The Racist Test for Judge Sonya Sotomayor and President Obama–Racism Unmasked!–Obama Flips Off White Middle Class America–Videos

Posted on July 14, 2009. Filed under: Blogroll, Economics, Education, Employment, Law, liberty, Links, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Themis_justice

Martin Luther King Jr – I Have a Dream

 

Krauthammer: Sotomayor is a leftist militant third-world race supremacist, not an impartial judge

 

US Supreme Court Again Reverses Radical Barack Obama Nominee Sonia Sotomayor [FOX News]

 

White Firefighters Prevail in Supreme Court Case

 

Sotomayor Decision Overruled by Supreme Court – justice for white firefighters

 

Glenn Beck: Sotomayer Hearings Like a Cartoon Show!

 

Racism on the Supreme Court…

 

Tancredo vs Tan Klan & Sotomayor

 

Tom DeLay Attacks Sonia Sotomayor & La Raza On CNN

 

cnn – lou dobbs – sotomayor on immigration

 

Beck & Sowell Discuss ‘Racist’ Sotomayor

 

Obama’s Supreme Court Nominee is a Racist Activist Policy making Judge, by her own admission

 

Time for The Racist Test…

 

Obama’s Supreme Court Pick: Racist?

 

Obama the Trickster

By James Lewis

 

“…Her job on the Supremes will be to keep the Affirmative Action Establishment in power. Those are the race/gender/sexuality statist demagogues who seized power when the Boomer Left took over. That is why we have Leftists in control of the Democrats, the universities, and the Chicago Machine. It’s why the deeply dishonest ideologue James Hansen has a fat salary at NASA while systematically lying about global warming.  It’s why the newspapers are crashing and the Democrats still win elections. It’s why California, blessed with resources, is broke and all the big cities are begging for Federal handouts.

Affirmative Action is the new American spoils system — and race, gender, and sexual demagoguery are always the key. It works by intimidating middle class whites. The Left has taken over Europe with the exactly same tactics. Just read the UK news.

 

Anti-white racists must be worried about their hold on power, because the US Supreme Court has heard of the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment. Even Justice Ginsburg keeps saying that legalized racial discrimination is only temporary, because, yes, it’s obviously unconstitutional. It’s affirmative racism.

 

Well, you can bet that the race/gender/gay industry isn’t going to go quietly into that dark night. Sotomayor’s nomination is a sign to the racism industry that it is still in power, and that its future is assured if Obama has anything to say about it. It’s a payoff to the race industry, and an invitation by Obama to expand racial protections to Hispanics and illegals.

 

Sotomayor’s mission on SCOTUS is to dig Affirmative Action into solid rock, to keep it entangled so deeply in the network of SCOTUS decisions that this country will never return to the equal protection of the laws. She will work to give illegal aliens all their “rights” under the UN Human Rights Charter — which nobody voted for except the unelected transnational Ruling Class.  But the American taxpayer will pay for it, oh, many times over.

 

It’s all a gargantuan finger to White Middle Class America. If you don’t get it he still gets the last laugh at your stupidity. …”

http://www.americanthinker.com/2009/07/obama_the_trickster_1.html

 

Obama Flips Off Hillary Clinton? Slow Motion!

 

barack_obama_flips_off

 

Background Articles and Videos

 

Day Two: Sotomayor and ritual reassurances

By Michelle Malkin  

“…Today, it’s the SCOTUS ceremonial dance with the Senate.

Republicans will delicately challenge Sonia Somotmayor on racial preferences, Second Amendment rights, property rights, sovereignty issues, and her extracurricular speechifying.

Democrats will bloviate about pet causes (”consumer-friendly” laws, the environment).

Sonia the Wise will assuage skeptics with repeated insistences that she’s “fair,” “impartial,” and committed to the rule of law.

Absent that “meltdown,” Lindsay Graham will pronounce himself satisfied with her ritual reassurances.

And Sotomayor will be one cleared hurdle closer to overcoming yet another set of “incredible odds” to complete her “compelling personal story.”

The morning news round-up:

WaPo: Sotomayor and the search for bipartisanship

Dallas Morning News: “Jane Roe” — Norma McCorvey — was one of the protesters arrested yesterday for disrupting the opening day of hearings.

Paul Mirengoff at Power Line zeroes in on Sotomayor’s incoherence:

The real question is this: if Sotomayor’s practice is to “strengthen both the rule of law and faith in the impartiality of our justice system” by carefully addressing the “arguments and concerns” of the parties, why did she depart so fundamentally from this practice in the Ricci case? …”

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/07/14/day-two-sotomayor-and-ritual-reassurances/

 

Day One: Spotlight on Sotomayor

By Michelle Malkin  

“…It’s opening day of the Senate SCOTUS hearings on the Sonia Sotomayor nomination. We’ll get gavel-to-gavel coverage this morning on all major networks and CSPAN starting at 10am Eastern.

The good news: At least we’ll be spared Joe Biden’s bloviations.

That’s about the only positive thing I can say about a day that will be dripping in the politics of racial identity and judicial nomination-as-high-hurdles-contest rhetoric.

Wonder which Senator will be the first to bring up her “history-making” status as a Wise, History-Making Person Living With Diabetes?

Latinos are putting conservatives “on notice” and will watch Republicans “like hawks.” Estuardo V. Rodriguez, director of something called “Hispanics for a Fair Judiciary,” told ABC News: “We accept tough questions. But what we are going to object to are questions that misrepresent the judge or that distort her record.” (The group includes the pro-racial/ethnic preference Hispanic National Bar Association, U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund.)

Translation: Be quiet about Ricci, the Puerto Rican Legal Defense Fund, and the Wise Latina Woman remarks — or else!

I’m reminded of a good column a few months ago by Rachel Campos-Duffy, who happens to be a wise conservative Latina woman:

For conservative minorities, especially conservative minority women, Sonia Sotomayor’s nomination and the warnings from the left not to “bully” her are a reminder of the double standard with which we live out our social and political lives. The recognition that there are two separate rulebooks for minorities: one for liberals and one for conservatives. In the liberal rulebook, whites must be sensitive and considerate of a minority’s life story and the unique obstacles he or she faced and/or overcame. In the conservative rulebook, well, there really is no rulebook because there are no rules. It’s always open season on conservative minorities. …”

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/07/13/day-one-spotlight-on-sotomayor/

What Ricci Says About Sotomayor – and Obama

By David Gibberman

“… The specific legal question in Ricci was: May an employer disregard the results of a promotion exam because too many individuals of one race had the best scores?

When New Haven firefighters took the lieutenant promotion test, only whites scored high enough to fill the eight current vacancies (for details about these exams, see Justice Kennedy’s opinion). At least three African-American candidates would have been eligible for subsequent vacancies during the two years that the test results would have been valid. With respect to the captain promotion test, seven whites and two Hispanics did well enough to be eligible for promotion to current vacancies.

All nine Supreme Court justices tried to reconcile New Haven’s legal obligation not to intentionally discriminate against firefighters on the basis of their race with its obligation not to unintentionally discriminate against them.

An employer can be liable for unintentionally discriminating when a job test adversely affects a disproportionate number of individuals of a particular race unless (1) the test measures the skills required to perform the job successfully and (2) those adversely affected can’t point to an equally good alternative with less adverse impact (42 U.S.C. §2000e-2(k)(1)(A), (C), available, like other U.S. Code provisions).

New Haven made a conscientious effort not to unintentionally discriminate. It  paid $100,000 to Industrial/Organizational Solutions, Inc. (IOS), a company specializing in designing entry-level and promotion tests for fire and police departments, to develop lieutenant and captain promotion exams. IOS interviewed and observed lieutenants and captains at work to identify the tasks, knowledge, skills, and abilities essential for them to perform their jobs successfully. Minority firefighters were oversampled so that white candidates would not be unintentionally favored.

IOS prepared for each position a multiple-choice test (each question written below the 10th-grade reading level) and an oral exam consisting of hypothetical situations testing skills identified as needed to successfully perform as a lieutenant or captain. Each panel grading a candidate’s oral exam included one white, one African-American, and one Hispanic. Candidates were given three months to prepare for the exams and told which chapters in the source materials they should study.

All nine Supreme Court justices agreed that it wasn’t okay for New Haven to discard the test results merely because there was a racial disparity in test scores. Five justices decided that an employer can intentionally discriminate against employees by disregarding test results only if the facts show that it has a “strong basis in evidence” to believe that it otherwise will be liable for unintentional discrimination (Justice Kennedy’s opinion, p. 26 ).

The other four justices would have set a lower threshold. They argued that an employer should be able to disregard test results if the facts show that it has “good cause” to believe that it otherwise will be liable for unintentional discrimination (Justice Ginsburg’s opinion, p. 19). …”

“…President Obama’s selection of Judge Sotomayor should disappoint white supporters who saw his election as absolving them from the sin of racism. His selection of Judge Sotomayor shows that he still considers whites to have unfairly benefited from racism and that it’s still okay to discriminate against whites to remedy past sins. …”

“…Considering that it’s been more than 45 years since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, it’s sad that those in power still are looking for “quick fixes,” like quotas and preferences, instead of tackling the hard work, like improving education, to overcome the lingering effects of racism. …”
 

 

Sotomayor and International Law

If other countries have ‘good ideas’ it’s up to Congress, not the courts, to copy them.

“…Judge Sotomayor insists in the ACLU speech that the brouhaha about foreign and international law is due to a misunderstanding about how she and others like Justices Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg would propose to use it. The point, she says, isn’t that judges actually use foreign decisions as precedent (er, well, of course they don’t), but that they open their minds to the intellectual force of their foreign counterparts.

But either foreign ideas carry weight by butressing judicial arguments, or they don’t. Judicial opinions are written with great precision and care because they matter, and each strand of argument becomes a part of the grit and texture of American law.

No one is suggesting that judges stop reading or learning in ways that help expand their understanding of the law and the cases they are hearing. But that is an altogether different matter than official citation in a decision.

Our system of government has stood the test of time not in spite of but because it is uniquely drawn from the priorities of our own citizens, and them alone. The responsibility of the Supreme Court is neither to win an international beauty pageant, nor to encourage the export of our ideas. It is to extend principles of the Founders and the words of the Constitution into a world that still needs their wisdom. …”

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124753085258335815.html

 

Sessions: Sotomayor and Foreign Law

 

Sonia Sotomayor: Courts make policy full clip

 

Rush Limbaugh – Judge Sonya Sotomayor (First Comments)

 

Rush limbaugh On Supreme Court Pick Sonia Sotomayor and her Racist Case against White men

 

Coulter On Sotomayor: Clarence Thomas & Miguel Estrada’s Backgrounds Didn’t Impress Democrats

 

Part 1: Rev. Jeremiah Wright In His Own Words

 

Part 2: Rev. Jeremiah Wright In His Own Words

 

Part 3: Rev. Jeremiah Wright In His Own Words

 

Barack Obama plays the RACE CARD…


 

Barack Obama at La Raza Conference

 

Lou Dobbs – 2-2-9 -Obama Admin wants to kill E-Verify

 

E-Verify & Border Fence may be canceled

 

Aztlan

 

CNN- Obama = Amnesty For Illegal Aliens

 

Obama and his outrageous amnesty agenda

 

Sotomayor A Member Of La Raza, A Near Terrorist Organization?

 

Sonia Sotomayor Berkeley speech 2001

“A Latina Judge’s Voice”

By Sonia Sotomayor

Note: Federal Appeals Court Judge Sonia Sotomayor, nominated by President Obama on May 26, 2009, to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, delivered this talk on Oct. 26, 2001, as the Judge Mario G. Olmos Memorial Lecture. She spoke at a UC Berkeley School of Law symposium titled “Raising the Bar: Latino and Latina Presence in the Judiciary and the Struggle for Representation.” The symposium was co-hosted by the La Raza Law Journal, the Berkeley La Raza Law Students Association, the Boalt Hall Center for Social Justice, and the Center for Latino Policy Research. The text below is from the archives of the La Raza Law Journal.

Judge Reynoso, thank you for that lovely introduction. I am humbled to be speaking behind a man who has contributed so much to the Hispanic community. I am also grateful to have such kind words said about me.  

I am delighted to be here. It is nice to escape my hometown for just a little bit. It is also nice to say hello to old friends who are in the audience, to rekindle contact with old acquaintances and to make new friends among those of you in the audience. It is particularly heart warming to me to be attending a conference to which I was invited by a Latina law school friend, Rachel Moran, who is now an accomplished and widely respected legal scholar. I warn Latinos in this room: Latinas are making a lot of progress in the old-boy network.

I am also deeply honored to have been asked to deliver the annual Judge Mario G. Olmos lecture. I am joining a remarkable group of prior speakers who have given this lecture. I hope what I speak about today continues to promote the legacy of that man whose commitment to public service and abiding dedication to promoting equality and justice for all people inspired this memorial lecture and the conference that will follow. I thank Judge Olmos’ widow Mary Louise’s family, her son and the judge’s many friends for hosting me. And for the privilege you have bestowed on me in honoring the memory of a very special person. If I and the many people of this conference can accomplish a fraction of what Judge Olmos did in his short but extraordinary life we and our respective communities will be infinitely better.

I intend tonight to touch upon the themes that this conference will be discussing this weekend and to talk to you about my Latina identity, where it came from, and the influence I perceive it has on my presence on the bench.

Who am I? I am a “Newyorkrican.” For those of you on the West Coast who do not know what that term means: I am a born and bred New Yorker of Puerto Rican-born parents who came to the states during World War II.

Like many other immigrants to this great land, my parents came because of poverty and to attempt to find and secure a better life for themselves and the family that they hoped to have. They largely succeeded. For that, my brother and I are very grateful. The story of that success is what made me and what makes me the Latina that I am. The Latina side of my identity was forged and closely nurtured by my family through our shared experiences and traditions.

For me, a very special part of my being Latina is the mucho platos de arroz, gandoles y pernir – rice, beans and pork – that I have eaten at countless family holidays and special events. My Latina identity also includes, because of my particularly adventurous taste buds, morcilla, — pig intestines, patitas de cerdo con garbanzo — pigs’ feet with beans, and la lengua y orejas de cuchifrito, pigs’ tongue and ears. I bet the Mexican-Americans in this room are thinking that Puerto Ricans have unusual food tastes. Some of us, like me, do. Part of my Latina identity is the sound of merengue at all our family parties and the heart wrenching Spanish love songs that we enjoy. It is the memory of Saturday afternoon at the movies with my aunt and cousins watching Cantinflas, who is not Puerto Rican, but who was an icon Spanish comedian on par with Abbot and Costello of my generation. My Latina soul was nourished as I visited and played at my grandmother’s house with my cousins and extended family. They were my friends as I grew up. Being a Latina child was watching the adults playing dominos on Saturday night and us kids playing lotería, bingo, with my grandmother calling out the numbers which we marked on our cards with chick peas.

Now, does any one of these things make me a Latina? Obviously not because each of our Caribbean and Latin American communities has their own unique food and different traditions at the holidays. I only learned about tacos in college from my Mexican-American roommate. Being a Latina in America also does not mean speaking Spanish. I happen to speak it fairly well. But my brother, only three years younger, like too many of us educated here, barely speaks it. Most of us born and bred here, speak it very poorly.

If I had pursued my career in my undergraduate history major, I would likely provide you with a very academic description of what being a Latino or Latina means. For example, I could define Latinos as those peoples and cultures populated or colonized by Spain who maintained or adopted Spanish or Spanish Creole as their language of communication. You can tell that I have been very well educated. That antiseptic description however, does not really explain the appeal of morcilla – pig’s intestine – to an American born child. It does not provide an adequate explanation of why individuals like us, many of whom are born in this completely different American culture, still identify so strongly with those communities in which our parents were born and raised.

America has a deeply confused image of itself that is in perpetual tension. We are a nation that takes pride in our ethnic diversity, recognizing its importance in shaping our society and in adding richness to its existence. Yet, we simultaneously insist that we can and must function and live in a race and color-blind way that ignore these very differences that in other contexts we laud. That tension between “the melting pot and the salad bowl” — a recently popular metaphor used to described New York’s diversity – is being hotly debated today in national discussions about affirmative action. Many of us struggle with this tension and attempt to maintain and promote our cultural and ethnic identities in a society that is often ambivalent about how to deal with its differences. In this time of great debate we must remember that it is not political struggles that create a Latino or Latina identity. I became a Latina by the way I love and the way I live my life. My family showed me by their example how wonderful and vibrant life is and how wonderful and magical it is to have a Latina soul. They taught me to love being a Puerto Riqueña and to love America and value its lesson that great things could be achieved if one works hard for it. But achieving success here is no easy accomplishment for Latinos or Latinas, and although that struggle did not and does not create a Latina identity, it does inspire how I live my life.

I was born in the year 1954. That year was the fateful year in which Brown v. Board of Education was decided. When I was eight, in 1961, the first Latino, the wonderful Judge Reynaldo Garza, was appointed to the federal bench, an event we are celebrating at this conference. When I finished law school in 1979, there were no women judges on the Supreme Court or on the highest court of my home state, New York. There was then only one Afro-American Supreme Court Justice and then and now no Latino or Latina justices on our highest court. Now in the last twenty plus years of my professional life, I have seen a quantum leap in the representation of women and Latinos in the legal profession and particularly in the judiciary. In addition to the appointment of the first female United States Attorney General, Janet Reno, we have seen the appointment of two female justices to the Supreme Court and two female justices to the New York Court of Appeals, the highest court of my home state. One of those judges is the Chief Judge and the other is a Puerto Riqueña, like I am. As of today, women sit on the highest courts of almost all of the states and of the territories, including Puerto Rico. One Supreme Court, that of Minnesota, had a majority of women justices for a period of time.

As of September 1, 2001, the federal judiciary consisting of Supreme, Circuit and District Court Judges was about 22% women. In 1992, nearly ten years ago, when I was first appointed a District Court Judge, the percentage of women in the total federal judiciary was only 13%. Now, the growth of Latino representation is somewhat less favorable. As of today we have, as I noted earlier, no Supreme Court justices, and we have only 10 out of 147 active Circuit Court judges and 30 out of 587 active district court judges. Those numbers are grossly below our proportion of the population. As recently as 1965, however, the federal bench had only three women serving and only one Latino judge. So changes are happening, although in some areas, very slowly. These figures and appointments are heartwarming. Nevertheless, much still remains to happen.

Let us not forget that between the appointments of Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981 and Justice Ginsburg in 1992, eleven years passed. Similarly, between Justice Kaye’s initial appointment as an Associate Judge to the New York Court of Appeals in 1983, and Justice Ciparick’s appointment in 1993, ten years elapsed. Almost nine years later, we are waiting for a third appointment of a woman to both the Supreme Court and the New York Court of Appeals and of a second minority, male or female, preferably Hispanic, to the Supreme Court. In 1992 when I joined the bench, there were still two out of 13 circuit courts and about 53 out of 92 district courts in which no women sat. At the beginning of September of 2001, there are women sitting in all 13 circuit courts. The First, Fifth, Eighth and Federal Circuits each have only one female judge, however, out of a combined total number of 48 judges. There are still nearly 37 district courts with no women judges at all. For women of color the statistics are more sobering. As of September 20, 1998, of the then 195 circuit court judges only two were African-American women and two Hispanic women. Of the 641 district court judges only twelve were African-American women and eleven Hispanic women. African-American women comprise only 1.56% of the federal judiciary and Hispanic-American women comprise only 1%. No African-American, male or female, sits today on the Fourth or Federal circuits. And no Hispanics, male or female, sit on the Fourth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, District of Columbia or Federal Circuits.

Sort of shocking, isn’t it? This is the year 2002. We have a long way to go. Unfortunately, there are some very deep storm warnings we must keep in mind. In at least the last five years the majority of nominated judges the Senate delayed more than one year before confirming or never confirming were women or minorities. I need not remind this audience that Judge Paez of your home Circuit, the Ninth Circuit, has had the dubious distinction of having had his confirmation delayed the longest in Senate history. These figures demonstrate that there is a real and continuing need for Latino and Latina organizations and community groups throughout the country to exist and to continue their efforts of promoting women and men of all colors in their pursuit for equality in the judicial system.

This weekend’s conference, illustrated by its name, is bound to examine issues that I hope will identify the efforts and solutions that will assist our communities. The focus of my speech tonight, however, is not about the struggle to get us where we are and where we need to go but instead to discuss with you what it all will mean to have more women and people of color on the bench. The statistics I have been talking about provide a base from which to discuss a question which one of my former colleagues on the Southern District bench, Judge Miriam Cederbaum, raised when speaking about women on the federal bench. Her question was: What do the history and statistics mean? In her speech, Judge Cederbaum expressed her belief that the number of women and by direct inference people of color on the bench, was still statistically insignificant and that therefore we could not draw valid scientific conclusions from the acts of so few people over such a short period of time. Yet, we do have women and people of color in more significant numbers on the bench and no one can or should ignore pondering what that will mean or not mean in the development of the law. Now, I cannot and do not claim this issue as personally my own. In recent years there has been an explosion of research and writing in this area. On one of the panels tomorrow, you will hear the Latino perspective in this debate.

For those of you interested in the gender perspective on this issue, I commend to you a wonderful compilation of articles published on the subject in Vol. 77 of the Judicature, the Journal of the American Judicature Society of November-December 1993. It is on Westlaw/Lexis and I assume the students and academics in this room can find it.

Now Judge Cedarbaum expresses concern with any analysis of women and presumably again people of color on the bench, which begins and presumably ends with the conclusion that women or minorities are different from men generally. She sees danger in presuming that judging should be gender or anything else based. She rightly points out that the perception of the differences between men and women is what led to many paternalistic laws and to the denial to women of the right to vote because we were described then “as not capable of reasoning or thinking logically” but instead of “acting intuitively.” I am quoting adjectives that were bandied around famously during the suffragettes’ movement.

While recognizing the potential effect of individual experiences on perception, Judge Cedarbaum nevertheless believes that judges must transcend their personal sympathies and prejudices and aspire to achieve a greater degree of fairness and integrity based on the reason of law. Although I agree with and attempt to work toward Judge Cedarbaum’s aspiration, I wonder whether achieving that goal is possible in all or even in most cases. And I wonder whether by ignoring our differences as women or men of color we do a disservice both to the law and society. Whatever the reasons why we may have different perspectives, either as some theorists suggest because of our cultural experiences or as others postulate because we have basic differences in logic and reasoning, are in many respects a small part of a larger practical question we as women and minority judges in society in general must address. I accept the thesis of a law school classmate, Professor Steven Carter of Yale Law School, in his affirmative action book that in any group of human beings there is a diversity of opinion because there is both a diversity of experiences and of thought. Thus, as noted by another Yale Law School Professor — I did graduate from there and I am not really biased except that they seem to be doing a lot of writing in that area — Professor Judith Resnik says that there is not a single voice of feminism, not a feminist approach but many who are exploring the possible ways of being that are distinct from those structured in a world dominated by the power and words of men. Thus, feminist theories of judging are in the midst of creation and are not and perhaps will never aspire to be as solidified as the established legal doctrines of judging can sometimes appear to be.

That same point can be made with respect to people of color. No one person, judge or nominee will speak in a female or people of color voice. I need not remind you that Justice Clarence Thomas represents a part but not the whole of African-American thought on many subjects. Yet, because I accept the proposition that, as Judge Resnik describes it, “to judge is an exercise of power” and because as, another former law school classmate, Professor Martha Minnow of Harvard Law School, states “there is no objective stance but only a series of perspectives — no neutrality, no escape from choice in judging,” I further accept that our experiences as women and people of color affect our decisions. The aspiration to impartiality is just that — it’s an aspiration because it denies the fact that we are by our experiences making different choices than others. Not all women or people of color, in all or some circumstances or indeed in any particular case or circumstance but enough people of color in enough cases, will make a difference in the process of judging. The Minnesota Supreme Court has given an example of this. As reported by Judge Patricia Wald formerly of the D.C. Circuit Court, three women on the Minnesota Court with two men dissenting agreed to grant a protective order against a father’s visitation rights when the father abused his child. The Judicature Journal has at least two excellent studies on how women on the courts of appeal and state supreme courts have tended to vote more often than their male counterpart to uphold women’s claims in sex discrimination cases and criminal defendants’ claims in search and seizure cases. As recognized by legal scholars, whatever the reason, not one woman or person of color in any one position but as a group we will have an effect on the development of the law and on judging.

In our private conversations, Judge Cedarbaum has pointed out to me that seminal decisions in race and sex discrimination cases have come from Supreme Courts composed exclusively of white males. I agree that this is significant but I also choose to emphasize that the people who argued those cases before the Supreme Court which changed the legal landscape ultimately were largely people of color and women. I recall that Justice Thurgood Marshall, Judge Connie Baker Motley, the first black woman appointed to the federal bench, and others of the NAACP argued Brown v. Board of Education. Similarly, Justice Ginsburg, with other women attorneys, was instrumental in advocating and convincing the Court that equality of work required equality in terms and conditions of employment.

Whether born from experience or inherent physiological or cultural differences, a possibility I abhor less or discount less than my colleague Judge Cedarbaum, our gender and national origins may and will make a difference in our judging. Justice O’Connor has often been cited as saying that a wise old man and wise old woman will reach the same conclusion in deciding cases. I am not so sure Justice O’Connor is the author of that line since Professor Resnik attributes that line to Supreme Court Justice Coyle. I am also not so sure that I agree with the statement. First, as Professor Martha Minnow has noted, there can never be a universal definition of wise. Second, I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life.

Let us not forget that wise men like Oliver Wendell Holmes and Justice Cardozo voted on cases which upheld both sex and race discrimination in our society. Until 1972, no Supreme Court case ever upheld the claim of a woman in a gender discrimination case. I, like Professor Carter, believe that we should not be so myopic as to believe that others of different experiences or backgrounds are incapable of understanding the values and needs of people from a different group. Many are so capable. As Judge Cedarbaum pointed out to me, nine white men on the Supreme Court in the past have done so on many occasions and on many issues including Brown.

However, to understand takes time and effort, something that not all people are willing to give. For others, their experiences limit their ability to understand the experiences of others. Other simply do not care. Hence, one must accept the proposition that a difference there will be by the presence of women and people of color on the bench. Personal experiences affect the facts that judges choose to see. My hope is that I will take the good from my experiences and extrapolate them further into areas with which I am unfamiliar. I simply do not know exactly what that difference will be in my judging. But I accept there will be some based on my gender and my Latina heritage.

I also hope that by raising the question today of what difference having more Latinos and Latinas on the bench will make will start your own evaluation. For people of color and women lawyers, what does and should being an ethnic minority mean in your lawyering? For men lawyers, what areas in your experiences and attitudes do you need to work on to make you capable of reaching those great moments of enlightenment which other men in different circumstances have been able to reach. For all of us, how do change the facts that in every task force study of gender and race bias in the courts, women and people of color, lawyers and judges alike, report in significantly higher percentages than white men that their gender and race has shaped their careers, from hiring, retention to promotion and that a statistically significant number of women and minority lawyers and judges, both alike, have experienced bias in the courtroom?

Each day on the bench I learn something new about the judicial process and about being a professional Latina woman in a world that sometimes looks at me with suspicion. I am reminded each day that I render decisions that affect people concretely and that I owe them constant and complete vigilance in checking my assumptions, presumptions and perspectives and ensuring that to the extent that my limited abilities and capabilities permit me, that I reevaluate them and change as circumstances and cases before me requires. I can and do aspire to be greater than the sum total of my experiences but I accept my limitations. I willingly accept that we who judge must not deny the differences resulting from experience and heritage but attempt, as the Supreme Court suggests, continuously to judge when those opinions, sympathies and prejudices are appropriate.

here is always a danger embedded in relative morality, but since judging is a series of choices that we must make, that I am forced to make, I hope that I can make them by informing myself on the questions I must not avoid asking and continuously pondering. We, I mean all of us in this room, must continue individually and in voices united in organizations that have supported this conference, to think about these questions and to figure out how we go about creating the opportunity for there to be more women and people of color on the bench so we can finally have statistically significant numbers to measure the differences we will and are making.

I am delighted to have been here tonight and extend once again my deepest gratitude to all of you for listening and letting me share my reflections on being a Latina voice on the bench. Thank you.”

http://berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2009/05/26_sotomayor.shtml 

 

Martin Luther King “I have a dream”

 

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Barack Obama: A Watermellon Man–Green on The Outside–Red on The Inside

Barack Obama Throws His White Grandma Under The Bus–Backs Up and Does It Again–Amazing!

Barack Obama–Damaged Goods–Birds of A Feather Flock Together

Barack Obama Cult?

US Immigration Videos

Borderline Chaos: Immigration Out of Control–Videos

The Hyphenated American and The Hyphen

The Signed “Stimulus Package” Did Not Include Funding for E-Verify and Border Fence Construction–Less Jobs And Security for American Citizens

President Obama Delays E-Verify–Shame On You Mr. President!

The Issue of The United States 2008 Presidential Election–Criminal Alien Removal (CAR) and A Border Security Fence (BSF)

The Cost of Comprehensive Immigration Reform–McCain and Obama Are Hopeless–It is the Economy Stupid!

Appeasers and Oath Breakers All: Bush, Clinton, Bush, McCain, Clinton, Obama…Who is next?

Why immigration will be the number 1 political issue in the 2008 Presidential Election! — Gum Balls

Presidential Candidates on Illegal Immigration, Criminal Alien Removal and Social Service Benefits

John McCain’s Position on Illegal Immigration and Criminal Alien Removal?

Alan Keyes on Immigration

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Calling and Raising The Stakes for Race Card Players–Obama and Sotomayor

Posted on May 30, 2009. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Cult, Culture, Economics, Education, Employment, Immigration, Links, People, Politics, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Talk Radio, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

 lady_jsutice

sotomajor

“…I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life. …”

~Sonia Sotomayor

“When a nominee for the Supreme Court, one of only nine lifetime appointments, makes an overtly brazen racist comment about tens of millions of American citizens, we don’t need lectures. What we need to do is to confront her with what she said and what it says about her.”

~ Rush Limbaugh 

Rush Limbaugh May 29 2009 Morning Update

~ Rush Limbaugh

Racism on the Supreme Court…

Tom Tancredo Still Thinks La Raza Is “Latino KKK” & Limbaugh: ‘Obama Hates White People’


 

Obama appoints a racists to the supreme court

Fox Anchor Wonders If GOP Can “Shut Down” Sotomayor Nomination

Fox News Digs Dirt On Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Sotomayor

2001 speech at the University of California’s Berkeley  School of Law.

“…Thus, feminist theories of judging are in the midst of creation and are not and perhaps will never aspire to be as solidified as the established legal doctrines of judging can sometimes appear to be.

That same point can be made with respect to people of color. No one person, judge or nominee will speak in a female or people of color voice. I need not remind you that Justice Clarence Thomas represents a part but not the whole of African-American thought on many subjects. Yet, because I accept the proposition that, as Judge Resnik describes it, “to judge is an exercise of power” and because as, another former law school classmate, Professor Martha Minnow of Harvard Law School, states “there is no objective stance but only a series of perspectives – no neutrality, no escape from choice in judging,” I further accept that our experiences as women and people of color affect our decisions. The aspiration to impartiality is just that–it’s an aspiration because it denies the fact that we are by our experiences making different choices than others. Not all women or people of color, in all or some circumstances or indeed in any particular case or circumstance but enough people of color in enough cases, will make a difference in the process of judging. …”

“…Whether born from experience or inherent physiological or cultural differences, a possibility I abhor less or discount less than my colleague Judge Cedarbaum, our gender and national origins may and will make a difference in our judging. Justice O’Connor has often been cited as saying that a wise old man and wise old woman will reach the same conclusion in deciding cases. I am not so sure Justice O’Connor is the author of that line since Professor Resnik attributes that line to Supreme Court Justice Coyle. I am also not so sure that I agree with the statement. First, as Professor Martha Minnow has noted, there can never be a universal definition of wise. Second, I would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life. …”

http://www.law.berkeley.edu/4982.htm

The lecture was published the following year in the Berkeley La Raza Law Journal.

Sonia Sotomayor: Courts make policy full clip

 
 

Coulter On Sotomayor: Clarence Thomas & Miguel Estrada’s Backgrounds Didn’t Impress Democrats

 

Media Matters’ Boehlert goes head-to-head with Tancredo over Sotomayor on CNN

Tom DeLay Attacks Sonia Sotomayor & La Raza On CNN

The racist comments of Sonia Sotomajor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law should have eliminated her from serious consideration as a nominee for justice of the Supreme Court.

The fact that President Obama still went forward confirms his own views about race learned in the pews  every Sunday morning over a twenty year period  listening to his Reverand Wright:

Part 1: Rev. Jeremiah Wright In His Own Words

Part 2: Rev. Jeremiah Wright In His Own Words

Part 3: Rev. Jeremiah Wright In His Own Words

Since Sonia Sotomajor is also a member of  the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), a group that favors amnesty or a pathway to citizenship for millions of illegal immigrants, this too should also have eliminated her from consideration.

Illegal immigrants are breaking immigration laws and should be tried and deported from the United States for entering and working in the United States illegally.

NCLR also favors driver licenses for illegal immigrants and prohibiting local and state police from the enforcement of immigration laws.

President Obama was also a big supportor of the National Council of La Raza (NCLR):

Barack Obama at Annual NCLR Conference

Judges should not in any way give the impression they are in any way supporting criminal aliens entering and working in the US.

The tactics of National Council of La Raza and the radical socialist Democratic Party is to attempt to shutup their critics by labelling their exercise of free speech as hate speech and to attempt to get them fired or thrown off the air.

Press Conference -Janet Murguía, National Council of La Raza

This exchange between Lou Dobbs and the President of La Raza is an excellent example of how they try to go about shutting people up that disagree with their radical socialist views:

Lou Dobbs slams Janet Murguia of La Raza 1 of 3

Lou Dobbs slams Janet Murguia of La Raza 2 of 3

Lou Dobbs slams Janet Murguia of La Raza 3 of 3

La Raza supports driver licenses and amnesty for illegal immigrants and calls it by the code word of a pathway to citizenship.

Judges should be for law enforcement and not supporting any organization that promotes the selective enforcement of our nation’s laws and amnesty for criminal aliens.

The American people want the immigration laws enforced.

The American people want illegal immigration to be stopped and all the illegal immigrants to either return home on their own or face criminal alien removal and deportation to their country of origin.

There are currently over twenty five million American citizens searching for a full time job while between ten and twenty million illegal immigrants are currently working in the United States.

These were jobs in the past done by American citizens, but are now done by illegal aliens who are paid less than what an American citizen would have to be paid and are compliant workers.

Every day Americans are seeing in their own communities jobs being done by illegal aliens while American citizens are unemployed.

American taxpayers are paying for the  education, medical care, welfare services, jails,  and prisons for illegal aliens.

No wonder the states that have encouraged illegal immigration are now facing billions in deficits!

The American people are telling both political parties to enforce immigration laws or face their wrath.

The political elites of both parties have repeatedly ignored the American people on the issue of illegal immigration.

President Obama and the radical socialist Democratic Party by refusing to enforce immigration laws is following the Cloward-Piven strategy of creating a crisis by flooding local, state, and the Federal governments with millions of illegal immigrants demanding services as well as jobs.

Cost of Illegal Immigration

CNN’s Lou Dobbs – “Hate Crimes Going Down, Not Up”

Lou Dobbs Tonight – 03.28.07 – Lou Takes on Leftist SPLC

 

Aztlan Rising

 What the Local News Doesn’t Show You

Illegal immigrant supporters harass American citizens

Time to call the race card players bluff and raise the stakes by joining the Second American Revolution.

You are invited to attend a Tea Party on July 4, 2009, Indepedence Day!

 

Join the Second American Revolution

 

we_the_people

The Meaning of Independence Day

Ayn Rand Center for Individual Rights

 

Second American Revolution–Tea Party Celebrations–Washington Fair–July 4, 2009–An Open Invitation To The American People 

American People’s Plan = 6 Month Tax Holiday + FairTax = Real Hope + Real Change!–Millions To March On Washington D.C. Saturday, July 4, 2009!

Millions of Rightwing Extremists To March On Washington D.C. Fair–Celebrating Independence Day Tea Parties and Chanting “Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice!” 

 

Please Spread The Message of Liberty

liberty_bell1

 “Proclaim liberty throughout the land to all its inhabitants.”

 

 Let Freedom Ring  

 

 

 

Thomas Paine on to Washington

switchfoot-dare you to move(live)

Background Articles and Videos

Sonia Sotomayor ‘La Raza member’
American Bar Association lists Obama choice as part of group
 

By Joe Kovacs

“…As President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee comes under heavy fire for allegedly being a “racist,” Judge Sonia Sotomayor is listed as a member of the National Council of La Raza, a group that’s promoted driver’s licenses for illegal aliens, amnesty programs, and no immigration law enforcement by local and state police.

According the American Bar Association, Sotomayor is a member of the NCLR, which bills itself as the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the U.S. …”

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=99420

 

National Council of La Raza

“…The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) – the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States – works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Through its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations (CBOs), NCLR reaches millions of Hispanics each year in 41 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. To achieve its mission, NCLR conducts applied research, policy analysis, and advocacy, providing a Latino perspective in five key areas – assets/investments, civil rights/immigration, education, employment and economic status, and health. In addition, it provides capacity-building assistance to its Affiliates who work at the state and local level to advance opportunities for individuals and families.

Founded in 1968, NCLR is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, tax-exempt organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCLR serves all Hispanic subgroups in all regions of the country and has operations in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix, Sacramento, San Antonio, and San Juan, Puerto Rico. …”

http://www.nclr.org/section/about/

 

National Council of La Raza

“The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) is a non-profit and non-partisan advocacy group in the United States. It is not to be confused with La Raza Unida. Its stated focus is on reducing poverty and discrimination, and improving opportunities for Hispanics. According to the organization’s website, it is “the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States”[citation needed] and “serves all Hispanic subgroups in all regions of the country”.[citation needed] NCLR receives funding from philanthropic organizations, such as the Ford Foundation, and corporations such as Citigroup and Wal-Mart. NCLR serves its constituency by means of its Affiliates, nearly 300 community-based organizations. The NCLR is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and maintains eight regional offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix, Sacramento, San Antonio, and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The current president is Janet Murguía.[1]

…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Council_of_La_Raza

NCLR LAUDS HISTORIC APPOINTMENT OF SOTOMAYOR TO NATION’S HIGHEST COURT 

Judge Sonia Sotomayor Would Be the First Hispanic on the Supreme Court if Confirmed

“…Washington, DC—NCLR (National Council of La Raza), the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States, applauds President Obama’s nomination for Supreme Court Justice, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, to replace retiring Justice David Souter.

“Today is a monumental day for Latinos. Finally, we see ourselves represented on the highest court in the land,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “Judge Sotomayor’s story personifies the American Dream for so many Latinos in this country.”

“By nominating someone with the experience, background, and superb legal credentials of Sonia Sotomayor, President Obama has made an excellent choice for the entire country,” added Murguía. “The President wanted a justice who not only is a respected jurist, but also understands how the law affects the lives of everyday people. Judge Sotomayor embodies those qualities.” …”

http://www.nclr.org/content/news/detail/57500/

M.E.Ch.A.

“…M.E.Ch.A. (Spanish: Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán, “Chicano Student Movement of Aztlán“) is a student organization that seeks to promote Chicano unity and empowerment through education and political action. The acronym of the organization’s name is the Spanish word mecha, which means “fuse”. The motto of MEChA is La Unión Hace La Fuerza (“Unity Creates Strength”), according to the MEChA National Constitution.[1][2][3][4] …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MEChA

 

M.E.Ch.A.

http://www.nationalmecha.org/philosophy.html#philosophy

NCLR AND DEMOCRACIA U.S.A. LAUNCH A NEW PARTNERSHIP TO INCREASE LATINO VOTER PARTICIPATION

“…Washington, DC– The National Council of La Raza (NCLR), the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the U.S., and Democracia U.S.A., one of the country’s leading Latino-focused voter registration and civic engagements efforts, today announced an historic partnership designed to maximize Hispanic participation in the democratic process.

“The importance of the Latino vote in shaping our country’s future has never been greater. This is the ‘perfect moment in time’ to combine Democracia U.S.A.’s proven expertise and NCLR’s broad reach to promote increased Latino civic engagement in the 2008 elections and beyond,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO.

“Democracia U.S.A. brings substantial expertise and a strong track record of successfully registering and turning out new Latino voters. NCLR is a leading and highly respected voice for Latinos in America. By joining forces, Latinos will be engaged in the political process like never before,” stated Jorge Mursuli, President of Democracia U.S.A. …”

http://www.nclr.org/content/news/detail/50909/

Janet Murguia, President and CEO NCLR

 

It’s not just ACORN: La Raza partner caught red-handed

By Michelle Malkin  

“…ACORN isn’t the only one cornering the voter fraud market.

Democracia USA is a partner of open-borders La Raza (The Race) in an aggressive, nationwide Hispanic voter registration drive.

George Moneo at Babalu Blog reports that canvassers for Democracia USA have been caught on tape sabotaging electoral integrity. …”

http://michellemalkin.com/2008/10/09/its-not-just-acorn-la-raza-partner-caught-red-handed/

LOL

Obama’s Supreme Court Pick: Racist?

 

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