Gardner Mckay — Toyer — Videos

Posted on February 3, 2015. Filed under: American History, Art, Art, Blogroll, Books, College, Communications, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Fiction, Freedom, Friends, history, Language, liberty, Life, Links, Literature, media, Movies, People, Philosophy, Photos, Radio, Raves, Television, Wisdom, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

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Gardner Mckay

VANITY FAIR, DOMINICK DUNNE – “GARDNER MCKAY’S BRILLIANTLY INTRICATE NOVEL,TOYER, IS FRIGHTENING, FASCINATING, AND WONDERFULLY WELL WRITTEN.

THERE WERE TIMES READING IT WHEN I HAD TO PUT IT DOWN TO COLLECT MYSELF BEFORE PICKING IT UP AGAIN.”

JIMMY BUFFETT – “THE MOST EFFECTIVE, EXCITING, BIZARRE TALE POSSIBLE. IN TOYER,MCKAY HAS GIVEN US AN ARRAY OF VICTIMS WHO FALL INTO THE VENUS FLYTRAP OF A VILLAIN AS CUNNING AS RICHARD III AND A MANIACAL AS HANNIBAL LECTER.”

JAMES CAMERON – TOYER IS A NOVEL WHERE LOS ANGELES STARS AS ITSELF, THE CITY OF MASKS, WHERE RELATIONSHIPS PEEL THE ONION OF DARK REVELATION, AS TWO ADVERSARIES COUPLE IN A SEDUCTIVE DEATH-LOCK. GARDNER MCKAY HAS WOVEN A CHILLING AND DISTURBING DESCENT INTO THE CATACOMBS OF THE MIND.”

LEON BING – “WHOEVER PICKS UP GARDNER MCKAY’S NOVEL, TOYER, WILL KNOW, EARLY ON, THAT A MASTER HAS LAID HANDS ON THEM. THIS IS A BOOK OF SUCH SHEER, BRUTAL BRILLIANCE THAT THE READER OFTEN FEELS LIKE A PASSENGER TRAPPED ON A RUNAWAY TRAIN RACKETING ALONG A DOWNHILL TRACK.

MR. MCKAY IS A SUPERBLY ACCOMPLISHED WRITER; NOT SINCE HANNIBAL LECTER HAS THERE BEEN A LITERARY CHARACTER OF SUCH SILKEN AND ABSOLUTE MENACE AS TOYER.” –

THE NEW YORK TIMES – ”Connoisseurs – will appreciate the gorgeous imagery of McKay’s novel – the bizarre beauty of his writing.”

LOS ANGELES TIMES – “Anyone should make a beeline for  McKay’s novel.”

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICAL – “FIRST RATE.”

HONOLULU STAR-BULLETIN, JOHN BERGER – “Almost impossible to put down. Read it once for the story. Read it at least twice more for the writing.”

LOS ANGELES MAGAZINE – BOOK PICK OF THE MONTH – ”Reminiscent of the best of classical L.A.noir – chilling.”

BOSTON GLOBE – “As bad as this title is as good as this book is. Slick, sensitive, brilliant.”

HONOLULU ADVERTISER, WANDA ADAMS – Insightful writing, unexpected plot, arresting asides, delicious evocations, and its unique take on a very much tried formula. [ I will ] read it again.”

HONOLULU WEEKLY, STUART COLEMAN – “ I couldn’t put it down.”

REDBOOK  MAGAZINE – PICK OF THE MONTH

JANE MAGAZINE –    “ * * * * *  –  Perfect.”

HONOLULU ADVERTISER  – # 1 BEST SELLER

WILLIAM SPEAR  (JUNEAU) – “A classy brain- clearing thriller.”

KATE JACKSON – “A stunning success. A wonderful book – brilliantly twisted.”

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER – “A true psychological thriller that will leave the reader mentally drained.”

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Gardner McKay – Actor, Writer, Icon

Adventures in Paradise a Tribute to Gardner Mckay in photos

TOYER – Annabel & Andrew scene

“Toyer” by Gardner McKay

“Toyer” by Gardner McKay. Directed by Jon Gonzalez. Here’s a short play I directed. Starring Laya Hernandez and Zebastian Duchene.

Gardner McKay

Adventures in Paradise – Isle of Eden

An extract of the episode “Isle of Eden” of the “Adventures of Paradise” TV series, broadcasted on ABC TV in the USA on February 22nd 1960. Starring Gardner McKay, as Adam Troy, captain of the “Tiki, and as guest stars Yvonne De Carlo and Hugo Haas.

Sea Marks by Gardner McKay at The Irish Repertory Theatre

 

Adventures In Paradise Somewhere South of Suva part 2 Gardner Mckay 1960

Biography

copy-Gardner_pix.jpgGeorge Cadogan Gardner McKay was born in Manhattan, New York City, his early years were spent in France, Connecticut and Kentucky. He attended Cornell University where he edited the humor magazine, wrote a film review column for the paper, was briefly president of his class and rowed on their crew.

At age fifteen, he published his first story. His novel Toyer  won critical acclaim upon its release in 1998 and is currently in pre-production for a major motion film.

He has been awarded several prizes for his writing:- The Drama Critics Award for playwriting, The Sydney Carrington Prize. He won three National Endowment for the Arts grants for playwriting. Five of his play have been published by Samuel French Publishing Company, New York, Los Angeles, London: Sea Marks, Masters of the Sea, Toyer, Me, In Order of Appearance. His plays have been, and continue to be, produced in every state in the union and internationally.

Sea Marks won the National Regional Theatre Award in Canada. The Drama Critics Circle Award, best play of the year. And has been produced in NYC in six Off-Broadway productions; the Players Theatre (“Best Off- Broadway Play, Walter Kerr, New York Times) the Manhattan Theatre Club, and other theatres. It has been presented at the Eisenhower Theatre, The Kennedy Center in Washington D. C. The Edinburgh Festival and The Pitlochry Festival, Scotland. It has also been broadcast on B.B.C. Radio Theatre, London.

McKay’s play Toyer was first staged at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. – starring  Kathleen Turner and Brad Davis, directed by, Tony Richardson. It has also  been produced by Michael White in England – starring Rupert Graves,  and later in  London’s West End.

Other plays of his – in random order- of various lengths that have been produced are: – Untold Damage (PBS) Written and directed by Mr. McKay for PBS starring Richard Dreyfuss, Geraldine Fitzgerald, tracy Swope, Josh Bryant. It was cited as the best television production by the Television Theatre. Narcissa-Narcissus, Tapes, The Girl Next  Door is Screaming, The Suit, The Visitor, Meeting, Silver Eyes, The Honeyman, Yeats/Millay, Becker, The People we Kill, Alligators Have no Choice.

He was Drama critic and Drama editor for the Los Angeles Herald Tribune. During the time he was with the Herald he invented a method of review called the “Triple Review” three brief reviews of the same play by three writers. The lone newspaper’s  “Voice of the Critic” was hushed for these reviews and, instead, the review became an argument of the play’s worth on the forum of its pages.

He has taught playwriting at U.C.L.A at his Playwriting Roundtable. Later he taught playwriting and screenwriting at University of Southern California, Juneau Alaska, and the University of Hawaii.

During the ’70 and ‘80s he started a small professional group called the Playwrights’ Exchange. He personally constructed a 50-seat theatre off the kitchen of his L.A. house and every Tuesday playwrights gathered to see new work being read in whole or in fragments by professional actors. The theatre was named The Free Theatre, mainly because no money changed hands; emblematic of playwriting.

From 1995 – until his death in November 2001,  Gardner wrote and recorded stories for his weekly radio show “Stories on the Wind” which aired each Sunday.

McKay has also been a  sculptor ( several of his works are in the Museum of Modern Art, NYC and the Whitney Museum.) He has been a professional skipper, photographer, actor (Adventures in Paradise, Boots and Saddles), and has raised African lions.

http://gardnermckay.net/biography

 

Gardner McKay

George Cadogan Gardner McKay (June 10, 1932 – November 21, 2001) was an American actor, artist, and author.

Biography

Born in New York City, McKay was the great-grandson[1] of the shipbuilder Donald McKay. He attended Cornell University in Ithaca, New York for two years,[2] where he majored in art. He became a Hollywood heartthrob in the 1950s and 1960s. He landed the lead role in Adventures in Paradise, based loosely on the writings of James Michener. His character, Adam Troy, is a Korean War veteran who purchased the two-masted 82-foot (25 m) schooner Tiki III, and sailed the South Pacific.

McKay was under contract to MGM when he was spotted by Dominick Dunne, then a television producer for Twentieth Century Fox, who was searching for an actor to star in his planned Adventures in Paradise. Dunne put his business card on the table and said, “If you’re interested in discussing a television series, call me.” McKay competed in screen tests with nine other candidates, and won it because of his good looks and ability to sail. An accomplished sailor, he had made eight Atlantic crossings by the age of seventeen. Although previously unknown to the public, McKay appeared on the July 6, 1959, cover of Life Magazine just two months before the series premiered.

In the 1957–1958 season, McKay played United States Army Lieutenant Dan Kelly in the 38-episode syndicatedwestern series, Boots and Saddles, with co-stars Jack Pickard and Patrick McVey.[3] Thereafter, he was cast in the episode “Showdown” of the NBC western, Jefferson Drum, with Jeff Richards.

McKay’s final film was the 1968 I Sailed to Tahiti with an All Girl Crew written and directed by Richard L. Bare.

McKay left Hollywood to pursue his interest in photography, sculpture, and writing. He turned down the opportunity to star opposite Marilyn Monroe in Something’s Got to Give, a film which was never completed. He exhibited his sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, besides holding individual exhibitions. His lifeboat rescue photographs of the Andrea Doria were published internationally. McKay wrote many plays and novels, and was a literary critic for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner between 1977 and 1982. He taught writing classes at the University of California at Los Angeles, University of Southern California, University of Alaska, and the University of Hawaii. In 2014 his play Sea Marks was produced Off-Broadway at the Irish Repertory Theatre.

McKay’s awards included three National Endowment for the Arts fellowships for playwriting, the Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play, and Sidney Carrington Prize. He was a winner in Canadian Regional Drama Festival, and runner-up in the Hemingway Short Story Contest.

Last years

McKay settled in Hawaii, where he died from prostate cancer in 2001, at the age of sixty-nine. He was survived by his wife, Madeleine Madigan, a painter, and two children.

References

External links

Gardner McKay at the Internet Movie Database

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gardner_McKay

 

Brian De Palma Toys With Toyer Again

By Claude Brodesser-Akner

 

Six years ago, reports surfaced that Brian De Palma would next be directing the diabolical Gardner McKay novel and stage play Toyer, which follows a “serial lunatic.” The Toyer doesn’t murder or rape his beautiful female victims, he “toys” with them, torturing them psychologically, then puttting them into a medically induced coma. (Sort of like what De Palma did to audiences in Snake Eyes … We kid, Brian!)

Anyway, without a capital crime to prosecute, the police and D.A. can only charge the Toyer with “mayhem,” and as they’re overwhelmed with hundreds of uncleared murder cases, the Toyer case becomes a lower priority. So a female neurologist who treats Toyer’s victims teams up with a newspaper editor to draw him out and bring him to justice.

This time, we’re told, Toyer really is happening, but as an indie financed via producers Tarak Ben Ammar, (who most famously produced Franco Zefferilli’s La Traviata) and the L.A.-based Scott Steindorff. Steindorff has brought heavyweight literature like Philip Roth’s The Human Stain and Gabriel García Márquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera to the screen, and tells Vulture that the film will be shooting in Venice, Italy, late this fall and into the early winter.

That’s a switch from the Gardner version, which is set in L.A., but should be far creepier: De Palma plans to set the mayhem against Venice’s famous Carnevale di Venezia, for which elaborate masks disguising one’s identity are traditionally worn on the street from St. Stephen’s Day (the day after Christmas) until the start of the Venitian Carnival (two weeks before Ash Wednesday). Steindorff says shooting during the actual Carnival (during February and March) would be logistically impossible. They plan to re-create their own Carnival on location.

“It has all the elements of suspense that Brian does so well in films likeBlow Out and Carrie,” Steindorff says, adding, “And by that I mean, it’s really frickin’ scary: I read the script on a plane, and I was still terrified.”

http://www.vulture.com/2010/08/vulture_exclusive_writer-direc.html

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Sterling Hayden Interviewed By Tom Synder — Photos and Videos

Posted on July 13, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, European History, history, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Movies, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Security, Talk Radio, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

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Tom Russell : Sterling Hayden

This song comes from Tom Russell’s 2011 release, ‘Mesabi’, available through Tom’s website – http://www.tomrussell.com – and the usual record outlets. Sterling Hayden (March 26, 1916 — May 23, 1986) was an American actor and author. For most of his career as a leading man, he specialized in westerns and film noir, such as Johnny Guitar, The Asphalt Jungle and The Killing. Later on he became noted as a character actor for such roles as Gen. Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). He also played the Irish policeman, Captain McCluskey, in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather in 1972, and the novelist Roger Wade in 1973’s The Long Goodbye. The quote at the beginning of the video comes from Hayden’s autobiography, “Wanderer” (1963).

Dr. Strangelove – Precious Bodily Fluids

Dr. Strangelove (4/8) Movie CLIP – Water and Commies (1964) HD

The Godfather (3/9) Movie CLIP – Killing Sollozzo and McCluskey (1972) HD

Sterling Hayden- The Golden Hawk (1952) 1

The Asphalt Jungle-Doublecross scene

Sterling Hayden in Johnny Guitar (1954) – Coffee & Smoke Scene

“The Killing” Chess Club Scene (Stanley Kubrick, 1956)

Martin Scorsese introduces Johnny Guitar (USA, 1954) dir. Nicholas Ray

Johnny Guitar

Taste of Strangelove Number 2

“The Killing” Chess Club Scene (Stanley Kubrick, 1956)

Dr. Strangelove (4/8) Movie CLIP – Water and Commies (1964) HD

The Godfather (3/9) Movie CLIP – Killing Sollozzo and McCluskey (1972) HD

Sterling Hayden interview Part 1 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 2 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 3 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 4 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 5 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 6 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 1 of four on  Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder  5-29-1980

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 2 of four on Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder  5 29 1980

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 3 of four on Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder  5 29 1980

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 4 of four on Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder

Sterling Hayden, 3rd interview of 3 Part 1 of three on  Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder

Sterling Hayden, 3rd interview of 3 Part 2 of three on  Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder

Sterling Hayden, 3rd interview of 3 (part 3 of 3) Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder 

Cinéma Cinémas – Sterling Hayden (suite & fin) 

Kansas Pacific (1953) STERLING HAYDEN

1954 – Suddenly – FRANK SINATRA & STERLING HAYDEN | Lewis Allen

Suddenly 1954 – Frank Sinatra/Sterling Hayden/James Gleason/Nancy Gates

Sterling Hayden – Top Gun (1955) Full Western 

Valerie 1957 Sterling Hayden Anita Ekberg Legendado

Sterling Hayden – Kansas Pacific – Full Movie – 1953

Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden (born Sterling Relyea Walter; March 26, 1916 – May 23, 1986) was an American actor and author. For most of his career as a leading man, he specialized in westerns and film noir, such as Johnny Guitar, The Asphalt Jungle and The Killing. Later on he became noted as a character actor for such roles as Gen. Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). He also played the Irish-American policeman, Captain McCluskey, in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather in 1972, and the novelist Roger Wade in 1973’s The Long Goodbye. He played the role of Leo Dalcò in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 1900 in 1976. At six feet five inches (196 cm),[1] he was taller than most actors.

Biography

Early life, education

He was born in Montclair, New Jersey, to George and Frances Walter, who named him Sterling Relyea Walter.[2][3] After his father died, he was adopted at the age of nine by James Hayden and renamed Sterling Walter Hayden. He grew up in coastal towns of New England,[4] and as a child lived in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Maine, where he attended Wassookeag School in Dexter, Maine.

Hayden was a genuine adventurer and man of action, not dissimilar from many of his movie parts. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and took a job as mate on a schooner.[5] His first voyage was to Newport Beach, California from New London, Connecticut.[4] Later, he was a fisherman on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, ran a charter yacht, and served as a fireman on eleven trips to Cuba aboard a steamer.[4] He skippered a trading schooner in the Caribbean after earning his master’s license, and in 1937 he served as mate on a world cruise of the schooner Yankee.[4] After serving as sailor and fireman on larger vessels and sailing around the world several times, he was awarded his first command aged 22, skippering the square rigger Florence C. Robinson 7,700 miles from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to Tahiti in 1938.[4][6][7]

Hollywood years and military service

Hayden became a print model and later signed a contract with Paramount Pictures, who dubbed the 6′ 5″ (1.96 m)[1] actor “The Most Beautiful Man in the Movies” and “The Beautiful Blond Viking God”. His first film, Virginia (1941), starred Madeleine Carroll, with whom he fell in love and married.

After two film roles, he left Hollywood and joined the Marines as a private, under the name “John Hamilton” (a pseudonym Hayden only used in the military). While at Parris Island he was recommended for Officer Candidate School. After graduation, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and was transferred to service as an undercover agent with William J. Donovan’s COI office. He remained there after it became the OSS.[8][9][10]

As OSS agent John Hamilton, his World War II service included sailing with supplies from Italy to Yugoslav partisans and parachuting into fascist Croatia. Hayden, who also participated in the Naples-Foggia campaign and established air crew rescue teams in enemy-occupied territory, became a first lieutenant on September 13, 1944, and a captain on February 14, 1945. He received the Silver Star (for gallantry in action in the Balkans and Mediterranean; “Lt. Hamilton displayed great courage in making hazardous sea voyages in enemy-infested waters and reconnaissance through enemy-held areas”), a Bronze Arrowhead device for parachuting behind enemy lines, and a commendation from Yugoslavia’s Marshal Tito. He left active duty on December 24, 1945.[10]

His great admiration for the bravery of the Communist partisans led to a brief membership in the Communist Party. He was apparently active in supporting an effort by the Communist-controlled motion picture painters’ union to absorb other film industry unions.[11] As the Red Scare deepened in U.S., he cooperated with the House Un-American Activities Committee, confessing his brief Communist ties and “naming names.”[2] His wife at that time, Betty de Noon, insisted that the ‘names’ her ex-husband provided were already in the hands of the Committee, which had a copy of the Communist Party’s membership list. In any event, Hayden subsequently repudiated his cooperation with the Committee, stating in his autobiography “I don’t think you have the foggiest notion of the contempt I have had for myself since the day I did that thing.”[2]

Personal life

Sterling Hayden often professed distaste for film acting, claiming he did it mainly to pay for his ships and voyages. In 1958, after a bitter divorce, he was awarded custody of his children. He defied a court order and sailed to Tahiti with all four children, Christian, Dana, Gretchen and Matthew.[12] The crew sailed from San Francisco Bay to Tahiti, where Hayden had planned to film a movie. Hayden also invited well known photographer Dody Weston Thompson along to document the trip and to help shoot location choices. Her South Seas folio is replete with fascinating photographs of the Hayden’s ship The Wanderer, on-deck photos of life aboard the ship, colorful prints of his children, Tahitian women and children, and of unique artifacts on shore. The film did not materialize, however, and according to Dody’s notes U.S. Camera printed these photographs of paradise in 1961.

Marin County Superior Court Judge Harold Haley would later order Hayden to repay Republic Pictures, who financed the trip with two promissory notes, nearly $50,000 for defaulting on an agreement to repay the debt.[13] In 1960, he married Catherine Devine McConnell. They had two sons, Andrew and David, and were married until his death in 1986. McConnell also had a son from her first marriage, to journalist Scott McConnell.

In the early 1960s, Hayden rented one of the pilot houses of the retired ferryboat Berkeley, docked in Sausalito, California where he resided while writing his autobiography Wanderer, which was first published in 1963. In it, he reminisces about turning points in his life:

“The sun beats down and you pace, you pace and you pace. Your mind flies free and you see yourself as an actor, condemned to a treadmill wherein men and women conspire to breathe life into a screenplay that allegedly depicts life as it was in the old wild West. You see yourself coming awake any one of a thousand mornings between the spring of 1954, and that of 1958 ‑ alone in a double bed in a big white house deep in suburban Sherman Oaks, not far from Hollywood.
“The windows are open wide, and beyond these is the backyard swimming pool inert and green, within a picket fence. You turn and gaze at a pair of desks not far from the double bed. This is your private office, the place that shelters your fondest hopes: these desks so neat, patiently waiting for the day that never comes, the day you’ll sit down at last and begin to write.
“Why did you never write? Why, instead, did you grovel along, through the endless months and years, as a motion‑picture actor? What held you to it, to something you so vehemently professed to despise? Could it be that you secretly liked it—that the big dough and the big house and the high life meant more than the aura you spun for those around you to see?
“‘Hayden’s wild,’ they said. ‘He’s kind of nuts‑but you’ve got to hand it to him. He doesn’t give a damn about the loot or the stardom or things like that—something to do with his seafaring, or maybe what he went through in the war . . .'”[2]:151

In the 1970s, after his appearance in The Godfather, he appeared several times on NBC’s Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder, where he talked about his career resurgence and how it had funded his travels and adventures around the world. Hayden bought a canal barge in the Netherlands in 1969, eventually moving it to the heart of Paris and living on it part of the time. He also shared a home in Wilton, Connecticut with his family and had an apartment in Sausalito.

Hayden wrote two acclaimed books: an autobiography, Wanderer (1962), and a novel Voyage (1976).

Sterling Hayden died of prostate cancer in Sausalito in 1986, age 70.[5]

Bibliography

Filmography

References in Popular Culture

In the film Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, 1975), two veteran CIA officers were reminiscing about their past. Higgins (Cliff Robertson) asked Mr. Wabash, “You served with Col. Donovan in the OSS, didn’t you, sir?” Wabash (John Houseman) replies, “I sailed the Adriatic with a movie star at the helm. It doesn’t seem like much of a war now, but it was.”

In 2011 the American singer-songwriter Tom Russell released the song “Sterling Hayden” on his album Mesabi.

Hayden, under his nom de guerre Lieutenant John Hamilton, and his role as an OSS agent play a secondary part in the 2012 novel Deaths Door: A Billy Boyle World War II mystery by author James R. Benn. Hayden/Hamilton assists in getting protagonist Billy Boyle through German-occupied Italy.[14]

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Hayden 1977, p. 224
  2. ^ a b c d Hayden 1998, pp. 65–66, 76, 354
  3. ^ United States Census for 1920, Montclair Town, Essex County, New Jersey, p. Sheet 6B
  4. ^ a b c d e “Sterling Hayden Gives Up Sailing, Settles For Movie Career, Family”. Toledo Blade (Google News). January 14, 1951. Retrieved October 8, 2009. [dead link]
  5. ^ a b Krebs, Albin (May 24, 1986). “Sterling Hayden Dead at 70; an Actor, Writer and Sailor”. The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved October 8, 2009.
  6. ^ Hayden 1977, pp. 225–227
  7. ^ “New in the News”, Boy’s Life, Feb 1939, p. 25
  8. ^ “Chef Julia Child, others, part of WWII spy network”. CNN.com. Associated Press. August 14, 2008. Archived from the original on August 22, 2008.
  9. ^ Schlesinger, Robert (August 20, 2008). “Arthur Schlesinger Jr.’s Not-So-Secret Career as a Spy”. US News and World Report. Retrieved October 8, 2009.
  10. ^ a b Schuon, Karl (1963). U. S. Marine Corps Biographical Dictionary. New York: Watts. pp. 99–100. OCLC 1360534.
  11. ^ Meroney, John, “Left in the Past”, LA Times Magazine, February 2012.
  12. ^ “HOLLYWOOD: To Break Out”. TIME (New York: Time Inc.). February 9, 1959. Retrieved July 6, 2010.
  13. ^ “Film Actor Handed $49,518 Judgment”. Reading Eagle (Reading, Pennsylvania). Associated Press. August 6, 1961. p. 12. Retrieved July 6, 2010.
  14. ^ Benn, James R. (2012). New York, New York: Soho Press. ISBN 978-1-61695-185-6. Missing or empty |title= (help)

References

  • Hayden, Sterling (1977). Wanderer. New York: Norton. ISBN 0-393-07521-4. Unknown parameter |refs= ignored (help)
  • Hayden, Sterling (1998). Wanderer. Dobbs Ferry: Sheridan House. ISBN 978-1-57409-048-2. Unknown parameter |refs= ignored (help)

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Sterling Hayden

Video clips

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Bahama Passage 1941 – Madeleine Carroll – Sterling Hayden

Madeleine Carroll Tribute

Movie Legends – Madeleine Carroll (Reprise)

Alfred Hitchcock | The 39 Steps (1935) [Thriller]

Secret Agent (Alfred Hitchcock)

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Harry Morgan–Videos

Posted on October 12, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

Jack Webb Dragnet – The Big Departure Speech

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 1 of 7

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 2 of 7

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 3 of 7

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 4 of 7

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 5 of 7

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 6 of 7

Harry Morgan – Archive Interview Part 7 of 7

(28) M*A*S*H (1980) A Harry Morgan Toast

 

Background Articles and Videos

 

Harry Morgan

“…Harry Morgan (born April 10, 1915) is an American actor. Morgan is perhaps best known as Colonel Sherman T. Potter on M*A*S*H (1975–1983), Pete Porter on both Pete and Gladys (1960–1962) and December Bride (1954–1959), Detective Bill Gannon on Dragnet (1967–1970), and Amos Coogan on Hec Ramsey (1972–1974). He has appeared in more than 100 films.

Early life and career

Morgan was born Harry Bratsberg[1] in Detroit, Michigan of Norwegian and Swedish heritage.[1] He was raised in Muskegon, Michigan, and graduated from Muskegon High School in 1933, where he achieved distinction as a statewide debating champion.[2] He originally aspired to a law degree, but began acting while a junior at the University of Chicago in 1935.

Morgan began acting on stage under his birth name, joining the Group Theatre in New York City in 1937, and appearing in the original production of the Clifford Odets play Golden Boy, followed by a host of successful Broadway roles alongside such other Group members as Lee J. Cobb, Elia Kazan, Sanford Meisner, and Karl Malden.

Morgan did summer stock at the Pine Brook Country Club located in the countryside of Nichols, Connecticut, with the Group Theatre (New York) formed by Harold Clurman, Cheryl Crawford and Lee Strasberg in the 1930s and early 1940s.[3][4]

Screen debut

Morgan made his screen debut (originally using the name “Henry Morgan”) in the 1942 movie To the Shores of Tripoli. His screen name later would become “Henry ‘Harry’ Morgan” and eventually Harry Morgan, to avoid confusion with the then-popular humorist of the same name. Morgan appeared in the 1941 movie “Sun Valley Serenade” as a young man pushing his way to the front of a ballroom crowd to hear Glenn Miller’s band play.

Screen career

Morgan continued to play a number of significant roles on the big screen in such films as The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), Wing and a Prayer (1944), Dragonwyck (1946), The Big Clock (1948), High Noon (1952), and several films in the 1950s for director Anthony Mann, including Bend of the River (1952), The Glenn Miller Story (1953), Thunder Bay (film) (1953), The Far Country (1955) and Strategic Air Command (1955); in his later film career he starred in Inherit the Wind (1960), How the West Was Won (1962), John Goldfarb, Please Come Home (1965), Frankie and Johnny (1966), Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969), Support Your Local Gunfighter! (1971), Snowball Express (1972), The Shootist (1976), The Wild Wild West Revisited (1979), and a cameo in the film version of Dragnet (1987). Besides all of the Anthony Mann films, Morgan was in a number of movies with James Stewart, including The Mountain Road (1960), How the West Was Won, Bend of the River (1952), The Far Country (1955), The Glenn Miller Story (1954) and The Shootist (1976), also with John Wayne, with whom he also shared scenes in How the West Was Won.

 1950s TV roles

Morgan hosted the NBC radio series Mystery in the Air starring Peter Lorre in 1947. On CBS, he played Pete Porter in Pete and Gladys (1960–1962), with Cara Williams as wife Gladys. Pete and Gladys was a spinoff of December Bride (1954–1959), starring Spring Byington, Dean Miller, Frances Rafferty, and Verna Felton. When Miller and Rafferty died within three months of each other in 2004, Morgan became the last surviving member of the December Bride cast.

 1960s: Dragnet and other roles

In the 1964–1965 season, Morgan co-starred as Seldom Jackson in the 26-week NBC comedy/drama Kentucky Jones, starring Dennis Weaver.

Morgan is even more widely recognized as Officer Bill Gannon, Joe Friday’s partner in the revived version of Dragnet (1967–1970). Morgan had also appeared with Dragnet star Jack Webb in two film noir movies, Dark City (1950) and Appointment with Danger (1951), and was an early regular member of Jack Webb’s stock company of actors on the original Dragnet radio show. Morgan later worked on two other shows for Webb, 1971’s The D.A. and the 1972–1974 western Hec Ramsey. Morgan also appeared in at least one episode of Gunsmoke.

M*A*S*H (1975–1983)

Morgan’s first appearance on M*A*S*H was in the show’s third season (1974–1975), when he played spaced-out Major General Bartford Hamilton Steele (“That’s three e’s, not all in a row!”) in “The General Flipped at Dawn”, which originally aired on September 10, 1974. Steele is convinced that the 4077th needs to move closer to the front line, to be near the action.

Morgan’s memorable Emmy-nominated performance impressed the producers of the show. The following season, Morgan joined the cast of M*A*S*H as Colonel Sherman T. Potter. Morgan replaced McLean Stevenson, who had left the show at the end of the previous season. Col. Potter was a career army officer who was tough, yet good-humored and caring—a father figure to the people under his command. The picture of Col. Potter’s wife, on the right side of his desk, is actually that of Mrs. Harry Morgan. He asked if he could use the picture of his wife, and the producers had no objections.

In 1980, Morgan won an Emmy award for his performance on M*A*S*H. After the end of the series, Morgan reprised the Potter role in a short-lived spinoff series, AfterMASH.

 Later years

In 1986, he costarred with Hal Linden in Blacke’s Magic, a show about a magician who doubled as a detective solving unusual crimes. The series lasted only one season.

In 1987, Morgan played Martin Vanderhof on a TV series version of Kaufman and Hart’s Pulitzer prize-winning play You Can’t Take It With You.

In 1987, Morgan reprised his Bill Gannon character for a supporting role in another film version of Dragnet, a parody of the original series written by and starring Dan Aykroyd and co-starring Tom Hanks and Christopher Plummer.

In the 1990s, Morgan played the role of Judge Stoddard Bell in a series of The Incident; Against Her Will: An Incident in Baltimore (TV 1992) and Incident in a Small Town (1994 TV) TV movies starring Walter Matthau. He was on an episode of The Simpsons as Officer Bill Gannon from Dragnet in the 7th season (“Mother Simpson”) and had a recurring role on 3rd Rock from the Sun as Professor Suter. Morgan directed episodes for several TV series, including two episodes of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour and eight episodes of M*A*S*H. Morgan had a guest role on The Jeff Foxworthy Show as Raymond and a guest role on Grace Under Fire as Jean’s pot-smoking boyfriend.

In 2006, Morgan was inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

Personal life

Morgan has been married twice: first to Eileen Detchon, from 1940 until her death in 1985, and then to Barbara Bushman Quine (granddaughter of silent film star Francis X. Bushman) from December 17, 1986 to the present. He had four sons with his first wife: Christopher, Charles, Paul, and Daniel (who died in 1989). His grandson Spencer Morgan is a columnist at the New York Observer.[5]

In July 1997, Morgan was charged with abusing his wife in July 1996 after a beating left her with injuries to her eye, foot, and arm. Prosecutors dropped the charges after Morgan completed a six-month domestic violence counseling program[6]

During Morgan’s tenure on M*A*S*H, a photograph of Eileen Detchon regularly appeared on the desk of his character, Sherman T. Potter, to represent Potter’s wife, Mildred. Mildred was also the name of Morgan’s character’s wife in High Noon, as well as the name of his wife in the movie “The Apple Dumpling Gang”. A drawing of a horse, seen on the wall behind Potter’s desk, was drawn by Morgan’s grandson Jeremy Morgan. Eileen was the name of the wife of Officer Bill Gannon on Dragnet.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Morgan

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