrak/Metro-North Railroad station in front of the city’s old trolley barn. A bust of Fitzgerald is on the campus of Chapman University in Orange, California. On January 9, 2007, the United States Postal Service announced that Fitzgerald would be honored with her own postage stamp.[43] The stamp was released in April 2007 as part of the Postal Service’s Black Heritage series.[64]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ella_Fitzgerald

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The Boss’ Speech–Bruce Springsteen’s Keynote Speech at South By South West Festival, SXSW, Austin, Texas, March, 2012–Videos

Posted on March 17, 2012. Filed under: Communications, Culture, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Radio, Raves, Video, Wealth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Bruce Springsteen’s keynote speech at the SXSW Festival, Austin, Texas

Keynote speech at the South by South West Festival in Austin, Texas. Bruce comes in after 4 minutes. It’s almost an hour long, but if you have the time, definitely worth watching.

Bruce Springsteen – Dancing In The Dark

Bruce Springsteen – Born To Run

We Take Care Of Our Own – Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen-Jack of all trades

 

I’ll mow your lawn, clean the leaves out your drain

I’ll mend your roof to keep out the rain

 I’ll take the work that god provides

I’m a jack of all trades, honey, we’ll be alright

I’ll hammer the nails, and i’ll set the stone

 I’ll harvest your crops when they’re ripe and grown

 I’ll pull that engine apart and patch her up ’til she’s running right

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

A hurricane blows, brings a hard rain

 When the blue sky breaks, feels like the world’s gonna change

 We’ll start caring for each other like jesus said that we might

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

The banker man grows fatter, the working man grows thin

 It’s all happened before and it’ll happen again

 It’ll happen again, they’ll bet your life

 I’m a jack of all trades and, darling, we’ll be alright

Now sometimes tomorrow comes soaked in treasure and blood

Here we stood the drought, now we’ll stand the flood

 There’s a new world coming, i can see the light

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

So you use what you’ve got, and you learn to make do

 You take the old, you make it new

 If i had me a gun, i’d find the bastards and shoot ’em on sight

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

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Eva Cassidy–Videos

Posted on April 21, 2011. Filed under: Art, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

UPDATED December 9, 2014 

ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL!!! LISTEN TO ALL — Eva Cassidy – Live at Blues Alley

Vermeer and Cassidy

American Tune – (Eva Cassidy)

Eva Cassidy – Autumn Leaves

 

Eva Cassidy – Somewhere Over the Rainbow

 

Eva Cassidy – Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain

Eva Cassidy – Time After Time

Eva Cassidy – Ain’t no sunshine…

Eva Cassidy – Who Knows Where The Time Goes – by Sandy Denny

Eva Cassidy – Fields of Gold


Tennessee Waltz by Eva Cassidy


Danny Boy by Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy – Summertime

Eva Cassidy – I Can Only Be Me – by Stevie Wonder

Eva Cassidy – I Know You By Heart

eva cassidy – My Love is Like a Red Red Rose (eng lyrics)

Forever by Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy – Blues In The Night

Eva Cassidy – Nightbird

Eva Cassidy – Dark End of The Street

Eva Cassidy – Bridge Over Troubled Water – by Paul Simon

Fever – Eva Cassidy

Eva Cassidy – Chain Of Fools

Eva Cassidy – Imagine – by John Lennon

Eva Cassidy-Songbird

Eva Cassidy – What a Wonderful World

Eva Cassidy – Somewhere Over The Rainbow

EVA CASSIDY – CHEEK TO CHEEK (Live At Blues Alley)

Silent Night by Eva Cassidy – Video & photos by Chris Burke

“Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears.”

~Edgar Allan Poe

Background Articles and Videos

The Eva Cassidy Story – on ABC Nightline

The Eva Cassidy Story – a BBC Production

Eva Cassidy Story-Trevor McDonald Pt.1

Eva Cassidy Story-Trevor McDonald Pt 2

Eva Cassidy Story-Trevor McDonald Pt 3

 

The Eva Cassidy Story – on ABC Nightline

Songbird

Eva Cassidy’s Voice Was Pure and Rich With Emotion. When She Died Five Years Ago,That Might Have Been the End of the Story. But Her Music Has Lived On, and Now It’s Making Her a Star.

By Sherri Dalphonse

“…When radio stations play Eva, their switchboards light up. Many callers say they were in their car when they first heard her and had to pull over to cry.

“Eva evokes that kind of reaction. Not just ‘She’s good’ but ‘Who the heck is that?’ ” says Keith Grimes, who was a guitarist in the Eva Cassidy Band.

Cassidy had great control, phrasing, and range. She was petite—five-foot-two—but could belt out a bluesy “People Get Ready” as easily as she could sing a delicate tune like “Autumn Leaves.” Some who heard this soulful Scotch-Irish-German woman thought she was black.

It’s more than Cassidy’s technical skill that grabs people. It’s the sense as she sang that she was reaching from her heart to her listener’s.

“There are singers that have great instruments but are just singing the notes,” says Grace Griffith, a friend and local chanteuse. “Other singers have emotion but not the instrument. Eva had both.”

No song speaks to this expressiveness as much as her rendition of “Over the Rainbow.” Cassidy, who loved the Wizard of Oz books as a child, breathed new life into an old song about hope and longing.

An amateur video of Eva shot at Blues Alley, her face full of feeling as she sings “Over the Rainbow,” is largely responsible for the big sales in England. It’s just about the most requested video in BBC history. …”

http://classic-web.archive.org/web/20010617004225/http://www.washingtonian.com/people/evacassidy.html

Eva Cassidy

http://evacassidy.org/eva/

 Singer: Eva Cassidy

“…Eva Cassidy’s music has made its way from iPod to iPod by enthusiastic word of mouth. Sadly, it can’t be spread any other way. Eva died in 1996 of a melanoma at the way-too-young age of 33.

What an incredible voice. I heard about Eva from a travel forum on which people posted their island playlists. I hadn’t heard of her, so I went to iTunes and listened to my allotted twenty seconds of some of her songs. That’s all it took – twenty seconds of Eva’s voice – to make me a fan for life.

Her version of “Over the Rainbow” is just unbelievable. A British d.j., Terry Wogan, happened to hear it several years after Eva’s death, and like almost everyone else, was blown away. So were his listeners. When a low-res video of Eva singing the song was played on Britain’s Top of the Pops 2 TV show, the song went to number one on the U.K. charts. …”

http://americanthings.wordpress.com/2009/08/17/no-131-eva-cassidy/

Eva Marie Cassidy

“…Eva Marie Cassidy (February 2, 1963 – November 2, 1996) was an American vocalist known for her interpretations of jazz, blues, folk, gospel, country and pop classics. In 1992 she released her first album, The Other Side, a set of duets with go-go musician Chuck Brown, followed by a live solo album, Live at Blues Alley in 1996. Although she had been honored by the Washington Area Music Association, she was virtually unknown outside her native Washington, D.C. when she died of melanoma in 1996.

Four years later, Cassidy’s music was brought to the attention of British audiences when her version of “Over the Rainbow” was played by Terry Wogan on BBC Radio 2. Following the overwhelming response, a camcorder recording of “Over the Rainbow”, taken at the Blues Alley, was shown on BBC Two’s Top of the Pops 2. Shortly afterwards, the compilation album Songbird climbed to the top of the UK Albums Charts, almost three years after its initial release. The chart success in the United Kingdom and Ireland led to increased recognition worldwide; her posthumously released recordings, including three UK #1s, have sold more than ten million copies.[1] Her music has also charted top 10 positions in Australia, Germany, Sweden, Norway and Switzerland.[2] …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eva_Cassidy

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Happy Birthday Doris Day!

Posted on April 3, 2011. Filed under: Blogroll, Comedy, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Movies, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

On April 3, 1922 Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff was born in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Today, Doris Day celecbrates her 89th birthday.

Happy Birthday Doris from Dallas, Texas.

Extracts from Doris Day’s April 3rd 2011 birthday call with MAGIC 63 AM

 

Doris Day – Que Sera Sera

 

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Doris Day – Autumn Leaves – 1956

 

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Susan Boyle–Videos

Posted on September 22, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , |

Susan Boyle (BEST quality) – Britains Got Talent

Susan Boyle – Amazing Grace

Elaine Paige praises Susan Boyle and proposes a duet

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Susan Boyle’s Makeover for Harper’s Bazaar Magazine 2009

Silent Night

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Sam Cooke–Videos

Posted on September 23, 2009. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Music, People, Quotations, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

sam_cooke_studio

Sam Cooke – (Ain’t That) Good News & Interview [HQ]

Sam Cooke – You Send Me

Sam Cooke-Everybody Loves To Cha Cha Cha

Sam Cooke-Blowing In The Wind

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Chain Gang-Sam Cooke

Sam Cooke – Frankie And Johnny (Stereo)


 

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For Sentimental Reasons and Interview

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Sam Cooke “Sugar Dumpling”

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sam cooke-mona lisa

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDEeAl_PvEI

 

Sam Cooke- One More Time

Your Always On My Mind – Sam Cooke

over my shoulder- sam cooke video-the wittle man album tribute video and song

Sam Cooke – Wonderful World

Sam Cooke – Send Me Some Lovin’

Sam Cooke-Mary Lou

♥♫ SAM COOKE – Blue Moon♥♫

   Sam Cooke- Another Saturday Night

Sam Cooke – Smoke Rings

 
 

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyIo1M-Sp1g

 

THE GANGS ALL HERE Sam Cooke Ali

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sam_cooke

Background Articles and Videos

Sam Cooke

“…Samuel “Sam” Cooke (January 22, 1931 – December 11, 1964) was an American gospel, R&B, soul, and pop singer, songwriter, and entrepreneur. He is considered to be one of the pioneers and founders of soul music.[2][3][4]

Cooke had twenty-nine Top 40 hits in the U.S. between 1957 and 1964. Major hits like “You Send Me”, “A Change Is Gonna Come”, “Chain Gang”, “Wonderful World”, and “Bring It on Home to Me” are some of his most popular songs. Cooke was also among the first modern black performers and composers to attend to the business side of his musical career. He founded both a record label and a publishing company as an extension of his careers as a singer and composer. He also took an active part in the American Civil Rights Movement.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Cooke

Sam Cooke

http://www.history-of-rock.com/cooke.htm

Sam Cooke

http://www.samcooke.com/samcooke.php#

Sam Cooke

http://musicbrainz.org/artist/6c8fd0be-d961-454c-aee0-4366a6dbc993.html

Sam Cooke Tribute

Chain Gang from Cadence

Sam Cooke “Chain Gang”

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John Denver–Videos

Posted on February 14, 2009. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Life, Links, Music, People, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , |

john_denver_young

“There’s one piece of advice my dad gave me when he dropped me off at college. He said, “You’ve got the talent. You can sing and play guitar. That doesn’t make you any better than anyone else.””

~John Denver

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john_denver

Perhaps love is like a resting place, A shelter from the storm, It exists to give you comfort, It is there to keep you warm, And in those times of trouble, When you are most alone, The memory of love will bring you home”

~John Denver

Background Articles and Videos

John Denver

John Denver (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr., was an American Country Music/folk singer-songwriter and folk rock musician. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s in terms of record sales,[1] recording and releasing around 300 songs, about half composed by himself. He was named Poet Laureate of Colorado in 1977. Songs such as “Leaving on a Jet Plane” (1967), “Take Me Home, Country Roads” (1971), “Rocky Mountain High” (1972), “Sunshine on My Shoulders” (1973), “Thank God I’m a Country Boy” (1974), “Annie’s Song” (1974), and “Calypso” (1975) are popular worldwide. Denver has been referred to as “The Poet for the Planet”, “Mother Nature’s Son” (based on The Beatles song he covered) and “A Song’s Best Friend”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Denver

John Denver

http://www.johndenver.com/

John Denver – Follow Me (1974)

John Denver – Talking with Johnny Carson (1985) [Part.2]

John Denver – Good Company Interview (1988) [1/2]

John Denver – Good Company Interview (1988) [2/2]

John Denver – Interviewed by Derryn Hinch (1994)

INTERVIEW WITH GOD

John Denver Talks About Rocky Mountain High

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [1/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [2/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [3/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [4/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [5/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [6/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [7/8]

John Denver – Sarajevo Winter Olympics (1984) [8/8]

John Denver – Very Special Interview with Ray Martin (1989) [1/5]

John Denver – Very Special Interview with Ray Martin (1989) [2/5]

John Denver: On Being Human

John Denver – Last Performance (1997)

John Denver’s Death – Australian News Reports & Interviews 1997

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Sam Cooke–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

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