Majority of American People Support Trumps Temporary Ban on Muslims — Trump Takes Out Big Media and Leadership of Big Government Democratic and Republican Parties — Political Elitist Establishment (PEEs) Panic! — Trump/Cruz Republican Ticket Will Win By A Landside Running The Table — PEEs Wet Their Pants — Conservative Republicans in White House — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 590: December 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 589: December 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 588: December 7, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 587: December 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 586: December 3, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 585: December 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 584: December 1, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 583: November 30, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 582: November 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 581: November 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 580: November 23, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 579: November 20, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 578: November 19, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 577: November 18, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 576: November 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 575: November 16, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 574: November 13, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 573: November 12, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 572: November 11, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 571: November 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 570: November 6, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 569: November 5, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 568: November 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 567: November 3, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 566: November 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 565: October 30, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 564: October 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 563: October 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 562: October 27, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 561: October 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 560: October 23, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 559: October 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 558: October 21, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 557: October 20, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 556: October 19, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 555: October 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 554: October 15, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 553: October 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 552: October 13, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 551: October 12, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 550: October 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 549: October 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 548: October 7, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 547: October 5, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 546: October 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 545: October 1, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 544: September 30, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 543: September 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 542: September 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 541: September 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 540: September 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 539: September 23, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 538: September 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 537: September 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 536: September 18, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 535: September 17, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 534: September 16, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 533: September 15, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 532: September 14, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 531: September 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 530: September 10, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 529: September 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 528: September 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 527: September 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 526: September 3, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 525: September 2, 2015 

Story 1: Majority of American People Support Trumps Temporary Ban on Muslims — Trump Takes Out Big Media and Leadership of Big Government Democratic and Republican Parties — Political Elitist Establishment (PEEs) Panic! — Trump/Cruz Republican Ticket Will Win By A Landside Running The Table — PEEs Wet Their Pants — Conservative Republicans in White House — Videos

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Latest Polls

Thursday, December 10
Race/Topic   (Click to Sort) Poll Results Spread
2016 Republican Presidential Nomination CBS/NY Times Trump 35, Cruz 16, Carson 13, Rubio 9, Bush 3, Christie 3, Paul 4, Kasich 3, Fiorina 1, Huckabee 3, Santorum 0, Pataki 0, Graham 0 Trump +19
2016 Democratic Presidential Nomination CBS/NY Times Clinton 52, Sanders 32, O’Malley 2 Clinton +20
South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary Winthrop Trump 24, Carson 14, Cruz 16, Rubio 11, Bush 9, Fiorina 2, Graham 2, Huckabee 2, Kasich 1, Paul 1, Christie 1, Santorum 0, Pataki 0 Trump +8
President Obama Job Approval Gallup Approve 45, Disapprove 50 Disapprove +5
President Obama Job Approval Rasmussen Reports Approve 46, Disapprove 53 Disapprove +7
President Obama Job Approval Reuters/Ipsos Approve 41, Disapprove 53 Disapprove +12
Direction of Country Reuters/Ipsos Right Direction 24, Wrong Track 66 Wrong Track +42
Wednesday, December 9
Race/Topic   (Click to Sort) Poll Results Spread
New Hampshire 2016 Democratic Primary CNN/WMUR Sanders 50, Clinton 40, O’Malley 1 Sanders +10
South Carolina Democratic Presidential Primary FOX News Clinton 65, Sanders 21, O’Malley 3 Clinton +44
South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary FOX News Trump 35, Carson 15, Cruz 14, Rubio 14, Bush 5, Fiorina 1, Graham 2, Huckabee 1, Kasich 1, Paul 2, Christie 2, Santorum 1, Pataki 0 Trump +20
North Carolina Senate – Burr vs. Ross PPP (D) Burr 46, Ross 35 Burr +11
North Carolina Governor – McCrory vs. Cooper PPP (D) McCrory 44, Cooper 42 McCrory +2
President Obama Job Approval The Economist/YouGov Approve 42, Disapprove 56 Disapprove +14
Congressional Job Approval The Economist/YouGov Approve 10, Disapprove 67 Disapprove +57
Direction of Country The Economist/YouGov Right Direction 25, Wrong Track 67 Wrong Track +42

Donald Trump Don Lemon FULL Interview – Ban Proposal Controversy and More – CNN – 12/9/15

Bought and Paid For

 Big Government and Open Borders

Leadership of Republican and Democratic Parties

Political Elitist Establishment and 

Big Media Tries Unsuccessfully To Demonize

Donald J. Trump

Donald Trump vows to ban Muslims entering US

Radical Islam Documentary

Obsession – Radical Islam’s War Against the West is a new documentary film that will challenge the way you look at the world.

Almost 70 years ago, Europe found itself at war with one of the most sinister figures in modern history: Adolf Hitler. When the last bullet of World War II was fired, over 50 million people were dead, and countless countries were both physically and economically devastated. Hitlers bloody struggle sought to forge the world anew, in the crucible of Nazi values. How could such a disaster occur? How could the West have overlooked the evil staring it in the face, for so long, before standing forcefully against it?

Today, we find ourselves confronted by a new enemy, also engaged in a violent struggle to transform our world. As we sleep in the comfort of our homes, a new evil rises against us. A new menace is threatening, with all the means at its disposal, to bow Western Civilization under the yoke of its values. That enemy is Radical Islam.

Using images from Arab TV, rarely seen in the West, Obsession reveals an insider’s view’ of the hatred the Radicals are teaching, their incitement of global jihad, and their goal of world domination. With the help of experts, including first-hand accounts from a former PLO terrorist, a Nazi youth commander, and the daughter of a martyred guerilla leader, the film shows, clearly, that the threat of Radical Islam is real.

Islam is being hijacked by radical extremists, who actively seek to destroy the shared values we stand for. The world should be very concerned.

This is a documentary film about Radical Islamic terror. A dangerous ideology, fuelled by religious hatred. It’s important to remember, most Muslims are peaceful and do not support terror. This is not a film about them.

Muslim Leader Admits Islam Not a Religion of Peace

Robert Spencer – The Islamic State

Robert Spencer on Why ISIS is Islamic?

McConnell on Trump: Muslim Ban “Totally Unworkable”

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday criticized GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump’s proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S., calling it “totally unworkable.”

“King Abdullah of Jordan, a great friend and ally of ours, would presumably not be able to come to the United States,” McConnell said. “How about President Ghani of Afghanistan, a great friend and ally who would not be able to come to the United States.”

However, when asked if he would vote for Trump should he get the Republican nomination, McConnell said he would “certainly support the Republican nominee.”

Paul Ryan condemns Donald Trump’s call to ban Muslims

House Speaker Paul Ryan issued a dramatic condemnation Tuesday of the latest proposal by Donald Trump, his party’s front-runner for president, following Trump’s call to ban all Muslims from entering the United States.

Ryan said at a press conference that Trump’s comments are “not who we are as a party” and violate the Constitution.

“This is not conservatism,” the Wisconsin representative said, adding, “Some of our best and biggest allies in this struggle and fight against radical Islam terror are Muslims.”

Asked if he’d back Trump if he was nominated by the party in 2016, Ryan responded, “I’m going to support whoever the Republican nominee is and I’m going to stand up for what I believe in as I do that.”

Ryan’s denunciation of the proposal by the party’s leading presidential candidate marked a highly unusual moment in the campaign. Sitting House speakers rarely engage in presidential politics and the reprimand is particularly noteworthy coming from Ryan, the party’s 2012 vice presidential nominee.

Paul Ryan Condemns Donald Trump’s Muslim Ban Comment – FULL Press Conference

Jeb Bush: ‘I can guarantee’ Donald Trump won’t be nominee

Donald Trump Unites Democrats, Republicans Against His Plan to Bar Muslims From Entering US

Hillary Clinton calls Donald Trump out over US Muslim ban

Trump defends Muslim ban proposal (Part 1)

Trump defends Muslim ban proposal (Part 2)

Donald Trump Morning Joe HEATED FULL Interview 12/8/2015

Donald Trump Defends Barring Muslims From US: ‘We Have No Idea If They Love Us or Hate Us’

Donald Trump Defends Barring Muslims From US: ‘We Have No Idea If They Love Us or Hate Us’

Trump’s son on father’s plan to ban Muslims from US entry

Donald Trump Defends Ban on Good Morning America

Trump’s Plan to Ban Muslims: A Closer Look – Late Night with Seth Meyers

Voters Like Trump’s Proposed Muslim Ban

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Despite an international uproar and condemnation by President Obama and nearly all of those running for the presidency, Donald Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims coming to the United States has the support of a sizable majority of Republicans – and a plurality of all voters.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 66% of Likely Republican Voters favor a temporary ban on all Muslims entering the United States until the federal government improves its ability to screen out potential terrorists from coming here. Just 24% oppose the plan, with 10% undecided.

Among all voters, 46% favor a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States, while 40% are opposed. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording,click here.)

Trump, the front-runner in the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, proposed the ban following last week’s massacre in San Bernardino, California. Sixty-five percent (65%) of voters believe the two shooters in the incident were radical Islamic terrorists. Those individuals had entered the United States without problem and escaped detection despite several actions here suggesting that they had violent intentions.

Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters believe it is too easy for foreigners to legally enter the Untied States. Only 10% believe it is too hard, while 23% say the level of difficulty is about right.

Still, when thinking about immigration policy in general, 59% also feel that the United States should treat all potential immigrants equally, down only slightly from June. Thirty percent (30%) think the United States should allow more immigrants from some countries than others, a finding that’schanged very from past surveying.  Eleven percent (11%) are not sure.

Late last month – and prior to the mass murders in San Bernardino, Trump said he would support government tracking of Muslims living in the United States through a federal database, a plan his fellow GOP rivals said was going too far. But at that time, one-in-three voters – and a slight plurality of Republicans – supported government monitoring of Muslims.

Rasmussen Reports Managing Editor Fran Coombs is available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777×205 to schedule now.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 8-9, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Rasmussen Reports will post its latest weekly Trump Change survey tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. Eastern. We’ll see if Trump’s latest remarks have raised or lowered expectations for his candidacy.

In another survey just before the San Bernardino incident, 49% of U.S. voters said Islam as practiced today encourages violence more than most other religions, and 71% thought Islamic religious leaders need to do more to emphasize the peaceful beliefs of their faith.

Most voters who believe Trump is likely to be the next Republican presidential nominee support his proposed ban on Muslims entering the United States.

Men and women are in equal agreement on a temporary ban on Muslims coming here. The older the voter, the more likely he or she is to support such a ban.

Just 30% of Democrats favor Trump’s proposed ban, while 55% oppose it. Voters not affiliated with either major party support the ban by a narrow 45% to 39% margin.

The majority of voters in most demographic categories think it is too easy for foreigners to legally enter the United States but also feel that America should treat all potential immigrants equally.

While 78% of Republicans and 59% of unaffiliateds think it is too easy to get into the United States, just 42% of Democrats agree. Voters in Obama’s party, on the other hand, feel more strongly than GOP and unaffiliated voters that the United States should treat all potential immigrants equally.

Only 30% of all voters think the federal government is doing a good or excellent job monitoring potential terrorists inside the United States.

Thirty-nine percent (39%) think the terrorists are winning the War on Terror, while only 28% believe the United States and its allies are winning.  That’s consistent with surveying for months but reflects voter attitudes before the terrorist attacks in Paris and last week’s massacre in California. We’ll be updating those findings tomorrow morning, too.

Voters are far more likely to think the media is biased against Trump than against his chief Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/current_events/immigration/december_2015/voters_like_trump_s_proposed_muslim_ban

 

Voters See Media Biased Against Trump but Not Clinton

Voters are far more likely to think the media is biased against Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump than against his chief Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

Forty-seven percent (47%) of Likely U.S. Voters think most reporters are biased against Trump. A new Rasmussen Reports finds that 31% disagree, but 22% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

By comparison, just half as many (23%) believe the media is biased against Clinton. Most voters (59%), in fact, say the media is not biased against the former first lady and secretary of State. Eighteen percent (18%) are undecided.

Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Republicans and 50% of unaffiliated voters feel the media is biased against Trump, but just 26% of Democrats agree. Only 13% of GOP voters and 20% of unaffiliateds believe the media is biased against Clinton, compared to 34% of Democrats. But even a plurality (44%) of voters in Clinton’s own party says the media is not biased against her.

This survey was taken before perhaps the biggest controversy yet involving Trump, his call in the wake of the San Bernardino massacre for barring all Muslims from entering the United States until the federal government can figure out how to do a better job keeping out radical Islamic terrorists.

Sixty-six percent (66%) of all voters say the news media focus too much on Trump and Clinton at the expense of the other presidential candidates. Just six percent (6%) think there is too little focus on the two front-runners. Twenty percent (20%) describe the level of media coverage as about right.

Seventy-five percent (75%) believe that when it comes to covering prospective presidential candidates, the media is more interested in creating controversies about them than it is in reporting where they stand on the issues.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 2-3, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Seventy-one percent (71%) of voters believe that when covering a political campaign, most reporters try to help the candidate they want to win. Republicans and unaffiliated voters are more skeptical of the media than Democrats are.

That’s comparable to attitudes in 2012 just three months before Election Day and four years before that right before the 2008 election.

When it comes to the level of coverage given the two front-runners, Republicans and Democrats are in general agreement. Unaffiliated voters believe even more strongly that they receive too much coverage at the expense of the other candidates.

Men feel much more strongly than women that the media is biased against Trump. Most women agree the media is not biased against Clinton, but they don’t believe that as strongly as men do.

Voters of all ages tend to think the media is biased against Trump. Those under 40 are more likely than their elders to believe the media is also biased against Clinton, but younger voters still see the media as more biased against Trump than against Clinton.

But then voters in nearly all demographic categories see more bias against Trump than against Clinton.

Among voters who rate the current level of media focus as about right, 51% say the media is biased against Trump, but just 20% feel the media is biased against Clinton.

In a survey earlier this year, 55% of Republicans said they expect most reporters to try to help Clinton’s campaign. Just 17% of Democrats and 39% of unaffiliated voters agreed.

Media coverage of the immigration policies of Clinton and Trump is a case in point.

Just 23% of voters expect reporters to offer unbiased coverage of the 2016 presidential race. The Republican presidential debate in late October was a textbook example of the media bias voters have complained about in surveys for years.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections/election_2016/voters_see_media_biased_against_trump_but_not_clinton

 

Donald Trump Calls for Ban on Muslim Entry Into U.S.

Announcement comes hours after poll of Iowa Republicans shows Trump trailing Sen. Ted Cruz

By REID J. EPSTEIN And PETER NICHOLAS

Donald Trump evoked outrage from across the political spectrum Monday by calling for a “total and complete shutdown” of Muslims entering the U.S., a proposal that taps into voter anxiety about the recent spate of terrorist attacks yet likely runs afoul of religious freedoms enshrined in the Constitution.

“It is obvious to anybody the hatred [among Muslims] is beyond comprehension,” Mr. Trump said. “Where this hatred comes from and why, we will have to determine. Until we are able to determine and understand this problem and the dangerous threat it poses, our country cannot be the victims of horrendous attacks by people that believe only in jihad, and have no sense of reason or respect for human life.”

His campaign said he would keep the ban intact “until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on,” including the facts around the two attackers who killed 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif., last week. Syed Rizwan Farook, a U.S. citizen, and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, a legal immigrant who had a green card, were killed in a shootout with the police after the massacre.

In an interview on Fox News, Mr. Trump said he would ease the ban in the case of Muslims serving in the U.S. military and allow them to return home.

Mr. Trump’s proposal, which many legal scholars deemed unconstitutional, was immediately attacked by many Republican and Democratic presidential candidates.

The announcement came the same day Mr. Trump lost ground in a poll in Iowa, and also after President Barack Obama gave a speech from the Oval Office on Sunday night in which he asked Americans to show tolerance for the Islamic faith and avoid the temptation to “turn against one another.” Mr. Obama said anti-Muslim rhetoric would be a recruitment tool for the terrorist group Islamic State.

In Trump style, the celebrity businessman refused to back down in the face of the broad criticism. It is that tenacious style that has largely kept him at the forefront of the GOP primary.

At a rally in South Carolina on Monday night, Mr. Trump drew cheers from a large crowd when he repeated his message. “It’s going to get worse and worse, folks,” he said. “You are going to have more World Trade Centers,” he added in a reference to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in New York and Washington.

His candidacy relies on an unusual Republican coalition: blue-collar voters who are impatient with career politicians and unnerved by the direction of the country. These are voters who see him as a strong leader and aren’t worried about the nuances of his policy pronouncements.

Although establishment Republicans find his rhetoric incendiary, there also are indications that a large swath of party’s rank-and-file voters relish his tough-sounding messages and a sizable number are worried about religious extremism.

In September, a poll by the Democratic-leaning firm PPP found that 30% of Republicans think Islam should not be legal in the U.S., while 21% weren’t sure.

A Pew Research Center survey in 2014 found that Republicans take a cool view toward Muslims. Asked to rate a series of religious groups from zero to 100, with 100 reflecting the warmest feelings, Republicans gave Muslims an average rating of 33, almost equal with atheists and below all other major religions.

Legal scholars said the Constitution forbids the sort of ban Mr. Trump envisions. John Yoo, a conservative law professor at the University of California, Berkeley, said the proposal is unconstitutional, pointing to First Amendment guarantees of the free exercise of religion.

“The United States cannot discriminate on the basis of religion,” Mr. Yoo said. He added that in the past, the U.S. has discriminated based on country of origin, but that is different from a wholesale religious ban.

William Banks, a constitutional law scholar at the Syracuse College of Law, agreed that Mr. Trump’s plan would not pass constitutional muster, pointing to 14th Amendment guarantees of due process under law.

“Aside from being outrageous, it would be unconstitutional,” Mr. Banks said.

In an unusual display of bipartisan agreement, other presidential candidates quickly weighed in and denounced Mr. Trump’s proposal.

“This is just more of the outrageous divisiveness that characterizes his every breath and another reason why he is entirely unsuited to lead the United States,” said Ohio GOP Gov. John Kasich.

Another GOP candidate, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, said on Twitter that Mr. Trump “has gone from making absurd comments to being downright dangerous with his bombastic rhetoric.” He added that such an inflammatory proposal could put at risk the lives of U.S. troops abroad in Muslim countries.

Former Florida GOP Gov. Jeb Bush called Mr. Trump “unhinged.”

Mr. Trump’s remarks may well have been designed to remind voters of the core message of his campaign on immigration. They came the same day a Monmouth University Poll showed him slipping behind Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in Iowa, and a CNN-ORC survey that also detected Cruz momentum.

On the campaign trail in South Carolina, Mr. Cruz offered more muted criticism of Mr. Trump’s proposal. “That is not my policy. I’ve introduced legislation in the Senate that would put in place a three-year moratorium on refugees coming from countries where ISIS or al Qaeda can control a substantial amount of territory.”

Meanwhile, Mr. Trump had been scheduled to appear at a Republican National Committee fundraiser on Wednesday in New York. He now will not, RNC spokesman Sean Spicer said Monday evening.

On the Democratic side, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, said via Twitter that the Trump proposal “removes all doubt: he is running for president as a fascist demagogue.”

Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton tweeted: “This is reprehensible, prejudiced and divisive,” adding that it makes America “less safe.”

Researchers struggled to find a precedent for the sort of blanket prohibition based on religious belief that Mr. Trump embraced.

“This is the right place you would use the word ‘unprecedented,’ ” said Morris Vogel, president of New York’s Tenement Museum, which traces the immigrant experience in the U.S.

Mr. Vogel compared Mr. Trump’s rhetoric to the rise of the Know-Nothing Party, which rode anti-Catholic sentiment to win local elections in the 1840s and 1850s, but had little influence in presidential elections.

“People wanted to ban Catholics, but we had a different kind of political system,” Mr. Vogel said. “We didn’t have a year of running for president and media with people getting nominations. You would have gotten anti-Catholicism as a very strong political force but expressed at the local level.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/donald-trump-calls-for-ban-on-muslim-entry-into-u-s-1449526104

Trump’s proposal to keep out Muslims crosses a line for many in both parties

By Sean Sullivan and Jenna Johnson

Republican and Democratic leaders leveled their most forceful criticism yet against Donald Trump on Tuesday, widely denouncing the GOP presidential front-runner’s call to bar Muslims from entering the United States and signaling that Trump’s anti-immigrant and anti-Islamic rhetoric has agitated both parties more than ever.

At the White House, President Obama’s top spokesman said Trump’s proposal “disqualifies him” from the presidency, marking a rare administration foray into the 2016 race. On Capitol Hill, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) saidthe idea was at odds with the values of their party and the United States as a whole.

In the space of a day, Trump’s role as a domestic political provocateur expanded to international agitator as he sent a first-of-its-kind signal abroad: The leading presidential contender in the opposition party wants to keep Muslims out of the United States.

Leaders across the globe condemned Trump as officials at home worried about the long-term implications of his actions. Trump called Monday for a “total and complete” ban on Muslims entering the United States until we “figure out what is going on.” He reiterated his overall view on Tuesday.

It was far from clear whether the proposed ban on Muslims would have a negative effect on Trump’s popularity, which has only grown as he has escalated his rhetoric against illegal immigrants and a host of other groups. Some of his rivals stepped carefully around his remarks, and many of his most vocal critics stopped short of refusing to back him if he is the Republican nominee.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Trump’s proposal “disqualifies him from serving as president,” declaring that his rhetoric is “harmful to the country” and makes it harder to “work in partnership” with American Muslim leaders to identify potential threats.

Earnest said other candidates and Republican leaders “should say right now that they will not support him for president.”

Ryan, who typically stays out of the GOP presidential contest, made a strongly worded exception.

“Freedom of religion is a fundamental constitutional principle. It’s a founding principle of this country,” Ryan told reporters. “This is not conservatism. What was proposed yesterday is not what this party stands for. And more importantly, it’s not what this country stands for.”

McConnell called proposals to bar visitors on the basis of their religion “completely inconsistent” with American values.

But neither Republican said he would reject Trump if he won the nomination, and GOP senators facing difficult reelections dodged questions about whether they would support the provocative businessman if he won the nomination. Almost all Republicans who were questioned tried to duck that possibility, saying only that they would support the eventual nominee.

“He knows that a lot of Americans agree, to a certain extent, with things that he says,” conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh said on his show Tuesday. “He also knows he’s the only one reaching those people.”

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), wary of alienating Trump supporters as he tries to consolidate the conservative wing of the party, emphasized that he differed with that specific policy proposed by Trump.

“I disagree with that proposal. I like Donald Trump. A lot of our friends here have encouraged me to criticize and attack Donald Trump. I’m not interested in doing so,” Cruz told reporters.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), a long-shot candidate near the bottom of the field,told a New Hampshire radio station that it is “a mistake to base immigration or moratoriums based on religion,” but added, “I’ve called for something similar.” Paul was referring to a measure that would suspend the issuance of visas to refugees from about 30 countries “that have large jihadist movements,” pending strict background checks.

The Christian Broadcasting Network’s chief political correspondent, David Brody, wrote that Trump’s position is likely to resonate with Christian evangelicals, as long as he is able to verbalize “the underlying theological problems with Islam and the Quran.” Several prominent evangelical leaders in Iowa and elsewhere who are often quick to comment on the twists and turns of the election declined to comment on Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims entering the country.

After announcing his proposal — which he said was a response to recent terrorist attacks in Paris and California — he was greeted with adoration by his legion of fans on Twitter and at a raucous rally Monday night in South Carolina. On Tuesday, Trump conducted a contentious round of morning news-show interviews in which he defended the idea against critics who have deemed it unconstitutional, illegal, racist, dangerous and un-American.

Although Trump’s aides had initially said no one would be exempt from the “total” ban, the candidate began listing exceptions he would make. U.S. citizens who are Muslim and traveling abroad would be allowed to reenter, along with Muslim members of the U.S. military returning from tours overseas. Muslim leaders of foreign countries would also be allowed in, and exceptions would be made for athletes visiting the United States for competitions.

In the interviews, Trump performed as he usually does — deflecting questions, avoiding specifics and talking over the journalists trying to ask him questions. During an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” that lasted more than 30 minutes, host Joe Scarborough told Trump to stop talking so that he could ask the candidate a question, then cut to a commercial.

On Twitter late Tuesday, Trump reminded his followers that he will journey to Israel before the end of the year. The trip will not include a stop in Jordan, he wrote, despite his “great respect for King Abdullah II.”

Corey Saylor, a spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, predicted that Trump’s comments would make it easier for the Islamic State terrorist group to radicalize potential recruits.

“I think that Trump’s statement is a propaganda coup for ISIS,” he said. “No doubt in my mind about that.”

Some Democrats said Tuesday that the Republican Party is partly culpable in Trump’s rise.

“Republicans today are still saying they will support Trump if he is their nominee. Why? Because they are intimidated by his support and his supporters,” said Paul Begala, a strategist with the pro-Hillary Clinton super PAC Priorities USA Action. “Trump may be the monster, but the GOP establishment is the Dr. Frankenstein who created him.”

Many Republicans worry that Trump’s proposals — which have drawn comparisons to those of Adolf Hitler and to the internment of Japanese Americans on U.S. soil during World War II — will do lasting damage to a party desperately trying to cast itself as more tolerant and open than in previous presidential elections.

Tom Ridge, a former Republican governor of Pennsylvania who became the first secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, said Tuesday he would not vote for Trump. Ridge said that his anger over Trump’s popularity has been building for months and that he was frustrated that many fellow Republicans took so long to denounce the candidate’s rhetoric.

“I think the man is an embarrassment to my party,” said Ridge, who supports Trump’s rival Jeb Bush. “He’s an embarrassment to our country. We deserve better than this.”

Trump’s actions also hold implications down the ballot. Rep. David Jolly (Fla.), a centrist Republican running for U.S. Senate who backs Bush, took to the House floor Tuesday to call for Trump to end his campaign.

“I think its been a dark day for the country,” Jolly said in an interview. He encouraged other GOP leaders to “speak up.”

While Trump has gone furthest in his rhetoric and proposals, other candidates have given voice to views that Democrats have condemned as anti-Muslim. “Their language may be more veiled than Mr. Trump’s, but their ideas aren’t so different,” Democratic presidential front-runner Clinton wroteTuesday on her website.

All of the GOP candidates have called for at least a pause in the acceptance of most Syrian refugees. Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson has said that a Muslim should not be president and has argued that accepting Syrian refugees into the United States is “a suspension of intellect.”

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), seen by many party leaders as the GOP’s best hope for cross-party appeal, has equated Muslims with Nazis and dismissed complaints of anti-Muslim bias.

“Where is there widespread evidence that we have a problem in America with discrimination against Muslims?” Rubio said on Fox News Sunday night after Obama’s address to the nation urging tolerance.

The anti-Muslim rhetoric Trump and some of his rivals have been using stands in stark contrast to the tone struck by President George W. Bush after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

In working to tamp down anti-Muslim sentiment that erupted after the attacks, Bush repeatedly talked about Islam as a peaceful religion and said the terrorists did not represent Muslims around the world. He quoted the Koranduring remarks at the Islamic Center of Washington six days after 9/11.

Three days after that, he spoke directly to Muslims during an address before a joint session of Congress.

“We respect your faith,” Bush said. “It’s practiced freely by many millions of Americans and by millions more in countries that America counts as friends.”

On Tuesday, Trump’s message sounded much different.

“I would want to engage the Muslim community, but the Muslim community has to help us,” he said on “Morning Joe.” “They’re not helping us.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trumps-proposal-to-keep-out-muslims-crosses-a-line-for-many-in-both-parties/2015/12/08/bb887e64-9dea-11e5-bce4-708fe33e3288_story.html

Donald Trump: ban all Muslims entering US

Republican frontrunner wants ‘total and complete shutdown’ of borders to Muslims after San Bernardino shooting in latest boundary-pushing proposal

Donald Trump, the leading contender to become the Republican party’s nominee for US presidential candidate, has called for a “total and complete shutdown” of the country’s borders to Muslims in the wake of the San Bernardino terrorist attack.

Trump made his most extreme pledge yet – in a race in which he has consistently pushed the boat out on issues of race and immigration – in a statement released to the media through his presidential campaign team.

He said there was such hatred among Muslims around the world towards Americans that it was necessary to rebuff them en masse, until the problem was better understood.

Until we are able to determine and understand this problem and the dangerous threat it poses, our country cannot be the victims of horrendous attacks by people that believe only in Jihad, and have no sense of reason or respect for human life,” the billionaire real estate developer said.

Trump put out his incendiary proposal just hours before he was scheduled to appear at a rally on board the USS Yorktown, a second world war aircraft carrier that is berthed near Charleston, South Carolina. The military location was carefully chosen for an address that falls on the 74th anniversary of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor that brought America into the war. After being interrupted several times aboard the ship, he said the proposal was “probably not politically correct, but I don’t care”.

To justify his extreme call for a total rejection of all Muslims seeking to enter the US, Trump turned to what he claimed to be polling data that underlined what he said was the violent hatred of followers of the faith toward Americans. However, the statement cites the Center for Security Policy, an organisation branded extremist by anti-race-hatred campaigners at the Southern Poverty Law Center.

“Shariah authorizes such atrocities as murder against non-believers who won’t convert, beheadings and more unthinkable acts that pose great harm to Americans, especially women,” Trump’s “policy statement” said.

The former reality TV star added: “Without looking at the various polling data, it is obvious to anybody the hatred is beyond comprehension. Where this hatred comes from and why we will have to determine.”

Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski said Trump’s proposed ban would apply to “everybody”, including Muslims seeking immigration visas as well as tourists seeking to enter the country. Another Trump staffer confirmed that the ban would also apply to American Muslims who were currently overseas – presumably including members of the military and diplomatic service. “This does not apply to people living in the country,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News, “but we have to be vigilant.”

In an interview with the Guardian, Trump senior policy adviser Sam Clovis said: “I don’t think there is anything wrong about asking about religious affiliation.”

Trump’s remarks immediately drew condemnation from Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley, who tweeted: “@realdonaldtrump removes all doubt: he is running for President as a fascist demagogue.” Other politicians on both sides of the aisle quickly followed suit – including former vice-president Dick Cheney.

Trump has come under fire before for his contentious views on how to deal with the threat of domestic radicalization of Muslims. He has refused to rule out creating a government database of all American Muslims.

He has also called for the deportation of 11 million undocumented Hispanics, as well as said were he elected president, he would build a wall along the border with Mexico.

Since the Paris attacks orchestrated by Islamic State, and last week’s attack in San Bernardino, California by a married couple inspired by the terror group, Trump has sought to build his already substantial lead over his Republican presidential rivals by portraying himself as being tougher than all others on national security.

He responded in a tweet on Sunday night to President Obama’s Oval Office address on combating the Isis threat by saying: “Is that all there is? We need a new President – FAST!”

In his address to the nation on Sunday night, the president was at his most passionate when he made an appeal to Americans for tolerance in the aftermath of the California shooting.

Obama specifically sought to underscore that while Muslims have a responsibility to identify and reject extremism within their ranks, Americans cannot lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Islam’s more than a billion followers are peaceful.

“We cannot turn against one another by letting this fight be defined as a war between America and Islam,” Obama said. “That, too, is what groups like Isil want. Isil does not speak for Islam. They are thugs and killers. Part of a cult of death. And they account for a tiny fraction of a more than a billion Muslims around the world, including millions of patriotic Muslim Americans who reject their hateful ideology.

“Muslim Americans are our friends and our neighbors. Our co-workers. Our sports heroes. And, yes, they are our men and women in uniform who are willing to die in defense of our country,” he added. “We have to remember that.”

Trump’s threat was met with perplexed anger on the part of prominent Muslim American groups. Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the largest such group, the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said on Twitter: “Where is there left for him to go? Are we talking internment camps? Are we talking the final solution?”

Republican presidential rival Lindsey Graham, one of a number who have seen their prospects of making headway in the campaign subsumed by Trump’s dominance, said: “What has been in the past absurd and hateful has turned dangerous.”

He told the Guardian: “Donald Trump today took xenophobia and religious bigotry to a new level. His comments are hurting the war effort and putting our diplomats and soldiers serving in the Middle East at risk. The way to win this war is to reach to the vast majority of people in Islamic faith who reject Isil and provide them the capability to resist this ideology.

“Today’s statement embraces a ‘fortress America’ approach, is doomed to fail and shows a complete lack of understanding by Donald Trump as to what the war is all about. As to interpreters and others who have helped American military in Iraq and Afghanistan, this policy, if enacted, would be a death sentence.”

Trump’s choice of polling data to hold up his highly controversial views was in itself inflammatory. He cited data that purported to show that a quarter of those Muslims polled – Trump did not specify what the sample group was, nor even what part of the world he was referring to – “agreed that violence against Americans here in the United States is justified as a part of global jihad”.

More than half of the unspecified sample group “agreed that Muslims in America should have the choice of being governed according to Shariah”.

The data was drawn from the Center for Security Policy, a neoconservative thinktank based in Washington DC whose founder and president, Frank Gaffney, is a prominent US Islamophobe. The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate speech in the country, has described Gaffney as being “gripped by paranoid fantasies about Muslims destroying the west from within”.

The SPLC said that “Gaffney believes that ‘creeping Shariah’, or Islamic religious law, is a dire threat to American democracy”.

In 2011, Gaffney, a former Pentagon official in the Reagan administration, was barred from the influential Conservative Political Action Conference having suggested that two of its organizers had connections to the Muslim Brotherhood.

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/dec/07/donald-trump-ban-all-muslims-entering-us-san-bernardino-shooting

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