The Boss’ Speech–Bruce Springsteen’s Keynote Speech at South By South West Festival, SXSW, Austin, Texas, March, 2012–Videos

Posted on March 17, 2012. Filed under: Communications, Culture, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Radio, Raves, Video, Wealth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Bruce Springsteen’s keynote speech at the SXSW Festival, Austin, Texas

Keynote speech at the South by South West Festival in Austin, Texas. Bruce comes in after 4 minutes. It’s almost an hour long, but if you have the time, definitely worth watching.

Bruce Springsteen – Dancing In The Dark

Bruce Springsteen – Born To Run

We Take Care Of Our Own – Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen-Jack of all trades

 

I’ll mow your lawn, clean the leaves out your drain

I’ll mend your roof to keep out the rain

 I’ll take the work that god provides

I’m a jack of all trades, honey, we’ll be alright

I’ll hammer the nails, and i’ll set the stone

 I’ll harvest your crops when they’re ripe and grown

 I’ll pull that engine apart and patch her up ’til she’s running right

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

A hurricane blows, brings a hard rain

 When the blue sky breaks, feels like the world’s gonna change

 We’ll start caring for each other like jesus said that we might

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

The banker man grows fatter, the working man grows thin

 It’s all happened before and it’ll happen again

 It’ll happen again, they’ll bet your life

 I’m a jack of all trades and, darling, we’ll be alright

Now sometimes tomorrow comes soaked in treasure and blood

Here we stood the drought, now we’ll stand the flood

 There’s a new world coming, i can see the light

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

So you use what you’ve got, and you learn to make do

 You take the old, you make it new

 If i had me a gun, i’d find the bastards and shoot ’em on sight

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

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American and German War Propaganda–War Made Easy In A Warfare and Welfare State–Videos

Posted on March 3, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, Diasters, Economics, Energy, European History, Foreign Policy, government spending, history, Language, Law, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Radio, Raves, Video, War, Wealth, Weapons, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

NBC Execs Privately Briefed On War With Iran By General McCaffrey

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HITLER IN COLOUR #1

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The Hyphenated American and The Hyphen

Posted on April 16, 2009. Filed under: Immigration, Law, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Raves, Uncategorized, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all. This is just as true of the man who puts “native” before the hyphen as of the man who puts German or Irish or English or French before the hyphen. Americanism is a matter of the spirit and of the soul. Our allegiance must be purely to the United States. We must unsparingly condemn any man who holds any other allegiance. But if he is heartily and singly loyal to this Republic, then no matter where he was born, he is just as good an American as any one else.”

~Theodore Roosevelt, 1915

The Hyphen – By John Wayne

 

Hyphenated Americanism

 

John Wayne and the Pledge of Allegiance

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Frederic Remington–Videos

Posted on February 18, 2009. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Links, Music, People, Quotations, Raves, Video | Tags: , , , , , , |

 

Art is a she-devil of a mistress, and if at times in earlier days she would not even stoop to my way of thinking, I have persevered and will so continue.

~Frederic Remington

 

Antoines Cabin, 1890

Antoines Cabin, 1890

Banff Cascade Mountain, 1890

Banff Cascade Mountain, 1890

 

To celebrate over 100,000 views and 330 posts on the Pronk Palisades blog I have posted two videos of the art works of Frederic Remington on YouTube channel, A Pronk Video Studio:

http://www.youtube.com/user/raymondpronk

 

Remington

 

Remington Sculptures

 

I hope you enjoy the videos as I did in creating them.

Thank you for your comments and ratings.

 

 

Blandy, 1890-1900

Blandy, 1890-1900

 

The End of The Day, 1904

The End of The Day, 1904

I knew the wild riders and the vacant land were about to vanish forever… and the more I considered the subject, the bigger the forever loomed. Without knowing how to do it, I began to record some facts around me, and the more I looked the more the panorama unfolded.

~Frederic Remington

 

Background Articles and Videos

 

Frederic Remington

Frederic Sackrider Remington (October 4, 1861 – December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the Old American West, specifically concentrating on the last quarter of the 19th century American West and images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U.S. Cavalry. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederic_Remington

 

Frederic Remington

http://visualwikipedia.com/en/Frederic_Remington

 

Frederic Remington Art Museum

http://www.fredericremington.org/

 

Remington-Art.com

http://www.remington-art.com/paintings.htm

 

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Robert Hughes–American Visions–Videos

Posted on November 12, 2008. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Homes, Links, Music, People, Quotations, Raves, Religion, Technology, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Updated September 26, 2015

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 1 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 1 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 1 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 1 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 1 (part 5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 2 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 2 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 2 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 2 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 2 (part 5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 3 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 3 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 3 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 3 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 3 (part 5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 4 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 4 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 4 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 4 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 4 (part5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 5 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 5 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 5 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 5 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 5 (part 5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 6 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 6 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 6 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 6 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 6 (part 5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 7 (part 1/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 7 (part 2/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 7 (part 3/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 7 (part 4/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – Episode 7 (part 5/5)

Robert Hughes – American Visions – 8th episode, part 1 of 5

Robert Hughes – American Visions – 8th episode, part 2 of 5

Robert Hughes – American Visions – 8th episode, part 3 of 5

Robert Hughes – American Visions – 8th episode, part 4 of 5

Robert Hughes – American Visions – 8th episode, part 5 of 5

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Enquiry Into the Beats: Robert Hughes and Clive James Interview (1959)

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Robert Hughes at ALA splitter 00

Robert Hughes at ALA splitter 01

Robert Hughes at ALA splitter 02

Robert Hughes at ALA splitter 03

Robert Hughes – Nexus Lecture 2009, Tilburg, The Netherlands

Robert Hughes, Nexus Lecture, Tilburg The Netherlands (2)

Robert Hughes Nexus Lecture 2009 Tilburg, The Netherlands

Playlist: Robert Hughes – American Visions (1997 TV series)

Charlie Rose: May 22, 1997
– An hour with Robert Hughes about American Visions

A conversation with art critic Robert Hughes about his eight-part PBS series and accompanying 600-page book, “The Epic History of Art in America”, which profiles Georgia O’Keefe, Andy Warhol, Edward Hopper, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

Charlie Rose – An hour with Robert Hughes

Charlie Rose: June 8, 1995

First, former Secretary of Education William Bennett and art critic Robert Hughes of “Time” magazine discuss the influence popular entertainment has on American culture and behavior, and whether the demand for products should outweigh potential consequences.

Charlie Rose – FUERTH / R. HUGHES

GUESTS/AFFILIATIONS: Leon Fuerth, National Security Advisor to Vice President Gore /// Robert Hughes, Art Critic, Time Magazine / Author; 3 clips from “Australia: Beyond the Fatal Shore” [Thirteen/WNET New York]

Australian critic Robert Hughes dead at 74

Remembering Robert

Remembering Robert Hughes

Robert Hughes

Robert Studley Forrest Hughes AO (born 28 July 1938) is an Australian-born art critic, writer and television documentary maker who has resided in New York since 1970.

“…His 1997 television series American Visions reviewed the history of American art since the Revolution. He was again dismissive of recent art; this time, sculptor Jeff Koons was subjected to scathing criticism. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hughes_(critic)

Author: Robert Hughes

“…

http://www.librarything.com/author/hughesrobert

Robert Hughes (critic)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other people named Robert Hughes, see Robert Hughes (disambiguation).
Robert Studley Forrest Hughes
AO
Born 28 July 1938
Sydney, Australia
Died 6 August 2012 (aged 74)
The Bronx, New York City
Education Saint Ignatius’ College, Riverview
Alma mater University of Sydney
Occupation
Spouse(s)
Parent(s) Geoffrey Forrest Hughes
Relatives Thomas Eyre Forrest Hughes(brother)
Lucy Turnbull (niece)

Robert Studley Forrest Hughes AO (28 July 1938 – 6 August 2012) was an Australian-born art critic, writer, and producer of television documentaries. His best sellerThe Fatal Shore (1987) is a study of the British penal colonies and early history of Australia. He was described in 1997 by Robert Boynton of The New York Times as “the most famous art critic in the world.”[1][2]

Hughes earned widespread recognition for his book and television series on Modern art, The Shock of the New, and for his longstanding position as art critic with TIMEmagazine. Known for his contentious critiques of art and artists, Hughes was generally conservative in his tastes, although he did not belong to a particular philosophical camp. Raising criticism to the level of art, his writing was noted for its power and elegance.[2]

Early life

Hughes was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1938. His father and paternal grandfather were lawyers. Hughes’s father, Geoffrey Forrest Hughes, was a pilot in the First World War, with later careers as a solicitor and company director. He died from lung cancer when Robert was aged 12.[1][2] His mother was Margaret Eyre Sealy, née Vidal. His older brother, Thomas Eyre Forrest Hughes, is an Australian lawyer and a formerAttorney-General of Australia.

Growing up in Rose Bay, Sydney,[3] Hughes was educated at St Ignatius’ College, Riverview before studying arts and then architecture at the University of Sydney.[4][5] At university, he associated with the Sydney “Push” – a group of artists, writers, intellectuals and drinkers. Among the group were Germaine Greer and Clive James.[1] Hughes, an aspiring artist and poet, abandoned his university endeavours to become first a cartoonist and then an art critic for the Sydney periodical The Observer, edited by Donald Horne.[6] Around this time he wrote a history of Australian painting, titled The Art of Australia, published in 1966 and still considered an important work.[1] Hughes was briefly involved in the original Sydney version of Oz magazine and wrote art criticism for The Nation and The Sunday Mirror.[citation needed]

Career

Hughes left Australia for Europe in 1964, living for a time in Italy before settling in London in 1965,[1] where he wrote for The Spectator, The Daily Telegraph, The Times, and The Observer, among others, and contributed to the London version of Oz. In 1970 he was appointed art critic for TIME magazine and moved to New York, where he soon became an influential voice.[5]

Hughes and Harold Hayes were recruited in 1978 to anchor the new ABC News (US) newsmagazine 20/20. His only broadcast, on 6 June 1978, proved so controversial that, less than a week later, ABC News president Roone Arledge terminated the contracts of both men, replacing them with veteran TV host Hugh Downs.[2] Hughes co-produced, in association with German producer Reiner Moritz and Lorna Pegram, the BBC eight-part series The Shock of the New (1980) on the development of modern art since the Impressionists. It was accompanied by a book with the same title. John O’Connor of The New York Times said, “Agree or disagree, you will not be bored. Mr. Hughes has a disarming way of being provocative.”[7]

Hughes’ sbook The Fatal Shore followed in 1987. A study of the British penal colonies and early European settlement of Australia, it became an international best-seller.[2] During the late 1990s, Hughes was a prominent supporter of the Australian Republican Movement.[8]

Hughes’s TV series American Visions (1997) reviewed the history of American art since the Revolution.[1] Australia: Beyond the Fatal Shore (2000) was a series musing on modern Australia and Hughes’s relationship with it. During production, Hughes was involved in a near-fatal road accident.[9] Hughes’s documentary on Francisco Goya, Goya: Crazy Like a Genius (2002),[4] was broadcast on the first night of the new British domestic digital service, BBC Four.[citation needed] He created a one-hour update to The Shock of the New, titled The New Shock of the New, which first aired in 2004.[10] He published the first volume of his memoirs,Things I Didn’t Know, in 2006.[11]

Personal life

Hughes met his first wife, Danne Emerson, in London in 1967. Together they became involved in the counterculture of the 1960s, exploring drug use and sexual freedom.[2][12] They divorced in 1981; she died of a brain tumor in 2003.[2][13] Their son, Danton, Hughes’s only child,[1] was named after the French revolutionary Georges Danton.[4] Danton Hughes, a sculptor, committed suicide in 2002. Hughes later wrote: “I miss Danton and always will, although we had been miserably estranged for years and the pain of his loss has been somewhat blunted by the passage of time”.[5]

Hughes was married to his second wife, Victoria Whistler, a housewife from California, from 1981 until a divorce in 1996.[5]

In 1999, Hughes was involved in a near-fatal car accident south of Broome, Western Australia. He was returning from a fishing trip and driving on the wrong side of the road when he collided head on with another car carrying three occupants. He was trapped in the car for three hours before being airlifted to Perth in critical condition.[9] Hughes was in a coma for five weeks after the crash.[14] In a 2000 court hearing Hughes’s defense barrister alleged that the occupants of the other car had been transporting illicit drugs at the time of the accident and were at fault.[15] In 2003 Hughes pled guilty to dangerous driving causing bodily harm and was fined A$2,500.[14] Hughes recounts the story of the accident and his recovery in the first chapter of his 2006 memoir Things I Didn’t Know.[16][17]

In 2001, Hughes wed his third wife, the American artist and art director, Doris Downes. “Apart from being a talented painter, she saved my life, my emotional stability, such as it is”, he said.[18]

Hughes was brother of Australian politician Thomas Hughes and uncle of former Sydney Lord Mayor Lucy Turnbull. Lucy Turnbull is wife of Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Death

After a long illness, Hughes died at Calvary Hospital in The Bronx, New York, on 6 August 2012, with his wife at his bedside. He was also survived by two stepsons from his wife’s previous marriage, Freeborn Garrettson Jewett IV and Fielder Douglas Jewett; his brothers, Tom and Geoffrey Hughes; a sister, Mrs. Constance Crisp; and many nieces and nephews.[2]

Assessment

When The Shock of the New was proposed to the BBC, television programmers were skeptical that a journalist could properly follow the aristocratic tone of Kenneth Clark, whose Civilisation had been so successful.[19] The Shock of the New proved to be a popular and critical success: it has been assessed “much the best synoptic introduction to modern art ever written”, taking as its premise the vitality gained by modern art when it ceded the need to replicate nature in favor of a more direct expression of human experience and emotion.[20] Hughes’ explanations of modern art benefited from the coherence of his judgments, and were marked by his ability to summarise the essential qualities of his subject.[19]

Be they positive or negative, his judgments were enthusiastic. He championed London painters like Frank Auerbach and Lucian Freud, helping to popularise the latter in the United States, and wrote with unabashed admiration for Francisco Goya and Pierre Bonnard.[21] By contrast Hughes was dismissive of much postmodernism and neo-expressionism, as well as the vicissitudes of a money-fueled art market.[21] While his reviews expressed antipathy for the avant-garde, he was beholden neither to any theory nor ideology, and managed to provoke both ends of the political spectrum.[19] He distrusted novelty in art for its own sake, yet he was also disdainful of a conservative aesthetic that avoided risk. Hughes, according to Adam Gopnik, was drawn to work that was rough-hewn, “craft attempted with passion.”[20]

Hughes’s critical prose, vivid in both praise and indignation, has been compared to that of George Bernard Shaw,[20] Jonathan Swift[21] and William Shakespeare.[19][21] “His prose”, according to a colleague, “was lithe, muscular and fast as a bunch of fives. He was incapable of writing the jargon of the art world, and consequently was treated by its mandarins with fear and loathing.”[19] In different moods he could write that “Schnabel’s work is to painting what Stallone’s is to acting: a lurching display of oily pectorals,”[21] as well as conclude that Antoine Watteau “was a connoisseur of the unplucked string, the immobility before the dance, the moment that falls between departure and nostalgia.”[19]

Honours

Bibliography

Books

Critical studies and reviews

Biographies

  • Anderson, Patricia (2009). Robert Hughes: The Australian Years, Sydney: Pandora Press; ISBN 978-0-9579142-2-3
  • Britain, Ian (1997). Once An Australian: Journeys with Barry Humphries, Clive James, Germaine Greer and Robert Hughes, Oxford University Press; ISBN 0195537424

Notes

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g Boynton, Robert S. (12 May 1997). “The Lives of Robert Hughes”. The New Yorker. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g h Kennedy, Randy (6 August 2012). “Robert Hughes, Art Critic Whose Writing Was Elegant and Contentious, Dies at 74”. The New York Times. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  3. Jump up^ “‘Robert Hughes was Australia’s Dante,’ says his friend Peter Carey”. The Guardian. 7 August 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b c “Robert Hughes made high art accessible”. The Australian. 7 August 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Williamson, Marcus (8 August 2012). “Robert Hughes: Forthright critic who transformed the public perception of modern art”. The Independent. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  6. Jump up^ Rose, Peter. “Up On Stilts”. Australian Book Review. Archived from the original on 22 October 2008. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  7. Jump up^ O’Connor, John (11 January 1981). “A Provocative New Series on Modern Art”. New York Times. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  8. Jump up^ “Australian art critic Robert Hughes dies, aged 74”. BBC News. 14 April 2003. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  9. ^ Jump up to:a b Rothenberg, Jackie (30 May 1999). “Art Critic Robert Hughes Seriously Hurt In Crash”. NYPOST.com. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  10. Jump up^ Robert Hughes (30 June 2004). “Robert Hughes on updating The Shock Of The New”. Guardian. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
  11. Jump up^ “Things I didn’t know: Book review”. The Scotsman. 14 October 2006. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  12. Jump up^ Maunder, Patricia (7 August 2012). “Robert Hughes turned criticism into an art”. Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  13. Jump up^ Hughes, Robert (2006). Things I Didn’t Know: A Memoir. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. p. 296. ISBN 9780307385987.
  14. ^ Jump up to:a b “Art critic admits crash guilt”. BBC News. 14 April 2003. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  15. Jump up^ Rothenberg, Jackie (6 June 1999). “Drug Link Eyed For Men Who Struck Hughes’s Car”. NYPOST.com. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  16. Jump up^ Hughes, Robert (2006). Things I Didn’t Know: A Memoir. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. pp. 3–33. ISBN 9780307385987.
  17. Jump up^ “Robert Hughes”. The Telegraph. 7 August 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  18. Jump up^ Bennett, Lennie (9 November 2003). “The art of conversation”. St. Petersburg Times Floridian. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  19. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f McNay, Michael (6 August 2012). “Robert Hughes obituary”. The Guardian. Retrieved 17 March 2013.
  20. ^ Jump up to:a b c Gopnik, Adam (7 August 2012). “Postscript: Robert Hughes”. The New Yorker. Retrieved 17 March 2013.
  21. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e Lacayo, Richard (7 August 2012). “The Art of Being Critical: Robert Hughes (1938–2012)”. Time magazine. Retrieved 17 March 2013.
  22. ^ Jump up to:a b “Awards: Frank Jewett Mather Award”. The College Art Association. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  23. Jump up^ “It’s an Honour: Australia Celebrating Australians”. Government of Australia. 10 June 1991. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  24. Jump up^ http://www20.gencat.cat/portal/site/portaldogc/menuitem.c973d2fc58aa0083e4492d92b0c0e1a0/?action=fitxa&documentId=428102&languageFitxa=ca_ES&newLang=ca_ES. Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hughes_(critic)

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