The Pronk Pops Show 655, April 11, 2016, Story 1: Republican Party Establishment Suicide Watch — The Delegate Fix To Eliminate Both Trump and Cruz on The Fourth Ballet — The Second American Revolution Is Coming — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 655: April 11, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 650: April 1, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 641: March 11, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 640: March 10, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 639: March 9, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 623: February 12, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 615: February 1, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 614: January 29, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 610: January 25, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 609: January 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 608: January 21, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 607: January 20, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 606: January 19, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 605: January 15, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 604: January 14, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 603: January 13, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 602: January 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 601: January 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 600: January 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 599: January 6, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 598: January 5, 2016

Story 1: Republican Party Establishment Suicide Watch — The Delegate Fix To Eliminate Both Trump and Cruz on The Fourth Ballot — Cheating Lying Cruz Establishment Puppet Trojan Horse? — Establishment Ticket: Romney/Ryan — Two Time Losers — American People Walk Out of Both Republican and Democratic Parties — Neither Republican Nor Democratic — Two Party Tyranny — Videos

The Green Papers

2016 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses, and Conventions

Colorado Republican
Presidential Nominating Process
Precinct Caucuses: Tuesday 1 March 2016
County Assemblies: Tuesday 1 March – Saturday 26 March 2016
District Conventions: CDs 1,6: Saturday 2 April 2016
District Convention: CDs 7: Thursday 7 April 2016
District Conventions: CDs 2,3,4,5: Friday 8 April 2016
State Convention: Saturday 9 April 2016
Republicans
Candidate Precinct
Popular
Vote
Delegate Votes
Soft
Pledged
Soft
Unpledged
Soft
Total
Hard Total
Cruz, Rafael Edward “Ted” 34 91.89% 34 91.89% 30 81.08%
Uncommitted 4 10.81%
(available) 3 8.11% 3 8.11% 3 8.11%
Total 37 100.00% 37 100.00% 37 100.00%

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P16/CO-R

Copyright www.flags.net/UNST.htm Republican Convention
Presidential Nominating Process
Debate – Fox – Cleveland, Ohio: Thursday 6 August 2015
Debate – CNN – Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, California: Wednesday 16 September 2015
Debate – CNBC – Boulder, Colorado: Wednesday 28 October 2015
Debate – Fox Business News – Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Tuesday 10 November 2015
Debate – CNN – Las Vegas, Nevada: Tuesday 15 December 2015
Debate – Fox Business Channel, Charleston, South Carolina: Thursday 14 January 2016
Debate – Fox – Iowa: Thursday 28 January 2016
Debate – CBS – South Carolina: February 2016 (presumably)
Debate – NBC/Telemundo – Texas: Friday 26 February 2016
Debate – CNN – TBD: March 2016 (presumably)
Debate – Salt Lake City, Utah (announced 20 February 2016): Monday 21 March 2016
41st Republican National Convention: Monday 18 July – Thursday 21 July 2016
Republicans
Candidate Popular
Vote
Delegate Votes
Soft
Pledged
Soft
Unpledged
Soft
Total
Hard Total
Trump, Donald John, Sr. 8,256,309 37.01% 758 32.04% 1 0.94% 759 30.70% 758 30.66%
Cruz, Rafael Edward “Ted” 6,319,244 28.33% 533 22.53% 11 10.38% 544 22.01% 529 21.40%
Rubio, Marco A. 3,482,129 15.61% 173 7.31% 173 7.00% 173 7.00%
Kasich, John Richard 2,979,379 13.36% 144 6.09% 144 5.83% 144 5.83%
Carson, Benjamin Solomon “Ben”, Sr. 698,532 3.13% 8 0.34% 8 0.32% 8 0.32%
Bush, John Ellis “Jeb” 257,760 1.16% 4 0.17% 4 0.16% 4 0.16%
Uncommitted 68,374 0.31% 11 0.46% 17 16.04% 28 1.13% 64 2.59%
Paul, Randal H. “Rand” 59,009 0.26% 1 0.04% 1 0.04% 1 0.04%
Christie, Christopher James “Chris” 54,016 0.24%
Huckabee, Michael Dale “Mike” 48,694 0.22% 1 0.04% 1 0.04% 1 0.04%
Fiorina, Carleton Sneed “Carly” 36,099 0.16% 1 0.04% 1 0.04% 1 0.04%
Santorum, Richard John “Rick” 16,301 0.07%
No Preference 9,312 0.04%
Graham, Lindsey Olin 5,689 0.03%
Gray, Elizabeth 5,455 0.02%
(others) 3,382 0.02%
Gilmore, James Stuart “Jim”, III 2,903 0.01%
Pataki, George E. 2,010 0.01%
Others 1,586 0.01%
Cook, Timothy “Tim” 517 0.00%
Jindal, Piyush “Bobby” 221 0.00%
Martin, Andy 202 0.00%
Witz, Richard P.H. 109 0.00%
Lynch, James P. “Jim”, Sr. 100 0.00%
Messina, Peter 79 0.00%
Cullison, Brooks Andrews 56 0.00%
Lynch, Frank 47 0.00%
Robinson, Joe 44 0.00%
Comley, Stephen Bradley, Sr. 32 0.00%
Prag, Chomi 16 0.00%
Dyas, Jacob Daniel “Daniel”, Sr. 15 0.00%
McCarthy, Stephen John 12 0.00%
Iwachiw, Walter N. 9 0.00%
Huey, Kevin Glenn 8 0.00%
Drozd, Matt 6 0.00%
Mann, Robert Lawrence 5 0.00%
Hall, David Eames
(available) 732 30.94% 77 72.64% 809 32.73% 789 31.92%
Total 22,307,661 100.00% 2,366 100.00% 106 100.00% 2,472 100.00% 2,472 100.00%

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P16/R

Donald Trump “Fox & Friends” FULL Interview: The System Is Rigged 4-11-2016

Cruz: We’re winning because of superior organization

Trump lashes out at ‘corrupt’ delegate system

Democrats think Trump is toxic to down ballot GOP candidates

Judge Napolitano on Trump – CIA Waterboarding – Boston Globe Fake Story – Colorado GOP Caucus

COLORADO GOP DENIES TRUMP DELEGATES

Colorado Delegate for Trump Being Told He Is Not Allowed In Convention

Colorado Trump Delegate Removed And Replaced

Colorado CRUZ GOPe BACKFIRE ! ! !

Cruz Campaign Deploys ‘Secret Weapon’ in Colorado Delegate Fight

What’s behind Ted Cruz’s Colorado win?

Ted Cruz Colorado GOP Convention FULL SPEECH – April 9, 2016

GOP Frontrunner, Donald Trump Has A Warning For The Republican Establishment – Hannity

The Behind-the-Scenes Delegate Fight to Stop Donald Trump

Donald Trump: I will have ‘millions more’ votes than Cruz

Trump hurt Cruz unlikable

Trump’s new right-hand man accuses Cruz campaign of ‘gestapo tactics’

Inside the battle to become a Colorado GOP delegate

See who the Colorado GOP delegates support

Donald Trump Vs The Establishment New Found Love For Ted Cruz – Convention Chaos – Hannity

Pat Buchanan: GOP establishment is right to be worried

Crowley: If Trump or Cruz Wins WH Bid, the GOP Establishment ‘Is Done’

Buchanan: Trump, Cruz will not allow nomination to be taken

Limbaugh: GOP Establishment wants neither Trump nor Cruz. Salivating for contested convention

Rush Limbaugh: “If Trump’s the Nominee, I’m Voting for Him!”

Limbaugh on Trump-Cruz “Dream Ticket”

Caller Has “LIT A FIRE UNDER ME!”: Listen To Rush Limbaugh’s EPIC Defense Of Trump

Colorado GOP Delegate Removed From Ballots For Supporting Trump

Republicans Cancel Election!

Public Outraged by Trump Screw Job In Colorado

Colorado GOP hastily deletes ‘#NeverTrump’ tweet

RNC Perfecting The Art Of The Steal: 4/10/16 Full Show

Senior Donald Trump Advisor On Staff Shakeup

Can A Brokered Convention Stop Trump?

Who Is Donald Trump?

7 Surprising Things About Donald Trump (Other Than His Hair)

Is Donald Trump A Fascist?

What Is Fascism?

Who Is Bernie Sanders?

What Is Socialism?

What Is Communism?

Angry Donald Trump blasts Colorado GOP results as “totally unfair”

Donald Trump says Colorado residents “had their vote taken away from them by the phony politicians” after Ted Cruz victory at state convention

A day after being trounced by Sen. Ted Cruz in Colorado, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump blasted the state party’s process for selecting national delegates and called into question the results.

“The people of Colorado had their vote taken away from them by the phony politicians. Biggest story in politics. This will not be allowed!” Trump posted on Twitter on Sunday evening.

Moments earlier, he posted a tweet that asked: “How is it possible that the people of the great State of Colorado never got to vote in the Republican Primary? Great anger — totally unfair!”

The Cruz campaign ran the table in Colorado, capturing all 34 delegates at a series of seven congressional district meetings this month and the state party convention Saturday in Colorado Springs.

Colorado GOP leaders canceled the party’s presidential straw pollin August to avoid binding its delegates to a candidate who may not survive until the Republican National Convention in July.

Instead, Republicans selected national delegates through the caucus process, a move that put the election of national delegates in the hands of party insiders and activists — leaving roughly 90 percent of the more than 1 million Republican voters on the sidelines.

The decision sparked significant controversy at the time and removed Colorado from the Republican primary map in the early stages of the campaign. But Cruz supporters worked quietly behind the scenes to build an organization to get like-minded Republicans to the March 1 precinct caucuses and capitalized on the Trump campaign’s failure to adapt to the system.

Trump’s campaign didn’t put a visible paid staffer on the ground in Colorado until last week, when it hired Patrick Davis, a Colorado Springs political consultant, to organize national delegate candidates at the 7th Congressional District convention in Arvada. By then, Cruz had won the first six delegates.

Even then, the energy behind Trump’s campaign didn’t materialize in support. He managed to win only seven alternate delegates.

The Trump campaign’s list of preferred national delegates distributed at the state convention on Saturday was riddled with errors and misspellings that only further hurt its chances.

The problems with Trump’s ballots — and the candidate’s comments — raise questions about whether Colorado will figure prominently into a challenge at the national convention about the state’s delegates.

Ahead of the state convention, a Trump campaign strategist said it made the strategic decision not to compete in Colorado because the caucus system favored party insiders.

Trump skipped the state party convention, where Cruz gave a rousing speech that galvanized his supporters.

In an interview at the event, Cruz said Trump was “scared” to attend because he “doesn’t handle losing well.”

Powered at first by volunteer organizers, the Cruz campaign began working to win delegates months ago and amplified the efforts in January when it brought U.S. Rep. Ken Buck, R-Windsor, on board as state chairman. The campaign also teamed with controversial conservative organizations, such as the Rocky Mountain Gun Owners, Gun Owners of America and religious liberty groups, to rally support.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump visits a caucus site Feb. 23, 2016, in Las Vegas.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump visits a caucus site Feb. 23, 2016, in Las Vegas. (Jae C. Hong, Associated Press file)

The Colorado Republican Party only exacerbated the fears of the Trump camp on Saturday when it tweeted after Cruz claimed victory at the convention: “We did it. #NeverTrump.”

A second after the tweet, a state party spokesman came running into the press box at the convention and shouted “it wasn’t us!”

The party quickly deleted the tweet and posted: “The last tweet was the result of unauthorized access to our account and in no way represents the opinion of the party. We are investigating.”

The party’s spokesman, Kyle Kohli, said Sunday evening the investigation is ongoing and the party is examining its IP login history.

The party declined to comment on Trump’s tweets about the process.

 

Former CO GOP Chair: Message We’re Sending Is “Your Vote Doesn’t Matter And Your Voice Doesn’t Count”

By Ian Schwartz

Former Colorado state Republican party chairman Ryan Call talked to Laura Ingraham today to explain the delegation-selection process works and how it “cuts out any semblance of democracy or the popular will.” Call said the statewide convention that chooses the delegates reinforces all the worst stereotypes of the party.

“The very time we should be opening up our doors and being more open and transparent, and welcoming people into our Party, we’ve essentially made the decision to close it off and make it more cumbersome and more difficult. And, to prevent the ability of people to have their voice heard in this process. You’re reinforcing all of the very worst stereotypes about the Party and I, frankly, am very concerned about the way voters are going to feel,” Call told Ingraham.

Transcript, via Laura Ingraham Show:

Ingraham: The August 25th announcement that they would no longer do the presidential preference poll at their caucus, my spidey-senses went up when that happened. Was I correct to, at the time, note that this was a sign that they were not going to be bound by the people of Colorado selecting Trump. If that was a risk, they wanted to cut that off at the pass in August. Am I correct in stating that?

Call: That’s exactly right. While the caucus votes we’ve held in previous elections in 2008 and 2012 were always straw polls, they didn’t bind or allocate the delegations. They at least were a snapshot into where voter sentiment is in the state of Colorado, and the decision by the state Republican Party to cancel that vote taken in connection with the caucus really did cut out any semblance of democracy or the popular will in connection with the delegate election event. It became an entire party insiders game with getting delegates to go to county assemblies in the state convention. While Colorado has over a million registered Republican voters, the only votes that really counted were that of the 3,900 delegates that gathered down in Colorado Springs.

Ingraham: How do you become a delegate in Colorado? Does it tend to be more people who are activists within the Party? Is there a Tea Party element? How does that play out?

Call: So, Colorado has a lot of different elements. Tea Party elements, strong second amendment and pro-life supporters, it’s a very diverse coalition. And, lots of factions are involved in the Party. But, the process to become a delegate, to be able to have your voice heard in the process, is admittedly cumbersome, convoluted, complicated, and not friendly to folks that are political novices or are new at this process. You would have had to show up at your local neighborhood caucuses back in March, March 1st, and sit through two or three hour meetings, get elected from among your neighbors at the local neighborhood precinct caucus to go attend a county assembly. Then, from the county assembly, you had to convince the few hundred or a thousand of delegates at the county assembly to move you on to attend the congressional district, or state convention process. Then, you had to show up at the state convention and, as has been widely reported, you had ten seconds to make your pitch to the 3,900 delegates at the state assembly of why they should elect you to go to Cleveland.

Ingraham: At a time where the Republicans are so fractured, and it really is for the most part an anti-Establishment mood within the Party, that’s why Rubio went down in flames, that’s why Jeb couldn’t get any traction, that’s why Kasich is still lower in delegate count than Rubio. These outsiders as they’re called are still managing to capture the imagination and the spirit of the people, but if at the end of all this people just have an overall sense that, if you’re a Republican voter and you vote it doesn’t matter that much, how much damage do you think that will do to the Republican brand or reputation going forward?

Call: That is a great observation, and it’s a concern I feel overwhelmingly as well. The very time we should be opening up our doors and being more open and transparent, and welcoming people into our Party, we’ve essentially made the decision to close it off and make it more cumbersome and more difficult. And, to prevent the ability of people to have their voice heard in this process. You’re reinforcing all of the very worst stereotypes about the Party and I, frankly, am very concerned about the way voters are going to feel. In a swing state like Colorado, for example, even if Ted Cruz or Donald Trump ultimately become the nominee for President, while we’ve been able to make our pitch to the 3,900 delegates at the state convention, there’s million registered Republicans that haven’t been talked to and there’s almost a million and a half unaffiliated voters, independent voters, that are key to deciding the contest in the battleground state and we haven’t done any work in a state like Colorado to build the campaign infrastructure to engage them or allow their voices to be heard. So, the message we’re sending to voters broadly the way this process is going is that your vote doesn’t matter and your voice doesn’t count.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2016/04/11/former_co_gop_chair_message_were_sending_is_your_vote_doesnt_matter_and_your_voice_doesnt_count.html

Colorado Republicans cancel presidential vote at 2016 caucus

Move makes Colorado only state to date to opt out of early nomination process

EDITOR’S NOTE: This story was first published on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 at 2:06 p.m. Please see Angry Donald Trump blasts Colorado GOP results as “totally unfair,” published on Sunday, April 10, 2016.

Colorado will not vote for a Republican candidate for president at its 2016 caucus after party leaders approved a little-noticed shift that may diminish the state’s clout in the most open nomination contest in the modern era.

The GOP executive committee has voted to cancel the traditional presidential preference poll after the national party changed its rules to require a state’s delegates to support the candidate who wins the caucus vote.

The move makes Colorado the only state so far to forfeit a role in the early nomination process, according to political experts, but other caucus states are still considering how to adapt to the new rule.

“It takes Colorado completely off the map” in the primary season, said Ryan Call, a former state GOP chairman.

Republicans still will hold precinct caucus meetings in early 2016 to begin the process of selecting delegates for the national convention — but the 37 delegates are not pledged to any specific candidate.

The Democratic Party still will hold a presidential straw poll March 1 — a Super Tuesday vote in a key swing state that is attracting attention from top-tier candidates.

For Republicans, no declared winner means the caucus will lack much of its hype. The presidential campaigns still may try to win delegate slots for their supporters, but experts say the move makes it less likely that candidates will visit Colorado to court voters.

The Colorado system often favors anti-establishment candidates who draw a dedicated following among activists — as evidenced by Rick Santorum’s victory in 2012 caucus. So the party’s movemay hurt GOP contenders such as Donald Trump, Ben Carson and Rand Paul, who would have received a boost if they won the state.

State Republican Party Chairman Steve House said the party’s 24-member executive committee made the unanimous decision Friday — six members were absent — to skip the preference poll.

The move, he said, would give Colorado delegates the freedom to support any candidate eligible at the Cleveland convention in July. Republican National Committee officials confirmed that the change complies with party rules.

“If we do a binding presidential preference poll, we would then pledge our delegates … and the candidates we bind them to may not be in the race by the time we get to the convention,” House said in an interview Tuesday.

The caucus is likely to occur in February, but party officials will meet next month to finalize the date.

In 2008 and 2012, die-hard Republican voters gathered at caucus meetings to begin the delegate-selection process of selecting delegates to the national convention and voice support for presidential candidates in a straw poll.

The votes, however, didn’t require Colorado delegates to support any particular candidate at the national conventions. This allowed for delegates that supported a losing candidate to vote for the nominee and demonstrate party unity at the convention.

But the freedom also opened the door for political mischief, as Colorado saw in 2012 when Ron Paul supporters managed to win a significant portion of the delegate slots, even though Paul finished far behind other candidates in the Colorado caucuses.

The RNC tightened the rules in 2012 to eliminate nonbinding straw polls and help prevent similar stunts in the future, forcing Colorado Republicans to re-evaluate their process. An effort earlier this year to switch to a presidential primary system failed amid party infighting.

“It’s an odd scenario,” said Josh Putnam, a political science lecturer at the University of Georgia who runs a popular blog on the presidential nominating process. “It’s not to say the campaigns won’t be there. … But you won’t have a good reflection of support at the caucuses, much less Colorado Republicans as a whole.”

Other caucus states are grappling with the rule change in different ways as they finalize their plans before the deadline at the end of September, Putnam said, but he is not aware of any state that has abandoned the presidential caucus vote.

With the change, the only way Colorado Republican delegates would remain relevant is the remote chance that no candidate emerges as a clear winner in the primary contest. In this case, the state’s unbound delegates would receive significant attention and may hold the key to victory in a floor fight.

“If there’s the potential for a brokered convention in any way, the unaffiliated delegates become extremely important,” said Joy Hoffman, the Arapahoe County GOP chairwoman who attended the party meeting. “If there is someone who becomes a front-runner, … then nobody’s important. So I think the view became that if we were not bound, it’s not the worse thing that could happen.”

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_28700919/

EXCLUSIVE: Border Patrol Agents Demand GOP Provide ‘Free, Fair and Open Elections in America’

The National Border Patrol Council (NBPC), the organization that represents nearly 17,000 of the Border Patrol agents who risk their lives to secure U.S. borders, is challenging the Colorado GOP for not holding a state primary and instead slating delegates mostly favorable to Trump’s rival

The NBPC recently endorsed Trump for president after the candidate shocked them by publicly declaring that actual Border Patrol agents would have a seat at the head of the table in any discussions on U.S. border security policy.

In an exclusive statement to Breitbart News, the National Border Patrol Council wrote:

In our March 30th endorsement statement of Donald J. Trump, we, the National Border Patrol Council called upon the American people to stand with border agents in support of Mr. Trump and his pledge to end illegal immigration. We fully expected that the will of the American electorate, whatever they decided in this primary, would be upheld. It is now clear that voters are being disenfranchised in order to protect established interests.

By cancelling the election in Colorado, the Republican Party has found a brand new way to disenfranchise voters who want secure borders and safe communities. Once again, the will of the public – who have pleaded for immigration enforcement – is being overridden by special interests with agendas. We see the same thing happening across the country, where delegates won by Mr. Trump – through a popular recorded vote – have made secret arrangements to support other candidates, thwarting the will of the millions of voters they collectively are supposed to represent. This is insidious.

I am calling today on the Republican Party to promise free, fair and open elections in America. All candidates should join in this demand. Elections should mean that the people – not party insiders – choose the nominee. We will never secure our immigration system unless the raw will of the American people is imposed through the ballot box. Clearly, politicians and special interests will continue to betray America’s interests if they are left to their own devices.

Over the past weekend, the Colorado Republican Party held its state convention, where at least 30 of the 37 Colorado delegates selected to attend the Republican National Convention and cast a vote for the 2016 nominee favor Cruz.

Following Cruz’s sweep, the Colorado GOP sent out a tweet from its official Twitter account, reading, “We did it! #NeverTrump.”

The tweet was subsequently deleted, but the occurrence is fueling backlash from voters who believe the establishment is obstructing the will of the people.

Trump also weighed in on Twitter about the people of Colorado not having their vote count:
******

(Disclosure: Breitbart Texas sponsored the Green Line podcast for the NBPC in an effort to provide a platform for agents to inform the public about the realities on the border and what Border Patrol agents face. Director Brandon Darby received an award from the Laredo chapter of the NBPC for his work in helping to defend and bring a voice to Border Patrol agents. Breitbart News assisted in covering funeral costs for a slain Border Patrol agent previously. Darby and Breitbart senior management have directly stated and shown that helping to bring a voice to the expressed needs and interests of Border Patrol agents is a top priority–personally, individually and together through Breitbart News.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RestqTD2J58

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Lying Lunatic Left Lame-stream Losers: CNBC — Winners: Cruz, Rubio, Paul, Carson and Trump — Losers: Bush and Kasich — 2016 Republican Candidates Debate — October 28, 2015 — Boulder, Colorado — New House Speaker Paul Ryan — Videos

Posted on October 28, 2015. Filed under: American History, Babies, Banking, Blogroll, College, Communications, Computers, Computers, Congress, Constitution, Corruption, Crisis, Documentary, Economics, Education, Elections, Employment, Faith, Family, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Freedom, Friends, government, government spending, Health Care, history, Homes, Immigration, Inflation, Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Investments, IRS, Law, Legal, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, Middle East, Monetary Policy, Money, Money, Narcissism, Newspapers, Obamacare, People, Philosophy, Photos, Political Correctness, Politics, Presidential Candidates, Press, Private Sector, Psychology, Public Sector, Radio, Radio, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Technology, Television, Terrorism, Trade Policiy, Unemployment, Unions, Video, War, Wealth, Welfare, Wisdom, Work, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 564: October 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 563: October 28, 2015 

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Pronk Pops Show 520: August 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 519: August 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 518: August 20, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 517: August 19, 2015 

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Pronk Pops Show 511: August 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 510: August 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 509: July 24, 2015

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Pronk Pops Show 507: July 17, 2015

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Pronk Pops Show 502: July 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 501: July 9, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 500: July 8, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 499: July 6, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 498: July 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 497: July 1, 2015

Story 1: Lying Lunatic Left Lame-stream Losers: CNBC  — Winners: Cruz, Rubio, Paul, Carson and Trump — Losers: Bush and Kasich — 2016 Republican Candidates Debate — October 28, 2015 — Boulder, Colorado — New House Speaker Paul Ryan — Videos

Lying Lunatic Left Lame-stream Losers

Carl Quintanilla, Becky Quick, and especially John Harwood

cnbc-gop-debate-moderators-1024x682cnbc-moderators-debate

The Winners

Cruz, Rubio, Paul, Carson and Trump

the winners

 Real Losers: Jeb Bush and John Kasich–  Next Out?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets a supporter following her address at the 18th Annual David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in New York April 29, 2015. (REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

House Speaker Paul Ryan

paulryanspeaker

GOP Debate: Main Event (Full Debate) | CNBC

Ted Cruz Shames CNBC Debate Moderators • 10/28/15 •

Are We Really Talking About Fantasy Football? • Chris Christie • GOP Debate • 10/28/15 •

Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio spar over Rubio’s congressional attendance record

Rand Paul on Raising the Debt Ceiling | Republican Debate

Ben Carson Says PC Culture is Destroying America

Donald Trump Closing Remarks During 3rd Republican Debate

Donald Trump says he negotiated the length of the debate from 3 hours down to 2 hours during his final statement at the end of the 3rd Republican Presidential Debate on CNBC.

The Republican debate

10 28 15 Luntz Focus Group After 3rd GOP Debate Segment 1

Did Marco Rubio Win The 3dr GOP Debate? Full Kelly File Segment.

O’Reilly On Trump: ‘Maybe This Is His New Style A Bit Low Key’

Must-see moments from the CNBC GOP debate (FULL VIDEO)

O’Reilly: ‘Jeb Bush Is Done, But He Has Cool Things To Do’ Post GOP Debate Recap

O’Reilly Recaps GOP Debate With Brit Hume 10.28.15

Paul Ryan Sworn In As New Speaker Of The House

Call It Like It Is: Marco Rubio Is Just Better At This Than Jeb Bush

FULL CNBC GOP DEBATE Part 8: Round 2 Republican Presidential Debate 10/28/2015

Texas Senator Ted Cruz Attacks CNBC Moderators- Presidential Debate

Rand Paul Opening Statement Republican Debate

Rand Paul on Medcaid and Medicare | Republican Debate

GOP presidential debate Highlights October 2015 #GOPDebate

FULL Rand Paul Highlights Republican Debate

Rand Paul Closing Statement | Republican Debate

Donald Trump Closing Statement At GOP Republican Presidential Debate On CNBC October 28, 2015

Donald Trump Interview after 3rd GOP Debate VIDEO CNBC Presidential Debate GOP

Donald Trump vs John Kasich At Gop Debate. Kasich Tears Into Trump, Carson:

Lamestream GOP Moderators’ Total Debate Fail

MEDIA SCOUNDRELS

By Lloyd Grove

When Rand Paul asked for the rules about who was allowed to respond to a rival candidate’s statement, Quick informed him, “It’s at the discretion of the moderators.”

It was not an answer guaranteed to instill the participants’—or, for that matter, the viewers’—confidence in the fairness and balance of the occasion.

Speaking of which, Fox News, unsurprisingly, had a field day with CNBC’s treatment of the candidates.

“This is the most appalling performance by the moderators,” Charles Krauthammer opined, “that I can ever remember seeing.”

Republican talking point virtuoso Sean Hannity declared: “The candidates combined beat the moderators, who were taking the Democratic Party line.”

“This a horrible night for the news media,” Hannity added—and, for once, I agreed with him.

The trouble started with the very first question, Quintanilla cutely asked each candidate, as though they were in a job interview, to admit to a weakness of character or somesuch.

It was a gimmicky and rather puerile inquiry, of course, and predictably few of the contenders even bothered to address it. Bush conceded he was probably a little too impatient. Trump claimed he was a little too trusting, and then bitterly unforgiving when betrayed. Carly Fiorina—grinning winsomely for laughs—revealed she was advised to smile more during debates.

Quick, meanwhile, got blindsided when she asked Trump about something he supposedly said about Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg’s immigration policies, and Trump told her he never said it.

“So where did that come from?” Quick pleaded lamely.

“I don’t know. You people write this stuff,” Trump retorted, to laughter.

Harwood, who also writes for The New York Times, came in for particular criticism from the candidates—and with justice. He came across as a sort of grand inquisitor and took on the severe and scolding tone of an irritated headmaster with candidates who spoke beyond their 60-second allotment.

“John, do you want me to answer or do you want to answer?” Christie chided after Harwood interrupted him. “Gotta tell ya, even in New Jersey what you’re doing is called ‘rude.’”

Toward the end, when each contender was invited to deliver a 30-second closing pitch, Trump used his time to congratulate himself and Ben Carson for negotiating with CNBC to pare down the debate from 3½ hours to 2 hours “so we can all get the hell out of here.”

Trump argued that it’s just those sorts of negotiating skills that he’ll employ as president to make America great again.

“Just for the record,” Harwood felt compelled to chime in, “it was always going to be two hours.”

“That is not right,” Trump shot back, basically calling Harwood a liar. “You know that is not right.”

All in all, the night offered a harsh lesson for future debate moderators: Go ahead and pose tough questions, but get your facts straight, don’t be snarky, and don’t, on any account, debate the pros

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/10/29/lamestream-cnbc-moderators-blamed-for-gop-debate-debacle.html

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

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2012 First Presidential Debate–Barack Obama vs. Mitt Romney–Denver, Colorado, October 3, 2012–Romney Clearly Won–Videos

Posted on October 3, 2012. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, Immigration, Inflation, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Raves, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Taxes, Unemployment, Video, Wealth | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

2012 First Presidential Debate – Romney vs. Obama (Full) 

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.1 

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.2

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.3

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.4

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.5

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.6

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.7

First Presidential Debate Of 2012 Race pt.8

Where Does Romney Go After Debate Success?

Post-Debate, Obama Under Fire for ‘Grim’ Demeanor

    Romney Vs Obama Debate – MSNBC’s Priceless Reaction

“About As Devastating A Victory & Defeat As I’ve Seen In A Presidential Campaign” Rudy Giuliani 

“Romney Was Spectacular” Media Bias In First Presidential Debate ??? Ann Coulter Weighs In

Frank Luntz’ Suspicious Presidential Debate Focus Group

 

First Presidential Debate of 2012: What did Mitt Romney Gain? 

ABC World News Now:      Presidential Debate 2012: Analysis by Rick Klein

Special Programming:      Mitt Romney zingers at first presidential debate

We Can’t Afford Four More Years 

Biden » Middle Class Buried by Barry

Ron Paul Gives His Pre-Presidential Debate Analysis @ CNBC (10-3-12) 

Rand Paul “Governor Romney Didn’t Need Me Last Night… I’m Pretty Impressed With His Performance” 

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Who is winning the race for the 2012 Republican Party presidential nomination? Mitt Romney–Updated March 30, 2012–Videos

Posted on February 1, 2012. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, College, Communications, Crime, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Enivornment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, Health Care, history, Homes, Immigration, Inflation, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Taxes, Technology, Unemployment, Unions, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Expanded, Revised and Updated March 30, 2012

Big Government Progressive Neocon Romney

Will Be Republican Presidential Nominee In 2012

Fiscal, Libertarian and Traditional Conservatives

Will Bolt The Republican Party

 Santorum Takes Kansas, Romney Wins in Wyoming

Mitt Romney Wins Michigan and Arizona 

Ron Paul: “We’ve Drifted From Original Intent”

Ron Paul Michigan State University speech pt. 1

Romney Wins Maine Caucus – February 11, 2012

Ron Paul speech after 2nd place finish in Maine caucus 2/11/2012 

Santorum scores hat-trick in the Republican race

Rick Santorum Sweeps Missouri, Minnesota, Colorado Primaries; Mitt Romney Losing Frontrunner Status? 

 

27% Second Place Finish in Minnesota: Ron Paul Breaks through Yet Another Ceiling! 

Romney wins Nevada, hanging on to frontrunner status  

Romney Triumphs in Florida 

Ron Paul Interview on ABC’s ‘This Week’

The World is Endorsing Ron Paul For President 2012

Ron Paul ~ I Think We Can Get Out Of Our Mess By Having People Read The Constitution And Obey It 

Ron Paul Post FL Primary Speech ~ 1-30-2012 

2 Parties vs Ron Paul – Judge Andrew Napolitano

Who is winning the race for the 2012 Republican Party presidential nomination?

On March 13 Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum won 18 delegates in Alabama, 13 delegates in Mississippi and no delegates in America Soma.  Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney won 11 delegates in Alabama, 12 delegates in Mississippi, and 9 delegates in America Soma. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich won 12 delegates in Alabama and 11 delegates in Mississippii and none in Americ Soma. Texas Rep Ron Paul did win a single delegate.

On March 10 Romney won 9 delegates in Guam, 9 delegates in the Northern Marinas, 7 delegates in the Virgin Islands and 7 delegates in Kansas for a total of 32 delegates.  Santorum won the most delegates in Kansas, 33. Paul won a single delegate in the Virgin Islands.  Gingrich won no delegates.

Romney with 449 delegates is clearly the front-runner in the race for the 1,144 delegates needed to be nominated the Republican presidential candidate. Santorum is in second place with 224 delegates. Gingrich is in third place with 144 delegates. Paul is in fourth place with 73 delegates.

On March 6 Super TuesdayRomney won the most delegates in Alaska, Idaho, Massachusetts, Ohio Vermont and Virginia. Sen. Rick Santorum won the most delegates in Oklahoma, North Dakota and Tennessee.   Gingrich won 43 delegates out of 76 delegates in his home state of Georgia. Paul did not win a single state but did add a total of 21 delegates in Alaska, North Dakota, Vermont and Virginia.

On March 3 Romney won the Washington primary with 19,111 votes or 37.65 percent of the popular vote winning 16 delegates. Ron Paul came in second with 12,954 votes or 24.81 percent of the popular vote winning 10 delegates. Santorum came in third with 12,089 votes or 23.81 percent. Gingrich received 5,221 votes or 10.28 percent of the popular vote.

On Feb.28, Romney won the Michigan and Arizona primaries. Both Michigan and Arizona were penalized for scheduling their primary early and lost 50 percent of their delegates. Arizona was a closed primary with the statewide winner taking all the 29 delegates. Michigan was an open primary with winner-take-all in each congressional district and proportional for the statewide delegates.

Romney received 216,085 votes or 44.27 percent of the popular vote, thereby winning all of Arizona’s 29 delegates. Santorum received 122,008 votes or 26.62 percent of the popular vote. Gingrich received 74,110 votes or 16.66 percent of the popular vote. Paul received 38,753 votes or 8.45 percent of the popular vote.

Romney defeated Santorum in Michigan’s open primary by over 30,000 vote. Romney received 409,131 votes or 40.07 percent of the popular vote, winning 15 delegates. Santorum received 377, 153 or 37.86 of the popular vote, winning 13 delegates. Paul came in third with 115,778 votes or 11.62percent of the vote and received zero delegates. Gingrich came in fourth with 65,007 or 6.53 percent and received zero delegates.

On Feb. 11, Romney narrowly beat Paul in the Maine caucus by just 194 votes. Romney received 2,190 or 39.6 percent of the popular vote, winning eight delegates. Paul received 1,996 or 36.1 percent of the popular vote, winning eight delegates. Santorum came in third with 989 or 17.9 percent of the popular vote, winning four delegates. Gingrich came in fourth with 349 or 6.3 percent of the popular vote, winning one delegate.

Since several Maine counties have scheduled their county caucuses after Feb. 11, the vote count will change. Washington County was the only county caucus scheduled for Feb. 11 that was postponed due to a forecasted 3-5-inch snow storm. Washington County was expected to heavily favor Paul over Romney based on the Feb. 7 precinct caucus results.

The voters of Maine are usually accustomed to driving on snow-covered roads. Several counties along Maine’s coastline had the same snow storm forecast including Cumberland County, which includes Portland, where Romney ran ahead of Paul. The Washington County caucus postponement appears politically motivated. Romney’s campaign needed a first-place win in Maine to counter the momentum of Santorum’s three wins in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri. Paul was apparently robbed of a first-place finish by Maine’s Republican Party’s decision to postpone the Washington County caucus due to snow.

When all the votes are counted next week, Paul said, “If I were a betting man, I would bet that we will control the Maine caucus when we go to Tampa,” the site of the Republican National Convention.

Romney is still the national front-runner in the race for the Republican Party’s nomination for president with an estimated total of 107 delegates. Santorum is second with 43 delegates, former Speaker of the House Gingrich is third with 42 delegates and Paul is fourth with 36 delegates.

On Feb. 7, Santorum jolted the race for 1,144 delegates and the 2012 Republican Party presidential nomination by a three state sweep of first place finishes in Colorado, Minnesota, and Missouri. In his victory speech to his supporters, Santorum said, “Ladies and gentlemen, I don’t stand here to claim to be the conservative alternative to Mitt Romney. I stand here to be the conservative alternative to Barack Obama.” His supporters shouted, “We pick Rick.”

Santorum won the Republican open non-binding Minnesota caucus on Feb. 7 with 21,436 or 44.81 percent of the popular vote, winning 17 delegates. Paul came in second with 13,030 or 27.24 percent of the popular vote, winning 10 delegates. Romney came in third with 8,096 or 16.92 percent of the popular vote, winning 6 delegates. Gingrich came in fourth with 5,134 or 10.73 percent or 10.73 percent of the popular vote, winning 4 delegates.

No candidate won any of the 52 delegates in the Missouri “straw poll” or non-binding primary on Feb.7. However, Santorum won with the primary with 138,957 or 55.17 percent of the popular vote. Romney came in second with 63,826 or 25.34 percent of the popular vote. Paul came in third with 30,641 or 12.17 percent of the popular vote. Delegates will be selected on the March 7 county caucus.

Santorum also won the Republican closed non-binding Colorado caucus on Feb.7 with 26,372 or 40.24 percent of the populat vote, winning 13 delegates. Romney came in second with 22,875 or 34.91 percent of the popular vote winning 12 delegates. Gingrich came in third with 8,394 or 12.81 percent of the popular vote, winning 4 delegates. Paul came in fourth with 7,713 or 11.77 percent of the popular vote, winning 4 delegates.

Romney won the Republican closed Nevada Caucus on Feb. 5 with 16,486 or 50.10 percent of the popular vote, winning 14 delegates. Romney beat out second place finisher, Gingrich, with 6,956 votes or 21.10 percent of the popular vote, winning 6 delegates. Paul finished third with 6,175 votes or 18.73 percent of the popular vote, winning 5 delegates. Santorum came in fourth with 3,277 votes or 9.94percent of the popular vote. winning 3 delegates.

Romney won the Republican Party’s closed Florida primary on Jan 31 with 774,989 votes or 46.42 percent of the popular vote, thereby winning all of the state’s 50 delegates. Romney beat out second place finisher, Gingrich, with 533,091 votes or 31.93 percent of the popular vote. Santorum came in third with 222,790 votes or 13.34 percent of the popular vote. Paul finished fourth with 117,100 votes or 7.01 percent of the popular vote.

Romney has now won in five states–Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina Florida and Nevada–and has a total of 99 delegates with an estimated total popular vote of 1,117,894. In second place is Gingrich, with a total of 41delegates with an estimated total popular vote of 837,302. In third place is former Santorum with 39 delegates with an estimated total popular vote of 381,793 votes. In fourth place is Paul with 28 delegates with an estimated total popular vote of 305,228.

Gingrich will petition the Republican Party of Florida to allocate delegates proportionally rather than on a winner-take-all basis. Republican Party rule 15 (b) (2) clearly states “Any presidential primary, caucus, convention, or other meeting held for the purpose of selecting delegates to the national convention which occurs prior to the first day of April in the year in which the national convention is held, shall provide for the allocation of delegates on a proportional basis.” This rule was approved by the Republican Party National committee in August 2010 for the 2012 Presidential nominating process. If Gingrich is successful, Romney would receive 23 delegates instead of 50 and Gingrich would receive 16 delegates instead of zero. Gingrich would then have a total of 48 delegates and would be slightly behind Romney with 54 delegates.

The estimated total delegate count is summarized in the table below:

Republican Party U.S. Presidential 2012

Estimated Delegate Count By Candidate and State

State

Romney

Gingrich

Santorum

Paul

Totals*

Iowa

6

4

6

6

28

New Hampshire

9

0

0

3

12

South Carolina

2

23

0

0

25

Florida

50

0

0

0

50

Nevada

14

6

3

5

28

Minnesota

6

4

17

10

40

Colorado

12

4

13

4

36

Maine

8

2

4

7

24

Arizona

29

0

0

0

29

Michigan

15

0

15

0

30

Wyoming

10

2

8

6

29

Washington

16

4

10

10

43

Alaska

 8  3  7  6

27

Georgia

 13  46  2  0

76

Idaho

 32  0  0  0

32

Massachusetts

 38  0  0  0

41

North Dakota

 7  2  11  8

28

Ohio

 35  0  21  0

66

Oklahoma

 13  13  14  0

43

Tennessee

 10  8  25  0

58

Vermont

 9  0  4  4

17

Virginia

 43  0  0  3

49

Guam

9 0 0 0

9

Northern Marianas

9 0 0 0

9

Virgin Islands

7 0 0 1

9

Kansas

7 0 33 0

40

America Soma

9 0 0 0

9

Alabama

11 14 22 0

50

Mississippi

12 12 13 0

40

Hawaii

9 0 5 3

20

Missouri

0 0 0 0

52

Utah

0 0 0 0

40

Washington

16 4 10 10

43

Puerto Rico

20 0 0 0

23

Illinois

42 0 12 0

69

Louisiana

5 0 10 0

46

District of Columbia

0 0 0 0

19

Maryland

0 0 0 0

37

Wisconsin

0 0 0 0

42

0 0 0 0

0

Totals

521

148

249

73

1205

*Totals include all delegates including those that are available but not pledged to a candidate such as each state’s party leadership delegates or delegates for candidates that have dropped out of the race.

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions: http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/IA-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/NH-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/SC-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/FL-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/NV-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MN-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/CO-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ME-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AZ-R     http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MI-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WY-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AK-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/GA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ID-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ND-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/OH-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/OK-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/TN-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VT-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/GU-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MP-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VI-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/KS-R  http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AS-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AL-R  http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MS-R  http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/HI-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WA     http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/PR-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/IL-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/LA-R

The estimated popular vote count is set forth in the table below:

Republican Party U.S. Presidential 2012

Estimated Popular Vote By Candidate and State

State

Romney

Gingrich

Santorum

Paul

Totals*

Iowa

29,805

16,163

29,839

26,036

121,501

New Hampshire

97,591

23,421

23,432

56,872

248,475

South Carolina

168,152

244,113

102,482

78,362

603,856

Florida

776,159

534,121

223,429

117,461

1,672,634

Nevada

16,486

6,956

3,277

6,175

32,963

Colorado

23,012

8,445

26,614

7,759

66,027

Minnesota

8,222

5,272

21,932

13,228

48,795

Maine

2,269

391

1,052

2,030

5,814

Arizona

216,805

74,110

122,088

38,753

458,631

Michigan

409,120

65,002

377,144

115,778

996,156

Wyoming

822

165

673

439

2,108

Washington

19,111

5,221

12,089

12,594

50,764

Alaska

 4,224  1,832  3,760  3,106     12,956

Georgia

     225,925  417,362  172,471  57,126  879,763

Idaho

 27,513  938  8,113  8,087   44,667

Massachusetts

 260,508  16,754  43,612  34,576  361,387

North Dakota

 2,690 960  4,508  3,187  11,345

Ohio

453,926 174,604 441,906  110,634  1,194,873

Oklahoma

80,290 78,684  96,757  27,573  286,301

Tennessee

153,888 132,140  204,976  49,783  550,174

Vermont

 22,532  4,606  13,399  14,408  59,614

Virginia

 158,049  0  0  107.471  265,520

Guam

207 0 0 0 207

Northern Marianas

740 27 53 78 848

Virgin Islands

101 18 23 112 384

Kansas

6,250 4,298 15,290 3,767 29,855

American Soma

0 0 0 0 70

Alabama

180,249 182,195 214,543 30,893 621,747

Mississippi

88,714 90,407 94,749 12,750 289,939

Hawaii

4,513 1,096 2,555 1,902 10,066

Missouri

63,826 0 138,957 30,641 251,868

Utah

0 0 0 0 0

Washington

19,111 5,221 12,089 12,594 50,764

Puerto Rico

98,375 2,431 9,524 1,452 118,696

Illinois

433,695 73,999 325,482 86,602 929,015

Louisiana

49,749 29,655 91,305 11.460 186,377

District of Columbia

0 0 0 0 0

Maryland

0 0 0 0 0

Wisconsin

0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0

Total Vote*

   2,929,937

1,815,603

1,948,919 895,395

8,005,619

Popular Vote Percentage

36.60%

22.68%

24.34%

11.18%

100.00%

*For all candidates on the ballot and write-ins.

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions.

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/IA-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/NH-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/SC-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/FL-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/NV-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MN-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/CO-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ME-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AZ-R     http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MI-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WY-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AK-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/GA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ID-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ND-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/OH-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/OK-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/TN-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VT-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VA-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/GU-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MP-R http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VI-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/KS-R  http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AS-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AL-R  http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MS-R  http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/HI-R    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WA     http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/PR-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/IL-R   http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/LA-R

 On March 24 the voters of Louisiana voted in a closed primary.

Results for Louisiana Republican Closed Primary

U.S. Presidential March 24, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 91,305 48.99% 10
Willard “Mitt” Romney 49,749 26.69% 5
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 26,655 15.91% 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 11,460 6.15% 0
Available

31

Totals 12,956 100.00%

46

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/LA-R

*Alaska has a total of 46 delegates consisting of 18 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 15 bonus.

On March 20 the voters of Illinois voted in a open primary.

Results for Illinois Republican Open Primary

U.S. Presidential March 20, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 433,695 46.68% 44
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 325,482 35.04% 12
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 86,602 9.32% 0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 73,999 7.97% 0
Available

13

Totals 929,015 100.00%

69

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/IL-R

*Illinois has a total of 69 delegates consisting of 54 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 2 bonus.

On March 18 the voters of Puerto Rico voted in a open primary.

Results for Puerto Rico Republican Open Primary

U.S. Presidential March 18, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 98,375 82.88% 20
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 69,524 8.02% 0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 2,431 2.05% 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 1,452 1.22% 0
Available/Uncommitted

3

Totals 118,696 100.00%

23

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/PR-R

*Puerto Rico has a total of 23 delegates consisting of 20 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On March 3 the voters of Washington voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Washington Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 3, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 19,111 37.65% 16
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 12,594 24.81% 10
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 12,089 23.81% 10
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 5,221 10.28% 4
Available

3

Totals 50,764 100.00%

43

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WA-R

*Washington has a total of 43 delegates consisting of 30 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On February 7 the voters of  Missouri voted in a non-binding primary.

Results for Missouri Republican Non-binding Primary

U.S. Presidential February 7, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 138,957 55.17% 0
Willard “Mitt” Romney 63,826 25.34% 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 30,641 14.40% 0
 Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 0 0.00% 0
Available

0

Totals 251,868 100.00%

52

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MO-R

*Missouri has a total of 52 delegates consisting of 24 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 15 bonus.

On March 13 the voters of Hawaii voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Hawaii Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 13, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 4,513 44.83% 9
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 2,555 25.38% 5
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 1,902 18.09% 3
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 1,096 10.89% 0
Available/Uncommitted

3

Totals 10,066 100.00%

20

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AK-R

*Hawaii has a total of 20 delegates consisting of 6 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 1 bonus.

On March 13 the voters of Mississippi voted in a open primary.

Results for Mississippi Republican Open Primary

U.S. Presidential March 13, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 94,979 32.76% 13
Willard “Mitt” Romney 90,407 31.18% 12
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 88,714 30.60% 12
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 12,750 4.40% 0
Available/Uncommitted

3

Totals 289.939 100.00%

40

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MS-R

*Mississippi has a total of 40 delegates consisting of 12 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 15 bonus.

On March 13 the voters of Alabama voted in an open primary.

Results for Alabama Republican Open Primary

U.S. Presidential March 13, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 214,543 34.51% 22
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 182,195 29.30% 14
Willard “Mitt” Romney 180,249 28.99% 11
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 30,893 4.97% 0
Available/Uncommitted

3

Totals 621,747 100.00%

50

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AL-R

*Alabama has a total of 50delegates consisting of 21 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 16 bonus.

On March 13 the voters of America Soma voted in a open caucus.

Results for America Soma Republican Open Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 13, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 9
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 0
Available

0

Totals 70 estimate 100.00%

9

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AS-R

*America Soma has a total of 9 delegates consisting of 6 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On March 10 the voters of Kansas voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Kansas Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 10, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 15,290 51.21% 33
Willard “Mitt” Romney 6,250 20.93% 7
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 4,298 14.40% 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 3,767 12.62% 0
Available

0

Totals 29,855 100.00%

40

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/KS-R

*Kansas has a total of 40 delegates consisting of 12 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 15 bonus.

On March 10 the voters of Virgin Islands voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Virgin Islands Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 10, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 112 29.17% 1
Willard “Mitt” Romney 101 23.60% 3
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 23 5.99% 0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 18 4.69% 0
Available/Uncommitted  130  33.85%

5

Totals 12,956 100.00%

9

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VI-R

*Virgin Islands has a total of 9 delegates consisting of 6 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On March 10 the voters of Northern Marianas voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Northern Marianas Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 10, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 740 87.26% 9
 Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 53 20.93% 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 28 14.40% 0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 27 12.62% 0
Available

0

Totals 848 100.00%

9

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MP-R

* Northern Marianas has a total of 9 delegates consisting of6 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On March 10 the voters of Guam voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Guam Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 10, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 207 100.00% 9
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 0 0.00% 0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich 0 0.00% 0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul 0 0.00% 0
Available

0

Totals 29,855 100.00%

9

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/GU-R

*Guam has a total of 9 delegates consisting of 6 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On March 6 the voters of Alaska voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Alaska Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 6 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney  4,224  32.60%  8
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum  3,760  29.02%  7
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  3,106  23.97%  6
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  1,832  14.14%  3
Available

3

Totals  12,956  100.00%

27

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AK-R

*Alaska has a total of 27 delegates consisting of 3 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 11 bonus.

On March 6 the voters of Georgia voted in a modified primary.

Results for Georgia Republican Modified Primary

U.S. Presidential March 7, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich
    417,362    47.44%  46
Willard “Mitt” Romney    225,925   25.68%  13
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum    172,471   19.60%  2
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul     57,126  6.49%  0
Available  15
Totals     879,763

100.00%

76

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/GA-R

*Georgia has a total of 76 delegates consisting of 42 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 21 bonus delegates.

On March 6 the voters of Idaho voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Idaho Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney  27,513  61.60%  32
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum  8,113  18.16%  0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  8,087  18.11%  0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  938  2.10%  0
Available  0
Totals  44,667

100.00%

32

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ID-R

*Idaho has a total of 32 delegates consisting of 6 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 13 bonus delegates

On March 6 the voters of Massachusetts voted in a modified primary.

Results for Massachusetts Republican Modified Primary

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney  260,508  72.09%  38

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum

 43,612  12.07%  0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  34,576  9.57%  0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  16,754  4.64%  0
Available

3

Totals  361,387

100.00%

41

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MA-R

*Massachusetts has a total of 41 delegates consisting of 9 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 1 bonus delegate.

On March 6 the voters of North Dakota voted in a closed caucus.

Results for North Dakota Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum
4,508  39.74%  11
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  3,187  28.09%  8
Willard “Mitt” Romney  2,690  23.71%  7
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  960  8.46%  2
Available  0
Totals  11,345

100.00%

28

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ND-R

*North Dakota has a total of 28 delegates consisting of 3 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 12 bonus delegates.

On March 6 the voters of Ohio voted in a modified primary.

Results for Ohio Republican Modified Primary

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney   453,926  37.99%  35
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum  441,906  36.98%  21
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  174,604  14.61%  0
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  110,634  9.26%  0
Available

10

Totals 1,194,873

100.00%

66

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/OH-R

*Ohio has a total of 66 delegates consisting of 48 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates and 5 bonus delegates.

On March 6 the voters of Oklahoma voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Oklahoma Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum  96,757  33.80%  14
Willard “Mitt” Romney  80,290  28.04%  13
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  78,684  27.48%  13
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  27,573  9.63%  0
Available

3

Totals

100.00%

43

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/OK-R

*Oklahoma has a total of 43 delegates consisting of 15 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 15 bonus delegates.

On March 6 the voters of  Tennessee voted in a open primary.

Results for Tennessee Republican Open Primary

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum  204,976  37.26%  25
Willard “Mitt” Romney  153,888  27.97% 10
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  132,140  24.02%  8
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  49,783  9.05%  0
Available

15

Totals  550,174

100.00%

58

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/TN-R

*Tennessee has a total of 58 delegates consisting of 27 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates and 18 bonus delegates

On March 6 the voters of Vermont voted in an open primary.

Results for Vermont Republican Open Primary

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney 22,532  39.80%  9
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  14,408  25.45%  4
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum  13,399  23.67%  4
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  4,606  8.14% 0
Available
Totals  56,614

100.00%

17

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VT-R

*Vermont has a total of 17 delegates consisting of 3 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 1 bonus delegate.

On March 6 the voters of Virginia voted in an open primary.

Results for Virginia Republican Closed Caucus

U.S. Presidential March 6, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard “Mitt” Romney   158,049  59.52%  43
Ronald E. “Ron” Paul  107.471  40.48%  3
Richard J. “Rick” Santorum 0  0.00%  0
Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich  0 0.00%  0
Available  3
Totals    265,520

100.00%

49

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/VA-R

*Virginia has a total of 49 delegates consisting of 33 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 3 bonus delegates.

On March 3 the voters of Washington voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Washington Republican Closed Caucus 

U.S.   Presidential March 3, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

19,111

37.65%

16

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

12,594

24.81%

10

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

12,089

23.81%

10

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

5,221

10.28%

4

Available

3

Totals

996,156

100.00%

43

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WA-R

*Wyoming has a total of  43 delegates consisting of 30 congressional district delegates, 10  at-large delegates and 3 party leader delegates.

On Feb. 29 the voters of Wyoming voted in a closed caucus.

Results for Wyoming Republican Caucus

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 29, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

822

38.99%

10

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

673

31.03%

8

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

439

20.83%

6

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

165

7.83%

2

Available

3

Totals

996,156

100.00%

29

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/WY-R

*Wyoming has a total of  29 delegates consisting of 3 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 13 bonus delegates.

On Feb. 28 the voters of Michigan voted in an open primary.

Results for Michigan Republican Primary

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 28, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

409,131

40.07%

15

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

377,153

37.86%

13

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

115,778

11.62%

0

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

65,007

6.53%

0

Available

2

Totals

996,156

100.00%

30

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and   Conventions.http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MI-R*Michigan would have had a total of  59 delegates consisting of 42 congressional district delegates, 10   at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 4 bonus delegates.   However, the state rescheduled the state primary to Feb. 28 and under the   Rules of the Republican Party forfeited 50 percent of its delegates. Also, the three state party leader delegates attend the national convention as guests.
On Feb. 28 the voters of Arizona voted in an open primary.

Results for Arizona Republican Primary

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 28, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

216,805

47.27%

29

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

122,088

26.62%

0

Newton Leroy   “Newt” Gingrich

74,110

16.66%

0

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

38,753

8.45%

0

Totals

458,681

100.00%

50

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and   Conventions.http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/AZ-R#0228*Arizona would have had a total of 58 delegates consisting of 27 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 18 bonus delegates.   However, the state rescheduled the state primary to Jan. 22 and under the   Rules of the Republican Party forfeited 50 percent of its delegates. Also, the three state party leader delegates attend the national convention as guests.

From Feb.3-11 the voters of Maine voted in a closed causus.

Results for Maine Republican Caucus

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 11, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

2,190

39.64%

8

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

1,996

36.13%

8

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

989

17.90%

4

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

349

6.32%

1

Available

3

Totals

5,585

100.00%

24

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions.

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/ME-R#0211

*Maine has a total of 24 delegates consisting of 6 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 5 bonus delegates. The 24 National Convention delegates are not bound to the candidate.

On Feb. 7 the voters of Minnesota voted in a closed causus.

Results for Minnesota Republican Caucus

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 7, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

21,436

44.81%

17

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

13,030

27.24%

10

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

8,096

16.92%

6

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

5,134

10.73%

4

Available

3

Totals

47,836

100.00%

40

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions.

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/MN-R#0207

*Minnesota has a total of 40 delegates consisting of 24 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 3 bonus delegates. The 40 National Convention delegates are proportionally bound to Presidential candidates based on the caucus vote.

On Feb. 7 the voters of Colorado voted in a closed causus.

Results for Colorado Republican Caucus

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 7, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

26,372

40.24%

13

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

22,875

43.91%

12

Newton Leroy   “Newt” Gingrich

8,394

12.81%

4

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

7,713

11.77%

4

Available

3

Totals

32,961

100.00%

36

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions.

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/CO-R#0207

*Colorado has a total of 36 delegates consisting of 21 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 2 bonus delegates. The 36 National Convention delegates are are not bound to Presidential candidates.

On Feb.5 the voters of Nevada voted in the second closed causus state.

Results for Nevada Republican Primary

U.S.   Presidential Feb. 7, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

16,486

50.02%

14

Newton Leroy   “Newt” Gingrich

6,956

21.10%

6

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

6,175

18.73%

5

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

3,277

9.94%

3

Totals

32,961

100.00%

28

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and   Conventions.

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/NV-R#0204

*Nevada has a total of 28 delegates consisting of 12 congressional district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 3 bonus delegates. The 28 National Convention delegates are proportionally bounf to Presidential candidates based on the caucus vote.

On Jan. 31 the voters of Florida voted in the first closed primary state where the candidate with the most votes statewide receives all of the state’s 50 delegates. Romney won and received all Florida’s 50 delegates.

Results for Florida Republican Primary

U.S.   Presidential Jan. 31, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

774,989

46.42%

50

Newton Leroy   “Newt” Gingrich

533,091

31.93%

0

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

222,790

13.34%

0

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

117,100

7.01%

0

Totals

1,669,585

100.00%

50

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions.

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/FL-R

*Florida would have had a total of   99 delegates consisting of 21 congressional district delegates, 10   at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 16 bonus delegates.   However, the state rescheduled the state primary to Jan. 22 and under the   Rules of the Republican Party forfeited 50 percent of its delegates. Also,   the three state party leader delegates attend the national convention as   guests.

On Jan. 21 the voters of South Carolina voted in the second open primary state where the candidate with the most votes statewide receives 11 delegates and the winner in each congressional district receives two delegates. Gingrich won statewide and received 11 delegates and won six congressional districts for additional 12 delegates for a total of 23 delegates. Romney won one congressional district and received two delegates.

Results for South Carolina Republican Primary

U.S.   Presidential Jan. 21, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Newton Leroy   “Newt” Gingrich

244,113

40.43%

23

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

168,152

27.85%

2

Richard J.   “Rick” Santorum

102,482

16.97%

0

Ronald E.   “Ron” Paul

78,362

12.98%

0

Herman Cain

6,338

1.05%

0

James Richard   “Rick” Perry

2,534

0.42%

0

Jon M.   Huntsman, Jr.

1,173

0.19%

0

Michele   M. Bachmann

491

0.03%

0

Totals

603,856

100.00%

25

Source: The Green Papers, 2012 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and   Conventions.     http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/SC-R

*South Carolina would have had a   total of 50 delegates consisting of 21 congressional district delegates,   10 at-large delegates, 3 party leader delegates and 16 bonus delegates.   However, the state rescheduled the state primary to Jan. 22 and under   the Rules of the Republican Party forfeited 50 percent of its delegates.   Also, the three state party leader delegates attend the national convention   as guests.

On Jan 10 the voters of New Hampshire voted in the first state primary where the states 12 delegates were bound proportionally to presidential contenders based on the primary vote statewide.

Results for New Hampshire Republican Primary

U.S.   Presidential Jan. 10, 2012

Candidate

Popular   Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Willard   “Mitt” Romney

97,591

39.28%

7

Ronald   E. “Ron” Paul

56,872

22.89%

3

Jon M.   Huntsman, Jr.

41,964

16.89%

2

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

23,421

9.43%

0

Richard   J. “Rick” Santorum

23,405

9.42%

0

James   Richard “Rick” Perry

1,764

.71%

0

Michele   M. Bachmann

350

.14%

0

Available

3

Totals

248,448

100.00%

15

Source: The Green Papers, 2012   Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions.       http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/NH-R

*New Hampshire  would have had a total of 23 delegates consisting of six district delegates,   10 at-large delegates, three party leader delegates and four bonus delegates.   However, the state rescheduled the state primary to Jan. 10 and under the   rules of the Republican Party forfeited 50 percent of its delegates. Also,   the three state party leader delegates attend the national convention as   nonvoting delegates.

On Jan. 3 the voters of Iowa met in 1,774 precinct caucuses to vote for their choice for the Republican presidential candidate by electing delegates to their county conventions.  The 99 county conventions then select delegates to the Iowa Congressional District Convention and the State Convention on June 12. This convention determines the delegates to the Republican National Convention. In 2012 Iowa will send 28 delegates to the nominating convention including 10 at-large, 12 for the four congressional districts (three per district), three party and three bonus. However, unlike other states where delegates are usually bound for the first vote, Iowa delegates are soft-pledged or not bound to vote for a particular candidate.

Results for Iowa   Republican Caucus

U.S. Presidential Jan. 03, 2012

Candidate

Popular Vote

Percentage

Delegates*

Richard J. “Rick” Santorum

29,839

24.56%

6

Willard “Mitt” Romney

29,805

24.53%

6

Ronald E. “Ron” Paul

26,036

21.43%

6

Newton Leroy “Newt” Gingrich

16,163

13.30%

4

Richard J. “Rick” Perry

12,557

10.33%

3

Michele M. Bachmann

6,046

4.98%

0

Jon M. Huntsman, Jr.

739

0.61%

0

Available

3

Totals 

121,501

100.000%

28

Source: The Green Papers, 2012   Presidential Primaries, Caucuses and Conventions. http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P12/IA-R   

*Iowa has a total of 28 delegates   consisting of 12 district delegates, 10 at-large delegates, three party   leader delegates and three bonus delegates. The 25 non- party leader   delegates were allocated to the candidates with more than five percent of the   popular vote. This is an estimate that will change by the time the state   convention meets.

On Super Tuesday, March 6, the greatest number of states hold their primary and caucus elections with the greatest number of national convention delegates, 437, elected on a single date. There are seven primary states–Georgia, Massachusetts, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont and Virginia; and three caucus states–Alaska, Idaho and North Dakota holding elections on this date.

A firm date for the Texas open primary is still awaiting a federal court decision by a three-judge panel in San Antonio approving Texas voting maps. The primary will most likely take place on May 29 for 155 delegates.

 [Raymond Thomas Pronk is host of the Pronk Pops Show on KDUX web radio from 3-5 p.m. Wednesdays and author of the companion blog www.pronkpops.wordpress.com]

Pronk Pops Show 61:February 8, 2011

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Republican Party Presidential Candidates Race to Win 1,144 Delegates–Updated Delegate Count–Videos

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