94 Million Americans Not In Labor Force, Labor Participation Rate Stuck At 62.6% A 38 Year Low, Unemployment Rate Declines To 5.1% –8 Million Unemployed — Fed Will Increase Federal Funds Target Rate to .5% In September — Three Years Late As Usual — Call It Clueless PHDs Lag — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 527: September 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 526: September 3, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 525: September 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 524: August 31, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 523: August 27, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 522: August 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 521: August 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 520: August 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 519: August 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 518: August 20, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 517: August 19, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 516: August 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 515: August 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 514: August 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 513: August 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 512: August 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 511: August 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 510: August 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 509: July 24, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 508: July 20, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 507: July 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 506: July 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 505: July 15, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 504: July 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 503: July 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 502: July 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 501: July 9, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 500: July 8, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 499: July 6, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 498: July 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 497: July 1, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 496: June 30, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 495: June 29, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 494: June 26, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 493: June 25, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 492: June 24, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 491: June 23, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 490: June 22, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 489: June 19, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 488: June 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 487: June 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 486; June 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 485: June 15, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 484: June 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 483: June 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 482; June 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 481: June 9, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 480: June 8, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 479: June 5, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 478: June 4, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 477: June 3, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 476: June 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 475: June 1, 2015

Story 1: 94 Million Americans Not In Labor Force, Labor Participation Rate Stuck At 62.6% A 38 Year Low, Unemployment Rate Declines To 5.1% –8 Million Unemployed — Fed Will Increase Federal Funds Target Rate to .5% In September — Three Years Late As Usual — Call It Clueless PHDs Lag — Videos

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Pin and Bubble

U.S. Stocks Suffer Heavy Losses After Mixed Jobs Report

August Jobs Report Provides Mixed Message

US Economy Riding 66 Month Job Growth Streak

What to Watch Friday: Labor Department Releases August Jobs Report

Peter Schiff: U.S. problems are ‘homegrown’, China is not the problem

Peter Schiff: The U.S. Dollar is very overvalued and the dollar is a bubble

No Fed Rate Hike Coming, They Never Intended To

[yotuube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F__CMQahfm4]

Fed Refuses to Acknowledge Data Has Been Awful All Year

September 4, 2015 Financial News – Business News – Stock Exchange – NYSE – Market News

Keiser Report: Rule 48 (E806)

Record 94,031,000 Americans Not in Labor Force; Participation Rate Stuck at 38-Year Low for 3rd Straight Month

By Susan Jones | September 4, 2015 | 8:54 AM EDT
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The labor force participation rate stayed stuck at 62.6 percent, a 38-year low, for a third straight month in August, the Labor Department reported on Friday. (AP File Photo)

(CNSNews.com) – A record 94,031,000 Americans were not in the American labor force last month — 261,000 more than July — and the labor force participation rate stayed stuck at 62.6 percent, a 38-year low, for a third straight month in August, the Labor Department reported on Friday, as the nation heads into the Labor Day weekend.

The number of Americans not in the labor force has continued to rise, partly because of retiring baby-boomers and fewer workers entering the workforce.

In August, according to BLS, the nation’s civilian noninstitutional population, consisting of all people 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution, reached 251,096,000. Of those, 157,065,000 participated in the labor force by either holding a job or actively seeking one.

The 157,065,000 who participated in the labor force equaled only 62.6 percent of the 251,096,000 civilian noninstitutional population — the same as it was in July and June. Not since October 1977, when the participation rate dropped to 62.4, has the percentage been this low.

Historical perspective

In January 1948 — the first year the data was recorded — 88.7 percent of men, aged 20 and older, were participating in the U.S. labor force. The rate first dipped below 80 percent in November 1975 (79.9%), spiraling steadily downward through August 2015, when 71.5 percent of men 20 and older were participating in the labor force.

It’s the opposite story for women 20 and older: In 1948, a time when one-earner incomes were generally sufficient to support the family, only 31 percent of  women participated in the workforce. In May 1966, the rate climbed above 40 percent for the first time; it broke 50 percent in October 1978; and 60 percent in July 1996.

When Barack Obama took office in January 2009, 60.9 percent of women were particiating in the labor force, but after rising somewhat in that economically turbulent year, the particpation rate for women started heading down. Last month, it stood at 58.2 percent.

Other notes from Friday’s jobs report:

— In August, the economy added 173,000 jobs, and the uemmployment rate dropped a tenth of a point to 5.1 percent from 5.2 percent. Job gains occurred in health care and social assistance and in financial activities. Manufacturing and mining lost jobs.

— Among the major demographic groups, the unemployment rate for whites declined to 4.4 percent in August. The rates for adult men (4.7 percent), adult women (4.7 percent), teenagers (16.9 percent), blacks (9.5 percent), Asians (3.5 percent), and Hispanics (6.6 percent) showed little change in August.

— The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) held at 2.2 million in August and accounted for 27.7 percent of the unemployed. Over the past 12 months, the number of long-term unemployed is down by 779,000.

— The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) ticked up in August to 6,483,000, 158,000 more than the 6,325,000 recorded in July. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

http://cnsnews.com/news/article/susan-jones/record-94031000-americans-not-labor-force-participation-rate-stuck-38-year

Unemployment rate plunge

Akin Oyedele

The US unemployment rate is at a seven-year low.

The economy added 173,000 jobs last month, fewer than expected, while the unemployment rate fell to 5.1% from 5.3%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

We also got some wage growth, with average hourly earnings rising 0.3% month-over-month and 2.5% year-on-year.

The number of job gains in July was revised up to 245,000 from 215,000.

As we outlined earlier, this report was expected to hugely influence market expectations for whether the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates at its meeting later this month. A strong report was seen to support other data we’ve recently received that show the economy is advancing at a steady pace — probably steady enough to warrant the first rate increase in a decade.

In a speech just before the jobs report, Richmond Fed president Jeffrey Lacker said the labor market supported the case for raising rates sooner rather than later. But this report was unlikely to “materially alter the labor market picture or, for that matter, the monetary policy outlook.”

Screen Shot 2015 09 04 at 10.35.44 AMBLS

Also, even though inflation is still off the Fed’s 2% target, wage growth was expected to boost confidence that it is on its way there.

Other secondary labor-market indicators had pointed to strong gains in August, including initial jobless claims, and the employment components of ISM manufacturing indexes.

And it turns out, history repeated itself. Deutsche Bank’s Joe Lavorgna had noted that job gains in August had missed consensus forecasts in 21 out of the past 27 years. He had forecast a payroll print of 170,000, below consensus and closer to the actual print.

By industry, employment in mining and manufacturing declined, while education and health services added the most jobs for any industry, at 62,000.

Stocks fell after the jobs report, and Dow futures lost more than 200 points.

Here’s what Wall Street was expecting, via Bloomberg:

  • Nonfarm payrolls: +217,000
  • Unemployment rate: 5.2%
  • Average hourly earnings, month-over-month: +0.2%
  • Average hourly earnings, year-over-year: +2.1%
  • Average weekly hours worked: 34.5

fredgraph

FREDAt 5.1%, the unemployment rate is at the lowest level since April 2008.

http://www.businessinsider.com/august-jobs-report-september-4-2015-9#ixzz3koMkR04q

August Jobs Report: Everything You Need to Know

Welcome to “Jobs Friday,” that ever-so-brief moment when the interests of Wall Street, Washington and Main Street are all aligned on one thing: jobs.

Friday’s report was even more significant than usual, since it’s the last one officials from the Federal Reserve will see before they meet later this month to debate a potential interest-rate hike. A rate increase, if and when it comes, would be the first for the U.S. since 2006.

When the numbers came in at 8:30 a.m. New York time, they potentially muddied the waters instead of providing clarity. The Bureau of Labor Statistics  said nonfarm payrolls rose a seasonally adjusted 173,000, well short of the 220,000 predicted by economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal. But the unemployment rate fell to 5.1% from 5.3%, and some of the other underlying numbers painted a rosier picture.

Here at MoneyBeat HQ, we crunched the data, tracked the markets and compiled the commentary in real time. Here’s how it all went down.

  • Good morning, folks. This is a big one. It’s the last jobs report before Federal Reserve officials sit down for their crucial Sept. 16-17 meeting to debate a potential rate hike—the first for the U.S. since 2006.

    The key question: Fed policy makers in July said they were looking for “some” further improvement in the labor market before raising rates. But how much improvement qualifies as “some?”

    Employers have added on average 211,000 jobs a month this year and the jobless rate has dropped 0.4 percentage point. Will that be enough to seal the deal? We won’t definitively know the answer today. But the economists, strategist and traders who plan to pour over every detail of this data dump are certainly going to try to guess.

    • 6:37 am
    • The debate won’t be settled

    Fed officials have been struggling to come to a common view on whether to raise short-term rates for the first time in nearly a decade at its September policy meeting. A strong report will strengthen the hand of officials arguing to raise rates in September; a weak report will strengthen the hands of officials who want to keep them near zero. Whether weak, strong or right down the middle, the numbers are going to leave some questions unanswered and doubts in the air.

    • 6:38 am
    • Economists on the fence

    In early August, 82% of economists in The Wall Street Journal’s monthly forecasting survey thought the Fed’s policy-setting committee would raise interest rates at its meeting Sept. 16 and 17. But financial-market turmoil over the past few weeks has altered those odds. Now, economists as a group are on the fence on whether the Fed moves—some say probably yes, others probably no, others give even chances.

    • 6:43 am
    • What this means for liftoff

    Market turbulence around the world the past two weeks has raised the bar for a September rate increase.

    As we wrote about in Friday’s Morning MoneyBeat, the Fed has long said strength in the labor market is key to its decision to raise rates. And for several months, economists have expected the August Nonfarm Payrolls report to provide the final go ahead for the central bank.

    But, amid market volatility and continued low inflation, the Fed has more to consider than just the jobs report.

    • 6:44 am
    • Ugly market mood greets jobs report

    Well, this is unusual. Most of these Jobs Friday days sees stock market idling ahead of the report. Not today. Futures are down sharply, taking their cues from Europe and Asia.

    U.K. stocks are down 1.6%, and every other major market is in the red, too. The CAC-40 and Dax are both off 2.1%. In Asia, Chinese marekts are still closed for the holiday, but everything else is down. The Nikkei is off 2.2%. The Kospi is down 1.5%, and India’s Sensex is down 2.2%.

    U.S. futures are down sharply. S&P 500 futures are down 18.5, and Dow futures are down 167.

    The yield on the U.S. 10-year Treasury note has fallen to 2.14%, and WTI crude is down 0.7% at $46.43.

    Does the market even care about the jobs report? Well, of course it does, and this one particularly. But the market is also caught in the vise grip of a global convulsion. The selloff has its own momentum, and it may wash right over this jobs report, no matter what the numbers say.

    • 6:48 am
    • The August report has fallen short of expectations in 21 of the last 27 years

    Ahead of the report, some economists have been warning that the first read has a history of falling short of expectations — only to get revised higher in the two subsequent months. The problem for the Fed is that it won’t see those revisions before its meeting later this month.

    As we detailed earlier this week, economists at Deutsche Bank found that the August report has fallen short of expectations in 21 of the last 27 years, missing by an average 61,000. The tendency for August figures to miss (or for economists to over-predict) has Deutsche Bank forecasting a net gain of 170,000 jobs for the month. That’s a fair amount less than the median estimate of 220,000 from economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal.

    Yet Wrightson ICAP found that August payrolls are the ones that get the biggest upward revisions. The final read that comes out two months later has been higher than the initial read in eight of the last nine Augusts – and by a not-insignificant amount of 66,000.

    • 6:50 am
    • The perfect number

    You have to figure there’s some kind of number that would hit an equilibrium spot in terms of trader sentiment. Something weak enough to get the market thinking the Fed’s going to hold off, but not so weak that you have to start worrying about a global economic meltdown.

    I’d reckon something around 150,000 might do it. Maybe a little higher.

    • 6:52 am
    • Jobs’ weight in Fed’s decision on rates

    The Fed has continuously said it will up interest rates when the data supports it. And it has placed more emphasis on the strength of the labor market versus other factors like inflation.

    But now, as markets have become more volatile since the Fed last met in July and since the last employment report was released at the beginning of August, Steven Englander, global head of G10 foreign exchange strategy at Citigroup Inc., thinks payrolls hold less weight in the Fed’s decision.

    “After the July FOMC, we thought that the Fed lift-off decision was 75% NFP [Nonfarm payrolls] and 25% everything else,” he said. “Now we would think that the September lift-off decision is 40% NFP and 60% everything else.”

    • 6:55 am
    • Watch the wage data

    Among the topics we flagged as worth watching when the report hits: wages.

    A continuing concern for the Fed has been the slow rise in wages despite the consistent increase in the number of jobs. The July jobs report found that the rise in hourly pay of nonsupervisory employees has been slowing. In July, earnings were 1.84% higher than a year ago, down from a 2% annual increase in earnings recorded in May. Friday’s report could hint at whether this slowdown is a momentary blip or a sign of something more lasting.

    • 6:56 am
    • People still on the sidelines

    In addition, many Americans who dropped out of the workforce in the aftermath of the recession have yet to make their way back. In July, 62.6% of those ages 16 and over were either working or looking for work, the lowest level since 1977. While some of that drop is due to the retirement of baby boomers, it’s clear many people are still sitting on the sidelines.

    • 6:57 am
    • Hawkish Lacker speech coming in ahead of the jobs report

    As if the market didn’t have enough to contend with, there is a Fed speech ahead of the jobs report, and we can already tell you it won’t be taking September off the table.

    Jeffrey Lacker, president of the Richmond Fed, is speaking at 8:10 a.m., in Richmond. He’s talking to the Retail Merchants Association. We haven’t seen the prepared remarks, but we don’t really need to. The title of the speech tells you everything you need to know: “The Case Against Further Delay.”

    Now, Lacker is one of the Fed’s most hawkish officials to begin with, so the angle isn’t unexpected. Still, those will not be comforting headlines for the bulls.

    • 7:03 am
    • Another thought on the “right” number

    Citi’s Steven Englander has also pondered the equilibrium number, and he pegs it a bit higher than I did: 175,000-200,000. “Strong enough to be regarded as firm by markets (post expected revision) but weak enough for them to delay liftoff.”

    He breaks it down further:

    … 175,000-200,000 – strong enough to be regarded as firm by markets (post expected revision) but weak enough maybe for them to delay liftoff- so USD falls in G3, but global asset markets maybe calmer.

    Worst number for EM – very strong +230,000 with upward revisions – Sept back in picture and CNY depreciation tensions increase – good for USD in G3 as well but that is not the story.

    Terrible number below 175,000 with downward revisions – certainly bad for USD within G3, but growth pessimism may take down all asset markets.

    Pretty good but not great – 200,000-230,000 with modest revision – would normally be good enough for Fed to move but now is not ‘normally’ — would be USD positive in G3 and EM – could see some divergence between US asset markets (ok) and EM (not so okay).

    Despite published consensus of 217,000, there is so much discussion of downward bias and upward revisions that above 200,000 should probably be considered upside surprise.

    I’d add only that a big factor in arriving at the “right” number is trying to figure out just how much growth the Fed will need to see to satisfy it. I personally think the bar is pretty low, which is why I came up with a lower number.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2015/09/04/august-jobs-report-everything-you-need-to-know/

    Employment Situation Summary

    Transmission of material in this release is embargoed until          USDL-15-1697
    8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, September 4, 2015
    
    Technical information:
     Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
     Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces
    
    Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov
    
    
                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- AUGUST 2015
    
    
    Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 173,000 in August, and the 
    unemployment rate edged down to 5.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics 
    reported today. Job gains occurred in health care and social assistance and in 
    financial activities. Manufacturing and mining lost jobs.
    
    Household Survey Data
    
    In August, the unemployment rate edged down to 5.1 percent, and the number of 
    unemployed persons edged down to 8.0 million. Over the year, the unemployment 
    rate and the number of unemployed persons were down by 1.0 percentage point 
    and 1.5 million, respectively. (See table A-1.) 
    
    Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for whites declined to 
    4.4 percent in August. The rates for adult men (4.7 percent), adult women
    (4.7 percent), teenagers (16.9 percent), blacks (9.5 percent), Asians
    (3.5 percent), and Hispanics (6.6 percent) showed little change in August.
    (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)
    
    The number of persons unemployed for less than 5 weeks decreased by 393,000 
    to 2.1 million in August. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless 
    for 27 weeks or more) held at 2.2 million in August and accounted for 27.7 
    percent of the unemployed. Over the past 12 months, the number of long-term 
    unemployed is down by 779,000. (See table A-12.)
    
    In August, the civilian labor force participation rate was 62.6 percent for 
    the third consecutive month. The employment-population ratio, at 59.4 percent, 
    was about unchanged in August and has shown little movement thus far this 
    year. (See table A-1.)
    
    The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes 
    referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed in August 
    at 6.5 million. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time 
    employment, were working part time because their hours had been cut back or 
    because they were unable to find a full-time job. (See table A-8.)
    
    In August, 1.8 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, 
    down by 329,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) 
    These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available 
    for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They 
    were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in 
    the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)
    
    Among the marginally attached, there were 624,000 discouraged workers in 
    August, down by 151,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally 
    adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work 
    because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.2 
    million persons marginally attached to the labor force in August had not 
    searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family 
    responsibilities. (See table A-16.)
    
    Establishment Survey Data
    
    Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 173,000 in August. Over the prior 
    12 months, employment growth had averaged 247,000 per month. In August, job 
    gains occurred in health care and social assistance and in financial 
    activities. Employment in manufacturing and mining declined. (See 
    table B-1.)
    
    Health care and social assistance added 56,000 jobs in August. Health care 
    employment increased by 41,000 over the month, with job growth occurring in 
    ambulatory health care services (+21,000) and hospitals (+16,000). Employment 
    rose by 16,000 in social assistance, which includes child day care services 
    and services for the elderly and disabled. Over the year, employment has 
    risen by 457,000 in health care and by 107,000 in social assistance.
    
    In August, financial activities employment increased by 19,000, with job 
    gains in real estate (+8,000) and in securities, commodity contracts, and 
    investments (+5,000). Over the year, employment in financial activities has 
    grown by 170,000. 
    
    Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up in 
    August (+33,000) and has increased by 641,000 over the year.
    
    Employment in food services and drinking places continued on an upward trend 
    in August (+26,000), in line with its average monthly gain of 31,000 over 
    the prior 12 months.
    
    Manufacturing employment decreased by 17,000 in August, after changing little 
    in July (+12,000). Job losses occurred in a number of component industries, 
    including fabricated metal products and food manufacturing (-7,000 each). 
    These losses more than offset gains in motor vehicles and parts (+6,000) and 
    in miscellaneous durable goods manufacturing (+4,000). Thus far this year, 
    overall employment in manufacturing has shown little net change.
    
    Employment in mining fell in August (-9,000), with losses concentrated in 
    support activities for mining (-7,000). Since reaching a peak in December 2014, 
    mining employment has declined by 90,000. 
    
    Employment in other major industries, including construction, wholesale 
    trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, and government, 
    showed little change over the month.
    
    The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up 
    by 0.1 hour to 34.6 hours in August. The manufacturing workweek was unchanged 
    at 40.8 hours, and factory overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.3 hours. The 
    average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private 
    nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 33.7 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)
    
    In August, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm 
    payrolls rose by 8 cents to $25.09, following a 6-cent gain in July. Hourly 
    earnings have risen by 2.2 percent over the year. Average hourly earnings 
    of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 5 
    cents to $21.07 in August. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)
    
    The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for June was revised from 
    +231,000 to +245,000, and the change for July was revised from +215,000 to 
    +245,000. With these revisions, employment gains in June and July combined 
    were 44,000 more than previously reported. Over the past 3 months, job 
    gains have averaged 221,000 per month.
    
    _____________
    The Employment Situation for September is scheduled to be released on 
    Friday, October 2, 2015, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).
    
    
    
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
       |                                                                            |
       |           2015 CES Preliminary Benchmark Revision to be released           |
       |                         on September 17, 2015                              |
       |                                                                            |
       | Each year, the Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey estimates are    |
       | benchmarked to comprehensive counts of employment from the Quarterly       |
       | Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) for the month of March. These counts |
       | are derived from state unemployment insurance (UI) tax records that nearly |
       | all employers are required to file. On September 17, 2015, at 10:00 a.m.   |
       | (EDT), the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) will release the preliminary   |
       | estimate of the upcoming annual benchmark revision to the establishment    |
       | survey employment series. This is the same day the First Quarter 2015 data |
       | from the QCEW will be issued. Preliminary benchmark revisions for all      |
       | major industry sectors, as well as total nonfarm and total private levels, |
       | will be available on the BLS website at                                    |
       | www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cesprelbmk.htm.                                     |
       |                                                                            |
       | The final benchmark revision will be issued with the publication of the    |
       | January 2016 Employment Situation news release in February.                |
       |                                                                            |
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    
    
    
    • Access to historical data for the “A” tables of the Employment Situation Release
    • Access to historical data for the “B” tables of the Employment Situation Release
    • HTML version of the entire news release

      Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

      HOUSEHOLD DATA
      Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

      [Numbers in thousands]
      Category Aug.
      2014
      June
      2015
      July
      2015
      Aug.
      2015
      Change from:
      July
      2015-
      Aug.
      2015

      Employment status

      Civilian noninstitutional population

      248,229 250,663 250,876 251,096 220

      Civilian labor force

      156,018 157,037 157,106 157,065 -41

      Participation rate

      62.9 62.6 62.6 62.6 0.0

      Employed

      146,451 148,739 148,840 149,036 196

      Employment-population ratio

      59.0 59.3 59.3 59.4 0.1

      Unemployed

      9,568 8,299 8,266 8,029 -237

      Unemployment rate

      6.1 5.3 5.3 5.1 -0.2

      Not in labor force

      92,210 93,626 93,770 94,031 261

      Unemployment rates

      Total, 16 years and over

      6.1 5.3 5.3 5.1 -0.2

      Adult men (20 years and over)

      5.7 4.8 4.8 4.7 -0.1

      Adult women (20 years and over)

      5.6 4.8 4.9 4.7 -0.2

      Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

      19.4 18.1 16.2 16.9 0.7

      White

      5.3 4.6 4.6 4.4 -0.2

      Black or African American

      11.6 9.5 9.1 9.5 0.4

      Asian

      4.6 3.8 4.0 3.5 -0.5

      Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

      7.4 6.6 6.8 6.6 -0.2

      Total, 25 years and over

      5.1 4.2 4.3 4.2 -0.1

      Less than a high school diploma

      9.1 8.2 8.3 7.7 -0.6

      High school graduates, no college

      6.2 5.4 5.5 5.5 0.0

      Some college or associate degree

      5.4 4.2 4.4 4.4 0.0

      Bachelor’s degree and higher

      3.2 2.5 2.6 2.5 -0.1

      Reason for unemployment

      Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

      4,813 4,088 4,143 4,070 -73

      Job leavers

      851 773 843 790 -53

      Reentrants

      2,845 2,516 2,447 2,349 -98

      New entrants

      1,064 933 826 850 24

      Duration of unemployment

      Less than 5 weeks

      2,609 2,355 2,488 2,095 -393

      5 to 14 weeks

      2,444 2,364 2,257 2,374 117

      15 to 26 weeks

      1,500 1,393 1,188 1,250 62

      27 weeks and over

      2,966 2,121 2,180 2,187 7

      Employed persons at work part time

      Part time for economic reasons

      7,223 6,505 6,325 6,483 158

      Slack work or business conditions

      4,217 3,915 3,828 3,841 13

      Could only find part-time work

      2,546 2,216 2,213 2,242 29

      Part time for noneconomic reasons

      19,538 20,480 19,891 19,760 -131

      Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

      Marginally attached to the labor force

      2,141 1,914 1,927 1,812

      Discouraged workers

      775 653 668 624

      – Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
      NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Aug.
2014
June
2015
July
2015(p)
Aug.
2015(p)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

213 245 245 173

Total private

209 218 224 140

Goods-producing

34 -3 13 -24

Mining and logging

3 -5 -6 -10

Construction

17 1 7 3

Manufacturing

14 1 12 -17

Durable goods(1)

16 1 -7 -5

Motor vehicles and parts

4.3 0.0 1.6 5.7

Nondurable goods

-2 0 19 -12

Private service-providing

175 221 211 164

Wholesale trade

4.7 3.1 6.4 7.8

Retail trade

-3.4 36.2 32.4 11.2

Transportation and warehousing

10.0 12.7 13.6 7.3

Utilities

2.2 0.0 2.6 1.5

Information

13 3 2 -7

Financial activities

13 21 21 19

Professional and business services(1)

56 68 39 33

Temporary help services

19.2 19.9 -9.2 10.7

Education and health services(1)

42 61 53 62

Health care and social assistance

35.9 56.9 45.4 56.4

Leisure and hospitality

25 19 30 33

Other services

12 -3 11 -4

Government

4 27 21 33

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

249 231 250 221

Total private

241 220 231 194

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.4 49.4 49.4 49.4

Total private women employees

47.9 48.0 48.0 48.0

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.7 82.5 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.5 34.5 34.5 34.6

Average hourly earnings

$24.55 $24.95 $25.01 $25.09

Average weekly earnings

$846.98 $860.78 $862.85 $868.11

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

101.3 103.4 103.6 104.0

Over-the-month percent change

0.1 0.2 0.2 0.4

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

118.7 123.2 123.7 124.6

Over-the-month percent change

0.5 0.2 0.4 0.7

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (263 industries)

65.8 57.2 60.5 56.3

Manufacturing (80 industries)

55.6 51.3 50.6 41.3

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(p) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2014 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

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