Eat The Rich–Obama’s Big Distraction And Big Lie: The Buffett Rule Tax and The Rich Do Not Pay Their Fair Share–Class Warfare Progressive Propaganda–Videos

Posted on April 16, 2012. Filed under: American History, Banking, Business, Communications, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Tax Policy, Unemployment, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Buffett Rule Rebuffed

EAT THE RICH!

Weekly Address: Passing the Buffett Rule So That Everyone Pays Their Fair Share

Priebus: Buffett Tax A Shiny Object That Would Raise Just 11 Hours Of Revenue

Steve Hayes – Buffet Tax meaningless

Gene Sperling on the Buffett Rule

Interview – The Buffett Tax: Anything But “Fair”

Real News: Buffett Rule Tax Reform

GBR: Lies from Warren Buffett

Warren Buffet On Why U.S. Taxes Are Too Low For The Wealthy

Mark Levin – The Warren Buffett-Bill Gates “Tax Us More!”

The Buffett Rule is BS pt1

The Buffett Rule is BS pt2

Debunking Warren Buffett and other tax myths

Who Pays Income Taxes and How Much?

http://www.ntu.org/tax-basics/who-pays-income-taxes.html

Tax Year 2009

Percentiles Ranked by AGI

AGI Threshold on Percentiles

Percentage of Federal Personal Income Tax Paid

Top 1%

$343,927

36.73

Top 5%

$154,643

58.66

Top 10%

$112,124

70.47

Top 25%

$66,193

87.30

Top 50%

$32,396

97.75

Bottom 50%

<$32,396

2.25

Note: AGI is Adjusted Gross Income
Source: Internal Revenue Service

Table 6
Total Income Tax Shares, 1980-2009 (Percent of federal income tax paid by each group)

Year

Total

Top 0.1%

Top 1%

Top 5%

Between 5% & 10%

Top 10%

Between 10% & 25%

Top 25%

Between 25% & 50%

Top 50%

Bottom 50%

1980

100%

19.05%

36.84%

12.44%

49.28%

23.74%

73.02%

19.93%

92.95%

7.05%

1981

100%

17.58%

35.06%

12.90%

47.96%

24.33%

72.29%

20.26%

92.55%

7.45%

1982

100%

19.03%

36.13%

12.45%

48.59%

23.91%

72.50%

20.15%

92.65%

7.35%

1983

100%

20.32%

37.26%

12.44%

49.71%

23.39%

73.10%

19.73%

92.83%

7.17%

1984

100%

21.12%

37.98%

12.58%

50.56%

22.92%

73.49%

19.16%

92.65%

7.35%

1985

100%

21.81%

38.78%

12.67%

51.46%

22.60%

74.06%

18.77%

92.83%

7.17%

1986

100%

25.75%

42.57%

12.12%

54.69%

21.33%

76.02%

17.52%

93.54%

6.46%

Tax Reform Act of 1986 changed the definition of AGI, so data above and below this line not strictly comparable

1987

100%

24.81%

43.26%

12.35%

55.61%

21.31%

76.92%

17.02%

93.93%

6.07%

1988

100%

27.58%

45.62%

11.66%

57.28%

20.57%

77.84%

16.44%

94.28%

5.72%

1989

100%

25.24%

43.94%

11.85%

55.78%

21.44%

77.22%

16.94%

94.17%

5.83%

1990

100%

25.13%

43.64%

11.73%

55.36%

21.66%

77.02%

17.16%

94.19%

5.81%

1991

100%

24.82%

43.38%

12.45%

55.82%

21.46%

77.29%

17.23%

94.52%

5.48%

1992

100%

27.54%

45.88%

12.12%

58.01%

20.47%

78.48%

16.46%

94.94%

5.06%

1993

100%

29.01%

47.36%

11.88%

59.24%

20.03%

79.27%

15.92%

95.19%

4.81%

1994

100%

28.86%

47.52%

11.93%

59.45%

20.10%

79.55%

15.68%

95.23%

4.77%

1995

100%

30.26%

48.91%

11.84%

60.75%

19.62%

80.36%

15.03%

95.39%

4.61%

1996

100%

32.31%

50.97%

11.54%

62.51%

18.80%

81.32%

14.36%

95.68%

4.32%

1997

100%

33.17%

51.87%

11.33%

63.20%

18.47%

81.67%

14.05%

95.72%

4.28%

1998

100%

34.75%

53.84%

11.20%

65.04%

17.65%

82.69%

13.10%

95.79%

4.21%

1999

100%

36.18%

55.45%

11.00%

66.45%

17.09%

83.54%

12.46%

96.00%

4.00%

2000

100%

37.42%

56.47%

10.86%

67.33%

16.68%

84.01%

12.08%

96.09%

3.91%

2001

100%

16.06%

33.89%

53.25%

11.64%

64.89%

18.01%

82.90%

13.13%

96.03%

3.97%

2002

100%

15.43%

33.71%

53.80%

11.94%

65.73%

18.16%

83.90%

12.60%

96.50%

3.50%

2003

100%

15.68%

34.27%

54.36%

11.48%

65.84%

18.04%

83.88%

12.65%

96.54%

3.46%

2004

100%

17.44%

36.89%

57.13%

11.07%

68.19%

16.67%

84.86%

11.85%

96.70%

3.30%

2005

100%

19.26%

39.38%

59.67%

10.63%

70.30%

15.69%

85.99%

10.94%

96.93%

3.07%

2006

100%

19.56%

39.89%

60.14%

10.65%

70.79%

15.47%

86.27%

10.75%

97.01%

2.99%

2007

100%

20.19%

40.41%

60.61%

10.59%

71.20%

15.37%

86.57%

10.54%

97.11%

2.89%

2008

100%

18.47%

38.02%

58.72%

11.22%

69.94%

16.40%

86.34%

10.96%

97.30%

2.70%

2009

100%

17.11%

36.73%

58.66%

11.81%

70.47%

16.83%

87.30%

10.45%

97.75%

2.25%

  Source: Internal Revenue Service

http://taxfoundation.org/news/show/250.html#table1

Table 8
Average Tax Rate, 1980-2009 (Percent of AGI paid in income taxes)

Year

Total

Top 0.1%

Top 1%

Top 5%

Between 5% & 10%

Top 10%

Between 10% & 25%

Top 25%

Between 25% & 50%

Top 50%

Bottom 50%

1980

15.31%

34.47%

26.85%

17.13%

23.49%

14.80%

19.72%

11.91%

17.29%

6.10%

1981

15.76%

33.37%

26.59%

18.16%

23.64%

15.53%

20.11%

12.48%

17.73%

6.62%

1982

14.72%

31.43%

25.05%

16.61%

22.17%

14.35%

18.79%

11.63%

16.57%

6.10%

1983

13.79%

30.18%

23.64%

15.54%

20.91%

13.20%

17.62%

10.76%

15.52%

5.66%

1984

13.68%

29.92%

23.42%

15.57%

20.81%

12.90%

17.47%

10.48%

15.35%

5.77%

1985

13.73%

29.86%

23.50%

15.69%

20.93%

12.83%

17.55%

10.41%

15.41%

5.70%

1986

14.54%

33.13%

25.68%

15.99%

22.64%

12.97%

18.72%

10.48%

16.32%

5.63%

Tax Reform Act of 1986 changed the definition of AGI, so data above and below this line not strictly comparable

1987

13.12%

26.41%

22.10%

14.43%

19.77%

11.71%

16.61%

9.45%

14.60%

5.09%

1988

13.21%

24.04%

21.14%

14.07%

19.18%

11.82%

16.47%

9.60%

14.64%

5.06%

1989

13.12%

23.34%

20.71%

13.93%

18.77%

12.08%

16.27%

9.77%

14.53%

5.11%

1990

12.95%

23.25%

20.46%

13.63%

18.50%

12.01%

16.06%

9.73%

14.36%

5.01%

1991

12.75%

24.37%

20.62%

13.96%

18.63%

11.57%

15.93%

9.55%

14.20%

4.62%

1992

12.94%

25.05%

21.19%

13.99%

19.13%

11.39%

16.25%

9.42%

14.44%

4.39%

1993

13.32%

28.01%

22.71%

14.01%

20.20%

11.40%

16.90%

9.37%

14.90%

4.29%

1994

13.50%

28.23%

23.04%

14.20%

20.48%

11.57%

17.15%

9.42%

15.11%

4.32%

1995

13.86%

28.73%

23.53%

14.46%

20.97%

11.71%

17.58%

9.43%

15.47%

4.39%

1996

14.34%

28.87%

24.07%

14.74%

21.55%

11.86%

18.12%

9.53%

15.96%

4.40%

1997

14.48%

27.64%

23.62%

14.87%

21.36%

12.04%

18.18%

9.63%

16.09%

4.48%

1998

14.42%

27.12%

23.63%

14.79%

21.42%

11.63%

18.16%

9.12%

16.00%

4.44%

1999

14.85%

27.53%

24.18%

15.06%

21.98%

11.76%

18.66%

9.12%

16.43%

4.48%

2000

15.26%

27.45%

24.42%

15.48%

22.34%

12.04%

19.09%

9.28%

16.86%

4.60%

2001

14.23%

28.20%

27.50%

23.68%

14.89%

21.41%

11.58%

18.08%

8.91%

15.85%

4.09%

2002

13.03%

28.49%

27.25%

22.95%

13.87%

20.51%

10.47%

16.99%

7.67%

14.66%

3.21%

2003

11.90%

24.64%

24.31%

20.74%

12.22%

18.49%

9.54%

15.38%

7.12%

13.35%

2.95%

2004

12.10%

23.09%

23.49%

20.67%

12.28%

18.60%

9.26%

15.53%

7.01%

13.51%

2.97%

2005

12.45%

22.52%

23.13%

20.78%

12.37%

18.84%

9.27%

15.86%

6.93%

13.84%

2.98%

2006

12.60%

21.98%

22.79%

20.68%

12.60%

18.86%

9.36%

15.95%

7.01%

13.98%

3.01%

2007

12.68%

21.46%

22.45%

20.53%

12.66%

18.79%

9.43%

15.98%

7.01%

14.03%

2.99%

2008

12.24%

22.70%

23.27%

20.70%

12.44%

18.71%

9.29%

15.68%

6.75%

13.65%

2.59%

2009

11.06%

24.28%

24.01%

20.46%

11.36%

18.05%

8.25%

14.68%

5.56%

12.50%

1.85%

Source: Internal Revenue Service

http://taxfoundation.org/news/show/250.html#table1

Obama Pushes ‘Buffett Rule’ in Florida

Obama’s Capital Gains Tax “Fairness”

Obama Presses ‘Buffett Rule’ Tax Pitch 

RED ALERT: Buffett Rule Is Criminal Scam!

Obama Pushes “Buffett Rule” and Calls for More Romney Tax Returns

Dan Mitchell Debating the Buffett Rule on CNBC

Obama is yet again pushing the “Buffett Rule” while lying about taxes

Six Reasons Why the Capital Gains Tax Should Be Abolished

Indexing the Capital Gains Tax to Protect Taxpayers from Inflation

End Capital Gains and Dividends Tax

Dan Mitchell on Taxing the Rich

Warren Buffett’s Reported Plans to Avoid Taxes and the Buffett Rule

Obama: ‘Buffett Rule’ Would Raise Taxes for Rich

Warren Buffett’s Tax Rate is Lower than His Secretary’s

Warren Buffett, Secretary Debbie Bosanek Discuss Tax Rate Inequality in

Opinion: The Buffett Tax Folly

Flat Tax vs. National Sales Tax

Ron Paul_ End the IRS & Abolish the Income Tax forever

Buffett Rule Fails in Senate, 51-45

By Josh Barro,

“…the so-called Buffett Rule (imposing a minimum 30 percent federal income tax rate on those making at least $2 million per year) came up for a vote in the Senate and was defeated. There were 51 votes in favor and 45 opposed, but 60 votes were required for cloture and so the proposal could not proceed.

The vote was nearly along party lines, with Susan Collins (Maine) the only Republican to vote yes and Mark Pryor (Arkansas) the only Democrat to vote no. Joe Lieberman, an independent who caucuses with Democrats, also broke with his party and opposed the proposal, though he wasn’t in Washington D.C. today and so didn’t actually cast a vote. Lieberman said “I am opposed to the Buffett Rule because it would double to 30 percent the capital gains tax on one group of investors”—a statement that reflects the fact that the Buffett Rule debate is fundamentally a debate about whether we should have a preferential tax rate for capital gains. …”

http://www.forbes.com/sites/joshbarro/2012/04/16/buffett-rule-fails-in-senate-51-45/

Dems Lay Trap for GOP with Buffett Rule

By KIM DIXON and PATRICK TEMPLE-WEST, Reuters

“….President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats are laying a political trap for Republicans to be sprung on Monday when the U.S. Senate is slated to vote on the proposed “Buffett Rule,” which would slap a minimum tax on the highest-income Americans. With polls showing strong public support for the rule, Democrats plan to bring it up for a procedural vote in the Senate. Republicans are solidly against it and the proposal is not expected to garner enough votes to move forward.

Even if it does advance in the Senate, it is not expected to be taken up in the House of Representatives, which is controlled by Republicans. Democrats control the Senate, but just barely. Despite the proposal’s poor outlook, Democrats hope that the Senate vote and the debate around it will help them politically ahead of the November 6 elections by casting the Republicans and their presumptive presidential candidate Mitt Romney, himself a multi-millionaire, as the party of the wealthy.

Republicans have attacked the Buffett Rule as a diversion from the weak economy. They also argue that raising taxes on the rich would hit small businesses and discourage their growth. Here is a Q+A on the legislation and the issues behind it.

What Is the Buffett Rule?
Named after billionaire Warren Buffett, who backs it, the rule would require individuals with adjusted gross income of more than $1 million, or $500,000 for married individuals filing separately, to pay at least 30 percent in taxes. Democrats have been careful to stress that the tax would not apply to people with $1 million or more in assets, who comprise a much larger slice of the U.S. population than those with annual incomes of $1 million or more. About 433,000 U.S. households earn more than $1 million a year. That is only about 0.3 percent of all taxpayers, according to the Tax Policy Center, a research group. The bill being voted on in the Senate, sponsored by Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, would impose the 30-percent tax on adjusted gross income after a modified deduction for charitable giving and certain other tax credits. …”

http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2012/04/16/Dems-Lay-Trap-for-GOP-with-Buffett-Rule.aspx#page1

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

The FairTax (National Consumption Sales Tax) vs. The Flat Tax (One Rate Federal Income Tax)–Who Pays The Most Federal Individual Income Tax? Videos

Posted on April 9, 2011. Filed under: American History, College, Economics, Education, Employment, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Raves, Taxes, Technology, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

“The income tax created more criminals than any other single act of government.”
~Barry Goldwater

Income Tax vs. Consumption Tax

 

What is the FairTax legislation?

“…What is the FairTax plan?

The FairTax plan is a comprehensive proposal that replaces all federal income and payroll based taxes with an integrated approach including a progressive national retail sales tax, a prebate to ensure no American pays federal taxes on spending up to the poverty level, dollar-for-dollar federal revenue neutrality, and, through companion legislation, the repeal of the 16th Amendment.

The FairTax Act (HR 25, S 13) is nonpartisan legislation. It abolishes all federal personal and corporate income taxes, gift, estate, capital gains, alternative minimum, Social Security, Medicare, and self-employment taxes and replaces them with one simple, visible, federal retail sales tax  administered primarily by existing state sales tax authorities.

The FairTax taxes us only on what we choose to spend on new goods or services, not on what we earn. The FairTax is a fair, efficient, transparent, and intelligent solution to the frustration and inequity of our current tax system.

The FairTax:

  • Enables workers to keep their entire paychecks
  • Enables retirees to keep their entire pensions
  • Refunds in advance the tax on purchases of basic necessities
  • Allows American products to compete fairly
  • Brings transparency and accountability to tax policy
  • Ensures Social Security and Medicare funding
  • Closes all loopholes and brings fairness to taxation
  • Abolishes the IRS

We offer a library of information throughout this Web site about the features and benefits of the FairTax plan. Please explore! …”

http://www.fairtax.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_main

 

The FairTax: It’s Time

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 1

 

Why is the FairTax better than a flat income tax?

 

Dan Mitchell explains the fair tax

 

Laura Ingraham Interviews John Linder And Steve Forbes On Fair Tax Or Flat Tax

 

Five Key Reasons to Reject Class-Warfare Tax Policy

Who Pays Federal Income Taxes?

 

Uncle Sam Wants Your Money

 

It’s Simple to Balance The Budget Without Higher Taxes

Controlling Leviathan: The Battle for Limited Government

Question and Answer Session: The Fight Against Big Government

 

Table 1
Summary of Federal Individual Income Tax Data, 2008

(Updated October 2010)

  Number of Returns with Positive AGI AGI
($ millions)
Income Taxes Paid
($ millions)
Group’s Share of Total AGI Group’s Share of Income Taxes Income Split Point Average Tax Rate
All Taxpayers 139,960,580 8,426,625 1,031,512 100% 100% 12.24%
Top 1% 1,399,606 1,685,472 392,149 20.00% 38.02% $380,354 23.27%
1-5% 5,598,423 1,241,229 213,569 14.73% 20.70%   17.21%
Top 5% 6,998,029 2,926,701 605,718 34.73% 58.72% $159,619 20.70%
5-10% 6,998,029 929,761 115,703 11.03% 11.22%   12.44%
Top 10% 13,996,058 3,856,462 721,421 45.77% 69.94% $113,799 18.71%
10-25% 20,994,087 1,821,717 169,193 21.62% 16.40%   9.29%
Top 25% 34,990,145 5,678,179 890,614 67.38% 86.34% $67,280 15.68%
25-50% 34,990,145 1,673,932 113,025 19.86% 10.96%   6.75%
Top 50% 69,980,290 7,352,111 1,003,639 87.25% 97.30% >$33,048 13.65%
Bottom 50% 69,980,290 1,074,514 27,873 12.75% 2.70% <$33,048 2.59%
Source: Internal Revenue Service Table 6

Total Income Tax Shares, 1980-2008 (Percent of federal income tax paid by each group)
Year Total Top 0.1% Top 1% Top 5% Between 5% & 10% Top 10% Between 10% & 25% Top 25% Between 25% & 50% Top 50% Bottom 50%
1980 100%   19.05% 36.84% 12.44% 49.28% 23.74% 73.02% 19.93% 92.95% 7.05%
1981 100%   17.58% 35.06% 12.90% 47.96% 24.33% 72.29% 20.26% 92.55% 7.45%
1982 100%   19.03% 36.13% 12.45% 48.59% 23.91% 72.50% 20.15% 92.65% 7.35%
1983 100%   20.32% 37.26% 12.44% 49.71% 23.39% 73.10% 19.73% 92.83% 7.17%
1984 100%   21.12% 37.98% 12.58% 50.56% 22.92% 73.49% 19.16% 92.65% 7.35%
1985 100%   21.81% 38.78% 12.67% 51.46% 22.60% 74.06% 18.77% 92.83% 7.17%
1986 100%   25.75% 42.57% 12.12% 54.69% 21.33% 76.02% 17.52% 93.54% 6.46%
Tax Reform Act of 1986 changed the definition of AGI, so data above and below this line not strictly comparable
1987 100%   24.81% 43.26% 12.35% 55.61% 21.31% 76.92% 17.02% 93.93% 6.07%
1988 100%   27.58% 45.62% 11.66% 57.28% 20.57% 77.84% 16.44% 94.28% 5.72%
1989 100%   25.24% 43.94% 11.85% 55.78% 21.44% 77.22% 16.94% 94.17% 5.83%
1990 100%   25.13% 43.64% 11.73% 55.36% 21.66% 77.02% 17.16% 94.19% 5.81%
1991 100%   24.82% 43.38% 12.45% 55.82% 21.46% 77.29% 17.23% 94.52% 5.48%
1992 100%   27.54% 45.88% 12.12% 58.01% 20.47% 78.48% 16.46% 94.94% 5.06%
1993 100%   29.01% 47.36% 11.88% 59.24% 20.03% 79.27% 15.92% 95.19% 4.81%
1994 100%   28.86% 47.52% 11.93% 59.45% 20.10% 79.55% 15.68% 95.23% 4.77%
1995 100%   30.26% 48.91% 11.84% 60.75% 19.62% 80.36% 15.03% 95.39% 4.61%
1996 100%   32.31% 50.97% 11.54% 62.51% 18.80% 81.32% 14.36% 95.68% 4.32%
1997 100%   33.17% 51.87% 11.33% 63.20% 18.47% 81.67% 14.05% 95.72% 4.28%
1998 100%   34.75% 53.84% 11.20% 65.04% 17.65% 82.69% 13.10% 95.79% 4.21%
1999 100%   36.18% 55.45% 11.00% 66.45% 17.09% 83.54% 12.46% 96.00% 4.00%
2000 100%   37.42% 56.47% 10.86% 67.33% 16.68% 84.01% 12.08% 96.09% 3.91%
2001 100% 16.06% 33.89% 53.25% 11.64% 64.89% 18.01% 82.90% 13.13% 96.03% 3.97%
2002 100% 15.43% 33.71% 53.80% 11.94% 65.73% 18.16% 83.90% 12.60% 96.50% 3.50%
2003 100% 15.68% 34.27% 54.36% 11.48% 65.84% 18.04% 83.88% 12.65% 96.54% 3.46%
2004 100% 17.44% 36.89% 57.13% 11.07% 68.19% 16.67% 84.86% 11.85% 96.70% 3.30%
2005 100% 19.26% 39.38% 59.67% 10.63% 70.30% 15.69% 85.99% 10.94% 96.93% 3.07%
2006 100% 19.56% 39.89% 60.14% 10.65% 70.79% 15.47% 86.27% 10.75% 97.01% 2.99%
2007 100% 20.19% 40.41% 60.61% 10.59% 71.20% 15.37% 86.57% 10.54% 97.11% 2.89%
2008 100% 18.47% 38.02% 58.72% 11.22% 69.94% 16.40% 86.34% 10.96% 97.30% 2.70%
Source: IRS        

http://www.taxfoundation.org/news/show/250.html

US State Sales Tax Rates – 2010
State
State sales tax rate (January 1st, 2010)%
Alabama
4.0
Alaska
nil
Arizona
5.6
Arkansas
6.0
California
8.25
Colorado
2.9
Connecticut
6.0
Delaware
nil
Florida
6.0
Georgia
4.0
Hawaii
4.0
Idaho
6.0
Illinois
6.25
Indiana
7.0
Iowa
6.0
Kansas
5.3
Kentucky
6.0
Louisiana
4.0
Maine
5.0
Maryland
6.0
Massachusetts
6.25
Michigan
6.0
Minnesota
6.875
Mississippi
7.0
Missouri
4.225
Montana
nil
Nebraska
5.5
Nevada
6.85
New Hampshire
nil
New Jersey
7.0
New Mexico
5.0
New York
4.0
North Carolina
5.75
North Dakota
5.0
Ohio
5.5
Oklahoma
4.5
Oregon
nil
Pennsylvania
6.0
Rhode Island
7.0
South Carolina
6.0
South Dakota
4.0
Tennessee
7.0
Texas
6.25
Utah
4.7
Vermont
6.0
Virginia
5.0
West Virginia
6.0
Wisconsin
5.0
Washington
6.5
Washington DC
6.0
Wyoming
4.0

http://www.usa-sales-use-tax-e-commerce.com/table_sales_rates.asp

The 48 Contiguous States and DC
Persons in family Poverty guideline
1 $10,830
2 14,570
3 18,310
4 22,050
5 25,790
6 29,530
7 33,270
8 37,010
For families with more than 8 persons, add $3,740 for each additional person.

http://www.atdn.org/access/poverty.html

 

Federal income tax rates

1930 – 1960

Historical income tax rates for Married Filing Jointly at stated income levels.[3]

Year $20,001 $60,001 $100,001
1930 10% 21% 25%
1932 16% 36% 56%
1934 19% 37% 56%
1936 19% 39% 62%
1938 19% 39% 62%
1940 28% 51% 62%
1942 55% 75% 85%
1944 59% 81% 92%
1946 56% 78% 89%
1948 56% 78% 89%
1950 56% 78% 89%
1952 62% 80% 90%
1954 56% 78% 89%
1956 38% 62% 75%
1958 38% 62% 75%
1960 38% 62% 75%

Year 2008 income brackets and tax rates

Marginal Tax Rate Single Married Filing Jointly or Qualified Widow(er) Married Filing Separately Head of Household
10% $0 – $8,025 $0 – $16,050 $0 – $8,025 $0 – $11,450
15% $8,026 – $32,550 $16,051 – $65,100 $8,026 – $32,550 $11,451 – $43,650
25% $32,551 – $78,850 $65,101 – $131,450 $32,551 – $65,725 $43,651 – $112,650
28% $78,851 – $164,550 $131,451 – $200,300 $65,726 – $100,150 $112,651 – $182,400
33% $164,551 – $357,700 $200,301 – $357,700 $100,151 – $178,850 $182,401 – $357,700
35% $357,701+ $357,701+ $178,851+ $357,701+

Year 2009 income brackets and tax rates

Marginal Tax Rate[4] Single Married Filing Jointly or Qualified Widow(er) Married Filing Separately Head of Household
10% $0 – $8,350 $0 – $16,700 $0 – $8,350 $0 – $11,950
15% $8,351 – $33,950 $16,701 – $67,900 $8,351 – $33,950 $11,951 – $45,500
25% $33,951 – $82,250 $67,901 – $137,050 $33,951 – $68,525 $45,501 – $117,450
28% $82,251 – $171,550 $137,051 – $208,850 $68,526 – $104,425 $117,451 – $190,200
33% $171,551 – $372,950 $208,851 – $372,950 $104,426 – $186,475 $190,201 – $372,950
35% $372,951+ $372,951+ $186,476+ $372,951+

Year 2010 income brackets and tax rates

Marginal Tax Rate[5] Single Married Filing Jointly or Qualified Widow(er) Married Filing Separately Head of Household
10% $0 – $8,375 $0 – $16,750 $0 – $8,375 $0 – $11,950
15% $8,376 – $34,000 $16,751 – $68,000 $8,376 – $34,000 $11,951 – $45,550
25% $34,001 – $82,400 $68,001 – $137,300 $34,001 – $68,650 $45,551 – $117,650
28% $82,401 – $171,850 $137,301 – $209,250 $68,651 – $104,625 $117,651 – $190,550
33% $171,851 – $373,650 $209,251 – $373,650 $104,626 – $186,825 $190,551 – $373,650
35% $373,651+ $373,651+ $186,826+ $373,651+

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Income_tax_in_the_United_States

 

Background Articles and Videos

 

Why Is The Fair Tax so Controversial–My Contribution to Fair Tax Friday

Mar 25th, 2011 by David Anderson

“…The result is the tax code is 71,684 pages (2010). In 2006, before Pelosi took over, it was 61,845 pages.   In 2005, the federal government estimated that the code and regulations contained 9,097,000 words. That is why it is burdensome.  It is a huge lodestone attaching itself to our economy and weighing us down in the international race for jobs and growth.  Fair Tax advocates say that it costs us 900 dollars per man, woman, boy, and girl in compliance costs.   According the Tax Foundation, it costs us an estimated 368,000,000,000 dollars in compliance cost which is higher than Fair Tax estimates.  Large companies have entire floors devoted to compliance with the tax code not productive activities.

Compare it to the Fair Tax proposal.  It is no comparison.  You are no longer manipulated.   Naturally, charitable donations and education expenses are not taxed.   You are not constantly manipulated. The hand of despotism is vanquished.  We go from 71,00 pages to 36 pages of code.   Compliance costs drop dramatically. 

Even better, we will finally have a tax system designed to grow the economy.   Currently imports get better treatment than domestic production.  The playing field is leveled. Exports won’t be taxed at all.  We will finally be ready to compete in the world.  America will stop destroying and shipping out manufacturing and the orphaned investments kept offshore by our highest in the world corporate income tax will flow back and forth into our economy.  The worst case estimates of growth are 5 to 7%.  Other estimates are as high as 14% growth.  We currently average around 3% and in the last few years struggle to reach 2% growth.  The difference between 2% growth and 6% growth is an economy doubling every 32 years or one doubling every 12 years.  That is huge. …”

http://www.delawarepolitics.net/why-is-the-fair-tax-so-controversial/

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 1

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 2

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 3

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 4

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 5

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 6

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 7

 

Why is the FairTax better than other tax reform efforts?

 

Does the FairTax repeal the federal income tax?

 

How does the FairTax affect the economy?

 

Is the FairTax truly progressive?

 

How does the “prebate” work?

 

Is it fair for rich people to get the same prebate as poor people?

 

Do corporations get a windfall break from the FairTax?

 

How do we keep exemptions and exclusions from undermining the FairTax?

 

Wouldn’t it be more fair to exempt food and medicine from the FairTax?

 

How does the FairTax rate compare to today’s?

 

Is the FairTax rate really 23%?

 

How is the FairTax different from a Value Added Tax (VAT)?

 

Will the prebate create a massive new entitlement system?

 

How does the FairTax impact the middle class?

 

How will the FairTax impact seniors?

 

How does the FairTax affect tax preparers and CPAs?

 

How does the FairTax impact charitable giving?

 

 

How does the FairTax affect compliance costs?

 

Will the FairTax hurt home ownership with no mortgage interest deduction?

 

Will the FairTax hurt home ownership with no mortgage interest deduction?

 

How will the FairTax help people who don’t hire an accountant?

 

How will the FairTax impact people who don’t file income taxes?

 

Will the FairTax drive the economy down if people stop buying?

 

How will the FairTax affect state sales tax systems?

 

Are any significant economies funded by a sales tax?

 

Is education taxed under the FairTax?

 

Will government pay taxes under the FairTax?

 

Will the FairTax impact tax deferred retirement accounts like 401(k)s?

 

What will happen to cities who depend on tax free bonds?

How does the FairTax impact tax free bonds?

 

How will Social Security payments be calculated under the FairTax?

 

What will happen to government programs like Social Security and Medicare?

 

How can you tax life saving medical treatment?

 

Will bartering present a compliance problem under the FairTax?

 

How will used goods be taxed?

 

Can’t Americans just cross the border to avoid the FairTax

 

How does the FairTax affect illegal immigration?

 

Isn’t it a stretch to say the IRS will go away?

 

What will the transition be like from the income tax to the FairTax?

 

FairTax Show – Part 1

 

FairTax Show – Part 2

 

Ron Paul on Taxes

 

Policy Resources

The following organizations provide policy analysis on taxation and related issues:

Tax Policy Organizations:

Small Business Policy Organizations:

General Public Policy Research Organizations:

http://www.fairtax.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_links

 

 

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

What Does The Tea Party Movement Want? Limited In Size and Scope Constitutional Government, Balanced Budgets and Constitutional Amendment, The FairTax and Repeal of the Income Tax 16th Amendment–Videos

Posted on January 29, 2011. Filed under: Banking, Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Regulations, Taxes, Transportation, Video, War, Wealth | Tags: , , |

Reagan on Balanced Budget

FairTax: Fire Up Our Economic Engine (Official HD)

‘Tea Party’ Political Groups and Government (John Samples)

It’s Simple to Balance The Budget Without Higher Taxes

Dan Mitchell explains the fair tax

Why We Need a FAIR Tax

What is the FairTax legislation?

Is the FairTax rate really 23%?

Flat Tax vs. National Sales Tax

The Tea Party Goes to Washington: Rand Paul on the intellectual bankruptcy of both major parties

Senator Rand Paul speaks at Tea Party 5 Year Anniversary Event

Rand Paul: Tea Party is actually co-opting Washington and shaping the debate.

Rand Paul “Tea Party Movement Is About Constitutional Government!”

The FairTax: It’s Time

FairTax 2012

What the Tea Party Movement Must Stand For

Former Tea Party Express Mark Williams – What does the Tea Party Really Want?

The Republican establishment better start paying attention and getting a clue as to what the tea party movement wants.

Once the American people have the FairTax, they will not want to go back to a Federal Income Tax and vote against any politician who even tries.

Pass the FairTax then repeal the income tax 16th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

Waiting for the repeal of the 16th Amendment is similiar to waiting for passage of the balanced budget Constitutional amendment before balancing the budget.

I have completely lost patience with either political party to balance budget or reform the Federal income tax code with a flat tax.

Both political parties are just stalling and lying about what they are actually doing.

Forget about the flat tax and pass and implement the FairTax now!

Otherwise the tea party movement will find candidates that not only talk the talk but walk the walk.

The Fiscal Year 2012 Federal Budget will either be balanced and the FairTax passed and implemented for 2012 or both political parties will pay in upcoming elections in 2012, 2014 and beyond.

Are you listening now?

“Them that is going, get on the wagon, them that a’ nt, get out of the way!”

Herman Cain at the Atlanta FairTax Rally

John Stossel speaks to the Fair Tax Rally

Senator Rand Paul’s Pledge To Kentuckians On His First Day As Senator

Rand Paul On FairTax

Pence on the Fair Tax

Congressman Pence – FairTax and FlatTax

RON PAUL APRIL 15, 2010 TEA PARTY SPEECH

NATO Review – The Tea Party: Home, alone? (with subtitles: English)

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 6 so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...