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Obama The Tyrant Races To Have The United Nations Security Council Pass The Traitorous Terrorist Treaty Before Congress Votes It Down — Congress and President Betray The United States Constitution –Just Walk Way From Both Political Parties — Never Again Fasicism — Videos

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Story 1: Obama The Tyrant Races To Have The United Nations Security Council Pass The Traitorous Terrorist Treaty Before Congress Votes It Down — Congress and President Betray The United States Constitution — Just Walk Way From Both Political Parties — Never Again Fasicism — Videos

Incredible! New George S Patton speech! Iran & modern warfare

The Iran nuclear deal. Good deal or bad deal?

George Pataki: Iran deal is bad for civilized world

White House, Democrats divided over Iran nuclear deal

KEY POINTS OF HISTORIC IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL

Bolton: Nuke Deal ‘Paves the Way’ for Iran to Get Nuclear Weapons

Mitch McConnell Fox News Sunday. McConnell On Iran Deal, Ted Cruz, Donald Trump

July 14, 2015 Fiorina on nuclear deal with Iran: Bad behavior pays

Trump reacts to Obama’s Iran deal presser, El Chapo’s escape

Key Republican Senator Corker Angry Over Iran Nuclear Deal

Blackburn: Iran Nuclear Deal is Bad for the United States

Levin: ‘U.S. Senate Just Capitulated To Obama,’ And Rewrote The Constitution’s Treaty Provision

Just Walk Way From Both Political Parties

Discusses Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act on FOX News Channel’s “The O’Reilly Factor”

“TREATY” – The Word Congress Won’t Use

Judge Napolitano : Obama pushes World Government by signing U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (Sep 26, 2013)

Obama Bringing Iran Deal to UN, Bypassing Congress

The Four Tops Walk Away Renee

Four Tops – It’s The Same Old Song (1966)

UN ENDORSES IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL WITH 6 WORLD POWERS

The U.N. Security Council on Monday unanimously endorsed the landmark nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers and authorized a series of measures leading to the end of U.N. sanctions that have hurt Iran’s economy.

But the measure also provides a mechanism for U.N. sanctions to “snap back” in place if Iran fails to meet its obligations.

Both U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power and Iran’s U.N. Ambassador Gholamali Khoshroo called the agreement an important achievement for diplomacy, the Iranian promising to be “resolute in fulfilling its obligations” and the American pledging to be vigilant in ensuring they are carried out.

The resolution had been agreed to by the five veto-wielding council members, who along with Germany negotiated the nuclear deal with Iran. It was co-sponsored by all 15 members of the Security Council. The European Union’s foreign ministers endorsed the agreement later Monday in Brussels and pledged to implement it.

Under the agreement, Iran’s nuclear program will be curbed for a decade in exchange for potentially hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of relief from international sanctions. Many key penalties on the Iranian economy, such as those related to the energy and financial sectors, could be lifted by the end of the year.

Iran insists its nuclear program is purely peaceful, aimed at producing nuclear energy and medical isotopes, but the United States and its Western allies believe Tehran’s real goal is to build atomic weapons. U.S. President Barack Obama has stressed that all of Iran’s pathways to a nuclear weapon are cut off for the duration of the agreement and Iran will remove two-thirds of its installed centrifuges and get rid of 98 percent of its stockpile of uranium.

Britain’s U.N. Ambassador Matthew Rycroft said “the world is now a safer place in the knowledge that Iran cannot now build a nuclear bomb.” But Israel’s U.N. Ambassador Ron Prosor told reporters immediately after the vote that the Security Council had “awarded a great prize to the most dangerous country in the world,” calling it “a very sad day” not only for Israel but the entire world.

The document specifies that seven resolutions related to U.N. sanctions will be terminated when Iran has completed a series of major steps to curb its nuclear program and the International Atomic Energy Agency has concluded that “all nuclear material in Iran remains in peaceful activities.”

All provisions of the U.N. resolution will terminate in 10 years, including the “snap back” provision on sanctions.

But last week the six major powers – the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany – and the European Union sent a letter, seen by The Associated Press, informing U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon that they have agreed to extend the snap back mechanism for an additional five years. They asked Ban to send the letter to the Security Council.

Obama told reporters the vote will send a strong message of international support for the agreement as the best way to ensure “that Iran does not get a nuclear weapon.” He faces strong opposition in the Republican-controlled Congress and expressed hope that members will pay attention to the vote.

Power, the U.S. ambassador, said the nuclear deal doesn’t change the United States’ “profound concern about human rights violations committed by the Iranian government or about the instability Iran fuels beyond its nuclear program, from its support for terrorist proxies to repeated threats against Israel to its other destabilizing activities in the region.”

She urged Iran to release three “unjustly imprisoned” Americans and to determine the whereabouts of Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent who vanished in Iran in 2007.

The message that diplomacy can work ran through many speeches from council members.

Iran’s Khoshroo stressed that only if commitments are fully honored “can diplomacy prevail over conflict and war in a world that is replete with violence, suffering and oppression.”

Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin said the agreement “clearly demonstrates that where there’s a political will based on realism and respect for legitimate mutual interests of the international community, the most complex tasks can be resolved.”

“Today, the Security Council has confirmed the inalienable right of Iran to develop its peaceful nuclear program, including to enrich uranium, while ensuring the comprehensive control by the IAEA,” Churkin said.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/UN_UNITED_NATIONS_IRAN_NUCLEAR_DEAL?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2015-07-20-12-04-13

 

Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution, includes the Treaty Clause, which empowers the President of the United States to propose and chiefly negotiate agreements, which must be confirmed by the Senate, between the United States and other countries, which become treaties between the United States and other countries after the advice and consent of a supermajority of the United States Senate.

Full text of the clause

[The President] shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur…

One of three types of international accord

In the United States, the term “treaty” is used in a more restricted legal sense than in international law. U.S. law distinguishes what it calls treaties from congressional-executive agreements and sole-executive agreements.[1] All three classes are considered treaties under international law; they are distinct only from the perspective of internal United States law. Distinctions among the three concern their method of ratification: by two-thirds of the Senate, by normal legislative process, or by the President alone, respectively. The Treaty Clause [2] empowers the President to make or enter into treaties with the “advice and consent” of two-thirds of theSenate. In contrast, normal legislation becomes law after approval by simple majorities in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Throughout U.S. history, the President has also made international “agreements” through congressional-executive agreements (CEAs) that are ratified with only a majority from both houses of Congress, or sole-executive agreements made by the President alone.[1] Though the Constitution does not expressly provide for any alternative to the Article II treaty procedure, Article I, Section 10 of the Constitution does distinguish between treaties (which states are forbidden to make) and agreements (which states may make with the consent of Congress).[3] The Supreme Court of the United States has considered congressional-executive and sole-executive agreements to be valid, and they have been common throughout American history. Thomas Jefferson explained that the Article II treaty procedure is not necessary when there is no long-term commitment:

It is desirable, in many instances, to exchange mutual advantages by Legislative Acts rather than by treaty: because the former, though understood to be in consideration of each other, and therefore greatly respected, yet when they become too inconvenient, can be dropped at the will of either party: whereas stipulations by treaty are forever irrevocable but by joint consent….[4]

A further distinction embodied in U.S. law is between self-executing treaties, which do not require additional legislative action, and non-self-executing treaties which do require the enactment of new laws.[1][5] These various distinctions of procedure and terminology do not affect the binding status of accords under international law. Nevertheless, they do have major implications under U.S. domestic law. In Missouri v. Holland, the Supreme Court ruled that the power to make treaties under the U.S. Constitution is a power separate from the other enumerated powers of the federal government, and hence the federal government can use treaties to legislate in areas which would otherwise fall within the exclusive authority of the states. By contrast, a congressional-executive agreement can only cover matters which the Constitution explicitly places within the powers of Congress and the President.[1] Likewise, a sole-executive agreement can only cover matters within the President’s authority or matters in which Congress has delegated authority to the President.[1] For example, a treaty may prohibit states from imposing capital punishment on foreign nationals, but a congressional-executive agreement or sole-executive agreement cannot.

In general, arms control agreements are often ratified by the treaty mechanism.[6] At the same time, trade agreements (such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and United States accession to the World Trade Organization) are generally voted on as a CEA, and such agreements typically include an explicit right to withdraw after giving sufficient written notice to the other parties.[7] If an international commercial accord contains binding “treaty” commitments, then a two-thirds vote of the Senate may be required.[8]

Between 1946 and 1999, the United States completed nearly 16,000 international agreements. Only 912 of those agreements were treaties, submitted to the Senate for approval as outlined in Article II of the United States Constitution. Since the Franklin Roosevelt presidency, only 6% of international accords have been completed as Article II treaties.[1] Most of these executive agreements consist of congressional-executive agreements.

Repeal

American law is that international accords become part of the body of U.S. federal law.[1] Consequently, Congress can modify or repeal treaties by subsequent legislative action, even if this amounts to a violation of the treaty under international law. This was held, for instance, in the Head Money Cases. The most recent changes will be enforced by U.S. courts entirely independent of whether the international community still considers the old treaty obligations binding upon the U.S.[1]

Additionally, an international accord that is inconsistent with the U.S. Constitution is void under domestic U.S. law, the same as any other federal law in conflict with the Constitution. This principle was most clearly established in the case of Reid v. Covert.[9] The Supreme Court could rule an Article II treaty provision to be unconstitutional and void under domestic law, although it has not yet done so.

In Goldwater v. Carter,[10] Congress challenged the constitutionality of then-president Jimmy Carter‘s unilateral termination of a defense treaty. The case went before the Supreme Court and was never heard; a majority of six Justices ruled that the case should be dismissed without hearing an oral argument, holding that “The issue at hand … was essentially a political question and could not be reviewed by the court, as Congress had not issued a formal opposition.” In his opinion, Justice Brennan dissented, “The issue of decision making authority must be resolved as a matter of constitutional law, not political discretion; accordingly, it falls within the competence of the courts”. Presently, there is no official ruling on whether the President has the power to break a treaty without the approval of Congress, and the courts also declined to interfere when President George W. Bush unilaterally withdrew the United States from the ABM Treaty in 2002, six months after giving the required notice of intent.[11]

Scope of presidential powers

Presidents have regarded the Article II treaty process as necessary where an international accord would bind a future president. For example, Theodore Roosevelt explained:

The Constitution did not explicitly give me power to bring about the necessary agreement with Santo Domingo. But the Constitution did not forbid my doing what I did. I put the agreement into effect, and I continued its execution for two years before the Senate acted; and I would have continued it until the end of my term, if necessary, without any action by Congress. But it was far preferable that there should be action by Congress, so that we might be proceeding under a treaty which was the law of the land and not merely by a direction of the Chief Executive which would lapse when that particular executive left office. I therefore did my best to get the Senate to ratify what I had done.[12]

A sole-executive agreement can only be negotiated and entered into through the president’s authority (1) in foreign policy, (2) as commander-in-chief of the armed forces, (3) from a prior act of Congress, or (4) from a prior treaty.[1] Agreements beyond these competencies must have the approval of Congress (for congressional-executive agreements) or the Senate (for treaties).

In 1972, Congress passed legislation requiring the president to notify Congress of any executive agreements that are formed.[13]

Although the nondelegation doctrine prevents Congress from delegating its legislative authority to the executive branch, Congress has allowed the executive to act as Congress’s “agent” in trade negotiations, such as by setting tariffs, and, in the case of Trade Promotion Authority, by solely authoring the implementing legislation for trade agreements. The constitutionality of this delegation was upheld by the Supreme Court in Field v. Clark (1892).

See also

Further reading

Warren F. Kimball, Alliances, Coalitions, and Ententes – The American alliance system: an unamerican tradition

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atT1erLYbOE

 

HAMILTON’S WARNING AGAINST OBAMA AND THE IRAN DEAL – FEDERALIST NO. 75

“An ambitious man might make his own aggrandizement, by the aid of a foreign power, the price of his treachery to his constituents.” Thus did Alexander Hamilton warn the American people, in Federalist No. 75, against allowing the president to make treaties alone.

Hamilton, while a supporter of executive power, nevertheless argued for the Senate’s treaty role, because “it would be utterly unsafe and improper to intrust that power to an elective magistrate of four years’ duration.”

It would be unsafe, he said, because even the most virtuous individuals, with the best of intentions, would fall prey to the temptations that negotiations with foreign powers would certainly provide.

How much more so does his advice apply to a president of lesser virtue, such as Barack Obama, who intends to decrease the power of the United States as a matter of ideological conviction, and who seeks narcissistic satisfaction in the attention a deal with Iran would temporarily provide!

Hamilton also anticipated the greed allegedly displayed by Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State, whose perambulations around the globe in service of the president’s dubious foreign policy agenda coincided with generous donations from foreign governments to her family’s personal foundation.

“An avaricious man might be tempted to betray the interests of the state to the acquisition of wealth,” Hamilton warns, prescribing the review powers of the Senate as the remedy.

And lest apologists for Obama argue that the nuclear deal with Iran is not actually a “treaty,” but merely an “executive agreement,” Hamilton leaves no doubt as to the scope of arrangements to which the Senate’s review power applies.

“The power of making treaties,” he says, concerns “CONTRACTS with foreign nations, which have the force of law, but derive it from the obligations of good faith” (original emphasis).

Congress should heed Hamilton’s warning before it is too late.

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/03/28/alexander-hamiltons-warning-against-obama-and-the-iran-deal/

 

The President… shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur….

ARTICLE II, SECTION 2, CLAUSE 2

Teacher’s Companion Lesson (PDF)

The Treaty Clause has a number of striking features. It gives the Senate, in James Madison’s terms, a “partial agency” in the President’s foreign-relations power. The clause requires a supermajority (two-thirds) of the Senate for approval of a treaty, but it gives the House of Representatives, representing the “people,” no role in the process.

Midway through the Constitutional Convention, a working draft had assigned the treaty-making power to the Senate, but the Framers, apparently considering the traditional role of a nation-state’s executive in making treaties, changed direction and gave the power to the President, but with the proviso of the Senate’s “Advice and Consent.” In a formal sense, then, treaty-making became a mixture of executive and legislative power. Most people of the time recognized the actual conduct of diplomacy as an executive function, but under Article VI treaties were, like statutes, part of the “supreme Law of the Land.” Thus, as Alexander Hamilton explained in The Federalist No. 75, the two branches were appropriately combined:

The qualities elsewhere detailed as indispensable in the management of foreign relations point out the executive as the most fit in those transactions; while the vast importance of the trust and the operation of treaties as laws plead strongly for the participation of the whole or a portion of the legislative body in the office of making them.

Another reason for involving both President and Senate was that the Framers thought American interests might be undermined by treaties entered into without proper reflection. The Framers believed that treaties should be strictly honored, both as a matter of the law of nations and as a practical matter, because the United States could not afford to give the great powers any cause for war. But this meant that the nation should be doubly cautious in accepting treaty obligations. As James Wilson said, “Neither the President nor the Senate, solely, can complete a treaty; they are checks upon each other, and are so balanced as to produce security to the people.”

The fear of disadvantageous treaties also underlay the Framers’ insistence on approval by a two-thirds majority of the Senate. In particular, the Framers worried that one region or interest within the nation, constituting a bare majority, would make a treaty advantageous to it but prejudicial to other parts of the country and to the national interest. An episode just a year before the start of the Convention had highlighted the problem. The United States desired a trade treaty with Spain, and sought free access to the Mississippi River through Spanish-controlled New Orleans. Spain offered favorable trade terms, but only if the United States would give up its demands on the Mississippi. The Northern states, which would have benefited most from the trade treaty and cared little about New Orleans, had a majority, but not a supermajority, in the Continental Congress. Under the Articles of Confederation, treaties required assent of a supermajority (nine out of thirteen) of the states, and the South was able to block the treaty. It was undoubtedly that experience that impelled the Framers to carry over the supermajority principle from the Articles of Confederation.

At the Convention, several prominent Framers argued unsuccessfully to have the House of Representatives included. But most delegates thought that the House had substantial disadvantages when it came to treaty-making. For example, as a large body, the House would have difficulty keeping secrets or acting quickly. The small states, wary of being disadvantaged, also preferred to keep the treaty-making power in the Senate, where they had proportionally greater power.

The ultimate purpose, then, of the Treaty Clause was to ensure that treaties would not be adopted unless most of the country stood to gain. True, treaties would be more difficult to adopt than statutes, but the Framers realized that an unwise statute could simply be repealed, but an unwise treaty remained a binding international commitment, which would not be so easy to unwind.

Other questions, however, remained. First, are the provisions of the clause exclusive—that is, does it provide the only way that the United States may enter into international obligations?

While the clause does not say, in so many words, that it is exclusive, its very purpose—not to have any treaty disadvantage one part of the nation—suggests that no other route was possible, whether it be the President acting alone, or the popularly elected House having a role. On the other hand, while the Treaty Clause was, in the original understanding, the exclusive way to make treaties, the Framers also apparently recognized a class of less-important international agreements, not rising to the level of “treaties,” which could be approved in some other way. Article I, Section 10, in describing restrictions upon the states, speaks of “Treat[ies]” and “Agreement[s]…with a foreign Power” as two distinct categories. Some scholars believe this shows that not all international agreements are treaties, and that these other agreements would not need to go through the procedures of the Treaty Clause. Instead, the President, in the exercise of his executive power, could conclude such agreements on his own. Still, this exception for lesser agreements would have to be limited to “agreements” of minor importance, or else it would provide too great an avenue for evasion of the protections the Framers placed in the Treaty Clause.

A second question is how the President and Senate should interact in their joint exercise of the treaty power. Many Framers apparently thought that the President would oversee the actual conduct of diplomacy, but that the Senate would be involved from the outset as a sort of executive council advising the President. This was likely a reason that the Framers thought the smaller Senate was more suited than the House to play a key role in treaty-making. In the first effort at treaty-making under the Constitution, President George Washington attempted to operate in just this fashion. He went to the Senate in person to discuss a proposed treaty before he began negotiations. What is less clear, however, is whether the Constitution actually requires this process, or whether it is only what the Framers assumed would happen. The Senate, of course, is constitutionally authorized to offer “advice” to the President at any stage of the treaty-making process, but the President is not directed (in so many words) as to when advice must be solicited. As we shall see, this uncertainty has led, in modern practice, to a very different procedure than some Framers envisioned. It seems clear, however, that the Framers expected that the Senate’s “advice and consent” would be a close review and not a mere formality, as they thought of it as an important check upon presidential power.

A third difficult question is whether the Treaty Clause implies a Senate power or role in treaty termination. Scholarly opinion is divided, and few Framers appear to have discussed the question directly. One view sees the power to make a treaty as distinct from the power of termination, with the latter being more akin to a power of implementation. Since the Constitution does not directly address the termination power, this view would give it to the President as part of the President’s executive powers to conduct foreign affairs and to execute the laws. When the termination question first arose in 1793, Washington and his Cabinet, which included Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, embraced this view. All of them thought Washington could, on his own authority, terminate the treaty with France if necessary to keep the United States neutral.

A second view holds that, as a matter of the general eighteenth-century understanding of the legal process, the power to take an action (such as passing a statute or making a treaty) implies the power to undo the action. This view would require the consent of the President and a supermajority of the Senate to undo a treaty. There is, however, not much historical evidence that many Framers actually held this view of treaty termination, and it is inconsistent with the common interpretation of the Appointments Clause (under which Senate approval is required to appoint but not to remove executive officers).

The third view is that the Congress as a whole has the power to terminate treaties, based on an analogy between treaties and federal laws. When the United States first terminated a treaty in 1798 under John Adams, this procedure was adopted, but there was little discussion of the constitutional ramifications.

Finally, there is a question of the limits of the treaty power. A treaty presumably cannot alter the constitutional structure of government, and the Supreme Court has said that executive agreements—and so apparently treaties—are subject to the limits of the Bill of Rights just as ordinary laws are. Reid v. Covert (1957). InGeofroy v. Riggs (1890), the Supreme Court also declared that the treaty power extends only to topics that are “properly the subject of negotiation with a foreign country.” However, at least in the modern world, one would think that few topics are so local that they could not, under some circumstances, be reached as part of the foreign-affairs interests of the nation. Some have argued that treaties are limited by the federalism interests of the states. The Supreme Court rejected a version of that argument in State of Missouri v. Holland (1920), holding that the subject matter of treaties is not limited to the enumerated powers of Congress. The revival of interest in federalism limits on Congress in such areas as state sovereign immunity, see Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida (1996), and the Tenth Amendment, see Printz v. United States (1997), raises the question whether these limits also apply to the treaty power, but the Court has not yet taken up these matters.

Turning to modern practice, the Framers’ vision of treaty-making has in some ways prevailed and in some ways been altered. First, it is not true—and has not been true since George Washington’s administration—that the Senate serves as an executive council to advise the President in all stages of treaty-making. Rather, the usual modern course is that the President negotiates and signs treaties independently and then presents the proposed treaty to the Senate for its approval or disapproval. Washington himself found personal consultation with the Senate to be so awkward and unproductive that he abandoned it, and subsequent Presidents have followed his example.

Moreover, the Senate frequently approves treaties with conditions and has done so since the Washington administration. If the President makes clear to foreign nations that his signature on a treaty is only a preliminary commitment subject to serious Senate scrutiny, and if the Senate takes seriously its constitutional role of reviewing treaties (rather than merely deferring to the President), the check that the Framers sought to create remains in place. By going beyond a simple “up-or-down” vote, the Senate retains some of its power of “advice”: the Senate not only disapproves the treaty proposed by the President but suggests how the President might craft a better treaty. As a practical matter, there is often much consultation between the executive and members of the Senate before treaties are crafted and signed. Thus modern practice captures the essence of the Framers’ vision that the Senate would have some form of a participatory role in treaty-making.

A more substantial departure from the Framers’ vision may arise from the practice of “executive agreements.” According to the Restatement of Foreign Relations Law of the United States, the President may validly conclude executive agreements that (1) cover matters that are solely within his executive power, or (2) are made pursuant to a treaty, or (3) are made pursuant to a legitimate act of Congress. Examples of important executive agreements include the Potsdam and Yalta agreements of World War II, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which regulated international trade for decades, and the numerous status-of-forces agreements the United States has concluded with foreign governments.

Where the President acts pursuant to a prior treaty, there seems little tension with the Framers’ vision, as Senate approval has, in effect, been secured in advance. Somewhat more troublesome is the modern practice of so-called congressional–executive agreements, by which some international agreements have been made by the President and approved (either in advance or after the fact) by a simple majority of both houses of Congress, rather than two-thirds of the Senate. Many of these agreements deal particularly with trade-related matters, which Congress has clear constitutional authority to regulate. Congressional–executive agreements, at least with respect to trade matters, are now well established, and recent court challenges have been unsuccessful. Made in the USA Foundation v. United States (2001). On the other hand, arguments for “complete interchangeability”—that is, claims that anything that can be done by treaty can be done by congressional–executive agreement—seem counter to the Framers’ intent. The Framers carefully considered the supermajority rule for treaties and adopted it in response to specific threats to the Union; finding a complete alternative to the Treaty Clause would in effect eliminate the supermajority rule and make important international agreements easier to adopt than the Framers wished.

The third type of executive agreement is one adopted by the President without explicit approval of either the Senate or the Congress as a whole. The Supreme Court and modern practice embrace the idea that the President may under some circumstances make these so-called sole executive agreements. United States v. Belmont (1937); United States v. Pink (1942). But the scope of this independent presidential power remains a serious question. The Pink and Belmont cases involved agreements relating to the recognition of a foreign government, a power closely tied to the President’s textual power to receive ambassadors (Article II, Section 3). The courts have consistently permitted the President to settle foreign claims by sole executive agreement, but at the same time have emphasized that the Congress has acquiesced in the practice. Dames & Moore v. Regan (1981);American Insurance Ass’n v. Garamendi (2003). Beyond this, the modern limits of the President’s ability to act independently in making international agreements have not been explored. With respect to treaty termination, modern practice allows the President to terminate treaties on his own. In recent times, President James Earl Carter terminated the U.S.–Taiwan Mutual Defense Treaty in 1977, and President George W. Bush terminated the ABM Treaty with Russia in 2001. The Senate objected sharply to President Carter’s actions, but the Supreme Court rebuffed the Senate in Goldwater v. Carter (1979). President Bush’s action was criticized in some academic quarters but received general acquiescence. In light of the consensus early in Washington’s administration, it is probably fair to say that presidential termination does not obviously depart from the original understanding, inasmuch as the Framers were much more concerned about checks upon entering into treaties than they were about checks upon terminating them.

Profile photo of Michael D. Ramsey
Michael D. Ramsey
Professor of Law
University of San Diego School of Law

http://www.heritage.org/constitution#!/articles/2/essays/90/treaty-clause

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When Will Obama and Kerry Walk Like Men Out Of Negotiations With The World Leading Terrorist Nation The Islamic Republic of Iran? Never! — Yakety Yak– Where Is The Written Signed Agreement/Treaty Stopping Iran From Having Nuclear Weapons President Obama? — Time To Release Some Massive Ordnance Penetrators (MOPs) — Bunker Busters on Iran’s Nuclear Bomb Factories — Bombs Away — Videos

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Story 1: When Will Obama and Kerry Walk Like Men Out Of Negotiations With The World Leading Terrorist Nation The Islamic Republic of Iran? Never! — Yakety Yak– Where Is The Written Signed Agreement/Treaty Stopping Iran From Having Nuclear Weapons President Obama? — Time To Release Some Massive Ordnance Penetrators (MOPs) — Bunker Busters on Iran’s Nuclear Bomb Factories — Bombs Away — Videos

Divine – Walk Like A Man (1985) HQ

Walk Like a Man – The Four Seasons

“Walk Like A Man”

oo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo
(Wop wop wop wop)
oo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo
Walk like a manOh how you tried
To cut me down to size
by telling dirty lies to my friends
But my own father
Said give her up, don’t bother
The world isn’t coming to an endHe said walk like a man
Talk like a man
Walk like a man my son
No woman’s worth
Crawling on the earth
So walk like a man my sonoo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo
(Wop wop wop wop)
oo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-ooFine eyed baby
I don’t mean maybe
We’re gonna get along somehow
Soon you’ll be crying
On ‘count of all you’re lying
Oh yeah, just look who’s laughing nowI’m gonna walk like a man
Fast as I can
Walk like a man from you
I’ll tell the world
Forget about it girl
And walk like a man from youoo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo
(Wop wop wop wop)
oo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo
(Wop wop wop wop)
oo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo
(Wop wop wop wop)
oo woo-oo-oo oo woo-oo-oo

Walk Like a Man Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons Lyrics

July 2015 Breaking News USA ready to attack Iranian nuclear facilities with awe-inspiring plan B

30,000 Pound Bunker Buster Bomb designed to detour Iran Nuclear Threat

As negotiations with Iran continue towards a nuclear arms agreement, the United States still holds a trump card. The 30,000 Pound Boeing GBU-57 Bunker Buster bomb, the largest non-nuclear weapon in U.S. inventory, designed to destroy nuclear weapons bunkers in Iran and North Korea. The bunker buster, known as the Massive Ordnance Penetrator (MOP), is 30,000 pounds (13,608 kg.) and has been improved with “adjusted fuses to maximize its burrowing power, upgraded guidance systems to improve its precision and hi-tech equipment intended to allow it to evade Iranian air defenses in order to reach and destroy the Fordow nuclear enrichment complex.”

“Hopefully we never have to use it, but if we had to, it would work.”

The existence of a bomb that has the capability of destroying the underground facility from the air could also give the West extra bargaining power in nuclear negotiations with the Iran.

US officials believe the improved MOP will serve to convince Israel to hold off on unilaterally attacking Iran and give Washington more time to diplomatically neutralize the Iranian nuclear threat.

US military chiefs openly admitted the weapon was built to attack the fortified nuclear facilities of “rogue states” such as Iran and North Korea. Although the Pentagon insists that it is not aimed at a specific threat, unnamed officials within the ministry have repeatedly claimed the bomb is being tailor-made to disable Iranian nuclear facilities at Fordo.

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MOP Massive Ordnance Penetrator GBU-57A-B Penetrator bunker buster bomb Iran United States

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Where Have all the Flowers Gone: Eve of Destruction

Iran Made Illegal Purchases of Nuclear Weapons Technology Last Month

1:48 AM, JUL 10, 2015 • BY BENJAMIN WEINTHAL AND EMANUELE OTTOLENGHI

The question is not whether Iran can be trusted to uphold the nuclear deal now being negotiated in Vienna (it can’t), but whether the Obama administration and its P5+1 partners can be trusted to punish Iran when it violates the agreement?

Experience shows that unless Iran violates the deal egregiously, the temptation will be to ignore it. For instance, Iran got away with selling more oil than it should have under the interim agreement. More ominously, Tehran repeatedly pushed the envelope on technical aspects of the agreement—such as caps on its uranium stockpile—and got away with it. The Obama administration and other Western powers have so much invested in their diplomatic efforts that they’ll deny such violations ever occurred.

More evidence of Iranian violations has now surfaced. Two reports regarding Iran’s attempts to illicitly and clandestinely procure technology for its nuclear and ballistic missile programs have recently been published. They show that Iran’s procurement continues apace, if not faster than before the Joint Plan of Action was signed in November 2013. But fear of potentially embarrassing negotiators and derailing negotiations has made some states reluctant to report Tehran’s illegal efforts. If these countries have hesitated to expose Iran during the negotiations, it is more likely they will refrain from reporting after a deal is struck.

The first report was released last month by the U.N. panel of experts in charge of reporting compliance with U.N. Security Council resolutions regarding Iran. The panel noted that U.N. member states had not reported significant violations of U.N. sanctions and speculated as to why: either Iran was complying, or countries did not wish to interfere with negotiations.

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More by Benjamin Weinthal

The second report, released last week by Germany’s domestic intelligence agency, is less ambiguous. The agency, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, confirmed to us that Iran continues to seek illicit technology for its nuclear and ballistic missiles programs.

Iran has had a long history of trying to obtain nuclear technology from German companies, particularly by seeking ways to transport merchandise in circumvention of international sanctions. Since November 2013, Tehran has sought industry computers, high-speed cameras, cable fiber, and pumps for its nuclear and missile program. It appears that Iran’s readiness to negotiate does not reflect any substantive policy change. Rather, it is a diplomatic tactic retreat forced by economic distress, not a strategic rethinking of its priorities.

Iran’s cheating should give Western negotiators additional resolve to impose ironclad guarantees in the agreement. They should compel Iran to reveal its past activities, including its post-JPOA procurement efforts, and impose tough, intrusive, “anytime, anywhere” inspections before sanctions are suspended, let alone lifted.

Instead, the lack of reporting to the U.N. despite evidence of cheating suggests a lack of resolve on the part of Western nations, and their willingness to downplay all but the most egregious violations. This does not bode well for the future. If Western powers are reluctant to penalize Iran for trying to evade sanctions because they’re afraid of spoiling the negotiations, what will happen in the future when Western powers have even more invested in preserving an agreement?

Emanuele Ottolenghi is a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, where Benjamin Weinthal is a research fellow.

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/iran-made-illegal-purchases-nuclear-weapons-technology-last-month_988067.html

Massive Ordnance Penetrator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
GBU-57A/B Massive Ordnance Penetrator
USAF MOP test release crop.jpg

GBU-57 MOP prototype
Type Bunker buster” bomb
Place of origin United States
Service history
Used by United States Air Force
Production history
Manufacturer Boeing[1]
Specifications
Weight 30,000 pounds (14,000 kg)
Length 20.5 feet (6.2 m)
Diameter 31.5 inches (0.80 m)

The GBU-57A/BMassive Ordnance Penetrator (MOP) is a U.S. Air Force, precision-guided, 30,000-pound (13,608 kg) “bunker busterbomb.[2] This is substantially larger than the deepest penetrating bunker busters previously available, the 5,000-pound (2,268 kg) GBU-28 and GBU-37.

Development

In 2002, Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin were working on the development of a 30,000-lb (13,600 kg) earth-penetrating weapon, said to be known as “Big BLU“. But funding and technical difficulties resulted in the development work being abandoned. Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, analysis of sites that had been attacked with bunker-buster bombs revealed poor penetration and inadequate levels of destruction.[citation needed]This renewed interest in the development of a super-large bunker-buster, and the MOP project was initiated by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency to fulfill a long-standing Air Force requirement.[3]

The U.S. Air Force has not officially recognized specific military requirement for an ultra-large bomb, but it does have a concept for a collection of massively sized penetrator and blast weapons, the so-called “Big BLU” collection, which includes the MOAB (Massive Ordnance Air Burst) bomb. Development of the MOP was performed at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida with design and testing work performed by Boeing. It is intended that the bomb will be deployed on the B-2 bomber, and will be guided by the use of GPS.[4][5]

Northrop Grumman announced a $2.5-million stealth-bomber refit contract on 19 July 2007. Each of the U.S. Air Force’s B-2s is to be able to carry two 14-ton MOPs.[6][7]

The initial explosive test of MOP took place on 14 March 2007 in a tunnel belonging to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.

On 6 October 2009, ABC News reported that the Pentagon had requested and obtained permission from the U.S. Congress to shift funding in order to accelerate the project.[8][9] It was later announced by the U.S. military that “funding delays and enhancements to the planned test schedule” meant the bomb would not be deployable until December 2010, six months later than the original availability date.[10]

The project has had at least one successful Flight Test MOP launch.[11] The final testing will be completed in 2012.[3]

The Air Force took delivery of 20 bombs, designed to be delivered by the B-2 bomber, in September 2011. In February 2012, Congress approved $81.6 million to further develop and improve the weapon.[12]

Recent development

On 7 April 2011, the USAF ordered eight MOPs plus supporting equipment for $28 million.[13]

On 14 November 2011, Bloomberg reported that the Air Force Global Strike Command started receiving the Massive Ordnance Penetrator and that the deliveries “will meet requirements for the current operational need”.[14] The Air Force now has received delivery of 16 MOPs as of November 2011.[15] And as of March 2012, there is an “operational stockpile” at Whiteman Air Force Base.[16]

In 2012, the Pentagon requested $82 million to develop greater penetration power for the existing weapon.[1] A 2013 report stated that the development had been a success,[17] and B-2 integration testing began that year.[18]

Next-generation Penetrator Munition

On 25 June 2010, USAF Lt. Gen. Phillip Breedlove said that the Next-generation Penetrator Munition should be about a third the size of the Massive Ordnance Penetrator so it could be carried by affordable aircraft.[19] In December 2010, the USAF had a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the Next Generation Penetrator (NGP).[20]

Global Strike Command has indicated that one of the objectives for the Next-Generation Bomber is for it to carry a weapon with the effects of the Massive Ordnance Penetrator. This would either be with the same weapon or a smaller weapon that uses rocket power to reach sufficient speed to match the penetrating power of the larger weapon.[21]

One of the current limitations of the MOP is that it lacks a void-sensing fuze and will therefore detonate after it has come to a stop, even if it passed by the target area.[22]

Specifications

  • Length: 20.5 feet (6.2 m)[23]
  • Diameter: 31.5 inches (0.8 m)[23]
  • Weight: 30,000 pounds (13,608 kilograms)
  • Warhead: 5,300 pounds (2,404.0 kilograms) high explosive
  • Penetration: 200 ft (61 m)[6]

See also

Specific large bombs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massive_Ordnance_Penetrator

  • April 2, 2015
  • 1950s
Nov. 24, 2014

Kerry Announces Extension to Iran Talks Video by Reuters/ Photo by Roland Schlager/European Pressphoto Agency

U.S. and Allies Extend Iran Nuclear Talks by 7 Months

A yearlong effort to reach an enduring accord with Iran to dismantle large parts of its nuclear infrastructure fell short, forcing the United States and its allies to declare a seven-month extension, but with no clear indication of how they plan to bridge fundamental differences.

Nov. 20, 2014

The Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, left, Catherine Ashton, who is representing the European Union, and Secretary of State John Kerry in Vienna. Leonhard Foeger/Reuters

Negotiators Scrambling as Deadline Looms in Nuclear Talks

As six world powers and Iran race to meet a Monday deadline for an agreement that would constrain Iran’s nuclear program, the United States stakes out an ambitious goal for what an accord should accomplish.

American officials say the agreement should slow the Iranian nuclear program enough that it would take Iran at least a year to make enough material for a nuclear bomb if it decided to ignore the accord.

It has become increasingly unlikely that any accord announced on Monday would be a complete one. And whatever deal is reached, it may not matter if Iranian hard-liners have their way. In Iran, the final decision on a nuclear deal lies with Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader.

Nov. 3, 2014

Under a proposed deal, Russia will convert uranium into specialized fuel rods for Iran’s Bushehr nuclear power plant.Majid Asgaripour/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Role for Russia Gives Iran Talks a Possible Boost

Iran tentatively agrees to ship much of its huge stockpile of uranium to Russia for conversion into specialized fuel rods for the Bushehr nuclear power plant, Iran’s only commercial reactor. The agreement is potentially a major breakthrough in talks that have until now been deadlocked.

A key question remains about the negotiations that American officials have been loath to discuss in public: In a final deal, would Iran be required to publicly admit its past activities, or merely provide a mechanism for monitoring its actions in the future?

Aug. 27, 2014

Iran’s nuclear reactor in Arak, about 150 miles southwest of Tehran, is being redesigned.Hamid Foroutan/Iranian Students News Agency, via Associated Press

Iran Altering Arak Reactor in Bid for Nuclear Deal

Atomic power engineers in Iran start redesigning a partly constructed reactor in Arak to limit the amount of plutonium it produces, Ali Akbar Salehi, the director of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, says, expressing hope that the change will help alleviate Western objections that the plutonium can be used in weapons.

July 18, 2014

Iran Nuclear Talks Extended, Diplomats Say

Iran, the United States and the five other countries agree to a four-month extension of the negotiations, giving them more time to try to bridge a major difference over whether the country will be forced to dismantle parts of its nuclear infrastructure, according to senior Western diplomats involved in the talks.

July 14, 2014

Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, accuses the West of trying to sabotage a reactor being built near Arak.Atta Kenare/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Iran Outlines Nuclear Deal; Accepts Limit

As the deadline for the talks approaches on Sunday, Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, says the country could accept a freeze on its capacity to produce nuclear fuel at current levels for several years, provided it could eventually produce fuel unhindered.

The proposal will effectively extend a limited series of concessions Iran made last November as part of a temporary deal to get negotiations started on a permanent accord. In return, Iran wants step-by-step relief from sanctions that have substantially weakened its economy.

May 24, 2014

Iran Is Providing Information on Its Detonators, Report Says

The I.A.E.A. releases a report stating that Iran is beginning to turn over information related to its nuclear detonators. The agency says that Iran has provided “additional information and explanations,” including documents, to substantiate its claim that it had tested the detonators for “a civilian application.”

Jan. 12, 2014

From left, Foreign Ministers Laurent Fabius of France and William Hague of Britain, and Secretary of State John Kerry with Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh of Jordan, in Paris. Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images

Negotiators Put Final Touches on Iran Accord

Iran and a group of six world powers complete a deal that will temporarily freeze much of Tehran’s nuclear program starting Jan. 20, in exchange for limited relief from Western economic sanctions.

The agreement faced opposition from Iranian hard-liners and Israeli leaders, as well as heavy criticism from some American lawmakers, who have threatened to approve further sanctions despite President Obama’s promise of a veto.

Nov. 24, 2013

The negotiators in Geneva early Sunday morning. President Obama hailed the agreement. Denis Balibouse/Reuters

Deal With Iran Halts Nuclear Program

The United States and five other world powers announce a landmark accord that would temporarily freeze Iran’s nuclear program and lay the foundation for a more sweeping agreement.

The aim of the accord, which is to last six months, is to give international negotiators time to pursue a more comprehensive accord that would ratchet back much of Iran’s nuclear program and ensure that it could only be used for peaceful purposes.

Nov. 14, 2013

Obama Calls for Patience in Iran Talks

I.A.E.A. inspectors release a report stating that for the first time in years, they saw evidence that the Iranians have put the brakes on their nuclear expansion.

President Obama makes an appeal to Congress to give breathing space to his efforts to forge a nuclear deal with Iran.

Nov. 11, 2013
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Iran is in a much different position now to negotiate on its nuclear program than it was four years ago when President Obama first broached the subject.

Iran Says It Agrees to ‘Road Map’ With U.N. on Nuclear Inspections

The I.A.E.A. says that Iran has agreed to resolve all outstanding issues with the agency, and will permit “managed access” by international inspectors to two key nuclear facilities. But the promise does not extend to the Parchin military site, which inspectors have been trying to see for months.

Marathon talks between major powers and Iran fail to ease sanctions on the country and produce a deal to freeze its nuclear program.

Oct. 16, 2013
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Iran Talks Called Substantive

Iran and a group of six world powers say that they have engaged in “substantive” and “forward-looking” discussions on the disputed Iranian nuclear program and that they will reconvene on November 7.

The account of the two days of talks in Geneva came in a rare joint statement from Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, and Catherine Ashton, the foreign policy chief for the European Union, who is the lead negotiator with Iran.

Sept. 27, 2013
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First Direct US-Iran Talk Since 1979

President Obama says he has spoken by phone with President Hassan Rouhani, the first direct contact between the leaders of Iran and the United States since 1979. Mr. Obama, speaking in the White House briefing room, said the two leaders discussed Iran’s nuclear program and said he was persuaded there was a basis for an agreement.

Moments before Mr. Obama’s announcement, Mr. Rouhani’s Twitter account posted this now-deleted message: “In a phone conversation b/w #Iranian & #US Presidents just now: @HassanRouhani: “Have a Nice Day!” @BarackObama: “Thank you. Khodahafez.”

Sept. 24, 2013
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Rouhani, Blunt and Charming, Pitches a Moderate Iran in First U.N. Appearance

Iran’s new president, Hassan Rouhani, turns himself into a high-speed salesman offering a flurry of speeches, tweets, televised interviews and carefully curated private meetings, intended to end Iran’s economic isolation.

At the United Nations General Assembly, he preaches tolerance and understanding, decries as a form of violence the Western sanctions imposed on his country and says nuclear weapons have no place in its future. He takes aim at Israel’s nuclear arsenal in a public – while the country’s leaders caution over what they deem as an empty charm offensive.

Sept. 19, 2013

Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s new leader, received a private letter from President Obama about easing tensions between the countries.Vahid Salemi/Associated Press

Iran Said to Seek a Nuclear Accord to End Sanctions

Seizing on a perceived flexibility in a letter from President Obama to President Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s leaders are focused on getting quick relief from crippling sanctions, a top adviser to the Iranian leadership says.

The adviser says that Mr. Obama’s letter, delivered about three weeks ago, promised relief from sanctions if Tehran demonstrated a willingness to “cooperate with the international community, keep your commitments and remove ambiguities.”

Aug. 28, 2013

Iran Slows Its Gathering of Enriched Uranium, Report Says

I.A.E.A. inspectors say that Iran is slowing its accumulation of enriched uranium that can be quickly turned into fuel for an atomic bomb. The report’s disclosure is significant politically because it delays the day when Iran could breach what Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel last fall called a “red line” beyond which Iran would not be allowed to pass — the point at which it has enough purified uranium to quickly make a single nuclear weapon.

June 15, 2013

Hassan Rouhani, a moderate, has been elected the next president of Iran.

Iran Elects New President

Voters overwhelmingly elect Hassan Rouhani, 64, a mild-mannered cleric who advocates greater personal freedoms and a more conciliatory approach to the world.

The diplomat sheik played a key role in Iran’s voluntary suspension of uranium enrichment in 2004, which Western powers responded to by asking for more concessions from Iran.

Mr. Rouhani replaces his predecessors’ foreign minister with Mohammad Javad Zarif, an American-educated diplomat known for his understanding of the West, and makes him responsible for negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program. Mr. Rouhani also removes a hard-line nuclear scientists as head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization, and replaces him with the former foreign minister, Ali Akbar Salehi. In September, Iran’s longtime ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency will be replaced as well.

June 2013

U.S. Adds to Its List of Sanctions Against Iran

The Obama administration escalates sanctions against Iran for the fourth time in a week, blacklisting what it describes as a global network of front companies controlled by Iran’s top leaders, accusing them of hiding assets and generating billions of dollars worth of revenue to help Tehran evade sanctions.

The White House also accuses Ayatollah Ali Khamenei of personally directing an effort to bypass them.

The United States also blacklists Iranian petrochemical companies, its automotive industry and more than 50 Iranian officials, and threatens to sanction foreign banks that trade or hold Iran’s national currency, the rial.

May 22, 2013

Iran Is Seen Advancing Nuclear Bid

The I.A.E.A. says Iran has made significant progress across the board in its nuclear program, while negotiations with the West dragged on this spring. But it said that it has not gone past the “red line” that Israel’s leaders have declared could trigger military action.

In its last report before the Iranian elections next month, the agency also gives details that point to an emerging production strategy by the Iranians. One strategy involves speeding ahead with another potential route to a bomb: producing plutonium. The report indicates that Iran is making significant progress at its Arak complex, where it has built a heavy-water facility and is expected to have a reactor running by the end of next year.

May 9, 2013

U.S. Imposes Sanctions on Those Aiding Iran

The United States expands its roster of those violating Iran sanctions, blacklisting four Iranian companies and one individual suspected of helping the country enrich nuclear fuel. It also singles out two other companies, including a Venezuelan-Iranian bank, accused of helping Iran evade other Western-imposed prohibitions on oil sales and financial dealings.

The penalties came a day after the Senate introduced legislation that could effectively deny the Iran government access to an estimated $100 billion worth of its own money parked in overseas banks, a step that proponents said could significantly damage Iran’s financial stability.

April 23, 2013

Fearing Price Increases, Iranians Hoard Goods

Iranians rush to supermarkets to buy cooking oil, red meat and other staples, stockpiling the goods over new fears of price spikes from a change in the official exchange rate that could severely reduce the already weakened purchasing power of the rial, the national currency.

Prices of staples are set to increase by as much as 60 percent because of the currency change.

Economists say the result is from a combination of severe Western sanctions and what many call the government’s economic mismanagement.

April 18, 2013

Chuck Hagel at the Pentagon. Next week he will travel to the Middle East to finalize the arms sale.Brendan Smialowski/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

U.S. Arms Deal With Israel and 2 Arab Nations Is Near

The Defense Department is expecting to finalize a $10 billion arms deal with Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates next week that will provide missiles, warplanes and troop transports to help them counter any future threat from Iran.

Israeli Officials Stress Readiness for Lone Strike on Iran

In an interview with the BBC, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke of dealing with the Iranian nuclear threat, saying Israel has “different vulnerabilities and different capabilities” than the United States. “We have to make our own calculations, when we lose the capacity to defend ourselves by ourselves.”

Israeli defense and military officials have been issuing explicit warnings this week that Israel was prepared and had the capability to carry out a lone military strike against Iran’s nuclear facilities.

April 12, 2013

US Blacklists an Iranian and Businesses Over Violation of Sanctions

The United States blacklists an affluent Iranian business executive, Babak Morteza Zanjani, and what it describes as his multibillion-dollar money laundering network, accusing them of selling oil for Iran in violation of the Western economic sanctions imposed over Iran’s disputed nuclear program.

On March 14, The Treasury Department, which administers the government’s Iran sanctions, blacklisted a Greek shipping tycoon, Dimitris Cambis, over what it called his scheme to acquire a fleet of oil tankers on Iran’s behalf and disguise their ownership to ship Iranian oil.

April 9, 2013

Family members of slain nuclear scientists stood with Fereydoun Abbasi-Davani, far right, a nuclear official. Arash Khamoushi/Iranian Students News Agency, ISNA, via Associated Press

After Talks End, Iran Announces an Expansion of Nuclear Fuel Production

Iran’s president announces an expansion of the country’s uranium production and claims other atomic energy advances, striking a pugnacious tone in the aftermath of diplomatic talks thatended in an impasse with the big powers on April 6 in Kazakhstan.

April 8, 2013
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A look, provided by the United States Navy, at how its laser attack weapon works. The video is silent.

Navy Deploying Laser Weapon Prototype Near Iran

The U.S. announces that the Navy will deploy a laser weapon prototype in the Persian Gulf, where Iranian fast-attack boats have harassed American warships and where the government in Tehran is building remotely piloted aircraft carrying surveillance pods and, someday potentially, rockets.

The laser will not be operational until next year. It has been shown in tests to disable patrol boats and blind or destroy surveillance drones.

March 14, 2013

President Obama traveled to Israel on March 20, in a symbolic two-day visit to the country, the first of his presidency.

Iran Nuclear Weapon to Take Year or More, Obama Says

President Obama tells an Israeli television station that his administration believes it would take Iran “over a year or so” to develop a nuclear weapon.

Mr. Obama’s estimated timeline contrasts with Mr. Netanyahu’s stated belief that Israel and its Western allies are likely to have to intervene by the spring or summer, when, he says, Iran’s scientists will have enriched enough uranium to become a nuclear threat.

Feb. 26, 2013

Defiant Mood at Talks

Iran meets with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany in Kazakhstan, but talks end with no specific agreement over a proposal that would sharply constrain Iran’s stockpile of the most dangerous enriched uranium, in return for a modest lifting of some sanctions.

The six powers also agreed that Iran could keep a small amount of 20 percent enriched uranium — which can be converted to bomb grade with modest additional processing — for use in a reactor to produce medical isotopes.

Iranian oil sales have been reduced by half as a result of the international pressure on the country, and restrictions on financial transactions and transportation have created many difficulties for its leaders.

Feb. 23, 2013

New Deposits of Uranium

The state news agency IRNA quotes a report by the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, saying that it had found significant new deposits of raw uranium and identified sites for 16 more nuclear power stations.

Iran’s raw uranium reserves now total around 4,400 tons, including discoveries over the past 18 months, IRNA quoted the report as saying.

A few weeks earlier, Ayatollah Khamenei said that his country was not seeking nuclear weapons but added that if Iran ever decided to build them, no “global power” could stop it.

Feb. 6, 2013

Speaking to air force commanders in Tehran on Feb. 6, Ayatollah Khamenei said Iran “will not negotiate under pressure.” Khamenei Official Web site, via European Pressphoto Agency

U.S. Bolsters Sanctions

A new round of American sanctions take effect which state that any country that buys Iranian oil must put the purchase money into a local bank account. Iran cannot repatriate the money and can use it only to buy goods within that country. Violators risk severe penalties in doing business with the United States. Oil exports from Iran have already dropped by a million barrels a day.

A week earlier, Iran announces that it would deploy a new generation of centrifuges, four to six times as powerful as the current generation.

October 2012

Iran’s Currency Tumbles

After months of harsh, American-led sanctions, Iran’s currency, the rial, plunges 40 percent. The currency lost about half its value in 2012.

Most of that decline comes in a frenzy of speculative selling by Iranians worried that rapid inflation could render their money worthless. The government responds with a crackdown in which some money traders are arrested.

The depressed value of the rial forces Iranians to carry ever-fatter wads of bank notes to buy everyday items. But the sanctions also present a new complication to Iran’s banking authorities: they may not be able to print enough money.

Meanwhile, the European Union toughens sanctions against Iran, banning trade in industries like finance, metals and natural gas, and making other business transactions far more cumbersome.

Sept. 27, 2012

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the United Nations, displaying his red line for Iran’s nuclear program. Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Israel’s ‘Red Line’

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel tells the United Nations that Iran’s capability to enrich uranium must be stopped before the spring or early summer, arguing that by that time Iran will be in a position to make a short, perhaps undetectable, sprint to manufacture its first nuclear weapon.

August 2012

New Work at Nuclear Site

The United Nations atomic agency reports that Iran has installed three-quarters of the nuclear centrifuges needed to complete a deep-underground site under a mountain near Qum for the production of nuclear fuel.

The I.A.E.A. also says that Iran may have sought to cleanse another site where the agency has said it suspects that the country has conducted explosive experiments that could be relevant to the production of a nuclear weapon.

Meanwhile, the United States imposes more punishing sanctions against Iran, aimed at its oil and petrochemical sectors, as well as its shipping trade, intensifying existing sanctions intended to choke off the revenue that Iran reaps from its two largest export industries.

July 1, 2012

The Neptune, an oil tanker in the Persian Gulf, is part of a fleet of about 65 Iranian tankers serving as floating storage facilities for Iranian oil, each one given a nautical makeover to conceal its origin and make a buyer easier to find. Thomas Erdbrink

Embargo on Iranian Oil

A European Union embargo on Iranian oil takes effect, playing a large role in severely restricting Iran’s ability to sell its most important export.

In retaliation, Iran announces legislation intended to disrupt traffic in the Strait of Hormuz, a vital Persian Gulf shipping lane, and tests missiles in a desert drill clearly intended as a warning to Israel and the United States.

In January 2013, Iran’s oil minister, Rostam Qasemi, acknowledged for the first time that petroleum exports and sales had fallen by at least 40 percent in the previous year, costing the country $4 billion to $8 billion each month.

May 24, 2012

Iran’s nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, in Baghdad. Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters

Talks With West Falter

After a brief spurt of optimism, talks between Iran and six world powers on its disputed nuclear program fail to produce a breakthrough in Baghdad. The United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany wanted a freeze on Iranian production of uranium enriched to 20 percent purity, which is considered a short step from bomb grade. The Iranians wanted an easing of the onerous economic sanctions imposed by the West and a recognition of what they call their right to enrich. The countries agree to meet again in June, but talks were further slowed after a new regimen of harsh economic sanctions and a statement from the International Atomic Energy Agency that said Iran had made ”no progress” toward providing access to restricted sites it suspects of being used to test potential triggers for nuclear warheads.

March 2012

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad surveying the centrifuges at Iran’s underground complex at Natanz in March 2007.Office of the Iranian President

New Centrifuges at Natanz

Iran says it is building about3,000 advanced uranium-enrichment centrifuges at the Natanz plant.

Meanwhile, I.A.E.A. inspectors are still trying to gain access to the Parchin site, 20 miles south of Tehran, to ascertain whether tests have been carried out there on nuclear bomb triggers.

But satellites images show that the site has been extensively cleaned by the Iranians.

Jan. 11, 2012
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Iran’s semiofficial Fars News Agency supplied this photo of what it said was Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan’s car after the bombing.Meghdad Madadi/Fars News Agency, via Associated Press

Bomb Kills Nuclear Scientist

A bomber on a motorcycle kills Mostafa Ahmadi Rosha, a scientist from the Natanz site, and his bodyguard. Iran blames Israel and the United States. The Americans deny the accusation, but Israel is more circumspect.

Dec. 4, 2011

Iran displayed the drone for propaganda purposes, with photographs of ayatollahs who led Iran’s revolution behind it and a desecrated version of the American flag. Revolutionary Guards, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

A Blow to U.S., as Drone Crashes

A stealth C.I.A. drone, the RQ-170 Sentinel, crashes near the Iranian town of Kashmar, 140 miles from the Afghan border. It is part of a stepped-up surveillance program that has frequently sent the United States’ most hard-to-detect drone into Iran to map suspected nuclear sites.

Iran asserts that its military downed the aircraft, but American officials say the drone was lost because of a malfunction.

Iran’s nuclear enrichment plant at Natanz.Hasan Sarbakhshian/Associated Press

Natanz Plant Recovers

After a dip in enriched uranium production in 2010 because of the cyberattacks, Iranian production recovers. While the United States and Israel never acknowledged responsibility for the cyberprogram, Olympic Games, some experts argue that it set the Iranians back a year or two. Others say that estimate overstates the effect.

With the program still running, intelligence agencies in the United States and Israel seek out new targets that could further slow Iran’s progress.

November 2011

A poster of an Iranian gas field is a backdrop to passers-by in Asaluyeh. Newsha Tavakolian for The New York Times

West Expands Sanctions, and U.N. Offers Evidence on Nuclear Work

Major Western powers take significant steps to cut Iran off from the international financial system, announcing coordinated sanctions aimed at its central bank and commercial banks. The United States also imposes sanctions on companies involved in Iran’s nuclear industry, as well as on its petrochemical and oil industries.

The United Nations atomic agency releases evidence that it says make a “credible” case that “Iran has carried out activities relevant to the development of a nuclear device” at its Parchin military base and that the project may still be under way.

Nov. 29, 2010

One of the two cars bombed in Tehran. Reuters

Bombings Strike Scientists in Iran

Unidentified attackers riding motorcycles bomb two of Iran’s top nuclear scientists, killing one and prompting accusations that the United States and Israel are again trying to disrupt Iran’s nuclear program.

The scientist who was killed, Majid Shahriari, reportedly managed a ”major project” for the country’s Atomic Energy Organization. His wounded colleague, Fereydoon Abbasi, is believed to be even more important; he is on the United Nations Security Council’s sanctions list for ties to the Iranian nuclear effort.

July 15, 2010

The Iranian scientist Shahram Amiri, with his 7-year-old son, greeting family members in Tehran.Newsha Tavakolian/Polaris, for The New York Times

Iranian Scientist Defects to U.S., Then Reconsiders

Shahram Amiri, an Iranian nuclear scientist who American officials say defected to the United States in 2009, provided information about Iran’s nuclear weapons program and then developed second thoughts, returning to Iran. (After a hero’s welcome, he was imprisoned on treason charges and tortured, according to reports from Iran.)

The bizarre episode was the latest in a tale that has featured a mysterious disappearance from a hotel room in Saudi Arabia, rumors of a trove of new intelligence about Iran’s nuclear plants and a series of contradictory YouTube videos. It immediately set off a renewed propaganda war between Iran and the United States.

June 2010

Ambassadors to the United Nations, from right: Susan E. Rice of the United States, Mark Lyall Grant of Britain and Ruhakana Rugunda of Uganda voted to affirm a Security Council resolution on Iran while Turkey’s ambassador, Ertugrul Apakan, voted against it. Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.N. Approves New Sanctions

The United Nations Security Council levels its fourth round of sanctions against Iran’s nuclear program. The sanctions curtail military purchases, trade and financial transactions carried out by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, which controls the nuclear program.

The Security Council also requires countries to inspect ships or planes headed to or from Iran if they suspect banned cargo. In addition, Iran is barred from investing in other countries’ nuclear enrichment plants, uranium mines and related technologies, and the Security Council sets up a committee to monitor enforcement.

Summer 2010

Computer Worms Leak Online; 1,000 Centrifuges Destroyed

The United States and Israel realize that copies of the computer sabotage program introduced in Natanz are available on the Internet, where they are replicating quickly. In a few weeks, articles appear in the news media about a mysterious new computer worm carried on USB keys that exploits a hole in the Windows operating system. The worm is named Stuxnet.

President Obama decides not to kill the program, and a subsequent attack takes out nearly 1,000 Iranian centrifuges, nearly a fifth of those operating.

February 2010

Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency.Herwig Prammer/Reuters

Work on Warhead

The United Nations’ nuclear inspectors declare for the first time that they have extensive evidence of “past or current undisclosed activities” by Iran’s military to develop a nuclear warhead.

The report also concludes that some Iranian weapons-related activity apparently continued “beyond 2004,” contradicting an American intelligence assessment published in 2008 that concluded that work on a bomb was suspended at the end of 2003.

January 2010

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates in 2011. Francois Lenoir/Reuters

Leaked Gates Memo on U.S. Policy

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates warns in a secret three-page memorandum to top White House officials that the United States does not have an effective long-range policy for dealing with Iran’s steady progress toward nuclear capability.

When the memo becomes public in April, Mr. Gates issues a statement saying that he wishes to dispel any perception among allies that the administration had failed to adequately think through how to deal with Iran.

September 2009

Prime Minister Gordon Brown of Britain, President Nicolas Sarkozy of France and President Obama, in Pittsburgh, accused Iran of building a secret nuclear fuel plant.Doug Mills/The New York Times

Warning on Nuclear ‘Deception’

American, British and French officials declassify some of their most closely held intelligence and describe a multiyear Iranian effort, tracked by spies and satellites, to build a secret uranium enrichment plant deep inside a mountain.

The new plant, which Iran strongly denies is intended to be kept secret or used for making weapons, is months from completion and does nothing to shorten intelligence estimates of how long it would take Iran to produce a bomb. American intelligence officials say it will take at least a year, perhaps five, for Iran to develop the full ability to make a nuclear weapon.

April 8, 2009

U.S. Joins Regular Iran Talks

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announces that the United States will participate in talks with Iran involving five other nations: Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia.

July 19, 2008

The negotiators Saeed Jalili of Iran, left, and William J. Burns, third from right, in Geneva. Pool photo by Denis Balibouse

Talks End in Deadlock

International talks on Iran’s nuclear ambitions end in deadlock despite the Bush administration’s decision to reverse policy and send William J. Burns, a senior American official, to the table for the first time.

Iran responds with a written document that fails to address the main issue: international demands that it stop enriching uranium. Iranian diplomats reiterate before the talks that they consider the issue nonnegotiable.

2008

U.S. – Israel Cyberattacks Begin

President George W. Bush rejects a secret request by Israel for specialized bunker-busting bombs it wants for an attack on Iran’s nuclear program. The Bush administration is alarmed by the Israeli idea to fly over Iraq to reach Iran’s major nuclear complex at Natanz and decides to step up intelligence-sharing with Israel and brief Israeli officials on new American efforts to subtly sabotage Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. Mr. Bush will hand off the major covert program to President Obama.

The United States works with Israel to begin cyberattacks, code-named Olympic Games, on computer systems at the Natanz plant. A year later, the program is introduced undetected into a controller computer at Natanz. Centrifuges begin crashing and engineers have no clue that the plant is under attack.

December 2006

First Round of U.N. Sanctions

The Security Council unanimously approves sanctions intended to curb Iran’s nuclear program. The sanctions ban the import and export of materials and technology used in uranium enrichment and reprocessing and in the production of ballistic missiles.

Aug. 26, 2006

The heavy-water plant in Arak, south of Tehran.Iran/Reuters

Iran Opens a Heavy-Water Reactor

Just days before Iran is supposed to suspend enrichment of uranium or face the prospect of sanctions, President Ahmadinejad formally kicks off a heavy-water production plant in Arak, 120 miles southwest of Tehran, which would put Iran on the path to obtaining plutonium, a fuel used in nuclear weapons.

In November, Iran seeks international assistance to ensure safe operation for a 40-megawatt reactor it is building. Citing broader doubts about Iran’s nuclear ambitions, the United Nations atomic agency, the United States and European countries oppose offering help.

January 2006

A satellite image of Natanz in 2007.GeoEye/SIME, via Associated Press

Natanz Production Is Restarted

Iran resumes uranium enrichment at Natanz after negotiations with European and American officials collapse.

The I.A.E.A. approves a resolution to report Iran’s nuclear program to the Security Council, citing “the absence of confidence” among the atomic agency’s members “that Iran’s nuclear program is exclusively for peaceful purposes.”

Aug. 3, 2005

President Ahmadinejad offended Israel in his speech on the rule of law at a United Nations conference in 2012. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Ahmadinejad Elected President

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, known only as a secular conservative and a former mayor of Tehran, becomes president. He becomes a divisive figure in world affairs, cheering on the development of Iran’s nuclear program despite orders from the United Nations Security Council to halt it, calling for Israel to be “wiped off the map’’ and describing the Holocaust as “a myth.”

Mid-July, 2005

With Laptop Files, U.S. Seeks to Prove Iran’s Nuclear Aims

Senior American intelligence officials present the International Atomic Energy Agency with the contents of what they say is a stolen Iranian laptop containing more than a thousand pages of Iranian computer simulations and accounts of experiments — studies for crucial features of a nuclear warhead.

Intelligence reports reveal that Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, a little-known Iranian scientist, leads elements of Iran’s weaponization program known as Project 110 and Project 111.

But doubts about the intelligence persist among some experts, in part because American officials, citing the need to protect their source, have largely refused to provide details of the origins of the laptop beyond saying that they obtained it in mid-2004 from a source in Iran who they said had received it from a second person, now believed to be dead.

Nov. 7, 2004

Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi talking to reporters in Tehran ahead of nuclear talks in Paris. Abedin Taherkenareh/European Pressphoto Agency

Violation and New Agreement

Iran violates the agreement, charging that the Europeans reneged on their promises of economic and political incentives. After 22 hours of negotiations, an Iranian delegation and senior officials from France, Germany, Britain and the European Union come to a preliminary agreement to immediately suspend Iran’s production of enriched uranium. The Iranian foreign minister, Kamal Kharrazi, praises the so-called Paris Agreement but emphasizes that any suspension will be temporary.

In a few weeks, the I.A.E.A verifies Iran’s suspension of its enrichment activities, with one exception: its request to use up to 20 sets of centrifuge components for research and development.

2003

An Iranian missile displayed by the Revolutionary Guards under a portrait of the supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, in September 2003. Henghameh Fahimi/Agence France-Presse

Nuclear Program Is Suspended

Possibly in response to the American invasion of Iraq, which was originally justified by the Bush administration on the grounds that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, Ayatollah Khamenei orders a suspension of work on what appear to be weapons-related technologies, although he allows uranium enrichment efforts to continue.

Inspectors with the United Nations atomic agency find traces of highly enriched uranium at the Natanz plant, and Iran concedes to demands, after talks with Britain, France and Germany, to accept stricter international inspections of its nuclear sites and to suspend production of enriched uranium.

2002

Discovery of Secret Plants

Mujahedeen Khalq, an Iranian dissident group also known as the M.E.K., obtains and shares documents revealing a clandestine nuclear program previously unknown to the United Nations.

The program includes a vast uranium enrichment plant at Natanz and a heavy water plant at Arak. In December, satellite photographs of Natanz and Arak appear widely in the news media. The United States accuses Tehran of an “across-the-board pursuit of weapons of mass destruction,” but takes relatively little action because it is focused on the approaching invasion of Iraq the next year.

Iran agrees to inspections by the I.A.E.A. It also signs an accord with Russia to speed up completion of the nuclear power plant at Bushehr.

May 1999

Mohammad Khatami in 2009. Hasan Sarbakhshian/Associated Press

Proposal for Nuclear-Free Mideast

President Mohammad Khatami of Iran goes to Saudi Arabia, becoming the first Iranian leader since 1979 to visit the Arab world.

He issues a joint statement with King Fahd expressing concerns about Israel’s nuclear weapons program and support for ridding the Middle East of nuclear weapons. In 2003, Iran supports such a proposal initiated by Syria.

July 1996

President Bill Clinton addressing reporters in July 1996. Joe Marquette/Associated Press

Sanctions Against Iran and Libya

With growing intelligence estimates that Iran may secretly be trying to build a nuclear weapon, President Bill Clinton signs a bill imposing sanctions on foreign companies with investments in Iran and Libya. Such rules are already in place for American companies.

Jan. 8, 1995

A Russian engineer checking equipment at the Bushehr nuclear plant in April 2007.Behrouz Mehri/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Iran and Russia Sign Nuclear Contract

Iran announces that it will sign an $800 million contract with Russia to complete construction on one of two light water reactors at the Bushehr nuclear plant within four years. After many delays, the project was completed in 2010.

The United States has been persuading countries like Argentina, India, Spain, Germany and France to prohibit the sale of nuclear technology to Iran’s civilian program.

June 4, 1989

The body of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini was displayed to hundreds of thousands of Iranians at his funeral.Agence France-Presse

New Supreme Leader

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s nominal president for eight years, becomes supreme leader after Ayatollah Khomeini dies.

Late 1980s

The Pakistani scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan in Islamabad in 1988.B.K.Bangash/Associated Press

Help From Pakistani Scientist

In the late 1980s, Abdul Qadeer Khan, a Pakistani metallurgist and the father of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program, sells Iran, North Korea and Libya his uranium enrichment technology, and in Libya’s case, a bomb design. The transactions do not become public until years later.

In 2005, the United Nations’ International Atomic Energy Agency is on the verge of reviewing Tehran’s nuclear program when Iranian officials admit to a 1987 meetingwith Dr. Khan’s representatives. But Tehran tells the agency that it turned down the chance to buy the equipment required to build the core of a bomb.

1984

Iraqi gunners used a Soviet 130-milllimeter field gun to shell the Iranian cities of Abadan and Khurramshahr.United Press International

Nuclear Program Restarts

The Iran-Iraq war, from 1980 to 1988, changes Iran’s thinking about the nuclear program. With Saddam Hussein pursuing a nuclear program in Iraq, Ayatollah Khomeini secretly decides to restart Iran’s program and seeks the assistance of German partners to complete the construction at Bushehr, which was damaged by bombs during the war.

Feb. 11, 1979

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini descending from the Air France plane that returned him to Tehran after 15 years in exile.United Press International

Khomeini Comes to Power

Prime Minister Bakhtiar is overthrown by followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, an exiled cleric, after bloody clashes in Tehran.

The new leader is uninterested in the nuclear program and ends the shah’s effort. Many nuclear experts flee the country.

Any nuclear cooperation between Iran and the United States breaks down completely with the American Embassy hostage crisis from November 1979 until January 1981.

Jan. 16, 1979

The deposed shah, with Empress Farah and two of their children, in the Bahamas in 1979, where they dodged questions from photographers. Associated Press

Shah Flees

The shah is overthrown and flees the country, in what becomes known as the Islamic Revolution of 1979.

Prime Minister Shahpur Bakhtiar takes over and cancels the $6.2 billion contract for the construction of two nuclear power plants at the Bushehr complex.

The United States retracts a deal it had made with Iran a year earlier and stops supplying enriched uranium for the Tehran research reactor.

1973

The Bushehr nuclear plant on Aug. 21, 2010, as its first fuel rod was loaded. Getty Images

Creation of Atomic Energy Body

The shah creates the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, which conducts training for its personnel and nuclear deals with countries including the United States, France, West Germany, Namibia and South Africa. By training engineers in Iran and abroad, the country gains a solid understanding of nuclear technologies and capabilities.

A year later, Kraftwerk Union, a West German company, agrees to construct two light water reactors to produce nuclear energy at the Bushehr complex, 470 miles south of Tehran. Construction begins in 1974 but the contract is not signed until 1976.

By the late 1970s, the United States becomes worried that Iran may harbor nuclear weapon ambitions.

July 1, 1968

Iran Signs Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty

With the American-provided research reactor running, starting in 1967, Iran becomes one of 51 nations to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, agreeing to never become a nuclear-weapon state.

1950s

Nuclear Program Begins

Iran begins a civilian nuclear program in the 1950s, led by Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, who reaches a deal through the Eisenhower administration’s Atoms for Peace program. Under the agreement, the United States agrees to provide a nuclear research reactor in Tehran and power plants.

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Portrait of A Mass Murderer– Dylann Storm Roof — Racist, Drug User, Mentally Disturbed, Evil or Murderer? — It’s The Drugs — Feed Your Head — The House of the Rising Sun — Videos

Posted on June 24, 2015. Filed under: American History, Articles, Blogroll, British History, Business, Chemistry, Communications, Constitution, Corruption, Crime, Crisis, Culture, Education, Entertainment, European History, Faith, Family, Freedom, Friends, Games, government, government spending, history, Homicide, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Medicine, Money, Music, Music, People, Philosophy, Photos, Pistols, Police, Politics, Press, Psychology, Radio, Radio, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Religion, Religious, Religious, Science, Speech, Talk Radio, Television, Television, Terrorism, Video, War, Weapons, Welfare, Wisdom, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Story 1: Portrait of A Mass Murderer– Dylann Storm Roof — Racist, Drug User, Mentally Disturbed, Evil or Murderer? — It’s The Drugs — Feed Your Head — The House of the Rising Sun — Videos

crime statistics

gun free zonePsych-Meds-and-School-Shootings3blackboxwarningantidepressants-tca-ssripill picturesssri-drug-table1ssris-and-triptans1types of drugsnursingbuddy.com-nursing-pharmacology-Sites-of-Action-for-Selected-Antidepressantsantidepressant-side-effectpsychiatry-junk-science-anxiety-depression-myth-serotonin-level-nerve-endings-receptor-sites-presynaptic-postsynaptic-neuron-neurotransmitter-ssri-selective-serotonin-reuptake-inhibitor-sarafem-paxil-zoloft-celexssri-drug-table1antidepressant_medications_sig

SSRI Stories

Our Stories

SSRI Stories is a collection of over 6,000 stories that have appeared in the media (newspapers, TV, scientific journals) in which prescription drugs were mentioned and in which the drugs may be linked to a variety of adverse outcomes including violence.

This updated site includes the stories from the previous site and new ones from 2011 to date.  We have used a new “category” classification system on the new stories.  We are working back through previously SSRI Stories to bring them into the new classification system.  In the meantime use the search box in the upper right column to search through both the old and the new stories.

SSRI Stories focuses primarily on problems caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), of which Prozac (fluoxetine) was the first.  For more see About SSRIs.   Other medications prescribed as antidepressants that fit the “nightmares” theme of the collected stories are sometimes included.

Jefferson Airplane -White Rabbit

Go Ask Alice (White Rabbit) Lyrics

“Go Ask Alice” was written by Grace Slick.

One pill makes you larger
And one pill makes you small
And the ones that mother gives you
Don’t do anything at all

Go ask Alice
When she’s ten feet tall
And if you go chasing rabbits
And you know you’re going to fall

Tell them a hookah-smoking caterpillar
Has given you the call
Call Alice when she was just small
When the men on the chess board
Get up and tell you where to go

And you just had some kind of mushroom
And your mind is moving slow
Go ask Alice
I think she’ll know

When logic and proportion
Have fallen sloppy dead
And the white knight is talking backwards
And the Red Queen’s lost her head
Remember what the dormouse said

Feed your head
Feed your head

http://www.metrolyrics.com/go-ask-alice-lyrics-jefferson-airplane.html

Jefferson Airplane – White Rabbit (Grace Slick, Woodstock, aug 17 1969)

Jefferson Airplane – Somebody to love

Dylann Roof makes first South Carolina court appearance

Bond Hearing For Charleston Church Shooter Dylann Roof (Full Unedited): First Court Appearance

New video shows church group moments before shooting

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Dylann Roof: Charleston Church Shooting | True News

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Obama Says Legalizing Drugs is Worthy of Debate

The REAL Reason for the Mass Shooting Epidemic in America

The Marketing of Madness: The Truth About

Psychotropic Drugs

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Friend: Dyllan Storm Roof Took Gun from His Mom – She Didn’t Trust Him With It (VIDEO)

Witnesses: Shooter said he was there ‘to shoot black…

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Best 7 minutes on gun control I have ever seen!

In this segment of his Virtual State of the Union, the Virtual President talks about why politicians want to talk about gun control rather than crime control, and delivers the factual evidence and historical truths that make the case for the Second Amendment self-evident.

Dr Susan Gratia-Hupp – Survivor of the 1991 Kileen TX Lubys Shooting Massacre

Hupp and her parents were having lunch at the Luby’s Cafeteria in Killeen in 1991 when the Luby’s massacre commenced. The gunman shot 50 people and killed 23, including Hupp’s parents. Hupp later expressed regret about deciding to remove her gun from her purse and lock it in her car lest she risk possibly running afoul of the state’s concealed weapons laws; during the shootings, she reached for her weapon but then remembered that it was “a hundred feet away in my car.” Her father, Al Gratia, tried to rush the gunman and was shot in the chest. As the gunman reloaded, Hupp escaped through a broken window and believed that her mother, Ursula Gratia, was behind her. Actually however, her mother went to her mortally-wounded husband’s aid and was then shot in the head.

As a survivor of the Luby’s massacre, Hupp testified across the country in support of concealed-handgun laws. She said that if there had been a second chance to prevent the slaughter, she would have violated the Texas law and carried the handgun inside her purse into the restaurant. She testified across the country in support of concealed handgun laws, and was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1996. The law was signed by then-Governor George W. Bush.

The Animals – The House of the Rising Sun

“House Of The Rising Sun”

There is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
And God, I know I’m oneMy mother was a tailor
She sewed my new blue jeans
My father was a gamblin’ man
Down in New OrleansNow the only thing a gambler needs
Is a suitcase and trunk
And the only time he’s satisfied
Is when he’s on a drunk[Organ Solo]Oh mother, tell your children
Not to do what I have done
Spend your lives in sin and misery
In the House of the Rising SunWell, I got one foot on the platform
The other foot on the train
I’m goin’ back to New Orleans
To wear that ball and chainWell, there is a house in New Orleans
They call the Rising Sun
And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy
And God, I know I’m one

The Moody Blues – Nights In White Satin

Charleston shooting: c’s stepmother defends ‘smart’ boy ‘drawn in by internet evil’

CHARLESTON SHOOTING – Disaster Being Used to Forward Gun Control Agenda

Charleston Shooting: “Hate Crimes” and White Fear

Fox News Host ‘Surprise’ as Obama ‘Quick’ Invoke Gun Control on Charleston Mass Shooting

Fox’s Steve Doocy and Guest Wonder Whether Charleston Shooting Part of ‘War on Christians’

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Mass Murders caused by Pharma Meds… Not Guns!

Medicated to Death: SSRIs and Mass Killings

Chris Greene “SSRI Drugs are responsible for School Massacre”

Michael Savage, caller on how massacres occur at “gun-free” zones, not in armed places like Israel

Ft. Hood Shooting Reactions And The Horrors Of SSRIs

Affidavits spell out chilling case against Dylann Roof

As a subdued Dylann Roof made his first official appearance Friday on charges of killing nine people at a historic black church, police affidavits offered grim details of the murder case, including an allegation that the gunman fired multiple shots into each victim and stood over them to issue “a racially inflammatory statement.”

The documents also said that Roof’s father and uncle contacted police to positively identify the 21-year-old as the suspect after authorities issued photos of the gunman within hours of the attack at the Emanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston Wednesday evening.

As those details trickled out, the suspect’s family issued a statement expressing sadness and offering condolences to the families of the victims:

Dylann Roof’s father, according to the court documents, told investigators that his son owned a .45-caliber handgun. The documents note that .45-caliber casings were found at the scene of the shootings.

The affidavits allege that Roof, wearing a fanny pack apparently to hide a weapon, spent an hour with the parishioners before opening fire on the group. Before leaving the scene of the carnage, he allegedly “uttered a racially inflammatory statement” over the bodies to a witness who was apparently allowed to survive to convey the message.

Roof was returned to South Carolina after waiving his extradition rights following his arrest Thursday near Shelby, N.C., about 245 miles northwest of Charleston.

He appeared at ease when he allegedly told investigators shortly after his capture that he had launched the attack that left nine dead, a federal law enforcement official said. The official, who is not authorized to comment publicly, said that the suspect expressed no remorse and appeared “comfortable” with what he had done.

Authorities have determined that Roof legally obtained a .45-caliber handgun earlier this year, using money likely provided as birthday gift from his family, the official said. The weapon was purchased at gun store near Columbia, S.C.

Statements made by some family members of victims were particularly powerful.

Appearing by video link from jail, the 21-year-old Roof, who was handcuffed and wore a striped jail jumpsuit, often pursed his lips, closed his eyes, or stared at the floor as the relatives of five victims spoke to the court at the bond hearing.

“You took something really precious away from me, I will never talk to her again, never hold her again, but I forgive you,” said the daughter of one of the victims, Ethel Lance. “You hurt me, you hurt a lot of people but God forgive you and I forgive you.”

Roof appeared wan and subdued, his distinctive bowl hair, shown in surveillance photos outside the church on the night of the killings, stringy and unkempt. He stood with his hands cuffed behind his back. Two heavily armed guards stood behind him.

Bethanee Middleton-Brown, sister of another victim, DePayne Middleton-Doctor, addressed the hearing amid sniffles and sobs in the tiny courtroom.

She said her sister “taught me me that we are the family that love built, we have no room for hate, so we have to forgive. And I pray to God for your soul and I also thank God that And I also thank God I won’t be around when your judgment day comes with him.”

Although the court legally could not issue any bond in on the murder charges, Magistrate James Gosnell Jr. set Roof’s bond on a related weapons possession charge at $1 million.

Roof, who often swallowed hard as the judge asked questions, spoke only three times, answering “yes, sir” and “no, sir” to questions about his employment status. Roof is unemployed.

At the opening of the emotional, 13-minute hearing, Gosnell addressed the court, saying Charleston is a strong, loving community with “big hearts.”

“We are going to reach out to everyone, all the victims, and we will touch them,” he said. “We have victims — nine of them — but we also have victims on the other side.

“There are victims on this young man’s side of the family. No one would have ever thrown them into the whirlwind of events that they have been thrown into … We must find it in their heart to also help his family as well.”

In Washington, meanwhile, Justice Department spokeswoman Emily Pierce said the federal inquiry into the church shooting is ongoing.

Pierce said the investigation will not only consider possible hate crime violations, but prosecutors also will review the shooting as a possible “act of domestic terrorism.”

“This heartbreaking episode was undoubtedly designed to strike fear and terror into this community, and the department is looking at this crime from all angles,” Pierce said.

Charleston, South Carolina Mayor Joseph Riley said although he doesn’t condone the death penalty, he thinks prosecutors will seek it in the Emanuel AME church shooting. VPC

Gov. Nikki Haley, speaking on NBC’s Today show on Friday, said that “we will absolutely will want him to have the death penalty” for the fatal shooting of nine members of a Bible study group at the Emanuel AME Church on Wednesday evening.

Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr., said at a news conference Friday that though he’s not a proponent of the death penalty, it’s the law in South Carolina and he expects it will be sought in the church shooting. “If you are going to have a death penalty, certainly this case would merit it,” Riley said.

Shelby police officials did not interview Roof formally, according to WBTV, a Charlotte TV station, which quotes an unidentified source as saying the suspect was videotaped during the entire time he was at the Shelby police department.

The source told WBTV that Roof spoke freely, told investigators he had been planning the attack for a period of time, had researched the Emanuel AME Church and targeted it because it was a historic African-American church.

According to WBTV’s source, Roof told investigators he had a Glock handgun hidden behind a pouch he was wearing around his waist. He also told investigators he thought he’d only shot a few people and when told he actually had killed nine people, he appeared to be somewhat remorseful, according to the source.

During the recorded conversation, Roof reportedly told investigators he actually thought he would be caught in Charleston before fleeing and was headed to Nashville when he was captured. When asked why he was going to Nashville, he reportedly told investigators “I’ve never been there before.”

Police alleged that Roof opened fire on worshipers after sitting with them for at least an hour. The victims included the pastor, Clementa Pinckney, 41, who was also a state senator.

The 21-year-old man accused of killing nine people as they worshiped at a Charleston, South Carolina church has a criminal past. Dylann Roof was arrested twice this year and images of him posted to social media seem to show a racist ideology. WCNC

Roof allegedly told police he “almost didn’t go through with (the shooting) because everyone was so nice to him,” other sources told NBC News’ Craig Melvin.

Police say they thought Roof was the lone gunman within hours of the bloody attack on the church, which was founded in 1816. Asked whether authorities believe Roof had acted alone, Mullen said: “We don’t have any reason to believe anyone else was involved.”

A one-time acquaintance of Roof’s told the Associated Press that he would rant that “blacks were taking over the world” as the pair got drunk on vodka.

Roof railed that “someone needed to do something about it for the white race,” said the former friend, Joseph Meek Jr., according to the AP.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/06/19/dylann-roof-charleston-police-charged–murder-black-church/28975573/

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 480-489

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 455-463

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 447-454

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 439-446

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 431-438

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 422-430

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 414-421

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 408-413

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 400-407

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 391-399

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 383-390

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 376-382

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 369-375

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 360-368

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 354-359

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 346-353

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 338-345

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 328-337

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 319-327

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 307-318

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 296-306

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 287-295

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 277-286

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 124-130

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

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Lying Lunatic Left Gun Grabbers Blame Gun Violence (Nonexistent) and Not Human Violence (Real), On Trump, Talk Radio and The Millennial Mass Murderer, Dylann Storm Roof, in Charleston, South Carolina Church Killing of Nine Instead of Drugs and Mental Illness — Videos

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Story 1: Lying Lunatic Left Gun Grabbers Blame Gun Violence (Nonexistent) and Not Human Violence (Real), Trump and Talk Radio on The Millennial Mass Murderer, Dylann Storm Roof,  in Charleston, South Carolina Church Killing of Nine Instead of Drugs and Mental Illness — Videos

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, second from left, is escorted from the Shelby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, second from left, is escorted from the Shelby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, center, is escorted from the Sheby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, center, is escorted from the Sheby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

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mass shootingsmass shooting and killings

Dylann Roof: Charleston Church Shooting | True News

Nine people are dead after shooting which occurred 9pm on Wednesday at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The congregation, established in 1816, is one of the oldest African American churches in the United States.

Gunman Dylann Roof was attending a bible study meeting at the church and told the worshipers, “I have to do it. You rape our women and you’re taking over our country and you have to go.”

One woman was specifically spared as Roof said, “I’m not going to shoot you because I want you to tell everyone what happened.”

Stefan Molyneux examines the news story, what is known about Dylann Roof, how this incident could have been prevented, incomprehensible parenting, false rape statistics, violence in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, the call for gun control, the danger of SSRIs and a plea for an honest conversation about race in America.

Gun Control in 47 Seconds

Best 7 minutes on gun control I have ever seen!

In this segment of his Virtual State of the Union, the Virtual President talks about why politicians want to talk about gun control rather than crime control, and delivers the factual evidence and historical truths that make the case for the Second Amendment self-evident.

Dr Susan Gratia-Hupp – Survivor of the 1991 Kileen TX Lubys Shooting Massacre

Hupp and her parents were having lunch at the Luby’s Cafeteria in Killeen in 1991 when the Luby’s massacre commenced. The gunman shot 50 people and killed 23, including Hupp’s parents. Hupp later expressed regret about deciding to remove her gun from her purse and lock it in her car lest she risk possibly running afoul of the state’s concealed weapons laws; during the shootings, she reached for her weapon but then remembered that it was “a hundred feet away in my car.” Her father, Al Gratia, tried to rush the gunman and was shot in the chest. As the gunman reloaded, Hupp escaped through a broken window and believed that her mother, Ursula Gratia, was behind her. Actually however, her mother went to her mortally-wounded husband’s aid and was then shot in the head.

As a survivor of the Luby’s massacre, Hupp testified across the country in support of concealed-handgun laws. She said that if there had been a second chance to prevent the slaughter, she would have violated the Texas law and carried the handgun inside her purse into the restaurant. She testified across the country in support of concealed handgun laws, and was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1996. The law was signed by then-Governor George W. Bush.

The Truth About Gun Control

Breaking News: Gov. Abbott sign Texas Open Carry Law June 2015

Texas ‘Open Carry’ Law Passes, Allowing Guns in Holsters on the Street

Charleston shooting Suspect, Dylann Storm Roof, in police custody

Dylann Storm Roof, the 21-year-old white male allegedly behind the shooting of nine African-Americans at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church Wednesday night in Charleston, SC, was arrested by law enforcement on Thursday morning. Manila Chan has more on the details and what the authorities know at this time.

Dylann Storm Roof Captured by NC Police, Charleston Shooting Suspect Escorting VIDEO

Daily Show’s Jon Stewart on Charleston shooting: ‘This was a terrorist attack’

Citizen With Concealed Weapons Permit Shoots and Kills Attacker

John Lott: More Guns, Less Crime

Gun Regulation: U.S Gun Homicides vs. Japan

John Lott: More Guns, Less Crime book interview on CSPAN

Nine killed in South Carolina Charleston ‘hate crime’ shooting

Dylann Storm Roof Was ‘Wild,’ Not Violent, Took Drugs, Classmate of Charleston Shooting Suspect Says

President Obama makes statement on Charleston mass shooting

President Barack Obama expressed his sorrow about a mass shooting in Charleston, South Carolina that killed nine people during a news conference on Thursday. Speaking about the tragedy, the president also spoke about the need to take another look at gun violence in the nation.

Carolina Church Shooting: Obama gets it wrong–Guns SAVE Lives!

PJTV: Wake Up Obama. Drugs Are the Problem, Not Guns

Fox News Host ‘Surprise’ as Obama ‘Quick’ Invoke Gun Control on Charleston Mass Shooting

Donald Trump rails against immigrants in presidential campaign launch

Hillary Clinton ATTACKS Donald Trump Connects Negative Remarks on Mexico to MURDERS in Charleston

Hillary Clinton Takes a Veiled Shot at Donald Trump

Donald Trump on his campaign speech comments that some Mexican immigrants are ‘rapists’

Donald Trump Presidential speech announcement 2016 – Donald Trump Bashes Mexico Obamacare

Charleston Shooting: What They’re Not Telling You

The Alex Jones Show (1st HOUR-VIDEO Commercial Free) Thursday June 18 2015: #CharlestonShooting

News Behind the News: John Lott on America’s Gun Laws

Top 10 Infamous Mass Shootings in the U.S.

Top 10 Infamous Mass Shootings Outside the U.S.

CHARLESTON SHOOTER WAS ON DRUG LINKED TO VIOLENT OUTBURSTS

Dylann Storm Roof was taking habit-forming drug suboxone
Charleston Shooter Was on Drug Linked to Violent Outbursts

by PAUL JOSEPH WATSON | JUNE 18, 2015


Charleston shooter Dylann Storm Roof was reportedly taking a drug that has been linked with sudden outbursts of violence, fitting the pattern of innumerable other mass shooters who were on or had recently come off pharmaceutical drugs linked to aggression.

According to a CBS News report, earlier this year when cops searched Roof after he was acting suspiciously inside a Bath and Body Works store, they found “orange strips” that Roof told officers was suboxone, a narcotic that is used to treat opiate addiction.

Suboxone is a habit-forming drug that has been connected with sudden outbursts of aggression.
Another poster on the Drugs.com website tells the story of how his personality completely changed as a result of taking suboxone.A user on the MD Junction website relates how her husband “became violent, smashing things and threatening me,” after just a few days of coming off suboxone.

The individual relates how he became “nasty” and “violent” just weeks into taking the drug, adding that he would “snap” and be mean to people for no reason.

Another poster reveals how his son-in-law “completely changed on suboxone,” and that the drug sent him into “self-destruct mode.”

A user named ‘Jhalloway’ also tells the story of how her husband’s addiction to suboxone was “ruining our life.”

A poster on a separate forum writes about how he became “horribly aggressive” towards his partner after taking 8mg of suboxone.

A website devoted to horror stories about the drug called SubSux.com also features a post by a woman whose husband obtained a gun and began violently beating his 15-year-old son after taking suboxone.

According to a Courier-Journal report, suboxone “is increasingly being abused, sold on the streets and inappropriately prescribed” by doctors. For some users, it is even more addictive than the drugs it’s supposed to help them quit.

As we previously highlighted, virtually every major mass shooter was taking some form of SSRI or other pharmaceutical drug at the time of their attack, including Columbine killer Eric Harris, ‘Batman’ shooter James Holmes and Sandy Hook gunman Adam Lanza.

As the website SSRI Stories profusely documents, there are literally hundreds of examples of mass shootings, murders and other violent episodes that have been committed by individuals on psychiatric drugs over the past three decades.

Pharmaceutical giants who produce drugs like Zoloft, Prozac and Paxil spend around $2.4 billion dollars a year on direct-to-consumer television advertising every year. By running negative stories about prescription drugs, networks risk losing tens of millions of dollars in ad revenue, which is undoubtedly one of the primary reasons why the connection is habitually downplayed or ignored entirely.

http://www.infowars.com/charleston-shooter-was-on-drug-linked-to-violent-outbursts/

White suspect in massacre at black South Carolina church charged, held in jail

5 Things the Gun Grabbers Apparently Don’t Understand

John Hawkins

“I’m not a gun owner and, as I think as is the case for the more than half the people in the country who also aren’t gun owners, that means that for me guns are alien. In the current rhetorical climate people seem not to want to say: I think guns are kind of scary and don’t want to be around them.” — Josh Marshall

“A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity.”

~ Sigmund Freud

Sorry, but your Second Amendment rights no longer apply because liberals like Josh Marshall tinkle on themselves every time they come within fifty feet of a gun. This is really what the debate on gun control in America comes down to in the end: people who lose nothing if guns are banned because they don’t use them demanding that everyone else be disarmed. Meanwhile, trying to reason with gun control advocates is like arguing with a four year old about whether her imaginary friend is real or not. It doesn’t matter how clearly you prove your case; she’ll be pouring her pal tea two minutes after you’ve left the room. Speaking of imaginary…

1) A “gun free zone” won’t keep bad people with guns away: The basic problem with a “gun free zone” is that anyone you can’t trust with a gun will bring it in anyway while it will cause the people you’d want armed in a dangerous situation to leave their weapons behind. If this concept actually worked, we’d just train all of our soldiers in Jiu-jitsu and then we’d declare everywhere we sent them to be a “gun free zone.” Admittedly, Mortal Kombat: Afghanistan sounds like it would be an amazing movie, but someone needs to inform Democrats that the world doesn’t really work this way.

2) Criminals and lunatics don’t obey gun laws: The belief that someone who’s planning to go on a killing spree is going to turn in a gun because it’s made illegal is almost as nuts as going on the killing spree. Yet, the gun grabbers in the Democrat Party operate on the assumption that nut jobs like Adam Lanza or a gangbanger who sells crack for a living is going to get rid of a high-capacity magazine if Congress says he can’t have it. That’s like a prohibitionist who gets upset about alcoholism and deals with the problem by demanding that all the people without drinking problems have to be kept away from booze.

3) We already have somewhere between 200-300 million guns in this country: Adding to the last point, ever heard this old joke?

A drunk loses the keys to his house and is looking for them under a lamppost. A policeman comes over and asks what he’s doing.“I’m looking for my keys” he says. “I lost them over there”.

The policeman looks puzzled. “Then why are you looking for them all the way over here?”

“Because the light is so much better”.

If there were no already existing guns in America, gun control could conceivably help keep weaponry out of the hands of criminals and mass murderers. However, in a nation that’s already armed to the teeth, the next Adam Lanza, Jared Loughner, Tookie Williams or Mumia Abu-Jamal has already got his gun and new laws will only disarm law abiding Americans.

4) Gun owners aren’t required to explain a “need” for our Second Amendment rights: Why do gun owners “need” their guns? The same reason that Rosa Parks “needed” her seat at the front of the bus. In other words, it’s our constitutional right; so kiss off! If you need more of an explanation than that, why does California “need” to have its votes counted in the next presidential election? Why do we “need” so many liberal newspapers? Why not close a few? Why do movie stars “need” to make so much money for their films? Why don’t we confiscate it? What was it that Ann Coulter said?

“Free people are not in the habit of providing reasons why they ‘need’ something simply because the government wants to ban it. That’s true of anything — but especially something the government is constitutionally prohibited from banning, like guns.”

5) You’re not fooling us: Liberals like to think they’re smarter than everyone else, but they’re as transparent as glass to anyone who’s paying attention. That’s why gun sales have blown up like a can of shaving cream in a microwave. If Barack Obama, Diane Feinstein, Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden and the rest of the Democrat gun grabbers in Congress could get away with it, they would ban and confiscate every gun in America tomorrow — and people know it. Anything short of, “Nobody is allowed to own a firearm except the government,” is unacceptable to them and that’s why they always seem so ghoulishly pleased after tragedies like the Gabrielle Giffords shooting or the Newtown massacre. Everybody else is thinking of the victims, while they’re twirling their mustaches Snidely-Whiplash-style and repeating, “Never let a serious crisis go to waste,” to each other.

http://townhall.com/columnists/johnhawkins/2013/03/05/5-things-the-gun-grabbers-apparently-dont-understand-n1525945/page/full

List of rampage killers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Number of incidents listed
Africa/Middle East 85
Americas 108
Asia 127
Europe 94
Oceania/Maritime Southeast Asia 124
Workplace 102
Educational settings 89
Hate crimes 28
Home intruders 93
Familicides – U.S. 120
Familicides – Europe 103
Familicides – Rest of world 155
Vehicular 20
Grenade 21
Other 46
Total 1315

This is a partial list of rampage killings. It is further divided into several subsections.

This list should contain every case with at least one of the following features:

  • Rampage killings with six or more dead (excluding the perpetrator)
  • Rampage killings with at least four people killed and a double digit number of victims (dead plus injured)
  • Rampage killings with at least a dozen victims (dead plus injured)

In the tables that follow, the “W” column indicates the weapon, or weapons, used. Details are listed in the Annotation section.

Africa and the Middle East

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Africa and the Middle East

This section contains cases that occurred in Africa and the Middle East. Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Unek, William Feb. 11 1954
1957
Mahagi
Malampaka
Belgian Congo Belgian Congo
 Tanganyika
21
36
?
?
 M
FMA
Killed
2. Komakech, Richard June 26 1994 Kampala Uganda Uganda
26
13
F Killed by victim’s father [1]
3. Unknown March 25/26 1994 Ta’izz Yemen Yemen
22
?
F Shot by police [2]
4. Unknown Police Officer April 15 1983 Asureti Uganda Uganda
21
?
F Committed suicide [3]
5. Omar Abdul Razeq Abdullah Rifai, 28 Aug. 21 2013 Meet al-Attar Egypt Egypt
15
?
F Shot dead
Killed several people in a family feud in 2008
[4]
6. Unknown Soldier Nov. 6 1995 Nshili Rwanda Rwanda
14–17
19
FM Committed suicide [5]
7. Two Unknown Men 1936 Aksum Turkey Turkey
14
3
FM Both were killed [6]
8. Khumalo, Banda, 38 Dec. 4 1977 Bulawayo Rhodesia Rhodesia
13
16
F Shot by police [7]
9. Ogwang, Alfred, 28 Dec. 26 1994 Kamwenge Uganda Uganda
13
14
F Convicted [8]
10. Fekadu Nasha May 12 2013 Bahir Dar Ethiopia Ethiopia
12–18
2
F Died [9]
11. Mogo May 12 1929 Kitale East Africa Protectorate Kenya
12
1
 M Sentenced to death
12. Obwara, Lazaro, 55 July 28 1950 Kampala Flag of the Uganda Protectorate.svg Uganda
12
0
 M Arrested [10]
13. Ben Jebir, 28 March 25 1985 Fahs Tunisia Tunisia
12
?
F Committed suicide
Killed an unborn child
[11]
14. Vukwana, Bulelani, 29 Feb. 9 2002 East London South Africa South Africa
11
6
F Committed suicide
15. Abdullah Saleh Zaid al-Kohali, 26 May 30 2008 Bait al-Aqari Yemen Yemen
10
15
F Sentenced to death and executed [12]

Americas

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Americas

This section contains cases that occurred in the Americas.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Delgado Morales, Campo Elías, 52 Dec. 4 1986 Bogotá  Colombia
29
12
FMA Shot by police
2. Hennard, George Pierre, 35 Oct. 16 1991 Killeen, TX  USA
23
20
F V Committed suicide
3. Huberty, James Oliver, 41 July 18 1984 San Diego, CA  USA
21
19
F Shot by police
4. Ferreira de França, Genildo, 27 May 21/22 1997 Santo Antônio dos Barreiros  Brazil
14
3
F Committed suicide or shot by police [13]
5. Wong, Jiverly Antares, 41 April 3 2009 Binghamton, NY  USA
13
4
F Committed suicide
6. Unruh, Howard Barton, 28 Sep. 6 1949 Camden, NJ  USA
13
3
F Found mentally unfit to stand trial
7. Holmes, James Eagan, 24 (suspect) July 20 2012 Aurora, CO  USA
12
62
F E Suspect arrested, trial pending
8. Pough, James Edward, 42 June 17/18 1990 Jacksonville, FL  USA
11
6
F V Committed suicide
9. Lozano Velásquez, Juan de Jesús, 26 June 24 2000 Bogotá  Colombia
11
5
F Sentenced to 40 years in prison [14]
10. Cáceres, Gregorio, 50 Feb. 18 1942 Trujillo  Venezuela
11
4
 M Killed [15]
11. Flores, Oscar, 23 July 31 2005 San Jerónimo de Juárez  Mexico
11
2
FM Killed by angry mob or shot by police [16]
12. Unknown Dec. 18 1936 Monte Aprazível  Brazil
10–16
?
F Arrested [17]
13. McLendon, Michael Kenneth, 28 March 10 2009 Kinston, Samson & Geneva, AL  USA
10
6
F A Committed suicide
Also killed four dogs
[18]
14. Starkweather, Charles, 19
Fugate, Caril Ann, 14
Jan. 21–29 1958 Lincoln & Bennet, NE
Douglas, WY
 USA
10
0
FM Also killed two dogs
Starkweather killed a man on Nov. 30, 1957
15. Malagón González, Arnoldo, 22 June 1 1993 Soacha  Colombia
10
?
F Arrested [19]

Asia

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Asia

This section contains cases that occurred in Asia.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Woo Bum-Kon, 27 April 26/27 1982 Uiryeong  South Korea
56
35
F E Committed suicide
2. Feng Wanhai, 26
Jiang Liming, 22
Nov. 18 1995 Zhaodong  China
32
16
F Feng was shot by police
Jiang committed suicide
[20]
3. Toi, Mutsuo, 21 May 21 1938 Kaio  Japan
30
3
FM Committed suicide
4. Tian Mingjian, 31 Sep. 20 1994 Beijing  China
23
30–80
F Shot by police
5. Unknown Soldier April 1950 Nainital  India
22
?
 M [21]
6. Unknown April 1 1978 Dong Doc  Laos
16
60
F E [22]
7. Bales, Robert, 38 March 11 2012 Najeeban & Alkozai  Afghanistan
16
6
FMA Sentenced to life imprisonment
Also killed at least one dog and a cow
[23]
8. Yuan Daizhong, 41 Nov. 18 2004 Yueyang & Xima  China
15
28
 ME Committed suicide [24]
9. Harphul Singh July 23 1930 Tohana  India
15
?
F A Sentenced to death and executed
Had killed five people in the two years prior
[25]
10. Ramesh Sharma, 28 July 23 1983 Mandsaur  India
14
9
F Shot by police
11. Hu Wenhai, 46
Liu Haiwang, 40
Oct. 26 2001 Dayukou  China
14
3
FM Both were sentenced to death and executed [26]
12. Unknown Soldier June 14 1912 Guangzhou Republic of China (1912–49)China
14
2+
F Shot by soldiers [27]
13. Unknown Aug. 1938 Bhatinda  India
12
8
F [28]
14. Shi Yuejun, 35 Sep. 24–29 2006 Liuhe & Tonghua county  China
12
5
 M Sentenced to death and executed
15. Duong Van Mon, 35 Aug. 8 1998 Đắk Lắk Province  Vietnam
12
2–6
 M Sentenced to death [29]

Europe

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Europe

This section contains cases that occurred in Europe.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Grachev, Peter July 31 1925 Ivankovo  Soviet Union
17
3
F A Also killed 12 horses [30]
2. Ryan, Michael Robert, 27 Aug. 19 1987 Hungerford  United Kingdom
16
15
F A Committed suicide
Also shot his dog
3. Borel, Eric, 16 Sep. 23/24 1995 Solliès-Pont & Cuers  France
15
4
FM Committed suicide
4. Leibacher, Friedrich, 57 Sep. 27 2001 Zug   Switzerland
14
18
F E Committed suicide
5. Wagner, Ernst August, 38 Sep. 4 1913 Degerloch &
Mühlhausen/Enz
 German Empire
14
11
FMA Found not guilty by reason of insanity
Also shot two animals
6. Unknown June 10/11 1945 Rouen  France
14
9
FM Arrested [31]
7. Dornier, Christian, 31 July 12 1989 Luxiol  France
14
8
F Found not guilty by reason of insanity
8. Dembsky, Vladimir Feb. 15 1904 Warsaw  Russian Empire
13
10
F Arrested [32]
9. Bogdanović, Ljubiša, 60 April 9 2013 Velika Ivanča  Serbia
13
1
F Committed suicide
10. Bird, Derrick, 52 June 2 2010 Copeland, Cumbria  United Kingdom
12
11
F Committed suicide
11. Marimon Carles, Jose, 26 May 21 1928 Pobla de Ferran  Spain
10
2
F Shot dead [33]
12. Hedin, Tore, 25 Aug. 22 1952 Saxtorp & Hurva  Sweden
9
10–20
 MA Committed suicide
13. Izquierdo, Antonio, 53
Izquierdo, Emilio, 58
Aug. 26 1990 Puerto Hurraco  Spain
9
6–12
F Both were sentenced to 684 years in prison [34]
14. Palić, Vinko, 28 Jan. 1 1993 Zrinski Topolovac  Croatia
9
5–7
F Committed suicide [35]
15. Tranchita, Rosario June 25 1925 Librizzi  Italy
9
4
F Shot dead by his nephew [36]

Oceania and Maritime Southeast Asia

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Oceania and Maritime Southeast Asia

This section contains cases that occurred in Oceania and the Maritime Southeast Asia.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Bryant, Martin John, 28 April 28/29 1996 Port Arthur, TAS  Australia
35
23
FMA Sentenced to 35 consecutive life terms
2. Unknown Siquijor  Philippines
32
?
 M Killed by angry mob [37]
3. Wirjo, 42 April 15 1987 Banjarsari  Indonesia
20
12
 M Committed suicide [38]
4. Formentera, Arsenio Jan. 28 1968 Palompon  Philippines
17
?
 M [39]
5. Hodeng June 17 1879 Kampong Tankulu Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
16
1
Arrested [40]
6. Salazar, Domingo, 42 Oct. 11 1956 San Nicolas  Philippines
16
1
 M Sentenced to death
Killed two unborn children
[41]
7. Unknown Dec. 13 1873 Ternate Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
15
4
 M Killed [42]
8. Basobas, Florentino May 9 1977 Quezon, Palawan  Philippines
15
4
 M Shot dead [43]
9. Antakin May 27 1897 Kaningow North BorneoMalaysia
15
3
 M Shot dead
10. Pusok Anak Ngaik, 28 May 29 1965 Kampong Bukit Merah  Malaysia
14
4
 M [44]
11. Unknown March 1909 Borneo Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
14
?
[45]
12. Unknown Nov. 1935 Gondang Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
13
3
Sentenced to life imprisonment [46]
13. Gray, David Malcolm, 33 Nov. 13/14 1990 Aramoana  New Zealand
13
3
F Shot by police
14. Kalinga Boli May 25 – June 7 1937 Tagan  Philippines
13
?
 M Arrested [47]
15. Two unknown Men June 22 1952 Zamboanga  Philippines
12
14
 M One killed, the other arrested [48]

Workplace killings

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Workplace killings

People killing their (former) co-workers; also includes soldiers killing their comrades.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Sanurip, 36 April 15 1996 Timika Airport IndonesiaIndonesia
16
11
F Sentenced to death [49]
2. Chelakh, Vladislav, 19 May 27/28 2012 Arkankergen frontier post KazakhstanKazakhstan
15
0
F A Sentenced to life imprisonment [50]
3. Sherrill, Patrick Henry, 44 Aug. 20 1986 Edmond, OK United StatesU.S.
14
6
F Committed suicide
4. Hasan, Nidal Malik, 39 Nov. 5 2009 Fort Hood, TX United StatesU.S.
13
32
F Sentenced to death
Killed an unborn child
5. Barton, Mark Orrin, 44 July 27–29 1999 Atlanta, GA United StatesU.S.
12
13
FM Committed suicide
6. Alexis, Aaron, 34 Sep. 16 2013 Washington, D.C. United StatesU.S.
12
3
F Shot by police
7. Leung Ying, 29 Aug. 22 1928 Fairfield, CA United StatesU.S.
11
4
FM Committed suicide while awaiting execution [51]
8. Tazmal Hossein Dec. 1 1914 Naihati British RajIndia
10
11
 M Arrested [52]
9. Kim Won-jo, 25 May 1 1974 Kimpo South KoreaSouth Korea
10
3
F Committed suicide [53]
10. Vaganov, Artur, 22 June 1 1997 Sida AbkhaziaAbkhazia
10
3
F Committed suicide
11. Lee Wei, 41 April 5 1962 Taoyuan TaiwanTaiwan
10
0-2+
F A Arrested [54]
12. Ahmed Gul, 46 April 27 2011 Kabul AfghanistanAfghanistan
9
1–6
F Committed suicide [55]
13. Smith, William Vincent, 19 April 23 1946 LST 172 United StatesU.S.
9
1
F Committed suicide while awaiting trial [56]
14. Unknown July 29 1982 Maputo MozambiqueMozambique
9
?
F [57]
15. Moreño, Jonathan, 31 Jan. 16 2005 Kalibo PhilippinesPhilippines
8
29–33
F Shot by police [58]

School massacres

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:School massacres
See alsoList of school-related attacks

Massacres at kindergartens, schools and universities

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Kehoe, Andrew Philip, 55 May 18 1927 Bath Township, MI United StatesU.S.
44
58
FME Committed suicide
2. Cho, Seung-Hui, 23
(조승희)
April 16 2007 Blacksburg, VA United StatesU.S.
32
17
F Committed suicide
3. Lanza, Adam Peter, 20 Dec. 14 2012 Newtown, CT United StatesU.S.
27
2
F Committed suicide
4. Hamilton, Thomas Watt, 43 March 13 1996 Dunblane United KingdomU.K.
17
15
F Committed suicide
5. Steinhäuser, Robert, 19 April 26 2002 Erfurt GermanyGermany
16
1
F Committed suicide
6. Whitman, Charles Joseph, 25 Aug. 1 1966 Austin, TX United StatesU.S.
15
32
FM Shot by police
Killed an unborn child
One of the injured later died in 2001
7. Kretschmer, Tim, 17 March 11 2009 Winnenden & Wendlingen GermanyGermany
15
9
F Committed suicide
8. Lépine, Marc, 25 Dec. 6 1989 Montreal, QC CanadaCanada
14
14
FM Committed suicide
9. Harris, Eric David, 18
Klebold, Dylan Bennet, 17
April 20 1999 Littleton, CO United StatesU.S.
13
21
F E Both committed suicide
10. Gadirov, Farda, 28 April 30 2009 Baku AzerbaijanAzerbaijan
12
13
F Committed suicide [59]
11. Menezes de Oliveira, Wellington, 23 April 7 2011 Rio de Janeiro BrazilBrazil
12
12
F Committed suicide
12. Bai Ningyang, 18 May 8 2006 Shiguan ChinaChina
12
5
 MA Sentenced to death
13. Seifert, Walter, 42 June 11 1964 Volkhoven West GermanyWest Germany
10
22
FM Committed suicide
14. Saari, Matti Juhani, 22 Sep. 23 2008 Kauhajoki FinlandFinland
10
1
F A Committed suicide
15. Wu Huanming, 47 May 12 2010 Linchang ChinaChina
9
11
 M Committed suicide [60]

Religious, political or racial crimes

Mass murders, committed by single perpetrators, that have a foremost religious, racial or political background.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Breivik, Anders Behring, 32 July 22 2011 Oslo & Utøya NorwayNorway
75
241
F E Two more died trying to escape
Sentenced to 21 years plus preventive detention
2. Ibragimov, Ahmed, 43
(Ахмед Ибрагимов)
Oct. 8 1999 Mekenskaya RussiaRussia
34–41
?
F Killed by angry mob
3. Goldstein, Baruch Kappel, 37 Feb. 25 1994 Hebron State of PalestineWest Bank
29–52
70–200
F Killed by angry mob [61]
4. Abbas al-Baqir Abbas, 33 Dec. 8 2000 Jarafa SudanSudan
22–27
31–53
F Shot by police
5. Unknown July 20 2001 Sheshnag IndiaIndia
13–14
14–15
F E Shot by police [62]
6. Unknown Aug. 6 2002 Nunwan IndiaIndia
9
31
F E Shot by police [63]
7. Essex, Mark James Robert, 23 Dec. 31 /
Jan. 7
1972
1973
New Orleans, LA United StatesU.S.
9
13
F A Shot by police
8. Roof, Dylann Storm, 21 (suspect) June 17 2015 Charleston, SC United StatesU.S.
9
1
F Arrested
9. Asadullah
(اسد الله)
March 30 2012 Yahyakhel District AfghanistanAfghanistan
9
0
F P [64]
10. Strydom, Barend Hendrik, 23 Nov. 8/15 1988 De Deur &
Pretoria
South AfricaSouth Africa
8
16
F Sentenced to death plus 30 years [65]
11. Punchi Banda Kandegedera Feb. 25 1936 Colombo British CeylonSri Lanka
8
10
F Sentenced to death [66]
12. Wang Xiwen, 32^ Nov. 17 1980 Handan ChinaChina
7
12
F E Sentenced to death and executed
Also killed two pigs
13. Popper, Ami, 21 May 20 1990 Rishon LeZion IsraelIsrael
7
10–15
F Sentenced to seven consecutive life terms;
later reduced to 40 years in prison
14. Merah, Mohammed, 23 March 11–22 2012 Toulouse & Montauban FranceFrance
7
5
F Shot by police
15. Kariyev, Maksat Kokshkinbaevich, 34
(Максат Кокшкинбаевич Кариев)
Nov. 12 2011 Taraz KazakhstanKazakhstan
7
3
F E Committed suicide [67]
16. Abdul Salaam Sadek Hassouneh, 24
(عبد السلام صادق حسونة)
Jan. 17 2002 Hadera IsraelIsrael
6
14–33
F Killed by angry mob or shot by police [68]
17. Khaled Akar
(خالد آكر)
Nov. 25 1987 Kiryat Shemona IsraelIsrael
6
7
F E Shot by soldiers [69]
18. Page, Wade Michael, 40 Aug. 5 2012 Oak Creek, WI United StatesU.S.
6
3
F Committed suicide
19. Ahmed Jassim Ibrahim, 25
(احمد جاسم ابراهيم)
June 12 2009 Baghdad IraqIraq
5
12
F E Committed suicide or shot dead [70]
20. Mohammed Farhat, 17
(محمد فتحي فرحات)
March 7 2002 Atzmona State of PalestineGaza Strip
5
10–23
F E Shot dead [71]
21. Coulibaly, Amedy, 32 Jan. 7/9 2015 Montrouge & Porte de Vincennes FranceFrance
5
11
F Shot by police
22. Natan-Zada, Eden, 19 Aug. 4 2005 Shfar’am IsraelIsrael
4
9–14
F Killed by angry mob [72]
23. Nel, Johan, 18 Jan. 14 2008 Skierlik South AfricaSouth Africa
4
8
F Sentenced to life imprisonment [73]
24. Stone, Michael, 32 March 16 1988 Belfast United KingdomU.K.
3
68
F E Sentenced to 682 years in prison
25. Ibrahim Mohammed Hasuna, 20
(إبراهيم محمد محمود حسونة)
March 5 2002 Tel Aviv IsraelIsrael 3}}
14–31
FME Shot by police [74]
26. Raed Muhammed al-Rifi, 22 March 17 1992 Jaffa IsraelIsrael
2
19
 M Shot by police [75]
27. Hatem Shweikeh, 24 Nov. 4 2001 Jerusalem IsraelIsrael
2
15–42
F Shot dead [76]
28. Saeed Ibrahim Ramadan, 24
(سعيد إبراهيم رمضان)
Jan. 22 2002 Jerusalem IsraelIsrael
2
14–16
F Shot by police [77]

Domestic violence

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Home intruders, List of familicides, familicides in the United States and familicides in Europe.

This section contains cases that could be considered non-public, which means mass murders perpetrated in a domestic environment. The section is divided into two sub-categories; the first encompasses the lists of familicides and contains those incidents where most of the victims were relatives of the perpetrator, while the second, paraphrased as home intruders, contains those cases where the targeted families were not related to the perpetrator.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Ou Yangpu Jan. 1 1976 Zixing ChinaChina
17
0
 M Committed suicide [78]
2. Simmons, Ronald Gene, 47 Dec. 22–28 1987 Russellville, AR United StatesU.S.
16
4
FM Sentenced to death and executed
3. Mohammad Zaman, 30 Sep. 25 2009 Ghola AfghanistanAfghanistan
15
?
F Committed suicide [79]
4. Unknown Nov. 23 1936 Maropally British RajIndia
14
2
 M Arrested [80]
5. Banks, George Emil, 40 Sep. 25 1982 Wilkes-Barre, PA United StatesU.S.
13
1
F Sentenced to death
6. Liu Aibing, 34 Dec. 12 2009 Yinshanpai ChinaChina
13
1
FMA Sentenced to death and executed [81]
7. Guo Zhongmin, 36 Feb. 18 2003 Yangxiaoxiang ChinaChina
13
0
 M Committed suicide [82]
8. Saeed Qashash, 19 June 10 1998 Amman JordanJordan
12
0
F Sentenced to death and executed [83]
9. Jia Yingmin, 40 Oct. 6 2000 Kunlong ChinaChina
12
0
 M Committed suicide [84]
10. Augusto, Pedro Aug. 1900 Rio de Janeiro BrazilBrazil
12
?
FM Arrested [85]
11. Abbas Khan Sep. 1896 Jabbar British RajIndia
11
2
 M Arrested [86]
12. Andangan Oct. 21 1921 Cotabato PhilippinesPhilippines
11
0
 M Committed suicide [87]
13. Ruppert, James Urban, 40 March 30 1975 Hamilton, OH United StatesU.S.
11
0
F Sentenced to eleven consecutive life terms [88]
14. Jalal Osman Khoja, 40 Dec. 26 2000 Jeddah Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabia
11
0
F Committed suicide [89]
15. Abdul Emir Khalaf Sabhan Aug. 26 2003 Baghdad IraqIraq
11
0
F Committed suicide [90]

Vehicular manslaughter

This section contains those cases where only vehicles were used to attack people. Since it may be quite difficult to distinguish accidents, or cases of reckless driving from those incidents where the driver, or pilot, had the intention to harm others, only those cases are included where it is clear that the vehicle was applied as a weapon and crashed deliberately into people, other vehicles, or buildings. Also, those cases where a rampage killer used an armed vehicle, such as a tank, or a fighter aircraft, to shoot others are listed here.

Name Date Year Location Country Killed Injured Additional Notes Ref.
1. Unknown Aug. 1993 Kilifi KenyaKenya
18
25
Arrested [91]
2. Li Xianliang, 36
(李献良)
Aug. 1 2010 Nanzuo ChinaChina
17
20–30
Arrested [92]
3. Unknown Oct. 9 1994 Djimenzen HaitiHaiti
14
12
[93]
4. Unknown Dec. 1965 SyriaSyria
14
2+
Arrested [94]
5. Santosh Maruti Mane, 40
(संतोष मारुति माने)
Jan. 25 2012 Pune IndiaIndia
9
27–37
Sentenced to death [95]
6. Khalil Abu Olbeh, 35 Feb. 14 2001 Azor IsraelIsrael
8
21
Sentenced to eight life terms plus 21 years [96]
7. Hepnarová, Olga, 22 July 10 1973 Prague CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia
8
12
Sentenced to death and executed
8. Ford, Priscilla Joyce, 51 Nov. 27 1980 Reno, NV United StatesU.S.
7
22
Died while awaiting execution
9. Tates, Karst Roeland, 38 April 30 2009 Apeldoorn NetherlandsNetherlands
7
10
Died in the crash
10. Tian Shengming, 44
(田胜明)
May 28 2012 Zhangjiajie ChinaChina
6
9
Arrested [97]
11. Luo Xiaoji, 34
(骆效计)
Nov. 5 2008 Zhuhai ChinaChina
5
19
Shot by police [98]
12. Crabbe, Douglas John Edwin, 36 Aug. 18 1983 Yulara AustraliaAustralia
5
16
Sentenced to life imprisonment
13. Owens, Rashad Charjuan March 12 2014 Austin, TX United StatesU.S.
4
21
In custody, trial pending
14. Hussam Taysir Dwayat, 32 July 2 2008 Jerusalem IsraelIsrael
3
30–45
Shot by police [99]
15. Unknown Feb. 4 2001 Kampala UgandaUganda
3
21+
[100]
16. Ho Chung-ming, 36 Aug. 30 1964 Taipei TaiwanFormosa
3
20
Sentenced to death [101]
17. Kabolowsky, Robert, 20 July 10 1980 Wantagh, NY United StatesU.S.
3
20
Found not guilty by reason of insanity [102]
18. Ressa, Stephen Michael, 27 Sep. 21 2005 Las Vegas, NV United StatesU.S.
3
11
Sentenced to life imprisonment [103]
19. Nieto Avila, Jose Luis, 56 May 6 2002 San Cristóbal Ecatepec MexicoMexico
2
22
Sentenced to 146 years in prison [104]
20. Parkdel, Eric, 50 May 31 2003 Stockholm SwedenSweden
2
16
Convicted [105]

Grenade amok

This section lists incidents of “grenade amok”, which are mass murders where the perpetrator used only hand grenades or comparable explosive devices, like pipe bombs or dynamite sticks, for the attack. As it is sometimes difficult to distinguish cases of grenade amok from acts of terrorism or gang-related attacks, incidents are only included where there is at least some indication that it was neither committed in the context of a political, ethnic, or religious conflict, nor part of an assault with more than one participating offender.

Name Date Year Location Country Killed Injured Additional Notes Ref.
1. Unknown, 21 Nov. 2 1979 Sakhon Nakhon province ThailandThailand
12
40+
Arrested [106]
2. Ismatov, Bobomurad Feb. 7 1994 Kulyab TajikistanTajikistan
12
28
Committed suicide [107]
3. Unknown Police Officer May 8 1973 Phitsanulok Province ThailandThailand
11
12–21
Killed by the explosion [108]
4. Unknown Soldier, 23 May 1 1993 Nongmasaew ThailandThailand
9
23
Arrested [109]
5. Unknown May 10 1972 ThailandThailand
9
10
Arrested [110]
6. Unknown Soldier, 23 LaosLaos
8
12
Killed by the explosion [111]
7. Unknown Soldier, 35 LaosLaos
7
30
Killed by the explosion [111]
8. Cuellar Beltran, Jorge Alberto Aug. 17 1991 Comasagua El SalvadorEl Salvador
6–8
54–90
[112]
9. Abdullah Salih al-Hajiri Aug. 4 1999 Sana’a YemenYemen
6–7
40–43
Arrested [113]
10. Avraham, Ezra, 19 Feb. 4 1975 Netanya IsraelIsrael
6
26
Arrested [114]
11. Yeong Sik Shin May 18 1968 Andong City South KoreaSouth Korea
5–7
43–52
Sentenced to death [115]
12. David, Ernesto, 28 Dec. 2 1980 Manila PhilippinesPhilippines
5
28–34
Arrested [116]
13. Lotero, Hector Aug. 17 1969 Apartadó ColombiaColombia
5
25
[117]
14. Lacsina, Ederlino L. March 18 1978 Camarines Sur PhilippinesPhilippines
5
14
Arrested [118]
15. Unknown Soldier, 26 1959 LaosLaos
4
20
Arrested [119]
16. Cervantes, Richard, 20 Oct. 12 1996 Poblacion PhilippinesPhilippines
3
15
Arrested [120]
17. Marish Ali Al-Akhram, 30 Aug. 22 2003 Hawth YemenYemen
2
34
Arrested [121]
18. Mohammed Hassan al-Wajeeh, 30
(محمد حسن)
Feb. 2 2008 Sana’a YemenYemen
2
23–25
Sentenced to death [122]
19. Unknown Soldier Dec. 5 1954 Bou Amrane TunisiaTunisia
2
13
Shot by soldiers [123]
20. Jung, Heidrun-Erika, 49 Dec. 24 1996 Frankfurt GermanyGermany
2
13
Killed by the explosion [124]
21. Garcia, Rodolfo, 24 May 10 1969 Maplas PhilippinesPhilippines
2
11
[125]

Other incidents

This section lists mass murders by single perpetrators that do not fit into the upper categories, like arson fires, poisonings, and bombings.
Only cases with at least two people killed are included.

Name Date Year Location Country Killed Injured Additional Notes Ref.
1. Kim Dae-han, 56
(김대한)
Feb. 18 2003 Daegu South KoreaSouth Korea
198
147
Sentenced to life imprisonment for causing the Daegu subway fire
2. Segee, Robert Dale, 14 July 6 1944 Hartford, CT United StatesU.S.
167–169
412–682
Confessed to causing the Hartford circus fire; later recanted [126]
3. Zhang Pilin, 37 May 7 2002 Dalian ChinaChina
111
0
Set fire to the passenger cabin of an airplane; died in the crash
4. Jin Ruchao, 41
(靳如超)
March 16 2001 Shijiazhuang ChinaChina
108
38
Sentenced to death and executed for a bombing [127]
5. Unknown arsonist, 10 Dec. 1 1958 Chicago, IL United StatesU.S.
95
100
Fifth-grade student confessed to causing the Our Lady of the Angels School fire; later recanted
6. González, Julio, 35 March 25 1990 New York City, NY United StatesU.S.
87
6
Convicted of the Happy Land fire; sentenced to 174 twenty-five-year sentences
7. Keith, Alexander, 48 Dec. 11 1875 Bremerhaven German EmpireGerman Reich
81–83
200
Bomber; committed suicide [128]
8. Ma Hongqing, 50
(马宏清)
July 16 2001 Mafang ChinaChina
80–89
98
Sentenced to death and executed [129]
9. Le Duc Tan
(马宏清)
Sep. 15 1974 Phan Rang South VietnamSouth Vietnam
74
0
Died in the plane crash which he caused [130]
10. Nasra Yussef Mohammed al-Enezi, 23 Aug. 15 2009 Jahra KuwaitKuwait
55–57
80–90
Sentenced to death for causing a fatal fire at a wedding
11. Chen Shuizong, 59
(陈水总)
June 7 2013 Xiamen ChinaChina
46
34
Perished in the flames
12. Graham, Jack Gilbert, 23 Nov. 1 1955 Denver, CO United StatesU.S.
44
0
Sentenced to death and executed for the bombing of United Airlines Flight 629
13. Doty, Thomas G., 34 May 22 1962 Unionville, MO United StatesU.S.
44
0
Died in the crash of Continental Airlines Flight 11, which he caused
14. Gonzales, Francisco Paula, 27 May 7 1964 Danville, CA United StatesU.S.
43
0
Died in the crash of Pacific Air Lines Flight 773, which he caused [131]
15. Younes Khayati, 32 Aug. 21 1994 Agadir MoroccoMorocco
43
0
Died in the crash of Royal Air Maroc Flight 630, which he caused
16. Chen Zhengping, 32
(陈正平)
Sep. 15 2002 Nanjing ChinaChina
42
300–400
Sentenced to death and executed for poisoning [132]
17. Burke, David Augustus, 35 Dec. 7 1987 San Luis Obispo, CA United StatesU.S.
42
0
Died in the crash of Pacific Southwest Airlines Flight 1771, which he caused [133]
18. Chiasson, Louis, 64 Dec. 2 1969 Notre-Dame-du-Lac,QC CanadaCanada
40
2
Sentenced to life imprisonment for arson [134]
19. Huang Kefen, 27
(黄可芬)
June 24 1981 Xiamen ChinaChina
39
73
Killed by the explosion [135]
20. Thompson, John, 42 Aug. 16 1980 London United KingdomU.K.
37
23
Sentenced to life imprisonment for arson [136]
21. Li Zhanjin, 34
(刘占金)
March 29 2000 Shajian ChinaChina
36–39
30-50+
Killed by an explosion he caused at a wedding [137]
22. Hansen, Erik Solbakke, 24 Sep. 1 1973 Copenhagen DenmarkDenmark
35
17
Found not guilty by reason of insanity
Killed three other people
[138]
23. Çal, Kadir, 34 April 9 1991 Istanbul TurkeyTurkey
34–36
7–10
Perished in the flames [139]
24. Frank, Julian Andrew, 32 Jan. 6 1960 Bolivia, NC United StatesU.S.
33
0
Died in the crash of National Airlines Flight 2511, which he caused
25. Hermino dos Santos Fernandes, 32 Nov. 29 2013 Bwabwata National Park NamibiaNamibia
33
0
Died in the crash of LAM Mozambique Airlines Flight 470, which he caused
26. Qiu Fengguo, 23
(邱凤国)
Feb. 15 1986 Jilin ChinaChina
32
32
Killed by the explosion [140]
27. Unknown April 22 1980 Saint-Jean-de-Losne FranceFrance
32
6–9
[141]
28. Gao Haiping, 24
(高海平)
July 22 1981 Yangquan ChinaChina
31
127
Killed by the explosion [142]
29. Yu Xiugang, 21 April 14 1988 Yujia ChinaChina
30
18
Killed by the explosion [143]
30. Zhang Yunliang, 62 June 5 2009 Chengdu ChinaChina
27
73
Died in the Chengdu bus fire, which he caused
31. Unknown soldier Feb. 16 1984 Debre Zeyit EthiopiaEthiopia
25–28
10–12
Died [144]
32. Katagiri, Seiji, 35 Feb. 9 1982 Tokyo JapanJapan
24
141
Found not guilty of causing the crash of Japan Airlines Flight 350 by reason of insanity
33. de la Torre, Humberto Diaz, 19 Sep. 4 1982 Los Angeles, CA United StatesU.S.
24
32
Sentenced to 25 consecutive life terms for causing an apartment fire; killed an unborn child [145]
34. Unknown arsonist May 25 1982 Aire-sur-l’Adour FranceFrance
24
?
Attacked a psychiatric center [146]
35. Zhou Wenzhi, 25
(周文志)
June 26 1989 Shanghai ChinaChina
23
39
Killed by the explosion [147]
36. Guay, Albert, 32 Sep. 9 1949 Charlevoix, QC CanadaCanada
23
0
Sentenced to death and executed for bombing a passenger plane
37. Arrendondo, Pedro Oct. 10 1978 Caracas VenezuelaVenezuela
23
?
Arrested [148]
38. Matuska, Szilveszter, 39 Sep. 13 1931 Biatorbágy HungaryHungary
22
120+
Sentenced to death for causing fatal train derailments
39. Durado, Gavino, 48 Sep. 2 1962 Manila PhilippinesPhilippines
21
1+
Arrested [149]
40. Liang Hsin-teng, 51 May 12 1993 Taipei TaiwanTaiwan
20
7
Perished in the flames [150]
41. Álvarez, Juan Manuel, 25 Jan. 26 2005 Los Angeles, CA United StatesU.S.
11
177
Sentenced to life imprisonment for causing the 2005 Glendale train crash
42. Gerdt, Petri Erkki Tapio, 19 Oct. 11 2002 Vantaa FinlandFinland
6
166
Killed in the Myyrmanni bombing, which he caused
43. Blažka, Antonín, 57 Unknown 2013 Frenštát pod Radhoštěm Czech RepublicCzech Republic
6
10
Killed by the explosion he caused [151]
44. Dong Shihou, 29
(董世侯)
April 3 1968 Beijing ChinaChina
4
105
Killed by the explosion [152]
45. Copeland, David, 22 April 17/24/30 1999 London United KingdomU.K.
3
140
Sentenced to 6 concurrent life sentences

Annotation

The W-column gives a basic description of the weapons used in the murders

F – Firearms and other ranged weapons, especially rifles and handguns, but also bows and crossbows, grenade launchers, flamethrowers, or slingshots
M – Melee weapons, like knives, swords, spears, machetes, axes, clubs, rods, stones, or bare hands
O – Any other weapons, such as bombs, hand grenades, Molotov cocktails, poison and poisonous gas, as well as vehicle and arson attacks
A – indicates that an arson attack was the only other weapon used
V – indicates that a vehicle was the only other weapon used
E – indicates that explosives of any sort were the only other weapon used
P – indicates that an anaesthetising or deadly substance of any kind was the only other weapon used (includes poisonous gas)

See also

Bibliography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rampage_killers

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Story 1: Lying Lunatic Left Gun Grabbers Blame Gun Violence (Non-Existent) and Not Human Violence (Real), Trump and Talk Radio on The Millennial Mass Murderer, Dylann Storm Roof,  in Charleston, South Carolina Church Killing of Nine Instead of Drugs and Mental Illness — Videos

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, second from left, is escorted from the Shelby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, second from left, is escorted from the Shelby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, center, is escorted from the Sheby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof, center, is escorted from the Sheby Police Department in Shelby, N.C., Thursday, June 18, 2015. Roof is a suspect in the shooting of several people Wednesday night at the historic The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

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mass shootingsmass shooting and killings

Dylann Roof: Charleston Church Shooting | True News

Nine people are dead after shooting which occurred 9pm on Wednesday at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The congregation, established in 1816, is one of the oldest African American churches in the United States.

Gunman Dylann Roof was attending a bible study meeting at the church and told the worshipers, “I have to do it. You rape our women and you’re taking over our country and you have to go.”

One woman was specifically spared as Roof said, “I’m not going to shoot you because I want you to tell everyone what happened.”

Stefan Molyneux examines the news story, what is known about Dylann Roof, how this incident could have been prevented, incomprehensible parenting, false rape statistics, violence in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, the call for gun control, the danger of SSRIs and a plea for an honest conversation about race in America.

Gun Control in 47 Seconds

Best 7 minutes on gun control I have ever seen!

In this segment of his Virtual State of the Union, the Virtual President talks about why politicians want to talk about gun control rather than crime control, and delivers the factual evidence and historical truths that make the case for the Second Amendment self-evident.

Dr Susan Gratia-Hupp – Survivor of the 1991 Kileen TX Lubys Shooting Massacre

Hupp and her parents were having lunch at the Luby’s Cafeteria in Killeen in 1991 when the Luby’s massacre commenced. The gunman shot 50 people and killed 23, including Hupp’s parents. Hupp later expressed regret about deciding to remove her gun from her purse and lock it in her car lest she risk possibly running afoul of the state’s concealed weapons laws; during the shootings, she reached for her weapon but then remembered that it was “a hundred feet away in my car.” Her father, Al Gratia, tried to rush the gunman and was shot in the chest. As the gunman reloaded, Hupp escaped through a broken window and believed that her mother, Ursula Gratia, was behind her. Actually however, her mother went to her mortally-wounded husband’s aid and was then shot in the head.

As a survivor of the Luby’s massacre, Hupp testified across the country in support of concealed-handgun laws. She said that if there had been a second chance to prevent the slaughter, she would have violated the Texas law and carried the handgun inside her purse into the restaurant. She testified across the country in support of concealed handgun laws, and was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1996. The law was signed by then-Governor George W. Bush.

The Truth About Gun Control

Breaking News: Gov. Abbott sign Texas Open Carry Law June 2015

Texas ‘Open Carry’ Law Passes, Allowing Guns in Holsters on the Street

Charleston shooting Suspect, Dylann Storm Roof, in police custody

Dylann Storm Roof, the 21-year-old white male allegedly behind the shooting of nine African-Americans at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church Wednesday night in Charleston, SC, was arrested by law enforcement on Thursday morning. Manila Chan has more on the details and what the authorities know at this time.

Dylann Storm Roof Captured by NC Police, Charleston Shooting Suspect Escorting VIDEO

Daily Show’s Jon Stewart on Charleston shooting: ‘This was a terrorist attack’

Citizen With Concealed Weapons Permit Shoots and Kills Attacker

John Lott: More Guns, Less Crime

Gun Regulation: U.S Gun Homicides vs. Japan

John Lott: More Guns, Less Crime book interview on CSPAN

Nine killed in South Carolina Charleston ‘hate crime’ shooting

Dylann Storm Roof Was ‘Wild,’ Not Violent, Took Drugs, Classmate of Charleston Shooting Suspect Says

President Obama makes statement on Charleston mass shooting

President Barack Obama expressed his sorrow about a mass shooting in Charleston, South Carolina that killed nine people during a news conference on Thursday. Speaking about the tragedy, the president also spoke about the need to take another look at gun violence in the nation.

Carolina Church Shooting: Obama gets it wrong–Guns SAVE Lives!

PJTV: Wake Up Obama. Drugs Are the Problem, Not Guns

Fox News Host ‘Surprise’ as Obama ‘Quick’ Invoke Gun Control on Charleston Mass Shooting

Donald Trump rails against immigrants in presidential campaign launch

Hillary Clinton ATTACKS Donald Trump Connects Negative Remarks on Mexico to MURDERS in Charleston

Hillary Clinton Takes a Veiled Shot at Donald Trump

Donald Trump on his campaign speech comments that some Mexican immigrants are ‘rapists’

Donald Trump Presidential speech announcement 2016 – Donald Trump Bashes Mexico Obamacare

Charleston Shooting: What They’re Not Telling You

The Alex Jones Show (1st HOUR-VIDEO Commercial Free) Thursday June 18 2015: #CharlestonShooting

News Behind the News: John Lott on America’s Gun Laws

Top 10 Infamous Mass Shootings in the U.S.

Top 10 Infamous Mass Shootings Outside the U.S.

CHARLESTON SHOOTER WAS ON DRUG LINKED TO VIOLENT OUTBURSTS

Dylann Storm Roof was taking habit-forming drug suboxone
Charleston Shooter Was on Drug Linked to Violent Outbursts

by PAUL JOSEPH WATSON | JUNE 18, 2015


Charleston shooter Dylann Storm Roof was reportedly taking a drug that has been linked with sudden outbursts of violence, fitting the pattern of innumerable other mass shooters who were on or had recently come off pharmaceutical drugs linked to aggression.

According to a CBS News report, earlier this year when cops searched Roof after he was acting suspiciously inside a Bath and Body Works store, they found “orange strips” that Roof told officers was suboxone, a narcotic that is used to treat opiate addiction.

Suboxone is a habit-forming drug that has been connected with sudden outbursts of aggression.
Another poster on the Drugs.com website tells the story of how his personality completely changed as a result of taking suboxone.A user on the MD Junction website relates how her husband “became violent, smashing things and threatening me,” after just a few days of coming off suboxone.

The individual relates how he became “nasty” and “violent” just weeks into taking the drug, adding that he would “snap” and be mean to people for no reason.

Another poster reveals how his son-in-law “completely changed on suboxone,” and that the drug sent him into “self-destruct mode.”

A user named ‘Jhalloway’ also tells the story of how her husband’s addiction to suboxone was “ruining our life.”

A poster on a separate forum writes about how he became “horribly aggressive” towards his partner after taking 8mg of suboxone.

A website devoted to horror stories about the drug called SubSux.com also features a post by a woman whose husband obtained a gun and began violently beating his 15-year-old son after taking suboxone.

According to a Courier-Journal report, suboxone “is increasingly being abused, sold on the streets and inappropriately prescribed” by doctors. For some users, it is even more addictive than the drugs it’s supposed to help them quit.

As we previously highlighted, virtually every major mass shooter was taking some form of SSRI or other pharmaceutical drug at the time of their attack, including Columbine killer Eric Harris, ‘Batman’ shooter James Holmes and Sandy Hook gunman Adam Lanza.

As the website SSRI Stories profusely documents, there are literally hundreds of examples of mass shootings, murders and other violent episodes that have been committed by individuals on psychiatric drugs over the past three decades.

Pharmaceutical giants who produce drugs like Zoloft, Prozac and Paxil spend around $2.4 billion dollars a year on direct-to-consumer television advertising every year. By running negative stories about prescription drugs, networks risk losing tens of millions of dollars in ad revenue, which is undoubtedly one of the primary reasons why the connection is habitually downplayed or ignored entirely.

http://www.infowars.com/charleston-shooter-was-on-drug-linked-to-violent-outbursts/

White suspect in massacre at black South Carolina church charged, held in jail

5 Things the Gun Grabbers Apparently Don’t Understand

John Hawkins

“I’m not a gun owner and, as I think as is the case for the more than half the people in the country who also aren’t gun owners, that means that for me guns are alien. In the current rhetorical climate people seem not to want to say: I think guns are kind of scary and don’t want to be around them.” — Josh Marshall

“A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity.”

~ Sigmund Freud

Sorry, but your Second Amendment rights no longer apply because liberals like Josh Marshall tinkle on themselves every time they come within fifty feet of a gun. This is really what the debate on gun control in America comes down to in the end: people who lose nothing if guns are banned because they don’t use them demanding that everyone else be disarmed. Meanwhile, trying to reason with gun control advocates is like arguing with a four year old about whether her imaginary friend is real or not. It doesn’t matter how clearly you prove your case; she’ll be pouring her pal tea two minutes after you’ve left the room. Speaking of imaginary…

1) A “gun free zone” won’t keep bad people with guns away: The basic problem with a “gun free zone” is that anyone you can’t trust with a gun will bring it in anyway while it will cause the people you’d want armed in a dangerous situation to leave their weapons behind. If this concept actually worked, we’d just train all of our soldiers in Jiu-jitsu and then we’d declare everywhere we sent them to be a “gun free zone.” Admittedly, Mortal Kombat: Afghanistan sounds like it would be an amazing movie, but someone needs to inform Democrats that the world doesn’t really work this way.

2) Criminals and lunatics don’t obey gun laws: The belief that someone who’s planning to go on a killing spree is going to turn in a gun because it’s made illegal is almost as nuts as going on the killing spree. Yet, the gun grabbers in the Democrat Party operate on the assumption that nut jobs like Adam Lanza or a gangbanger who sells crack for a living is going to get rid of a high-capacity magazine if Congress says he can’t have it. That’s like a prohibitionist who gets upset about alcoholism and deals with the problem by demanding that all the people without drinking problems have to be kept away from booze.

3) We already have somewhere between 200-300 million guns in this country: Adding to the last point, ever heard this old joke?

A drunk loses the keys to his house and is looking for them under a lamppost. A policeman comes over and asks what he’s doing.“I’m looking for my keys” he says. “I lost them over there”.

The policeman looks puzzled. “Then why are you looking for them all the way over here?”

“Because the light is so much better”.

If there were no already existing guns in America, gun control could conceivably help keep weaponry out of the hands of criminals and mass murderers. However, in a nation that’s already armed to the teeth, the next Adam Lanza, Jared Loughner, Tookie Williams or Mumia Abu-Jamal has already got his gun and new laws will only disarm law abiding Americans.

4) Gun owners aren’t required to explain a “need” for our Second Amendment rights: Why do gun owners “need” their guns? The same reason that Rosa Parks “needed” her seat at the front of the bus. In other words, it’s our constitutional right; so kiss off! If you need more of an explanation than that, why does California “need” to have its votes counted in the next presidential election? Why do we “need” so many liberal newspapers? Why not close a few? Why do movie stars “need” to make so much money for their films? Why don’t we confiscate it? What was it that Ann Coulter said?

“Free people are not in the habit of providing reasons why they ‘need’ something simply because the government wants to ban it. That’s true of anything — but especially something the government is constitutionally prohibited from banning, like guns.”

5) You’re not fooling us: Liberals like to think they’re smarter than everyone else, but they’re as transparent as glass to anyone who’s paying attention. That’s why gun sales have blown up like a can of shaving cream in a microwave. If Barack Obama, Diane Feinstein, Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden and the rest of the Democrat gun grabbers in Congress could get away with it, they would ban and confiscate every gun in America tomorrow — and people know it. Anything short of, “Nobody is allowed to own a firearm except the government,” is unacceptable to them and that’s why they always seem so ghoulishly pleased after tragedies like the Gabrielle Giffords shooting or the Newtown massacre. Everybody else is thinking of the victims, while they’re twirling their mustaches Snidely-Whiplash-style and repeating, “Never let a serious crisis go to waste,” to each other.

http://townhall.com/columnists/johnhawkins/2013/03/05/5-things-the-gun-grabbers-apparently-dont-understand-n1525945/page/full

List of rampage killers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Number of incidents listed
Africa/Middle East 85
Americas 108
Asia 127
Europe 94
Oceania/Maritime Southeast Asia 124
Workplace 102
Educational settings 89
Hate crimes 28
Home intruders 93
Familicides – U.S. 120
Familicides – Europe 103
Familicides – Rest of world 155
Vehicular 20
Grenade 21
Other 46
Total 1315

This is a partial list of rampage killings. It is further divided into several subsections.

This list should contain every case with at least one of the following features:

  • Rampage killings with six or more dead (excluding the perpetrator)
  • Rampage killings with at least four people killed and a double digit number of victims (dead plus injured)
  • Rampage killings with at least a dozen victims (dead plus injured)

In the tables that follow, the “W” column indicates the weapon, or weapons, used. Details are listed in the Annotation section.

Africa and the Middle East

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Africa and the Middle East

This section contains cases that occurred in Africa and the Middle East. Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Unek, William Feb. 11 1954
1957
Mahagi
Malampaka
Belgian Congo Belgian Congo
 Tanganyika
21
36
?
?
 M
FMA
Killed
2. Komakech, Richard June 26 1994 Kampala Uganda Uganda
26
13
F Killed by victim’s father [1]
3. Unknown March 25/26 1994 Ta’izz Yemen Yemen
22
?
F Shot by police [2]
4. Unknown Police Officer April 15 1983 Asureti Uganda Uganda
21
?
F Committed suicide [3]
5. Omar Abdul Razeq Abdullah Rifai, 28 Aug. 21 2013 Meet al-Attar Egypt Egypt
15
?
F Shot dead
Killed several people in a family feud in 2008
[4]
6. Unknown Soldier Nov. 6 1995 Nshili Rwanda Rwanda
14–17
19
FM Committed suicide [5]
7. Two Unknown Men 1936 Aksum Turkey Turkey
14
3
FM Both were killed [6]
8. Khumalo, Banda, 38 Dec. 4 1977 Bulawayo Rhodesia Rhodesia
13
16
F Shot by police [7]
9. Ogwang, Alfred, 28 Dec. 26 1994 Kamwenge Uganda Uganda
13
14
F Convicted [8]
10. Fekadu Nasha May 12 2013 Bahir Dar Ethiopia Ethiopia
12–18
2
F Died [9]
11. Mogo May 12 1929 Kitale East Africa Protectorate Kenya
12
1
 M Sentenced to death
12. Obwara, Lazaro, 55 July 28 1950 Kampala Flag of the Uganda Protectorate.svg Uganda
12
0
 M Arrested [10]
13. Ben Jebir, 28 March 25 1985 Fahs Tunisia Tunisia
12
?
F Committed suicide
Killed an unborn child
[11]
14. Vukwana, Bulelani, 29 Feb. 9 2002 East London South Africa South Africa
11
6
F Committed suicide
15. Abdullah Saleh Zaid al-Kohali, 26 May 30 2008 Bait al-Aqari Yemen Yemen
10
15
F Sentenced to death and executed [12]

Americas

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Americas

This section contains cases that occurred in the Americas.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Delgado Morales, Campo Elías, 52 Dec. 4 1986 Bogotá  Colombia
29
12
FMA Shot by police
2. Hennard, George Pierre, 35 Oct. 16 1991 Killeen, TX  USA
23
20
F V Committed suicide
3. Huberty, James Oliver, 41 July 18 1984 San Diego, CA  USA
21
19
F Shot by police
4. Ferreira de França, Genildo, 27 May 21/22 1997 Santo Antônio dos Barreiros  Brazil
14
3
F Committed suicide or shot by police [13]
5. Wong, Jiverly Antares, 41 April 3 2009 Binghamton, NY  USA
13
4
F Committed suicide
6. Unruh, Howard Barton, 28 Sep. 6 1949 Camden, NJ  USA
13
3
F Found mentally unfit to stand trial
7. Holmes, James Eagan, 24 (suspect) July 20 2012 Aurora, CO  USA
12
62
F E Suspect arrested, trial pending
8. Pough, James Edward, 42 June 17/18 1990 Jacksonville, FL  USA
11
6
F V Committed suicide
9. Lozano Velásquez, Juan de Jesús, 26 June 24 2000 Bogotá  Colombia
11
5
F Sentenced to 40 years in prison [14]
10. Cáceres, Gregorio, 50 Feb. 18 1942 Trujillo  Venezuela
11
4
 M Killed [15]
11. Flores, Oscar, 23 July 31 2005 San Jerónimo de Juárez  Mexico
11
2
FM Killed by angry mob or shot by police [16]
12. Unknown Dec. 18 1936 Monte Aprazível  Brazil
10–16
?
F Arrested [17]
13. McLendon, Michael Kenneth, 28 March 10 2009 Kinston, Samson & Geneva, AL  USA
10
6
F A Committed suicide
Also killed four dogs
[18]
14. Starkweather, Charles, 19
Fugate, Caril Ann, 14
Jan. 21–29 1958 Lincoln & Bennet, NE
Douglas, WY
 USA
10
0
FM Also killed two dogs
Starkweather killed a man on Nov. 30, 1957
15. Malagón González, Arnoldo, 22 June 1 1993 Soacha  Colombia
10
?
F Arrested [19]

Asia

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Asia

This section contains cases that occurred in Asia.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Woo Bum-Kon, 27 April 26/27 1982 Uiryeong  South Korea
56
35
F E Committed suicide
2. Feng Wanhai, 26
Jiang Liming, 22
Nov. 18 1995 Zhaodong  China
32
16
F Feng was shot by police
Jiang committed suicide
[20]
3. Toi, Mutsuo, 21 May 21 1938 Kaio  Japan
30
3
FM Committed suicide
4. Tian Mingjian, 31 Sep. 20 1994 Beijing  China
23
30–80
F Shot by police
5. Unknown Soldier April 1950 Nainital  India
22
?
 M [21]
6. Unknown April 1 1978 Dong Doc  Laos
16
60
F E [22]
7. Bales, Robert, 38 March 11 2012 Najeeban & Alkozai  Afghanistan
16
6
FMA Sentenced to life imprisonment
Also killed at least one dog and a cow
[23]
8. Yuan Daizhong, 41 Nov. 18 2004 Yueyang & Xima  China
15
28
 ME Committed suicide [24]
9. Harphul Singh July 23 1930 Tohana  India
15
?
F A Sentenced to death and executed
Had killed five people in the two years prior
[25]
10. Ramesh Sharma, 28 July 23 1983 Mandsaur  India
14
9
F Shot by police
11. Hu Wenhai, 46
Liu Haiwang, 40
Oct. 26 2001 Dayukou  China
14
3
FM Both were sentenced to death and executed [26]
12. Unknown Soldier June 14 1912 Guangzhou Republic of China (1912–49)China
14
2+
F Shot by soldiers [27]
13. Unknown Aug. 1938 Bhatinda  India
12
8
F [28]
14. Shi Yuejun, 35 Sep. 24–29 2006 Liuhe & Tonghua county  China
12
5
 M Sentenced to death and executed
15. Duong Van Mon, 35 Aug. 8 1998 Đắk Lắk Province  Vietnam
12
2–6
 M Sentenced to death [29]

Europe

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Europe

This section contains cases that occurred in Europe.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Grachev, Peter July 31 1925 Ivankovo  Soviet Union
17
3
F A Also killed 12 horses [30]
2. Ryan, Michael Robert, 27 Aug. 19 1987 Hungerford  United Kingdom
16
15
F A Committed suicide
Also shot his dog
3. Borel, Eric, 16 Sep. 23/24 1995 Solliès-Pont & Cuers  France
15
4
FM Committed suicide
4. Leibacher, Friedrich, 57 Sep. 27 2001 Zug   Switzerland
14
18
F E Committed suicide
5. Wagner, Ernst August, 38 Sep. 4 1913 Degerloch &
Mühlhausen/Enz
 German Empire
14
11
FMA Found not guilty by reason of insanity
Also shot two animals
6. Unknown June 10/11 1945 Rouen  France
14
9
FM Arrested [31]
7. Dornier, Christian, 31 July 12 1989 Luxiol  France
14
8
F Found not guilty by reason of insanity
8. Dembsky, Vladimir Feb. 15 1904 Warsaw  Russian Empire
13
10
F Arrested [32]
9. Bogdanović, Ljubiša, 60 April 9 2013 Velika Ivanča  Serbia
13
1
F Committed suicide
10. Bird, Derrick, 52 June 2 2010 Copeland, Cumbria  United Kingdom
12
11
F Committed suicide
11. Marimon Carles, Jose, 26 May 21 1928 Pobla de Ferran  Spain
10
2
F Shot dead [33]
12. Hedin, Tore, 25 Aug. 22 1952 Saxtorp & Hurva  Sweden
9
10–20
 MA Committed suicide
13. Izquierdo, Antonio, 53
Izquierdo, Emilio, 58
Aug. 26 1990 Puerto Hurraco  Spain
9
6–12
F Both were sentenced to 684 years in prison [34]
14. Palić, Vinko, 28 Jan. 1 1993 Zrinski Topolovac  Croatia
9
5–7
F Committed suicide [35]
15. Tranchita, Rosario June 25 1925 Librizzi  Italy
9
4
F Shot dead by his nephew [36]

Oceania and Maritime Southeast Asia

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Oceania and Maritime Southeast Asia

This section contains cases that occurred in Oceania and the Maritime Southeast Asia.

Not included are school massacres, workplace killings, hate crimes or familicides, which form their own categories.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Bryant, Martin John, 28 April 28/29 1996 Port Arthur, TAS  Australia
35
23
FMA Sentenced to 35 consecutive life terms
2. Unknown Siquijor  Philippines
32
?
 M Killed by angry mob [37]
3. Wirjo, 42 April 15 1987 Banjarsari  Indonesia
20
12
 M Committed suicide [38]
4. Formentera, Arsenio Jan. 28 1968 Palompon  Philippines
17
?
 M [39]
5. Hodeng June 17 1879 Kampong Tankulu Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
16
1
Arrested [40]
6. Salazar, Domingo, 42 Oct. 11 1956 San Nicolas  Philippines
16
1
 M Sentenced to death
Killed two unborn children
[41]
7. Unknown Dec. 13 1873 Ternate Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
15
4
 M Killed [42]
8. Basobas, Florentino May 9 1977 Quezon, Palawan  Philippines
15
4
 M Shot dead [43]
9. Antakin May 27 1897 Kaningow North BorneoMalaysia
15
3
 M Shot dead
10. Pusok Anak Ngaik, 28 May 29 1965 Kampong Bukit Merah  Malaysia
14
4
 M [44]
11. Unknown March 1909 Borneo Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
14
?
[45]
12. Unknown Nov. 1935 Gondang Dutch East IndiesIndonesia
13
3
Sentenced to life imprisonment [46]
13. Gray, David Malcolm, 33 Nov. 13/14 1990 Aramoana  New Zealand
13
3
F Shot by police
14. Kalinga Boli May 25 – June 7 1937 Tagan  Philippines
13
?
 M Arrested [47]
15. Two unknown Men June 22 1952 Zamboanga  Philippines
12
14
 M One killed, the other arrested [48]

Workplace killings

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Workplace killings

People killing their (former) co-workers; also includes soldiers killing their comrades.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Sanurip, 36 April 15 1996 Timika Airport IndonesiaIndonesia
16
11
F Sentenced to death [49]
2. Chelakh, Vladislav, 19 May 27/28 2012 Arkankergen frontier post KazakhstanKazakhstan
15
0
F A Sentenced to life imprisonment [50]
3. Sherrill, Patrick Henry, 44 Aug. 20 1986 Edmond, OK United StatesU.S.
14
6
F Committed suicide
4. Hasan, Nidal Malik, 39 Nov. 5 2009 Fort Hood, TX United StatesU.S.
13
32
F Sentenced to death
Killed an unborn child
5. Barton, Mark Orrin, 44 July 27–29 1999 Atlanta, GA United StatesU.S.
12
13
FM Committed suicide
6. Alexis, Aaron, 34 Sep. 16 2013 Washington, D.C. United StatesU.S.
12
3
F Shot by police
7. Leung Ying, 29 Aug. 22 1928 Fairfield, CA United StatesU.S.
11
4
FM Committed suicide while awaiting execution [51]
8. Tazmal Hossein Dec. 1 1914 Naihati British RajIndia
10
11
 M Arrested [52]
9. Kim Won-jo, 25 May 1 1974 Kimpo South KoreaSouth Korea
10
3
F Committed suicide [53]
10. Vaganov, Artur, 22 June 1 1997 Sida AbkhaziaAbkhazia
10
3
F Committed suicide
11. Lee Wei, 41 April 5 1962 Taoyuan TaiwanTaiwan
10
0-2+
F A Arrested [54]
12. Ahmed Gul, 46 April 27 2011 Kabul AfghanistanAfghanistan
9
1–6
F Committed suicide [55]
13. Smith, William Vincent, 19 April 23 1946 LST 172 United StatesU.S.
9
1
F Committed suicide while awaiting trial [56]
14. Unknown July 29 1982 Maputo MozambiqueMozambique
9
?
F [57]
15. Moreño, Jonathan, 31 Jan. 16 2005 Kalibo PhilippinesPhilippines
8
29–33
F Shot by police [58]

School massacres

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:School massacres
See alsoList of school-related attacks

Massacres at kindergartens, schools and universities

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Kehoe, Andrew Philip, 55 May 18 1927 Bath Township, MI United StatesU.S.
44
58
FME Committed suicide
2. Cho, Seung-Hui, 23
(조승희)
April 16 2007 Blacksburg, VA United StatesU.S.
32
17
F Committed suicide
3. Lanza, Adam Peter, 20 Dec. 14 2012 Newtown, CT United StatesU.S.
27
2
F Committed suicide
4. Hamilton, Thomas Watt, 43 March 13 1996 Dunblane United KingdomU.K.
17
15
F Committed suicide
5. Steinhäuser, Robert, 19 April 26 2002 Erfurt GermanyGermany
16
1
F Committed suicide
6. Whitman, Charles Joseph, 25 Aug. 1 1966 Austin, TX United StatesU.S.
15
32
FM Shot by police
Killed an unborn child
One of the injured later died in 2001
7. Kretschmer, Tim, 17 March 11 2009 Winnenden & Wendlingen GermanyGermany
15
9
F Committed suicide
8. Lépine, Marc, 25 Dec. 6 1989 Montreal, QC CanadaCanada
14
14
FM Committed suicide
9. Harris, Eric David, 18
Klebold, Dylan Bennet, 17
April 20 1999 Littleton, CO United StatesU.S.
13
21
F E Both committed suicide
10. Gadirov, Farda, 28 April 30 2009 Baku AzerbaijanAzerbaijan
12
13
F Committed suicide [59]
11. Menezes de Oliveira, Wellington, 23 April 7 2011 Rio de Janeiro BrazilBrazil
12
12
F Committed suicide
12. Bai Ningyang, 18 May 8 2006 Shiguan ChinaChina
12
5
 MA Sentenced to death
13. Seifert, Walter, 42 June 11 1964 Volkhoven West GermanyWest Germany
10
22
FM Committed suicide
14. Saari, Matti Juhani, 22 Sep. 23 2008 Kauhajoki FinlandFinland
10
1
F A Committed suicide
15. Wu Huanming, 47 May 12 2010 Linchang ChinaChina
9
11
 M Committed suicide [60]

Religious, political or racial crimes

Mass murders, committed by single perpetrators, that have a foremost religious, racial or political background.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Breivik, Anders Behring, 32 July 22 2011 Oslo & Utøya NorwayNorway
75
241
F E Two more died trying to escape
Sentenced to 21 years plus preventive detention
2. Ibragimov, Ahmed, 43
(Ахмед Ибрагимов)
Oct. 8 1999 Mekenskaya RussiaRussia
34–41
?
F Killed by angry mob
3. Goldstein, Baruch Kappel, 37 Feb. 25 1994 Hebron State of PalestineWest Bank
29–52
70–200
F Killed by angry mob [61]
4. Abbas al-Baqir Abbas, 33 Dec. 8 2000 Jarafa SudanSudan
22–27
31–53
F Shot by police
5. Unknown July 20 2001 Sheshnag IndiaIndia
13–14
14–15
F E Shot by police [62]
6. Unknown Aug. 6 2002 Nunwan IndiaIndia
9
31
F E Shot by police [63]
7. Essex, Mark James Robert, 23 Dec. 31 /
Jan. 7
1972
1973
New Orleans, LA United StatesU.S.
9
13
F A Shot by police
8. Roof, Dylann Storm, 21 (suspect) June 17 2015 Charleston, SC United StatesU.S.
9
1
F Arrested
9. Asadullah
(اسد الله)
March 30 2012 Yahyakhel District AfghanistanAfghanistan
9
0
F P [64]
10. Strydom, Barend Hendrik, 23 Nov. 8/15 1988 De Deur &
Pretoria
South AfricaSouth Africa
8
16
F Sentenced to death plus 30 years [65]
11. Punchi Banda Kandegedera Feb. 25 1936 Colombo British CeylonSri Lanka
8
10
F Sentenced to death [66]
12. Wang Xiwen, 32^ Nov. 17 1980 Handan ChinaChina
7
12
F E Sentenced to death and executed
Also killed two pigs
13. Popper, Ami, 21 May 20 1990 Rishon LeZion IsraelIsrael
7
10–15
F Sentenced to seven consecutive life terms;
later reduced to 40 years in prison
14. Merah, Mohammed, 23 March 11–22 2012 Toulouse & Montauban FranceFrance
7
5
F Shot by police
15. Kariyev, Maksat Kokshkinbaevich, 34
(Максат Кокшкинбаевич Кариев)
Nov. 12 2011 Taraz KazakhstanKazakhstan
7
3
F E Committed suicide [67]
16. Abdul Salaam Sadek Hassouneh, 24
(عبد السلام صادق حسونة)
Jan. 17 2002 Hadera IsraelIsrael
6
14–33
F Killed by angry mob or shot by police [68]
17. Khaled Akar
(خالد آكر)
Nov. 25 1987 Kiryat Shemona IsraelIsrael
6
7
F E Shot by soldiers [69]
18. Page, Wade Michael, 40 Aug. 5 2012 Oak Creek, WI United StatesU.S.
6
3
F Committed suicide
19. Ahmed Jassim Ibrahim, 25
(احمد جاسم ابراهيم)
June 12 2009 Baghdad IraqIraq
5
12
F E Committed suicide or shot dead [70]
20. Mohammed Farhat, 17
(محمد فتحي فرحات)
March 7 2002 Atzmona State of PalestineGaza Strip
5
10–23
F E Shot dead [71]
21. Coulibaly, Amedy, 32 Jan. 7/9 2015 Montrouge & Porte de Vincennes FranceFrance
5
11
F Shot by police
22. Natan-Zada, Eden, 19 Aug. 4 2005 Shfar’am IsraelIsrael
4
9–14
F Killed by angry mob [72]
23. Nel, Johan, 18 Jan. 14 2008 Skierlik South AfricaSouth Africa
4
8
F Sentenced to life imprisonment [73]
24. Stone, Michael, 32 March 16 1988 Belfast United KingdomU.K.
3
68
F E Sentenced to 682 years in prison
25. Ibrahim Mohammed Hasuna, 20
(إبراهيم محمد محمود حسونة)
March 5 2002 Tel Aviv IsraelIsrael 3}}
14–31
FME Shot by police [74]
26. Raed Muhammed al-Rifi, 22 March 17 1992 Jaffa IsraelIsrael
2
19
 M Shot by police [75]
27. Hatem Shweikeh, 24 Nov. 4 2001 Jerusalem IsraelIsrael
2
15–42
F Shot dead [76]
28. Saeed Ibrahim Ramadan, 24
(سعيد إبراهيم رمضان)
Jan. 22 2002 Jerusalem IsraelIsrael
2
14–16
F Shot by police [77]

Domestic violence

Only the first 15 entries are shown here. For the entire list see:Home intruders, List of familicides, familicides in the United States and familicides in Europe.

This section contains cases that could be considered non-public, which means mass murders perpetrated in a domestic environment. The section is divided into two sub-categories; the first encompasses the lists of familicides and contains those incidents where most of the victims were relatives of the perpetrator, while the second, paraphrased as home intruders, contains those cases where the targeted families were not related to the perpetrator.

Perpetrator Date Year Location Country Killed Injured W Additional Notes Ref.
1. Ou Yangpu Jan. 1 1976 Zixing ChinaChina
17
0
 M Committed suicide [78]
2. Simmons, Ronald Gene, 47 Dec. 22–28 1987 Russellville, AR United StatesU.S.
16
4
FM Sentenced to death and executed
3. Mohammad Zaman, 30 Sep. 25 2009 Ghola AfghanistanAfghanistan
15
?
F Committed suicide [79]
4. Unknown Nov. 23 1936 Maropally British RajIndia
14
2
 M Arrested [80]
5. Banks, George Emil, 40 Sep. 25 1982 Wilkes-Barre, PA United StatesU.S.
13
1
F Sentenced to death
6. Liu Aibing, 34 Dec. 12 2009 Yinshanpai ChinaChina
13
1
FMA Sentenced to death and executed [81]
7. Guo Zhongmin, 36 Feb. 18 2003 Yangxiaoxiang ChinaChina
13
0
 M Committed suicide [82]
8. Saeed Qashash, 19 June 10 1998 Amman JordanJordan
12
0
F Sentenced to death and executed [83]
9. Jia Yingmin, 40 Oct. 6 2000 Kunlong ChinaChina
12
0
 M Committed suicide [84]
10. Augusto, Pedro Aug. 1900 Rio de Janeiro BrazilBrazil
12
?
FM Arrested [85]
11. Abbas Khan Sep. 1896 Jabbar British RajIndia
11
2
 M Arrested [86]
12. Andangan Oct. 21 1921 Cotabato PhilippinesPhilippines
11
0
 M Committed suicide [87]
13. Ruppert, James Urban, 40 March 30 1975 Hamilton, OH United StatesU.S.
11
0
F Sentenced to eleven consecutive life terms [88]
14. Jalal Osman Khoja, 40 Dec. 26 2000 Jeddah Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabia
11
0
F Committed suicide [89]
15. Abdul Emir Khalaf Sabhan Aug. 26 2003 Baghdad IraqIraq
11
0
F Committed suicide [90]

Vehicular manslaughter

This section contains those cases where only vehicles were used to attack people. Since it may be quite difficult to distinguish accidents, or cases of reckless driving from those incidents where the driver, or pilot, had the intention to harm others, only those cases are included where it is clear that the vehicle was applied as a weapon and crashed deliberately into people, other vehicles, or buildings. Also, those cases where a rampage killer used an armed vehicle, such as a tank, or a fighter aircraft, to shoot others are listed here.

Name Date Year Location Country Killed Injured Additional Notes Ref.
1. Unknown Aug. 1993 Kilifi KenyaKenya
18
25
Arrested [91]
2. Li Xianliang, 36
(李献良)
Aug. 1 2010 Nanzuo ChinaChina
17
20–30
Arrested [92]
3. Unknown Oct. 9 1994 Djimenzen HaitiHaiti
14
12
[93]
4. Unknown Dec. 1965 SyriaSyria
14
2+
Arrested [94]
5. Santosh Maruti Mane, 40
(संतोष मारुति माने)
Jan. 25 2012 Pune IndiaIndia
9
27–37
Sentenced to death [95]
6. Khalil Abu Olbeh, 35 Feb. 14 2001 Azor IsraelIsrael
8
21
Sentenced to eight life terms plus 21 years [96]
7. Hepnarová, Olga, 22 July 10 1973 Prague CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovakia
8
12
Sentenced to death and executed
8. Ford, Priscilla Joyce, 51 Nov. 27 1980 Reno, NV United StatesU.S.
7
22
Died while awaiting execution
9. Tates, Karst Roeland, 38 April 30 2009 Apeldoorn NetherlandsNetherlands
7
10
Died in the crash
10. Tian Shengming, 44
(田胜明)
May 28 2012 Zhangjiajie ChinaChina
6
9
Arrested [97]
11. Luo Xiaoji, 34
(骆效计)
Nov. 5 2008 Zhuhai ChinaChina
5
19
Shot by police [98]
12. Crabbe, Douglas John Edwin, 36 Aug. 18 1983 Yulara AustraliaAustralia
5
16
Sentenced to life imprisonment
13. Owens, Rashad Charjuan March 12 2014 Austin, TX United StatesU.S.
4
21
In custody, trial pending
14. Hussam Taysir Dwayat, 32 July 2 2008 Jerusalem IsraelIsrael
3
30–45
Shot by police [99]
15. Unknown Feb. 4 2001 Kampala UgandaUganda
3
21+
[100]
16. Ho Chung-ming, 36 Aug. 30 1964 Taipei TaiwanFormosa
3
20
Sentenced to death [101]
17. Kabolowsky, Robert, 20 July 10 1980 Wantagh, NY United StatesU.S.
3
20
Found not guilty by reason of insanity [102]
18. Ressa, Stephen Michael, 27 Sep. 21 2005 Las Vegas, NV United StatesU.S.
3
11
Sentenced to life imprisonment [103]
19. Nieto Avila, Jose Luis, 56 May 6 2002 San Cristóbal Ecatepec MexicoMexico
2
22
Sentenced to 146 years in prison [104]
20. Parkdel, Eric, 50 May 31 2003 Stockholm SwedenSweden
2
16
Convicted [105]

Grenade amok

This section lists incidents of “grenade amok”, which are mass murders where the perpetrator used only hand grenades or comparable explosive devices, like pipe bombs or dynamite sticks, for the attack. As it is sometimes difficult to distinguish cases of grenade amok from acts of terrorism or gang-related attacks, incidents are only included where there is at least some indication that it was neither committed in the context of a political, ethnic, or religious conflict, nor part of an assault with more than one participating offender.

Name Date Year Location Country Killed Injured Additional Notes Ref.
1. Unknown, 21 Nov. 2 1979 Sakhon Nakhon province ThailandThailand
12
40+
Arrested [106]
2. Ismatov, Bobomurad Feb. 7 1994 Kulyab TajikistanTajikistan
12
28
Committed suicide [107]
3. Unknown Police Officer May 8 1973 Phitsanulok Province ThailandThailand
11
12–21
Killed by the explosion [108]
4. Unknown Soldier, 23 May 1 1993 Nongmasaew ThailandThailand
9
23
Arrested [109]
5. Unknown May 10 1972 ThailandThailand
9
10
Arrested [110]
6. Unknown Soldier, 23 LaosLaos
8
12
Killed by the explosion [111]
7. Unknown Soldier, 35 LaosLaos
7
30
Killed by the explosion [111]
8. Cuellar Beltran, Jorge Alberto Aug. 17 1991 Comasagua El SalvadorEl Salvador
6–8
54–90
[112]
9. Abdullah Salih al-Hajiri Aug. 4 1999 Sana’a YemenYemen
6–7
40–43
Arrested [113]
10. Avraham, Ezra, 19 Feb. 4 1975 Netanya IsraelIsrael
6
26
Arrested [114]
11. Yeong Sik Shin May 18 1968 Andong City South KoreaSouth Korea
5–7
43–52
Sentenced to death [115]
12. David, Ernesto, 28 Dec. 2 1980 Manila PhilippinesPhilippines
5
28–34
Arrested [116]
13. Lotero, Hector Aug. 17 1969 Apartadó ColombiaColombia
5
25
[117]
14. Lacsina, Ederlino L. March 18 1978 Camarines Sur PhilippinesPhilippines
5
14
Arrested [118]
15. Unknown Soldier, 26 1959 LaosLaos
4
20
Arrested [119]
16. Cervantes, Richard, 20 Oct. 12 1996 Poblacion PhilippinesPhilippines
3
15
Arrested [120]
17. Marish Ali Al-Akhram, 30 Aug. 22 2003 Hawth YemenYemen
2
34
Arrested [121]
18. Mohammed Hassan al-Wajeeh, 30
(محمد حسن)
Feb. 2 2008 Sana’a YemenYemen
2
23–25
Sentenced to death [122]
19. Unknown Soldier Dec. 5 1954 Bou Amrane TunisiaTunisia
2
13
Shot by soldiers [123]
20. Jung, Heidrun-Erika, 49 Dec. 24 1996 Frankfurt GermanyGermany
2
13
Killed by the explosion [124]
21. Garcia, Rodolfo, 24 May 10 1969 Maplas PhilippinesPhilippines
2
11
[125]

Other incidents

This section lists mass murders by single perpetrators that do not fit into the upper categories, like arson fires, poisonings, and bombings.
Only cases with at least two people killed are included.

Name Date Year Location Country Killed Injured Additional Notes Ref.
1. Kim Dae-han, 56
(김대한)
Feb. 18 2003 Daegu South KoreaSouth Korea
198
147
Sentenced to life imprisonment for causing the Daegu subway fire
2. Segee, Robert Dale, 14 July 6 1944 Hartford, CT United StatesU.S.
167–169
412–682
Confessed to causing the Hartford circus fire; later recanted [126]
3. Zhang Pilin, 37 May 7 2002 Dalian ChinaChina
111
0
Set fire to the passenger cabin of an airplane; died in the crash
4. Jin Ruchao, 41
(靳如超)
March 16 2001 Shijiazhuang ChinaChina
108
38
Sentenced to death and executed for a bombing [127]
5. Unknown arsonist, 10 Dec. 1 1958 Chicago, IL United StatesU.S.
95
100
Fifth-grade student confessed to causing the Our Lady of the Angels School fire; later recanted
6. González, Julio, 35 March 25 1990 New York City, NY United StatesU.S.
87
6
Convicted of the Happy Land fire; sentenced to 174 twenty-five-year sentences
7. Keith, Alexander, 48 Dec. 11 1875 Bremerhaven German EmpireGerman Reich
81–83
200
Bomber; committed suicide [128]
8. Ma Hongqing, 50
(马宏清)
July 16 2001 Mafang ChinaChina
80–89
98
Sentenced to death and executed [129]
9. Le Duc Tan
(马宏清)
Sep. 15 1974 Phan Rang South VietnamSouth Vietnam
74
0
Died in the plane crash which he caused [130]
10. Nasra Yussef Mohammed al-Enezi, 23 Aug. 15 2009 Jahra KuwaitKuwait
55–57
80–90
Sentenced to death for causing a fatal fire at a wedding
11. Chen Shuizong, 59
(陈水总)
June 7 2013 Xiamen ChinaChina
46
34
Perished in the flames
12. Graham, Jack Gilbert, 23 Nov. 1 1955 Denver, CO United StatesU.S.
44
0
Sentenced to death and executed for the bombing of United Airlines Flight 629
13. Doty, Thomas G., 34 May 22 1962 Unionville, MO United StatesU.S.
44
0
Died in the crash of Continental Airlines Flight 11, which he caused
14. Gonzales, Francisco Paula, 27 May 7 1964 Danville, CA United StatesU.S.
43
0
Died in the crash of Pacific Air Lines Flight 773, which he caused [131]
15. Younes Khayati, 32 Aug. 21 1994 Agadir MoroccoMorocco
43
0
Died in the crash of Royal Air Maroc Flight 630, which he caused
16. Chen Zhengping, 32
(陈正平)
Sep. 15 2002 Nanjing ChinaChina
42
300–400
Sentenced to death and executed for poisoning [132]
17. Burke, David Augustus, 35 Dec. 7 1987 San Luis Obispo, CA United StatesU.S.
42
0
Died in the crash of Pacific Southwest Airlines Flight 1771, which he caused [133]
18. Chiasson, Louis, 64 Dec. 2 1969 Notre-Dame-du-Lac,QC CanadaCanada
40
2
Sentenced to life imprisonment for arson [134]
19. Huang Kefen, 27
(黄可芬)
June 24 1981 Xiamen ChinaChina
39
73
Killed by the explosion [135]
20. Thompson, John, 42 Aug. 16 1980 London United KingdomU.K.
37
23
Sentenced to life imprisonment for arson [136]
21. Li Zhanjin, 34
(刘占金)
March 29 2000 Shajian ChinaChina
36–39
30-50+
Killed by an explosion he caused at a wedding [137]
22. Hansen, Erik Solbakke, 24 Sep. 1 1973 Copenhagen DenmarkDenmark
35
17
Found not guilty by reason of insanity
Killed three other people
[138]
23. Çal, Kadir, 34 April 9 1991 Istanbul TurkeyTurkey
34–36
7–10
Perished in the flames [139]
24. Frank, Julian Andrew, 32 Jan. 6 1960 Bolivia, NC United StatesU.S.
33
0
Died in the crash of National Airlines Flight 2511, which he caused
25. Hermino dos Santos Fernandes, 32 Nov. 29 2013 Bwabwata National Park NamibiaNamibia
33
0
Died in the crash of LAM Mozambique Airlines Flight 470, which he caused
26. Qiu Fengguo, 23
(邱凤国)
Feb. 15 1986 Jilin ChinaChina
32
32
Killed by the explosion [140]
27. Unknown April 22 1980 Saint-Jean-de-Losne FranceFrance
32
6–9
[141]
28. Gao Haiping, 24
(高海平)
July 22 1981 Yangquan ChinaChina
31
127
Killed by the explosion [142]
29. Yu Xiugang, 21 April 14 1988 Yujia ChinaChina
30
18
Killed by the explosion [143]
30. Zhang Yunliang, 62 June 5 2009 Chengdu ChinaChina
27
73
Died in the Chengdu bus fire, which he caused
31. Unknown soldier Feb. 16 1984 Debre Zeyit EthiopiaEthiopia
25–28
10–12
Died [144]
32. Katagiri, Seiji, 35 Feb. 9 1982 Tokyo JapanJapan
24
141
Found not guilty of causing the crash of Japan Airlines Flight 350 by reason of insanity
33. de la Torre, Humberto Diaz, 19 Sep. 4 1982 Los Angeles, CA United StatesU.S.
24
32
Sentenced to 25 consecutive life terms for causing an apartment fire; killed an unborn child [145]
34. Unknown arsonist May 25 1982 Aire-sur-l’Adour FranceFrance
24
?
Attacked a psychiatric center [146]
35. Zhou Wenzhi, 25
(周文志)
June 26 1989 Shanghai ChinaChina
23
39
Killed by the explosion [147]
36. Guay, Albert, 32 Sep. 9 1949 Charlevoix, QC CanadaCanada
23
0
Sentenced to death and executed for bombing a passenger plane
37. Arrendondo, Pedro Oct. 10 1978 Caracas VenezuelaVenezuela
23
?
Arrested [148]
38. Matuska, Szilveszter, 39 Sep. 13 1931 Biatorbágy HungaryHungary
22
120+
Sentenced to death for causing fatal train derailments
39. Durado, Gavino, 48 Sep. 2 1962 Manila PhilippinesPhilippines
21
1+
Arrested [149]
40. Liang Hsin-teng, 51 May 12 1993 Taipei TaiwanTaiwan
20
7
Perished in the flames [150]
41. Álvarez, Juan Manuel, 25 Jan. 26 2005 Los Angeles, CA United StatesU.S.
11
177
Sentenced to life imprisonment for causing the 2005 Glendale train crash
42. Gerdt, Petri Erkki Tapio, 19 Oct. 11 2002 Vantaa FinlandFinland
6
166
Killed in the Myyrmanni bombing, which he caused
43. Blažka, Antonín, 57 Unknown 2013 Frenštát pod Radhoštěm Czech RepublicCzech Republic
6
10
Killed by the explosion he caused [151]
44. Dong Shihou, 29
(董世侯)
April 3 1968 Beijing ChinaChina
4
105
Killed by the explosion [152]
45. Copeland, David, 22 April 17/24/30 1999 London United KingdomU.K.
3
140
Sentenced to 6 concurrent life sentences

Annotation

The W-column gives a basic description of the weapons used in the murders

F – Firearms and other ranged weapons, especially rifles and handguns, but also bows and crossbows, grenade launchers, flamethrowers, or slingshots
M – Melee weapons, like knives, swords, spears, machetes, axes, clubs, rods, stones, or bare hands
O – Any other weapons, such as bombs, hand grenades, Molotov cocktails, poison and poisonous gas, as well as vehicle and arson attacks
A – indicates that an arson attack was the only other weapon used
V – indicates that a vehicle was the only other weapon used
E – indicates that explosives of any sort were the only other weapon used
P – indicates that an anaesthetising or deadly substance of any kind was the only other weapon used (includes poisonous gas)

See also

Bibliography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rampage_killers

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