Archive for August, 2013

Launching World War 3 with The Missiles of September — Videos

Posted on August 28, 2013. Filed under: American History, Babies, Blogroll, Communications, Computers, Constitution, Crime, Drones, Economics, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Genocide, government spending, history, Islam, Islam, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Natural Gas, Oil, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Religion, Resources, Security, Shite, Strategy, Sunni, Talk Radio, Taxes, Technology, Terrorism, Unemployment, Video, War, Wealth, Weapons, Weapons of Mass Destruction, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Four $1.8 Billion Destroyers Circling Syria

Special Report Online: What Action Will US Take In Syria?

U.S. Navy Forces warships prepare for possible strike on Syria

World War 3 : Russia sends Warships off the coast of Syria as tension rises (Aug 29, 2013)

Tomahawk Cruise Missile

USS Stout Launches Tomahawk Missiles During Operation Odyssey Dawn HD

First Cruise Missles fired at Libya from USS Barry

Uploaded on Mar 20, 2011

Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Barry launches a Tomahawk missile in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn. This was one of approximately 110 cruise missiles fired from U.S. and British ships and submarines that targeted about 20 radar and anti-aircraft sites along Libya’s Mediterranean coast.

Launching World War 3 with the missiles of September?

By Raymond Thomas Pronk

TLAM_Launch

Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) launched from guided missile cruiser USS Cape St. George

Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

In poll after poll the vast majority of the American people have opposed United States intervention in the Syrian civil war by military action and the shipping of arms to the Syrian rebels opposed to the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad.

The Syrian civil war is essentially a religious-based civil war between an Islamic Sunni majority and an Islamic Shia minority that controls the Syrian government.

Sunni Muslims comprise about 60 percent of the population with the Syrian rebels being mostly Arab Sunni Muslims. The Syrian rebels are supported by the United States, Britain, France, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

Arab Shia Muslims (Alawite, Twelvers and Ismailis) comprise about 13 percent of the Syrian population. Hafez al-Assad ruled Syria from 1970-2000 and Bashar al-Assad since July 2000. The Assad family is Alawite and most members of the Syrian government are Arab Shia Muslims. The Assad government is supported by Russia, China, Iran and Hezbollah. The Iranian government is a Persian Shia theocracy of Twelvers that also support the Shia Hezbollah in Lebanon.

The civil war is more than two years old with over 100,000 killed, nearly two million Syrians fleeing to other countries including Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq and Egypt and several million displaced Syrians moving to other areas within Syria to avoid the violence, according to the United Nations Syrian Refugee Response online report.

“About 60 percent of Americans surveyed said the U.S. should not intervene in Syria’s civil war, while just 9 percent thought President Barack Obama should act,” according to a recent Reuter’s poll. The Reuters/Ipsos tracking poll, taken Aug. 21-26, found that 47.4 percent would oppose, 27.6 percent would support U.S. intervention in Syria, even if Assad’s forces used chemical weapons against civilians, while 25 percent do not know.

After more than a decade of U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO) military action and Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) covert action in the Libyan civil war to overthrow Muammar Gaddafi, the American people may have become war weary and opposed to further U.S. government intervention in the Middle East.

In the Libyan civil war the submarine USS Florida launched 100 cruise missiles to takeout Libyan air defenses. This opened a cleared corridor for airstrikes by NATO aircraft and the eventual overthrow of Gaddafi, according to John Barry in his Aug. 20, 2011 online story, “America’ Secret Libya War.”

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), in a foreign policy speech to the Veterans of Foreign Wars National Convention on July 22, said “The Assad regime is no friend to freedom or the United States. But this does not mean the enemy of our enemy is our friend. There are currently 17 different rebel groups in Syria, including the largest group, al-Nusra. Al-Nusra fighters are radical anti-American jihadists that are affiliated with al-Qaeda. Politicians in Washington, who are eager to send these weapons, promise they will not fall into the hands of our enemies. Do you believe that? Does anyone believe that?”

On Aug. 20, 2012 at the White House, Obama said, “We cannot have a situation where chemical or biological weapons are falling into the hands of the wrong people.  We have communicated in no uncertain terms with every player in the region, that that’s a red line for us, and that there would be enormous consequences if we start seeing movement on the chemical weapons front, or the use of chemical weapons. That would change my calculations significantly.”

On Aug. 26 Secretary of State John Kerry accused the Syrian government of crossing Obama’s red line when he said, “Let me be clear: The indiscriminate slaughter of civilians, the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. By any standard, it is inexcusable and despite the excuses and equivocations that some have manufactured, it is undeniable.”

Kerry pointed out in his statement, “the U.N. investigation will not determine who used these chemical weapons, only whether such weapons were used, a judgment that is already clear to the world.”

The question left unanswered is who actually used the chemical weapons, the Syrian government or the Syrian rebels? As of press time, the Obama administration has not provided concrete proof that the Syrian government ordered the use of chemical weapons.

Obama as much as admitted this in a CNN interview on Aug. 23 when he said, “If the U.S. goes in and attacks another country without a U.N. mandate and without clear evidence that can be presented, then there are questions in terms of whether international law supports it – do we have the coalition to make it work?”

Obama appears determined to order the U.S. navy to launch Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAM). Four destroyers, the USS Barry, the USS Mahan, the USS Ramage and the USS Gravely as well as several submarines armed with TLAMs are at press time in position off the coast of Syria, according to naval officials. These cruise missiles would most likely be used to destroy Syrian air defense, communications and command and control systems. After these have been taken out, cruise missiles and fighter and bomber aircraft could be used to destroy the Syrian air force aircraft and runways and the stockpile of chemical and biological weapons.

According to recent polling however, by Reuters and others, the American people, want no part of the Syrian civil war even if chemical weapons were used, no matter who used them.

The American people may be concerned that given the Syrian government’s allies, the launching of cruise missiles could lead to rapid military escalation and a war with Russia, China and Iran.

Article 1, Section 8, of the Constitution gives Congress the power to declare war, not the president. Congress is not scheduled to reconvene until Monday, Sept. 9 at 2 p.m.. By then an undeclared war may have begun with the launching of the missiles aimed at Syria.

Obama Warns Syria’s Assad Chemical Weapons A ‘RED Line’

Published on Aug 21, 2012

President Obama made a surprise appearance during Jay Carney’s White House briefing. Speaking to a packed press room, he raised a smile as he traded banter with them before launching into the serious issue of Syria and chemical weapons.
He confirmed that the US has said Assad needs to step down.
Obama then tackled the issue of humanitarian aid to Syrians, and those who are fleeing the country to escape the Assad regime ,severely straining the resources of nearby host countries.
And the President ended the briefing on a serious note, by saying that should the US and United Nations be aware of any chemical weapons then they would react accordingly to the threat.
On the same day that Obama made this statement in the US, the Russian Minister and Syrian ally, SERGEI LAVROV speaking at a news conference in Helsinki, said Moscow would not approve any political transition that was forced on Syria. Stating that only the United Nations Security Council alone, can authorise the use of force against Syria, and not just the US.
Written and presented by Ann Salter

Barack Obama lays down red line to Syria over chemical weapons

Published on Dec 4, 2012

President Obama warns “there will be consequences” if the regime of Bashar Al-Assad used chemical weapons amid reports Syrian military forces were readying supplies of deadly nerve gas.

President Barack Obama warned Syrian President Bashar al-Assad not to use chemical weapons against opposition forces, saying there would be consequences if he were to do so.

“The world is watching,” he said.

“The use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable,” Mr Obama said in remarks to a gathering of nuclear proliferation experts.

The President’s warning came as US officials claimed to have detected signs that Syrian forces were mixing the chemicals needed to produce sarin gas, a nerve agent banned under international rules of war.

Rand Paul Obama’s plan to arm Syrian rebels means siding with terrorists

Rand Paul slams Obama’s plans for Syria involvement

Rand Paul: I’m Not Sure I Want To Give Weapons To People Who Are Anti-Christian and Anti-Israel

[youtub e=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9uAJ96BLIM]

Rand Paul Blasts Stupid Senate for Wanting to Arm Syrian al-Qaeda Fighters

Rand Paul Destroys Hillary Clinton Over Benghazi-Gate During Capitol Hill Press Conference

John Kerry: Syria must be held accountable for chemical weapon attacks

Published on Aug 27, 2013

John Kerry: Syria must be held accountable for chemical weapon attacks.

The US secretary of state, John Kerry, has made a stern speech condemning the use of chemical weapons in Syria to carry out the ‘indiscriminate slaughter of civilians and the killing of women, children and innocent bystanders’. Kerry said it was a moral outrage and the president was assessing how to respond

John Kerry Syria Chemical Weapons FULL Speech. KERRY: SYRIA ATTACK ‘A MORAL OBSCENITY’

What Is the True Objective of a Strike on Syria?

Rand Paul: Syrian rebels have more incentive to use chemical weapons than Assad

Sen. Ted Cruz with Sean Hannity on Syria, Defunding Obamacare, and More

U.S. DESTROYER LAUNCHES TOMAHAWK CRUISE MISSILES!

Syria: Obama Joins Al-Qaeda…

Published on Mar 20, 2012

Tomahawk cruise missiles being launched towards Qadhafi regime forces as a part of JTF Odyssey Dawn.
USS Stout (DDG-55) is a part of Task Force Odyssey Dawn, the U.S.
Africa Command task force established to provide operational and tactical command and control of U.S.
military forces supporting the international response to the unrest in Libya and enforcement
of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973. UNSCR 1973 authorizes all necessary
measures to protect civilians in Libya under threat of attack by Qadhafi regime forces.
JTF Odyssey Dawn is commanded by U.S. Navy Admiral Samuel J. Locklear, III.
Odyssey Dawn, Libya11. Video by Spc. Neil Stanfield. 03.27.2011.

TOMAHAWK Block IV TLAM Test Launched from Submarine

watchout from below

Uploaded on May 31, 2007

first tomahawk launch off the new SSGN, USS Florida

Russia reportedly Supports Syria’s Assad Regime with Advanced ‘Ship Killer’ Missiles

Russia Builds Up Naval Presence Off Syria

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Who Wants World War 3 To Start in Syria? The Warmongers Obama and McCain — Not The American People! — Videos

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Who Wants World War 3 To Start in Syria? The Warmongers Obama and McCain — Not The American People! — Videos

Posted on August 26, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, Constitution, Coptic Christian, Crime, Diasters, Dirty Bomb, Energy, Federal Government, history, Islam, Islam, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, Narcissism, Oil, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Press, Psychology, Rants, Raves, Religion, Resources, Security, Shite, Sunni, Talk Radio, Technology, Terrorism, Video, War, Wealth, Weapons, Weapons of Mass Destruction, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

“In war, truth is the first casualty.”

~Aeschylus

It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world…”

~George Washington, 1st President of the United States, Farewell Address

“Peace, commerce and honest friendship with all nations — entangling alliances with none, I deem [one of] the essential principles of our government, and consequently [one of] those which ought to shape its administration.”

~Thomas Jefferson, 1st Inaugural Address, 1801.

“America does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy.”

~John Quincy Adams, 6th President of the United States (1825-29)

Obama Warns Syria’s Assad Chemical Weapons A ‘RED Line’

‘Poison Gas’ Claims in Syria Crossing Obama’s Red Line?

Syria Chemical attack claims reignites Obama’s ‘Red Line’ intervention in Syria Aug 21, 2013

Jon Stewart harnesses of Obama about the Red Line from Syria

 

Chemical Weapon Use In Syria – Special Report All Star Panel

 

‘US fixing intelligence around Syria as unsure who’s behind chemical attack’

Too Little Too Late UN Inspectors Allowed to Visit Syria

Did John Kerry Orchestrate The Chemical Weapons Attack in Syria?

Syrian Girl Clears The Air on Chemical Attack in Syria

 

UPDATE: False Flag! World War 3 is upon us! (Expect more false flags soon!)

WW3 UPDATE – West Hell Bent On War Despite Syria Opening “Chemical Attack” Site To Inspectors

World War 3 : Iran warns of War, threatens U.S. as Warships draw close to Syria (Aug 24, 2013)

URGENT: U.S Green Light For Attack On Syria and World War 3

US strengthens naval force off Syrian coast

Did Syria Use Chemical Weapons on Its People?

Chemical expert breaks down attack in Syria

GRAPHIC VIDEO: Poison Gas Attack In Syria

Syria : Chemical attack claims reignites Obama’s ‘Red Line’ intervention in Syria (Aug 21, 2013)

Ramp Up to Syrian Invasion Hits DEFCON 3

Syria: Obama Admin Tells Congress ‘We’ll Inform You What We Decide’ to Wage War

Toxic Warfare: Rebels caught with sarin gas amid Syria arms supply scandal

TOP SECRET – ( RED-ALERT-WW3) Russia,China, Iran Send 90000 Troops to Syria 12 Warships

Syria Polls Find Most Americans Are Wary Of Intervention

By JENNIFER AGIESTA 08/27/13

As the U.S. weighs a response to Syria, recent polling has shown Americans largely opposed to military action and few paying close attention to the ongoing conflict. But that could change with the Syrian government’s use of what the Obama administration says were chemical weapons.

No polling has been conducted on the public’s views of Syria since that government was accused of using chemical weapons. But the trend lines against military action have been clear:

_ Seventy percent told Pew Research Center pollsters in June that they opposed sending arms and military supplies to anti-government groups in Syria. That poll was conducted around the time the Obama administration announced it would be providing military aid to the anti-government forces.

_ An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released earlier in June showed that two-thirds of Americans preferred that the U.S. provide only humanitarian assistance or take no action, compared with just a quarter who favored either providing arms or taking military action.

_ A Gallup survey in May found 68 percent thought the U.S. should not intervene militarily to end the conflict should economic and diplomatic efforts to end it fail.

Even with that consensus, a Washington Post/ABC News poll in December suggested that the government’s use of chemical weapons against its own people could change public opinion. In that poll, just 17 percent thought the U.S. military should get involved in the conflict as it was at the time, but 63 percent said they would support military intervention if the Syrian government used chemical weapons against its people.

The Pew Research Center has tracked public attention to news about the conflict in Syria since May 2011, and has consistently found most Americans are tuned out. Each time they’ve asked, a majority said they were not following closely.

So far, few have said they think the U.S. has a responsibility to intervene in Syria. A June CBS News/New York Times poll found just 28 percent said the U.S. had a responsibility to do something about the fighting in Syria, while 61 percent said it did not.

While the fighting in Syria has stretched on and escalated, Americans’ views on the U.S. duty to act have changed little. Several news organizations have asked the same question about Syria, and a February 2012 CNN/ORC International poll was the first, finding just 25 percent thought the U.S. had a duty to act. That sense of responsibility peaked in May 2012 at 33 percent.

Since the end of the Cold War, Americans have felt an obligation to get involved in just a few conflicts that did not directly involve the U.S. – about half said the nation had a duty to intervene in Somalia in 1993 and Darfur in the mid-2000s, and most said the U.S. had a responsibility to act in Kosovo in 1999.

The pattern with Syria is similar to the public’s long-standing skepticism about U.S. involvement in the Bosnian war in the mid-1990s. CBS News and The New York Times tracked public opinion on the fighting between Serbs and Bosnians in the former Yugoslavia, and from 1993 through 1995, regardless of the intensity of the conflict, those who felt no responsibility to act outnumbered those who did.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/27/syria-poll_n_3822101.html

 

As Syria war escalates, Americans cool to U.S. intervention: Reuters/Ipsos poll

Americans strongly oppose U.S. intervention in Syria’s civil war and believe Washington should stay out of the conflict even if reports that Syria’s government used deadly chemicals to attack civilians are confirmed, a Reuters/Ipsos poll says.

About 60 percent of Americans surveyed said the United States should not intervene in Syria’s civil war, while just 9 percent thought President Barack Obama should act.

More Americans would back intervention if it is established that chemical weapons have been used, but even that support has dipped in recent days – just as Syria’s civil war has escalated and the images of hundreds of civilians allegedly killed by chemicals appeared on television screens and the Internet.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll, taken August 19-23, found that 25 percent of Americans would support U.S. intervention if Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s forces used chemicals to attack civilians, while 46 percent would oppose it. That represented a decline in backing for U.S. action since August 13, when Reuters/Ipsos tracking polls found that 30.2 percent of Americans supported intervention in Syria if chemicals had been used, while 41.6 percent did not.

Taken together, the polls suggest that so far, the growing crisis in Syria, and the emotionally wrenching pictures from an alleged chemical attack in a Damascus suburb this week, may actually be hardening many Americans’ resolve not to get involved in another conflict in the Middle East.

The results – and Reuters/Ipsos polling on the use-of-chemicals question since early June – suggest that if Obama decides to undertake military action against Assad’s regime, he will do so in the face of steady opposition from an American public wary after more than a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Some foreign and U.S. officials – notably Republican Senator John McCain, whom Obama defeated for the presidency in 2008 – have called Obama too hesitant in deciding whether to act in Syria. But several Americans surveyed in this week’s poll, including Charles Kohls, 68, a former U.S. military officer from Maryland, praised Obama’s caution.

“The United States has become too much of the world’s policeman and we have become involved in too many places that should be a United Nations realm, not ours,” Kohls said in an interview. “I don’t think we ought to” intervene in Syria.

Kohls said the possibility of a chemical attack did not alter his belief that the United States should stay out of Syria, or any war for that matter.

CROSSING THE ‘RED LINE’

Obama has called the suspected chemical attack near Damascus on Wednesday “an event of great concern” and directed U.S. intelligence agencies to investigate the allegations of chemical use as he weighs potential responses.

The president met with his national security advisers on Saturday but U.S. officials said he has not decided whether to intervene.

U.S. defense officials, meanwhile, have repositioned naval forces in the Mediterranean to give Obama the option for a missile strike on Assad’s regime, which has been backed by Russia and China.

Obama has been reluctant to intervene in the Syria war, where rebel forces opposed to Assad are made up of dozens of militant factions, some not friendly to the United States.

The president warned Syria’s government last year that any attempt to deploy or use chemical or biological weapons would cross a “red line.”

The White House said that Assad’s military appeared to cross such a threshold in June, and responded to reports of Syrian troops using chemical weapons by agreeing to offer military aid to vetted groups of Syrian rebels.

It does not appear that any U.S. weapons have been delivered to rebels so far. As the war has escalated, Obama’s administration has come under increasing pressure from various governments, including those in France and Israel, to respond more forcefully to what many have called an unfolding humanitarian and political crisis.

LIKE OBAMA, AMERICANS CAUTIOUS

However, Obama does not appear to be feeling much pressure over Syria from the American people.

In this week’s Reuters/Ipsos survey of 1,448 people, just 27 percent said they supported his decision to send arms to some Syrian rebels; 47 percent were opposed. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percentage points for each number.

About 11 percent said Obama should do more to intervene in Syria than sending arms to the rebels, while 89 percent said he should not help the rebels.

Obama is considering a range of options. The most popular option among Americans: not intervening in Syria at all. That option is backed by 37 percent of Americans, according to the poll.

Less popular options include air strikes to help the rebels (supported by 12 percent of Americans); imposing a “no-fly” zone over Syria that would ground Assad’s air force (11 percent); funding a multi-national invasion of Syria (9 percent), and invading Syria with U.S. troops (4 percent).

Deborah Powell, 58, of California, said she initially opposed any involvement by the United States but now supports arming the rebels.

“I was against any involvement after watching a (television) program that said if we give (rebels) the weapons they could turn them against us, but I think now we need to give them the weapons,” Powell said.

Asked what changed her mind, she said: “What’s going on over there is terrible.” However, Powell praised Obama’s wariness toward getting the United States involved in another war.

Some Americans believe the use of chemical weapons has changed the game in Syria, and that the United States should get involved as long as other countries did, too.

Jonathan Adams, 56, of California, said that he was “happy that we didn’t get involved from the start and I’m glad Obama was cautious. But I think we have gotten past the point of where we should’ve been involved in some way.”

He said reports of chemical weapons use “went way past the line.”

**To see the Reuters/Ipsos daily tracking poll on whether the U.S. should intervene in Syria if chemical weapons are used there, go to polling.reuters.com/#!response/TM43/type/day/dates/20130531-current

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/25/us-syria-crisis-usa-poll-idUSBRE97O00E20130825

 

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Not Tweeting– Twerking — Sure Beats Tweeting — Queen of The Twerk — Miley Cryrus — Tweeting With The Jackson Five — Jerk with New Boyz — Do The Jerk With The Larks and The Righteous Brothers — Do The Twist With Chubby Checker — Photos and Videos

Posted on August 26, 2013. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, College, Communications, Cult, Culture, Dance, Education, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Rants, Raves, Talk Radio, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Miley Cyrus “We Can’t Stop” Twerking Performance – MTV VMA 2013

Miley Cyrus: We Can’t Stop – Twerking

Miley Cyrus – We Can’t Stop

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Miley-Cyrus-Twerking

Miley-Decisions

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UrbanMediaKings_comTwerk

twerking

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twerking

Twerking

The rhythmic gyrating of the lower fleshy extremities in a lascivious manner with the intent to elicit sexual arousal or laughter in ones intended audience
Hey Girl, lets Twerk on the dance floor.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=twerk

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twerking_off

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Tweeting

For most of history, “tweet” has been the sound a bird makes.  However, with the advent of Twitter, the word “tweet” has taken on a whole new meaning.

A tweet is an online posting, or “micro-blog” created by a Twitter user.  The purpose of each tweet is to answer the question, “What are you doing?”  However, tweets can contain any information you want to post, such as your plans for the weekend, your thoughts about a TV show, or even notes from a lecture.  You can publish a tweet using a computer or a mobile phone.  Once published, the tweet will appear on the Twitter home pages of all the users that are following you.  Likewise, your Twitter home page will display the most recent tweets of the users that you are following.

Each tweet is limited to 140 characters or less.  This limit makes it possible to show several tweets on one page without certain tweets taking up a lot more space than others.  However, it also means that tweets must be brief, so you must choose your words wisely.  Of course, there is no limit to how many tweets you can post, so if you really have a lot to say, you can publish several tweets in a row.  After all, what better way to spend your time than to let the world know that you are at Starbucks, drinking a Frappuccino and reading the latest issue of TIME magazine.  That is important information to share with the world.

http://www.techterms.com/definition/tweet

Tweet

noun
1.

a weak chirping sound, as of a young or small bird.
2.

Digital Technology . a very short message posted on the Twitter Web site: the message may include text, keywords, mentions of specific users, links to Web sites, and links to images or videos on a Web site.
verb (used without object)

3.

to make a weak chirping sound.
4.

Digital Technology . to post a message on Twitter: She tweets a lot about movies.
verb (used with object)

5.

Digital Technology . to post (a message) on Twitter for (people) to read: He tweeted his fans after the event.

“The Twitter Song” – Rockin’ Robin Spoof – I’m tweeting

Rockin’ Robin (Original)

Rockin’ Robin [Lyrics]

The Jackson 5 – Rockin’ Robin 1972 RARE

The Muppet Show – Rockin’ Robin

keep-calm-and-twerk-on

Miley Cyrus Vs. Vanessa Hudgens Twerk Off

How to Twerk | Club Dance Moves

101 WAYS to TWERK!!!

Lady – Twerk (Prod. by WGMI/2Much)

You’re A Jerk * New Boyz * OFFICIAL HD Music Video Behind The Scenes w/ Skee.TV

I Could Do It Better (Jerk Music Video) by Young Avz and Silky from Montreal

Learn Hip Hop Dance: The Jerk

The Larks “The Jerk”

The Righteous Brothers – Come On Do The Jerk (Shindig 1964)

The Twist – Chubby Checker

Chubby Checker – The twist

Background Articles and Videos

DJ Jubilee “Jubilee All”

Chubby Checker – Pony Time

The Olympics The Hully Gully

The Roaring Twenties – Dancing The Shimmy

Belly Dance How to: Hip Shimmy Move – Belly Dancing – with Neon 

 

Gaga Who? Miley Cyrus Snatches Crown for Queen of Obscene at VMAs

With Lady Gaga set to open the MTV Video Music Awards, the audience braced themselves for a dose of patented Gaga shock treatment. For half a decade plus now, Gaga has served as the reliable producer of those jaw-dropping moments that dominate water cooler talk the next day.

And this year looked to be a return to form. Gaga, looking for a bit of a comeback after some time out of the spotlight, needed to hit the stage hard. Counting on her chatter-generating skills, MTV booked her Ladyship into the lead-off slot. On the red carpet before the show, Gaga was asked how she planned to stun the crowd. The expectations were high.

But after coming out standing in a milk carton, a few retrospective wig changes, smearing some paint on her face, the big moment? A quick spin to flash the singer’s teeny tiny thong.

Just when people began to relax after Gaga’s not-so-weird performance, the real sucker punch of the night came: when the girl who was still a practically a Disney princess while Gaga was rocking a meat dress – Miley Cyrus hit the stage.

Cyrus stepped up and assumed the throne for the strangest, most provocative performer at this year’s VMAs, fitting nicely into the crown for Queen of Obscene, funny hair horns and all.

The singer emerged  in a furry gray leotard with the face of a seemingly-intoxicated teddy bear to perform her single “We Can’t Stop.” Following the theme of her music video, she was backed up by a gaggle of dancers with the giant teddy bear backpacks, folks in teddy bear suits, and the World’s Tallest Burlesque Dancer, Amazon Ashley, who stands at 6’7”.

Living up to her reputation for shamelessly working it, she didn’t disappoint as she playfully bounced, popped and thrust through the song that had viewers in a trance.

Once Robin Thicke came out to perform what is probably the song of summer ’13, “Blurred Lines,” Cyrus shed the fun fur to reveal a very Gaga-esque nude vinyl bikini, not much unlike the latex getup Gaga wore at the 2011 Grammys. And she just kept twerking like she copyrighted the move.

“Miley better get a pregnancy test after all that twerkin’, ” joked comedian Kevin Hart during the show. The whole audience may need to as well. The 20-year-old left Gaga in the dust with her gratuitous show of both skin and gesturing this year, blowing up social media with images and commentary on her performance.

After Miley’s dance, we’ll never look at a foam finger the same way again. Prancing about the stage with the prop, the singer made every rude, crude gesture imaginable. Then she took it a step further and made Robin Thicke the victim of some very lewd pokes.

Ultimately, Miley Cyrus has made it clear over and over again that she is all grown up and raising the bar for sexiness and strangeness with every appearance. Could she be the next Lady Gaga? Where do you think she’ll go from here?

As Jay Z says in “Somewhereinamerica,” “Somewhere in America / Miley Cyrus is still twerkin’ / Twerk, twerk Miley, Miley.”

http://music.yahoo.com/blogs/stop-the-presses/gaga-who–miley-cyrus-snatches-crown-for-queen-of-obscene-at-vmas-014117285.html

Miley Cyrus

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Miley Ray Cyrus (born Destiny Hope Cyrus; November 23, 1992)[2][3] is an American actress and recording artist. The daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus, she held minor roles in the television series Doc and the film Big Fish in her childhood. In 2006, Cyrus rose to prominence as a teen idol after being cast in the Disney Channel television series Hannah Montana, in which she portrayed the starring character Miley Stewart. After signing a recording contract with Hollywood Records in 2007, she released Hannah Montana 2: Meet Miley Cyrus, which served as the series’ soundtrack and Cyrus’ debut studio album. It sold three million copies in the United States, and additionally produced the Billboard Hot 100 top-ten single “See You Again“. Later that year, her Best of Both Worlds Tour was adapted into the film Hannah Montana & Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds Concert.

Cyrus’ second album Breakout (2008) was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for sales exceeding one million copies. It also featured the successful tracks “7 Things” and “Fly on the Wall“. That same year, she launched her film career as the voice actress for Penny in the animated film Bolt. She earned a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song for her performance of its theme song, “I Thought I Lost You“. In 2009, Cyrus starred in the feature film Hannah Montana: The Movie, the soundtrack of which introduced her to country and adult contemporary markets. Its lead single, “The Climb“, remains among Cyrus’ most successful singles to date.

Cyrus began to cultivate an adult image and mainstream pop sound with her extended play The Time of Our Lives (2009). Peaking at number two on the Billboard Hot 100, its track “Party in the U.S.A.” became Cyrus’ highest-peaking single on the chart thus far. Her increasingly maturing image progressed with the release of the film The Last Song and her third album, Can’t Be Tamed in 2010. The latter project featured more prominent dance elements than her earlier releases, and was promoted through sexually-themed performances. In 2011, Cyrus was featured as a teenage rebellion in the drama film LOL, though its limited release failed to make back its budget. She also appeared in the direct-to-video film So Undercover. In 2013, Cyrus signed a recording contract with RCA Records, and announced plans to release her fourth album, Bangerz, later that year. Its lead single, “We Can’t Stop“, was noted for developing an increasingly provocative image, particularly through its accompanying music video.

Since her debut, Cyrus has become one of the most successful artists to originate from Disney. Cyrus ranked number thirteen on Forbes‘ 2010 Celebrity 100.[4] For the 2011 Guinness World Records, she was named the “Most Charted Teenager” following her 29th US Billboard Hot 100 chart entry on November 7, 2009 with “Party in the USA”.[5] She has attained a total of six Top 10 hits on the Billboard Hot 100, and had four RIAA certified albums by the age of 18.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miley_Cyrus

Twerking

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Twerking is a dance move that involves a person shaking the hips in an up-and-down bouncing motion, causing the dancer to shake, “wobble” and “jiggle.”[1] To “twerk” means to “dance in a sexually suggestive fashion by twisting the hips.”[2]

Etymology

The word “twerking” is of uncertain origin. Possibilities include:

  1. a contraction of “footwork“, or[1]
  2. a portmanteau of twist and jerk.[1]

Ties have been made to many traditional African dances.[3] An example of such traditional dances is Mapouka.

In popular culture

Twerking was introduced into hip-hop culture by way of the New Orleans bounce music scene. In 1993, DJ Jubilee recorded the dance tune “Do The Jubilee All” in which he chanted, “Twerk baby, twerk baby, twerk, twerk, twerk.” The video for the song increased the popularity of twerking. In 1995 New Orleans-based rapper Cheeky Blakk recorded the song “Twerk Something!” a call-and-response dance song dedicated to twerking. In 1997 DJ Jubilee recorded “Get Ready, Ready” in which he encouraged listeners to “Twerk it!”.

A great amount of credit for the expansion of twerking outside of New Orleans can be given to strip clubs in Houston and Atlanta. Twerking was receiving recognition in national releases at least as early as the year 2000, when the Atlanta-based Ying Yang Twins released their debut single “Whistle While You Twurk,” which received national airplay peaking at #17 on the Hip Hop Chart and was further referenced in their 2002 follow-up release, “Say I Yi Yi,” which prominently features the lyrics “She got her hands up on her knees and her elbows on her thighs, she like to twerk and that’s for certain I can tell that she fly.” In 2011 The Twerk Team was mentioned in the song “Round of Applause” by Atlanta-based rapper Waka Flocka Flame featuring Drake, including the line, “Bounce that ass, shake that ass like the Twerk Team”.[3] Bandz A Make Her Dance rapper Juicy J has a lyric, “Start twerking when she hear her song”,[4] while French Montana questions the ability of a girl to twerk by asking, “What you twerkin’ with” in his song “Pop That” featuring Drake, Lil Wayne, and Rick Ross.[5] The song, along with “Express Yourself” by Nicky Da B & Diplo, “Made twerking the most popular dance move since the Dougie“.[6]

In 2013, 33 students from Scripps Ranch High School were suspended for using school equipment to make a twerking video on school grounds that was later uploaded to YouTube.[7][8]

References

  1. ^ a b c Levy, Megan (14 December 2012). “Do you know how to twerk? (Or even what it is?)”. The Age. Retrieved 20 December 2012.
  2. ^ Ivett, Alex (13 December 2012). “Aussie’s most googled 2012: Lara Bingle, reality TV and “how to love””. Australian Times. Retrieved 20 December 2012.
  3. ^ a b Morgan, Glennisha. “Could ‘Twerking’ Possibly Be a New Way to Stay Fit?”. Frugivore Magazine. Retrieved April 12, 2013.
  4. ^ “Juicy J – Bands A Make Her Dance (Remix 2) Lyrics”. RapGenius. Retrieved 20 December 2012.
  5. ^ “French Montana – Pop That Lyrics”. RapGenius. Retrieved 20 December 2012.
  6. ^ Weiss, Jeff (28 December 2012). “2012: The Year We All Got Ratchet”. MTV Hive. Retrieved 8 January 2013.
  7. ^ “San Diego high school students suspended over sexually suggestive ‘twerking’ dance video”. NY Daily News. 2013-05-02. Retrieved 2013-06-25.
  8. ^ Butler, Bethonie (2013-05-06). “Twerking: What is it, and why did it get high school students suspended? – Washington Post”. Articles.washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2013-06-25.

External links

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twerking

Miley Cyrus – We Can’t Stop

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Muslim Brotherhood Massive Attack on Coptic Christians in Egypt — Silence From President Obama Who Supports Muslim Brotherhood — Muslim Ethnic Cleansing of Coptic Christians — Videos

Posted on August 23, 2013. Filed under: American History, Art, Blogroll, Catholic Church, Communications, Coptic Christian, Crime, European History, Foreign Policy, Genocide, government spending, history, Islam, Islam, Language, Law, liberty, Life, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Religion | Tags: , , , , , |

EGYPT-POLITICS-UNREST-CHRISTIAN

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Australian collegiate baseball player, Christopher Lane Murdered By Two Black Teenagers Out of Boredom Using Stolen Weapons In Senseless Thrill Killing — Photos and Videos

Posted on August 21, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Crime, Culture, Diasters, Education, Entertainment, history, Homicide, Law, liberty, Life, Links, People, Philosophy, Photos, Press, Raves, Resources, Security, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Christopher Lane

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James Edwards, 15, charged with first-degree murder.

Chancey Allen Luna

Chancey Luna, 16, charged with first-degree murder.

Michael_Jones_age_17

Michael Jones, 17, charged with being an accessory to the killing.

James-edwards-chauncey-luna-michael-jones-christopher-lane-pics

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Melbourn)’I love you so much’ Girlfriend Sarah Harper’s tribute to slain baseballer Christopher Lane

THE girlfriend of slain Melbourne baseball star Chris Lane has posted an emotional tribute, describing their time together as “the most amazing years of my life”.

Sarah Harper, who was with Lane for four years, added to a raft of tributes for the 23-year-old after he was killed in a random drive-by shooting in Oklahoma.

“The past 4 years have been the most amazing years of my life and that’s all because of you babe,” she wrote on Facebook today.

“I love you so much babe. From 2009 until forever you will always be mine and in a very special and protected place in my heart.”

Ms Harper also posted a photo of a flower memorial erected by locals in the town of Duncan on the corner where he was tragically shot.

It comes after a 16-year-old boy confessed to pulling the trigger and killing Lane, according to police chief Danny Ford.

Chief Ford said the 16-year-old was with two other teens aged 15 and 17 when they killed Lane during a random drive-by shooting in the town of Duncan.
He said the three teenagers had no motive other than to make a name for themselves.

All three are facing the charge of first-degree murder, which carries a maximum sentence of the death penalty.

Chief Ford told 3AW this morning one of the accused has confessed to pulling the trigger, saying he just wanted to kill someone.

“Lately there has been some pretty weak motives, but I don’t know that I’ve had one that they told us they were just going to kill somebody,” he said.

He said the three teens were on a “killing spree” after , leaving a chilling message on Facebook.

Peter Lane said his son had left his mark and his death was just so pointless.
“There’s not going to be any good come out of this because it was just so senseless,” Mr Lane told reporters in Melbourne this morning.

“There wasn’t anything he did or could have done.

“He was an athlete going for a jog, like he would do five or six days a week in terms of his training schedule.

“It’s happened. It’s wrong and we just try and deal with it the best we can.”

Flowers and a baseball were placed on the home plate at Essendon Baseball Club this morning with a message that summed up the senseless shooting. “A wonderful young man taken too soon,” it read. “Why?”

As family and friends grappled with the unthinkable tragedy, the 22-year-old’s parents paid tribute to their boy at the field where his love for the sport began.
Peter Lane said he could not have been more proud of a remarkable young man.

“He did all the things a kid should have done,” Mr Lane said. “He caused us some grief but he caused us so much joy. He achieved a lot for a 22-year-old.

“He gave up a lot to follow his dream. He gave up 18th birthday parties to be at the Victorian Institute of Sport at 8am the next morning, ready to go.

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DUNCAN, Okla. — With the simplest of motives — breaking up the boredom of an Oklahoma summer — three teenagers followed an Australian collegiate baseball player who was attending school in the U.S. and killed him with a shot to the back for “the fun of it,” police say.

As authorities prepared to charge the teens with first-degree murder Tuesday, family and friends on two continents mourned Christopher Lane, who gave up pursuit of an Australian football career to pursue his passion for baseball, an American pastime. His girlfriend tearfully laid a cross at a streetside memorial in Duncan, while half a world away, an impromptu memorial grew at the home plate he protected as a catcher on his youth team.

“We just thought we’d leave it,” Sarah Harper said as she visited the memorial on Duncan’s north, well-to-do side. “This is his final spot.”

Flowers, photos and an Australian flag already adorned the roadside in a tribute to the 22-year-old.

“I don’t know anybody who’s left this. It means a lot,” Harper said.

Lane played at East Central University in Ada, 85 miles east of Duncan, and had been visiting Harper and her parents after he and his girlfriend returned to the U.S. from Australia about a week ago.

Police Chief Dan Ford said Lane appeared to have been chosen at random, saying in a variety of media interviews since Friday’s killing that a 17-year-old suspect told officers that he and other boys ages 15 and 16 were bored and that they followed Lane and killed him for “the fun of it.”

A former deputy prime minister in Australia called for a tourism boycott of the United States while Lane’s former clubs sought ways to honor their former teammate.

His old team, Essendon, scheduled a memorial game for Sunday to raise funds for Lane’s parents as they worked to have their boy’s remains sent home. The club said it would deliver notes of condolences sent to its headquarters.

At Essendon Catholic School, Lane will be remembered at a November Mass in which all former students who have died are mourned and celebrated, former school captain David Ireland told The Age newspaper in Melbourne.

“He was the sort of guy at school who everyone knew and knew quite well,” Ireland said of Lane. “He loved his footy (Australian football) and his sport and spent a lot of time with mates.”

Lane had attended St. Bernard’s college, where the principal at the time, Frank Fitzgerald, criticized the violence in Lane’s death.

“I think the rest of the countries around the world just look at that country and shake their head,” FitzGerald told The Age. He said Lane could have had a promising career in his country’s football league “but he already had indicated that baseball was what he would concentrate on.”

Melbourne’s Herald Sun newspaper reported that roses and a baseball were placed Monday on the home plate where Lane played as a youth with the message, “A wonderful young man taken too soon. Why?”

Former deputy prime minister Tim Fischer asked Australians to avoid the U.S. as a way to force its Congress to act on gun control.

“Tourists thinking of going to the USA should think twice,” Fischer told the Herald Sun. “This is the bitter harvest and legacy of the policies of the NRA that even blocked background checks for people buying guns at gunshows. People should take this into account before going to the United States. I am deeply angry about this because of the callous attitude of the three teenagers (but) it’s a sign of the proliferation of guns on the ground in the USA. There is a gun for almost every American.”

Tara Harper, Sarah Harper’s cousin, said her family was working with the Lanes on funeral arrangements.

Lane’s girlfriend had no intention of attending the suspects’ court appearance.

“She wants nothing to do with them. She doesn’t want to see them. She doesn’t want to hear them. She won’t be there. She won’t be there,” Tara Harper said. “I don’t think we’ll ever know why it happened. No answer will ever be satisfying, no matter what it is.”

Police say three bored teens killed an Australian collegiate baseball player

3 teens charged in ‘random’ killing of baseball player Christopher Lane

DUNCAN, Okla. – With a motive that’s both chilling and simple — to break up the boredom of an Oklahoma summer — three teenagers randomly targeted an Australian collegiate baseball player who was attending school in the U.S. and killed him for fun, prosecutors said Tuesday as they charged two of the boys with murder.

Prosecutor Jason Hicks called the boys “thugs” as he described how Christopher Lane, 22, of Melbourne, was shot once in the back and died along a tree-lined road on Duncan’s well-to-do north side. He said the three teens, from the grittier part of town, chose Lane at random and that one of the boys “thinks it’s all a joke.”

Hicks charged Chancey Allen Luna, 16, and James Francis Edwards Jr., 15, of Duncan, with first-degree murder. Under Oklahoma law they will be tried as adults. Michael Dewayne Jones, 17, of Duncan, was charged with using a vehicle in the discharge of a weapon and with accessory to first-degree murder after the fact. He is considered a youthful offender but will be tried in adult court.

Jones wept in the courtroom after he tried to speak about the incident but was cut off by the judge who said it wasn’t the time to sort out the facts of the case. Jones faces anywhere from two years to life in prison if convicted on the counts he faces.

The two younger teens face life in prison without parole if convicted on the murder charge.

“I’m appalled,” Hicks said after the hearing. “This is not supposed to happen in this community.”

In court, Hicks said Luna was sitting in the back seat of a car when he pulled the trigger on a .22 caliber revolver and shot Lane once in the back. Hicks said Jones was driving the vehicle and Edwards was in the passenger seat.

A recording of an emergency 911 call obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press offers a chilling account of the next moments as a woman identifying herself as Joyce Smith tells the operator she saw Lane fall over into a ditch as she drove by.

“He’s got blood on his back,” the woman says.

Later relaying word from another witness on the scene to the 911 operator, the woman says: “He’s turning blue. He’s making a noise.”

Edwards has had prior run-ins with the law and came to court Friday — apparently after the shooting — to sign documents related to his juvenile probation.

“I believe this man is a threat to the community and should not be let out,” Hicks said as he requested he be held without bail. “He thinks it’s all a joke.”

The two younger boys were held without bail, while bail for Jones was set at $1 million.

Before the hearing, Edwards’ father, James Edwards Sr., said he knew where his son was 95 percent of the time. He said his son was involved in wrestling and football, and was trying to forge the same sort of athletic career as Lane. He was heading into his sophomore year in high school.

Edwards Sr. said Luna was also like a son to him.

Luna’s mother, Jennifer Luna, said her son likes to play basketball at a local court and play on his iPhone and Xbox.

“I know my son. He is a good kid,” she said.

Lane played baseball at East Central University in Ada, 85 miles east of Duncan, and had been visiting his girlfriend and her parents in Duncan after he and his girlfriend returned to the U.S. from Australia about a week ago.

Duncan police Chief Dan Ford has said the boys wanted to overcome a boring end to their summer vacation — classes in Duncan resumed Tuesday — and that Jones told officers they were bored and killed Lane for “the fun of it.”

Family and friends on two continents were mourning Lane, who gave up pursuit of an Australian football career to pursue his passion for baseball, an American pastime. His girlfriend, Sarah Harper, tearfully laid a cross at a streetside memorial in Duncan, while half a world away, an impromptu memorial grew at the home plate he protected as a catcher on his youth team.

“We just thought we’d leave it,” Harper said as she visited the memorial in Duncan. “This is his final spot.”

His old baseball team, Essendon, scheduled a memorial game for Sunday to raise funds for Lane’s parents as they worked to have their boy’s remains sent home.

Tony Cornish, president of the Essendon Baseball Club, said Lane played with the club for 12 years.

“He started out as a T-baller, right from the age of 7, ” said Cornish.

Cornish said Lane was part of the club until he left to attend college in the U.S.

“Chris Lane was a good kid, just a great all-around guy,” Cornish said. “We’re still all in shock here.”

Meanwhile, St. Bernard’s College in Essendon, where Lane was a student, is planning a memorial Mass for Lane in November.

Melbourne’s Herald Sun newspaper reported that roses and a baseball were placed Monday on the home plate where Lane played as a youth with the message: “A wonderful young man taken too soon. Why?”

Tim Fischer, former Australia deputy prime minister, criticized the National Rifle Association and asked Australians to avoid the U.S. as a way to put pressure on its Congress to act on gun control.

“Tourists thinking of going to the USA should think twice,” Fischer told the Herald Sun. “I am deeply angry about this because of the callous attitude of the three teenagers, (but) it’s a sign of the proliferation of guns on the ground in the USA. There is a gun for almost every American.”

http://www.newsday.com/news/nation/3-teens-charged-in-random-killing-of-baseball-player-christopher-lane-1.5930352

These Are the Three Teens Charged in the Murder of Student Chris Lane ‘For the Fun of It’ (UPDATED)

Authorities formally charged three teenagers Tuesday afternoon for mercilessly gunning down Australian student Chris Lane Friday night “for the fun of it.”

James Edwards, 15, and Chancey Luna, 16, were reportedly charged with first degree murder and face life in prison if convicted. They are being held without bond.

Michael Jones, 17, was reportedly charged with using a vehicle to facilitate the discharge of a weapon and accessory after the fact of murder in the first degree. He reportedly said in court “I pulled the trigger” but the judge told him to remain silent. The boy cried and his bond was set at $1 million.

The three teens will be tried as adults, the Herald Sun reports.

A social networking page appearing to belong to Edwards reveals a video of Edwards brandishing a gun as well as multiple photos showing piles of cash he claims belong to him.

“B***h we up dem poles, f**k with me,” James can be heard saying in a newly surfaced Vine video, while brandishing a gun. The New York Post and Daily Mail both report this is authentic video of James.

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/08/20/these-are-the-three-teens-arrested-and-suspected-of-murdering-student-chris-lane-for-the-fun-of-it/

Chilling 911 call details final moments of Melbourne baseballer Chris Lane’s life

THE harrowing last seconds of murdered Melbourne man Chris Lane’s life has been recorded on a 911 emergency call.

The seven-minute call, released by the District Attorney’s office in Duncan, Oklahoma, begins with local Joyce Smith telling the operator she was driving her Toyota Corolla and spotted a bloodied man at the side of the road.

“There’s a young man,” Ms Smith tells the operator.

“He’s just fell over in a ditch and he’s got blood on him.”

It is 2.57pm on Friday.

Authorities allege Lane, a 22-year-old baseball player who had a scholarship with a Oklahoma college and was visiting his US girlfriend in Duncan, was jogging along Country Club Road when he was shot in the back in a random drive-by shooting.

Ms Smith, unaware Lane has been shot, has no idea what has happened to him.

“I’m afraid to go over to him,” Ms Smith tells the operator.

“I don’t know him.”

Ms Smith tells the operator Mr Lane was standing at the side of the road, but then fell over in a ditch.

“I’m kind of scared to go over by myself,” Ms Smith tells the operator.

At 1:42 into the call, Richard Rhodes, a building contractor who was working on a house in front of where Mr Lane was shot, on the corner of Country Club Rd and Twilight Beach Rd, came out to investigate.

“The man that has come around the corner off Twilight Beach said, ‘He has been shot. Tell them to hurry’,” Ms Smith, panic in her voice, relays to the operator.

“He said, ‘He heard the shot and he knows what the car looks like’.”

Mr Rhodes will become key to the arrest of the three boys who are accused of the drive-by shooting – James Edwards, 15, Chancey Luna, 16, and Michael Jones, 17.

Mr Rhodes said he was working on the house, heard what sounded like a bullet being fired, looked down the street and saw a black car with a white sticker on the windshield.

Edwards, Luna and Jones were arrested four hours later in a black 2003 Ford Focus with a white sticker on the windshield.

At 2:45 into the 911 call, Mr Rhodes has some alarming news that Ms Smith relays to the operator.

“He’s turning blue,” Ms Smith says.

Mr Lane is struggling to breath.

Mr Rhodes said he believed the bullet went through Lane’s back and punctured his lungs.

At 3:19 into the call, the operator alerts authorities.

“We have a male who said he has been shot and is bleeding in the back,” the operator can be heard saying.

At 3:37 she informs Ms Smith help is on the way.

“OK. We have an ambulance and a PD (police) on the way,” the operator says.

At 3:54 the operator asks: “Is he breathing? Is he conscious? Is he talking to you?”

Ms Smith asks Mr Rhodes and the reply is Lane is not conscious and is “barely breathing”.

There’s extra panic in Ms Smith’s voice.

About 20 seconds later Ms Smith relays some promising news from Mr Rhodes: “He just took a breath.”

At 4:26 an urgent Ms Smith complains to the operator she can’t hear any sirens and at 5:53 she again raises her concerns.

“I hear no sirens. I see no lights. Oh my gosh how long is it going to be?” Ms Smith says.

At 6:06 Ms Smith says: “I finally see some lights coming.”

At 6:20 Ms Smith says an unidentified female passerby was performing CPR on Lane, however the woman delivers an ominous warning.

The ambulance is yet to arrive.

“If you don’t hurry, he’s gone,” Ms Smith, relaying the message, tells the operator.

“Ma’am. They’re coming OK. I can’t make them come any faster,” the operator replies.

At 6:47 Ms Smith says: “Finally I see them coming up the street.”

The operator asks if Lane has stopped breathing.

Mr Rhodes can be heard in the background saying: “Yes.”

“Yes, yes they said he has,” an emotional Ms Smith confirms.

At 7:06 the ambulance pulls up at the scene.

“Stop right here fella,” Ms Smith can be heard telling them.

Lane was taken to Duncan Regional Hospital where exactly 50 minutes after Ms Smith called 911, doctors pronounced the young Australian, who had so much life to live, dead.

Luna, the alleged shooter of a .22 calibre revolver, and Edwards, an alleged passenger in the Focus, were charged with first-degree murder and face life in prison without parole if convicted.

Jones, the alleged driver, was charged with using a vehicle to facilitate the discharge of a weapon and accessory after the fact of murder in the first degree.

He faces a maximum 45-year sentence.

The accused teenagers were dobbed in by a local who claims his son was the trio’s next target.

James Johnson, 52, called the police to tell them that the accused killers were hiding in the car park of the Immauel Baptist Church car park at about 5pm, two hours after they allegedly shot Lane.

“My son called me and said, “They’re saying they’re coming to kill me,” so I called the police and they got here within about three minutes,” Johnson told the Herald Sun.

Mr Johnson claimed that Edwards Jr had threatened the life of his own 17-year-old son Christopher on Facebook. His son was at home with his mother and sisters near the church when he received the death threat.

“They threatened to kill my son because they are in a gang, the Crips, and were trying to get my son in it and I wouldn’t let him do it.

“I told him he couldn’t run with those boys. He’s a little terrified.”

Mr Johnson said the Crips, a predominantly African American street gang that began in Los Angeles in 1969 and had been in Duncan for the past few years.

He said the group consisted of teenagers who he called “wannabes.”

“I’ve been living here all my life and we never had this, but in the past few years gangs from Lawton have been coming here,” Johnson said of the Crips.

Johnson’s son also attends Duncan High School, where suspect Luna and Edwards Jr. were students. He said he knew both boys, and described them as “troublemakers” and “bullies” who had “no parental supervision.”

“I’m just glad they found the other gun, because they haven’t found the murder weapon yet,” said Johnson.

Meanwhile, the US government says it is “deeply saddened” by the drive-by shooting murder.

“The United States is deeply saddened to hear the tragic news of the death of an Australian citizen in Oklahoma,” Ms Harf said.

“This is clearly a tragic death, and we extend our condolences to the family and the loved ones. We understand that local authorities are focused on bringing those responsible to justice. Clearly, we would support that.”

The State Department’s comments came after former deputy prime minister Tim Fischer urged Australian tourists to stay away from America to protest the need for stricter gun controls in the US.

Prosecutors have promised that the “thugs” charged over the brutal murder “will pay”.

District Attorney Jason Hicks said outside the first court hearing in the Oklahoma town of Duncan that he was “going to do everything I can to ensure these three thugs pay for what they did to Christopher Lane”.

“To those friends of ours in Australia, we would say to you this is not Duncan, Oklahoma,” Mr Hicks said.

“This is not Stephens County, Oklahoma.”

Stephens County Courthouse heard how one of the boys accused of murdering Lane, 22, danced and laughed as he was taken into a police station to be charged after the killing on Friday.

James Edwards, 15, was treating the murder as a joke, Mr Hicks told the hearing.

Mr Hicks told the court that Edwards has previously been in contact with police, and that he had “an attitude of total disregard for law enforcement” when he was being charged over Lane’s death.

“He thinks it’s funny, and it’s all a joke,” Mr Hicks said.

“I believe he is a threat to the community.”

Mr Hicks said Edwards kept a probation appointment for another matter at the courthouse just minutes after Lane was killed.

“He was cold, callous and that was the demeanour that we saw throughout the course of the investigation,” Mr Hicks said.

Edwards and Chancey Luna, 16, are charged with first-degree murder and face life in prison if convicted.

Mr Hicks said that Luna had refused to co-operate with police.

They were both refused bail.

Michael Jones, 17, was charged with using a vehicle to facilitate the discharge of a weapon and accessory after the fact of murder in the first degree.

Bail for Jones, who is assisting prosecutors and police, was set at $US1 million ($A1.1 million).

The three will be tried as adults.

They were dressed in orange prison jumpsuits and had their legs shackled during the brief appearance.

The court was told that the three boys spotted Lane jogging along a road in an upper-class area of Duncan on Friday.

They got into a car driven by Jones, drove behind Lane and then Luna shot him with .22 calibre revolver in the back, the court was told.

“The information we have was this was the person who pulled the trigger,” the prosecutor said of Luna.

Edwards and Luna did not show any emotion, but Jones broke down in tears after Mr Hicks said he was looking at a “very, very lengthy prison sentence”.

“I didn’t pull the trigger,” Jones said.

The courtroom was packed and divided.

In the front row sat about 20 family and friends of Sarah Harper, Lane’s longtime American girlfriend. Ms Harper, 23, was not in court.

Cindy Harper told the Herald Sun her daughter was at home “trying to relax”.

Another Harper family member said “this is surreal” as they were taken out a side door of the court building by sheriffs.

A few rows behind was a distraught Jennifer Luna, coming to grips with a nightmare 12 months that saw the death of her husband in a motorcycle accident and now the prospect her son could spend the rest of his life in prison.

On the right hand side of the courtroom was James Edwards Sr, refusing to believe his son was a killer.

“Yes, I do,” Mr Edwards replied outside court when asked if he believed his son, who hoped to be an Olympic wrestler, was innocent.

In the back left area of the court was Jones’s parents and supporters, including his pregnant girlfriend.

She sobbed in her seat, eventually leaving the court before Jones came in.

Edwards and Luna did not appear to be fazed during their court appearance.

Even when Ms Luna stood up in court to answer an administrative question from Judge Jerry Herberger, her son didn’t acknowledge her.

Edwards didn’t look for family members.

Asked if she had a message for the Lane family outside court, Ms Luna told the Herald Sun: “I feel sorry for them, my heart goes out to them, it really does, but that’s my baby too.

“My boy was a baby too.”

Luna said there were no guns at her house, and her son was at home playing X-Box with her soon-to-be stepson when she came home from work last Friday after finishing at 3pm.

It comes a day after Duncan Police Chief Danny Ford said he had secured the confession of Jones who had summoned investigators to his jail cell and claimed they were bored “so they decided to kill somebody”.

Chief Ford said the teens had no motive other than to ”make a name for themselves”.

Lane was staying with Ms Harper in Duncan before going back to Oklahoma’s East Central University where he majored in finance and was the catcher on the team’s baseball team.

Ms Harper yesterday revealed her heartbreak at losing her “best friend”, and parents of the accused protested their innocence.

She also told the Herald Sun that she didn’t know what punishment would be appropriate for the three teens.

Lane, who grew up in Oak Park in Melbourne’s north, had only been back in the US for three days after an eight-week break in Australia with Ms Harper.

“I don’t want them to have any future that Chris wasn’t able to have as well,” Ms Harper said of the accused yesterday.

“It’s been pretty rough. It’s been hard knowing he was taken so close to home, let alone taken in the way he was. To be pointed out like that …”

Ms Harper said she and Lane had joked about America’s soft gun laws before he was shot.

“He wasn’t a fan of guns,” she said.

She fondly described Lane as a smart, kind and curious guy who would “do anything for anybody”.

Ms Harper, also a talented sportswoman, said she and Lane just “meshed together” within weeks of meeting at college in Oklahoma in August 2009.

“It was more of a personality (we had in common), not so much interests. He was intellectual, into world news, and I found that quite boring,” she said.

“He really wanted to travel more. He loved the idea of seeing the world.”

Ms Harper said she would come back to Australia to farewell Lane with his family.

“I’m probably going to go back and say goodbye with the people he loved the most,” she said.

“It was a great time getting back there and seeing him in his element with all his favourite friends.

“It’s going to be hard going back but it’s something I need to do.

“Thank you to everyone who supported and loved Chris. I really appreciated it.”

– with Stephen Drill Andy Burns and AAP

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/chilling-911-call-details-final-moments-of-melbourne-baseballer-chris-lane8217s-life/story-fni0fiyv-1226700172461

Background Articles and Videos

Bloods & Crips – Why We Bang (Documentary)

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Top 30 Gangsta Rap Songs

Crips

The Crips are a primarily, but not exclusively, African-American gang. They were founded in Los Angeles, California, in 1969 mainly by Raymond Washington and Stanley Williams. What was once a single alliance between two autonomous gangs is now a loosely connected network of individual sets, often engaged in open warfare with one another.

The Crips are one of the largest and most violent associations of street gangs in the United States,[1] with an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 members. The gang is known to be involved in murders, robberies, and drug dealing, among many other criminal pursuits. The gang is known for its gang members’ use of the color blue in their clothing. However, this practice has waned due to police crackdowns on gang members.

Crips are publicly known to have an intense and bitter rivalry with the Bloods. Crips have been documented in the U.S. military, found in bases in the United States and abroad

History

Stanley Tookie Williams met Raymond Lee Washington in 1969, and the two decided to unite their local gang members from the west and east sides of South Central Los Angeles in order to battle neighboring street gangs. Most of the members were 17 years old.[9] Williams discounted the sometimes cited founding date of 1969 in his memoir, Blue Rage, Black Redemption.[9] Gang activity in South Central Los Angeles has its roots in a variety of factors dating back to the 1950s and ’60s, including post-World War II economic decline leading to joblessness and poverty, racial segregation leading to the formation of black “street clubs” by young African American men who were excluded from organizations such as the Boy Scouts, and the waning of black nationalist organizations such as the Black Panther Party and the Black Power Movement.[10][11][12][13]

Etymology

The original name for the alliance was “Cribs,” a name narrowed down from a list of many options, and chosen unanimously from three final choices, which included the Black Overlords, and the Assassins. Cribs was chosen to reflect the young age of the majority of the gang members. The name “Cribs” evolved into the name “Crips” when gang members began carrying around canes to display their “pimp” status. People in the neighborhood then began calling them cripples, or “Crips” for short.[14] A Los Angeles Sentinel article in February 1972 referred to some members as “Crips” (for cripples).[1] The name had no political, organizational, cryptic, or acronymic meaning, though some have suggested it stands for Common Revolution In Progress, a backronym. Williams, in his memoir, further refuted claims that the group was a spin-off of the Black Panther Party or formed for a community agenda, the name “depicted a fighting alliance against street gangs—nothing more, nothing less.”[9] Washington, who attended Fremont High School, was the leader of the East Side Crips, and Williams, who attended Washington High School, led the West Side Crips.

Crip showing a gang signal.

Williams recalled that a blue bandana was first worn by Crips founding member Buddha, as a part of his color-coordinated clothing of blue Levi’s, a blue shirt, and dark blue suspenders. A blue bandana was worn in tribute to Buddha after he was shot and killed on February 23, 1973, which eventually became the color of blue associated with Crips.[9]

Chain of Command

Initially Crips leaders did not occupy leadership positions, but were recognized as leaders because of their personal charisma and influence. These leaders gave priority to expanding the gang’s membership to increase its power. By 1978, there were 45 Crips gangs, called sets, operating in Los Angeles. The gang became increasingly violent as they attempted to expand their turf.

Funding

By the early 1980s the gang was heavily involved with drug trade.[15] Some of these Crips sets began to produce and distribute PCP (phencyclidine) within the city. They also began to distribute marijuana and amphetamine in Los Angeles. In the early 1980s Crips sets began distributing crack cocaine in Los Angeles. The huge profits resulting from crack cocaine distribution induced many Crips members to establish new markets in other cities and states. In addition, many young men in other states adopted the Crips name and lifestyle. As a result of these two factors, Crips membership increased throughout the 1980s, making it one of the largest street gang associations in the country.[1] In 1999, there were at least 600 Crips sets with more than 30,000 members transporting drugs in the United States.[1]

Membership

Crips has over 800 sets with 30,000 to 35,000 members and associate members, including more than 13,000 members in Los Angeles. The states with the highest estimated number of Crips sets are California, Florida and Illinois . Members typically consist of young African-American men, with some members being white, Hispanic and Asian.[1]

Crip on Crip rivalries

The Crips became popular throughout southern Los Angeles as more youth gangs joined; at one point they outnumbered non-Crip gangs by 3 to 1, sparking disputes with non-Crip gangs, including the L.A. Brims, Athens Park Boys, the Bishops, The Drill Company, and the Denver Lanes. By 1971 the gang’s notoriety had spread across Los Angeles.

By 1971, a gang on Piru Street in Compton, California, known as the Piru Street Boys, was formed and associated themselves with the Crips as a set. After two years of peace, a feud began between the Piru Street Boys and the other Crip sets. It would later turn violent as gang warfare ensued between former allies. This battle continued and by 1973, the Piru Street Boys wanted to end the violence and called a meeting with other gangs that were targeted by the Crips. After a long discussion, the Pirus broke all connections to the Crips and started an organization that would later be called the Bloods,[16] a street gang infamous for its rivalry with the Crips.

Since then, other conflicts and feuds were started between many of the remaining sets of the Crips gang. It is a popular misconception that Crips sets feud only with Bloods. In reality, they fight each other—for example, the Rollin’ 60s and 83rd Street Gangster Crips have been rivals since 1979. In Watts, Los Angeles, the Grape Street Watts Crips and the P Jay Crips have feuded so much that the P Jay Crips even teamed up with the local Bloods set, the Bounty Hunter Bloods, to fight against the Grape Street Crips.[17]

Practices

Crip graffiti tag in Olympia, Washington.

Some practices of Crip gang life generally include rapping, graffiti and substitutions and deletions of particular letters of the alphabet. The letter “b” in the word “blood” will be “disrespected” among certain sets and written with a cross inside it because of its association with the enemy. The letters “CK”, which stand for “Crip killer”, will be avoided and substituted with a double “cc”, and the letter “b” will be replaced. The words “kick back” will instead be written as “kicc bkacc”. Many other letters are also altered due to symbolic associations.[18] Crips traditionally refer to each other as “Cuzz”, which itself is sometimes used as a moniker for Crip. “Crab” is the most disrespectful epithet to call a Crip, and can warrant fatal retaliation.[19] Crips in prison modules during the 1970s and 80s would speak in Kiswahili to maintain privacy among guards and rival gangs.[20]

Sets

Like the Bloods, the Crips are made up of gang sets.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j U.S. Department of Justice, Crips.
  2. ^ a b c “Los Angeles-based Gangs — Bloods and Crips”. Florida Department of Corrections. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  3. ^ “Crips”. Gang Prevention Services. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  4. ^ “Black Gangster Disciples”. Gang Prevention Services. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  5. ^ http://info.publicintelligence.net/NGIC-Juggalos.pdf
  6. ^ Gold, Scott (2009-09-18). “A gang feud’s fallout”. The Los Angeles Times.
  7. ^ Audi, Tamara (2011-06-08). “Latino Gang Targeted Blacks, U.S. Says – WSJ.com”. Online.wsj.com. Retrieved 2013-03-15.
  8. ^ “Gangs Increasing in Military, FBI Says”. Military.com. McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. 2008-06-30. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  9. ^ a b c d Williams, Stanley Tookie; Smiley, Tavis (2007). Blue Rage, Black Redemption. Simon & Schuster. pp. xvii–xix, 91–92, 136. ISBN 1-4165-4449-6.
  10. ^ Washington was murdered August 9, 1979 and Williams was executed December 13, 2005. Stacy Peralta (Director) (2009). Crips and Bloods: Made in America (TV-Documentary). PBS Independent Lens series. Retrieved 2009-05-15. Unknown parameter |producer= ignored (help); Unknown parameter |executive producer= ignored (help)
  11. ^ “Timeline: South Central Los Angeles”. PBS (part of the “Crips and Bloods: Made in America” TV documentary). 2009-04-21. Retrieved 2009-05-15.
  12. ^ Sharkey, Betsy (2009-02-06). “Review: ‘Crips and Bloods: Made in America'”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-05-16.
  13. ^ Cle Sloan (Director) (2009). Keith Salmon, ed. Bastards of the Party (TV-Documentary). HBO. Retrieved 2009-05-15. Unknown parameter |producer= ignored (help); Unknown parameter |executive producer= ignored (help)
  14. ^ “Los Angeles”. Inside. National Geographic Channel. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  15. ^ Crip History
  16. ^ Capozzoli, Thomas and McVey, R. Steve (1999). Kids Killing Kids: Managing Violence and Gangs in Schools. St. Lucie Press, Boca Raton, Florida, p. 72. ISBN 1-57444-283-X.
  17. ^ “War and Peace in Watts” (2005-07-14). LA Weekly. Retrieved 2007-05-04.
  18. ^ Smith, Debra; Whitmore, Kathryn F. (2006). Literacy and Advocacy in Adolescent Family, Gang, School, and Juvenile Court Communities. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN 0-8058-5599-8.
  19. ^ Simpson, Colton (2005). Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.’s Most Notorious Gang. St. Martin’s Press. p. 280. ISBN 978-0-312-32930-3.
  20. ^ Simpson, Colton (2005). Inside the Crips: Life Inside L.A.’s Most Notorious Gang. St. Martin’s Press. pp. 122–124. ISBN 978-0-312-32930-3.

References

  • Leon Bing (1991). Do or Die: America’s Most Notorious Gangs Speak for Themselves. Sagebrush. ISBN 0-8335-8499-5
  • Yusuf Jah, Sister Shah’keyah, Ice-T, UPRISING : Crips and Bloods Tell the Story of America’s Youth In The Crossfire, ISBN 0-684-80460-3
  • Capozzoli, Thomas og McVey, R. Steve (1999). Kids Killing Kids: Managing Violence and Gangs in Schools. St. Lucie Press, Boca Raton, Florida, side. 72 ISBN 1-57444-283-X
  • National Drug Intelligence Center (2002). Drugs and Crime: Gang Profile: Crips (PDF). U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved 2009-06-21. Product no. 2002-M0465-001.
  • Shakur, Sanyika (1993). Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member, Atlantic Monthly Pr, ISBN 0-87113-535-3
  • Colton Simpson, Ann Pearlman, Ice-T (Foreword) (2005). Inside the Crips : Life Inside L.A.’s Most Notorious Gang (HB) ISBN 0-312-32929-6
  • Smith, Debra; Whitmore, Kathryn F. (2006). Literacy and Advocacy in Adolescent Family, Gang, School, and Juvenile Court Communities. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN 0-8058-5599-8.
  • Stanley Tookie Williams (2005). Blue Rage, Black Redemption: A Memoir (PB) ISBN 0-9753584-0-5

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Crips

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crips

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Obama’s Siding With Muslim Brotherhood Not Popular in Egypt or in The United States — Videos

Posted on August 19, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, Demographics, Diasters, Economics, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, history, Islam, Islam, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Resources, Security, Shite, Sunni, Talk Radio, Terrorism, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

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Egyptian Democratic Coalition Responds to Obama

Friday, 16 Aug 2013

The National Salvation Front, a coalition of pro-democratic and secular parties in Egypt, set out its objections to remarks made by President Barack Obama Thursday on the escalating violence in Egypt.

Led by Ahmed Said of the Free Egyptians Party, the group issued the following letter:

“Like most Egyptians, we listened with attention to your statement on Egypt’s latest developments. As representatives of the non-Islamic political forces in Egypt, we believe in the same fundamental values on which the U.S. was founded. Be we also have 7,000 years of civilization and history that give us a special identity that we are fighting to keep since the Muslim Brotherhood came to power.

“Let us first inform you about who the Muslim brothers are: They’re an unlawful organization operating outside the realm of Egyptian law, receiving foreign funding and laundering money in a flagrant breech of international law. Their aim is to rule the world through a so-called Islamic Caliphate as they believe in their absolute supremacy.

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“They pretend they are God’s emissaries and they will not rest until they have forced the whole world into submission. For them, Egypt is the launching pad to achieve their fascist dream. Their international reach spans the globe and they command the hearts and minds of many unsuspecting politicians. They have used deceit, soft speeches, international funds and whenever required, violence,  to impose their will.

“The rule of (deposed President Mohammed) Morsi showed how in less than a year they abused the people, reneged on their promises and overturned the rule of law by issuing constitutional diktats monopolizing the judiciary as well as the legislative arms of the state. This was enough to impeach any president in a democratic nation. Unfortunately, Egyptians couldn’t refer to their Supreme Sourt as it was besieged by thugs for over 60 days back in November of 2012.

“So finally, Egyptians took to the streets and this century’s second Egyptian ‘peaceful unarmed’ revolution took place in June 2013 to recall the president and reject the rule of the Brotherhood. Egyptians deposed their president not because he was not inclusive, as you so kindly represented, but because he broke his constitutional oath and became another dictator reminiscent of the previous dictator this same great people of Egypt removed in January 2011. This was the will of the people that the West is now trying to bend pretending they are doing so in the name of democracy with no intention of interfering in Egyptian affairs!

“Now, I would like to address a few points in your address:

“Despite the perception, well-intentioned or ill-intentioned, history will tell of a Western media consistently portraying only one side — the Islamist’s. We have to let you know some facts and some truth.

“Since July 3, 2013, the day deposed President Morsi was ousted by popular demand of millions of Egyptians, the Western media and prominent emissaries from the U.S. and Europe have consistently described the sit-ins that paralyzed a large part of Cairo as ‘peaceful demonstrations.’ They chose to ignore what was happening across Egypt from torching churches and killing randomly and destroying private and public properties.

“Mr. President, peaceful demonstrators do not have the capacity to kill more than 50 police personnel in just a few hours.

“Peaceful demonstrators do not attack a police station with RPG and kill the police chief and his deputies, strip them of their clothes and drag their naked bodies down the street.

“Peaceful demonstrators do not threaten Christians with genocide as many of the Muslim Brotherhood declared in hate speeches from the sit-in stage. Peaceful demonstrators do not raise the black flags of al-Qaida while marching with pictures of bin Laden and al Zawahri on their chests.

“While the Western media was focusing yesterday on the clearing of the sit-ins, more than 45 attacks were made on Christian installations across Egypt, resulting in the torching of 19 churches and cathedrals, some built in the 6th Century.

“The list goes on, but your intelligence reports will enlighten you, we are sure. The attached video here will also give you an idea.

“Mr. President, it is important that you see reality, especially that the great American people have themselves suffered from the darkness of Islamists and unfortunately thousands of great Americans died from their terror.

“The Muslim Brotherhood and their jihadist allies have never known and will never know peace. It might be useful to remind you that these same people had a three-week sit-in that started on the next dawn after election day and lasted almost two weeks to declare that they will burn Egypt if their candidate is not declared the winner.

“Mr. President, we are on the side of freedom, we are on the side of human rights. We are on the side of justice for all. We also hurt to see mothers mourn their children and children mourn their parents. Have you seen, Mr. President, the video clip of the Muslim Brotherhood supporter throwing 14-year-old children off the roof of a six-floor building? One mother died of sorrow when she saw the video clip of her son thrown off the building. She did not have time to mourn.

“Today Mr. President, you chose to consider one side of the picture and to punish the Egyptians by cancelling Operation Bright Star. Well Mr. President, Operation Bright Star means nothing to most Egyptians, but it is the misunderstanding and misleading of the American people that we care most about. Egyptians have always stood by the American people when attacked by terrorists because we are freedom lovers and individual liberty champions like the American people. The only difference is that we have always been deprived of these great principles and rights.

“Is it too much for Egyptians today to have the support of the American people during our own war on terror? How can the same group be named terrorists in the U.S.A. and peaceful demonstrators in Egypt?

“How can these be the ones the U.S.A. will never negotiate with while the U.S. government demands that Egyptians not only negotiate with them but also partner with them in the building of modern Egypt?

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“Mr. President, the interest of peace in the region is served best by truly peace-loving people and democratic values.

“Finally, Mr. President, we hope that this letter will get your attention for, after all, we are now representing the majority. Our present government represents us, the secular, civil and liberal political forces. We hope that you will find it of value to probe more and investigate more and ask more. When you do, we are ready to come to you in a small delegation and discuss and explain more. We are sure that you will realize that, after all, Egyptians are indeed a great people deserving a great future.”

http://www.newsmax.com/Headline/Ahmed-Said-Obama-Egypt/2013/08/16/id/520880?s=al&promo_code=14907-1

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Muslim Brotherhood in America — Videos

Posted on August 19, 2013. Filed under: American History, Babies, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Crime, Cult, Economics, Federal Government, Foreign Policy, Genocide, government spending, history, Islam, Islam, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Religion, Resources, Shite, Strategy, Sunni, Talk Radio, Terrorism, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

7-Muslim-Brotherhood-Murfre (1)

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 1: The Threat Doctrine of Shariah & the Muslim Brotherhood

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 2: ‘Civilization Jihad’ in America

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 3: Influence Operations Against Conservatives & the GOP

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 4: Suhail Khan, A Case Study in Influence Operations

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 5: The Organizations Islamists Are Using to Subvert the Right

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 6: Electing Islamist Republicans

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 7: Advancing the Islamists’ Agendas

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 8: Team Obama & the Islamists

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 9: Team Obama & the Islamist Agenda

Muslim Brotherhood in America, Part 10: What’s To Be Done?

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NSA Diverts, Collects, Stores, Searches, Queries, Intercepts, Monitors, Reads, Listens, Analyzes, Reports, Targets and Spies On All The World’s 7 Billion People Plus Information Including 314 Million American Citizens –Massive Invasion of American People’s Privacy and Violation of 4th Amendment Right To Privacy Under U.S. Constitution — Violation of Law and Betrayal of Oaths of Office — The Tyranny of the Secret Security Surveillance State (S4) — Videos

Posted on August 17, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, College, Communications, Constitution, Data Storage, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, European History, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Press, Programming, Psychology, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Strategy, Tax Policy, Taxes, Technology, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

NSA

NSA Data Center, Bluffdale, Utah

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NSA_breaches

NSA broke privacy rules thousands of times per year, audit finds

By Barton Gellman,        

The National Security Agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since Congress granted the agency broad new powers in 2008, according to an internal audit and other top-secret documents.

Most of the infractions involve unauthorized surveillance of Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the United States, both of which are restricted by statute and executive order. They range from significant violations of law to typographical errors that resulted in unintended interception of U.S. e-mails and telephone calls.

The documents, provided earlier this summer to The Washington Post by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, include a level of detail and analysis that is not routinely shared with Congress or the special court that oversees surveillance. In one of the documents, agency personnel are instructed to remove details and substitute more generic language in reports to the Justice Department and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

In one instance, the NSA decided that it need not report the unintended surveillance of Americans. A notable example in 2008 was the interception of a “large number” of calls placed from Washington when a programming error confused the U.S. area code 202 for 20, the international dialing code for Egypt, according to a “quality assurance” review that was not distributed to the NSA’s oversight staff.

In another case, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which has authority over some NSA operations, did not learn about a new collection method until it had been in operation for many months. The court ruled it unconstitutional.

[FISA judge: Ability to police U.S. spying program is limited]

The Obama administration has provided almost no public information about the NSA’s compliance record. In June, after promising to explain the NSA’s record in “as transparent a way as we possibly can,” Deputy Attorney General James Cole described extensive safeguards and oversight that keep the agency in check. “Every now and then, there may be a mistake,” Cole said in congressional testimony.

The NSA audit obtained by The Post, dated May 2012, counted 2,776 incidents in the preceding 12 months of unauthorized collection, storage, access to or distribution of legally protected communications. Most were unintended. Many involved failures of due diligence or violations of standard operating procedure. The most serious incidents included a violation of a court order and unauthorized use of data about more than 3,000 Americans and green-card holders.

In a statement in response to questions for this article, the NSA said it attempts to identify problems “at the earliest possible moment, implement mitigation measures wherever possible, and drive the numbers down.” The government was made aware of The Post’s intention to publish the documents that accompany this article online.

“We’re a human-run agency operating in a complex environment with a number of different regulatory regimes, so at times we find ourselves on the wrong side of the line,” a senior NSA official said in an interview, speaking with White House permission on the condition of anonymity.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/nsa-broke-privacy-rules-thousands-of-times-per-year-audit-finds/2013/08/15/3310e554-05ca-11e3-a07f-49ddc7417125_story.html

NSA report on privacy violations in the first quarter of 2012

This is the full executive summary, with names redacted by The Post, of a classified internal report on breaches of NSA privacy rules and legal restrictions.

The report covers the period from January through March 2012 and includes comparative data for the full preceding year. Its author is director of oversight and compliance for the NSA’s Signals Intelligence Directorate, but the scope of the report is narrower. Incidents are counted only if they took place within “NSA-Washington,” a term encompassing the Ft. Meade headquarters and nearby facilities. The NSA declined to provide comparable figures for its operations as a whole. A senior intelligence official said only that if all offices and directorates were included, the number of violations would “not double.”

http://apps.washingtonpost.com/g/page/national/nsa-report-on-privacy-violations-in-the-first-quarter-of-2012/395/

Reporter reveals thousands of NSA abuses

NSA Scandal – Americans “Shut Up & Obey” – RPT NSA Broke Rules Thousands Of Times!

Ron Paul / Glenn Greenwald Interview

Snowden Leak Reveals NSA Broke Its Own Rules THOUSANDS OF TIMES

Internal NSA Audit  Privacy Rules Broken Thousands of Times

NSA audit confirms abuse despite Obama’s claim

Report: NSA Spying Broke Privacy Rules Many Times – Edwards Snowden Documents Reveal

Edward Snowden NSA Reform Analysis

EVERYTHING You Do Online Is Recorded In XKeyscore The Young Turks with Cenk Uygur

XKeyscore  A New Level of Invasive NSA Data Spying

‘Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?’

Glenn Greenwald   There Are Extremely Invasive Spying Programs the Public Still Does Not Know About

What you’re not being told about Booz Allen Hamilton and Edward Snowden

Justin Amash  No Precedent In History For NSA Spying

Can American’s Change the Agenda of Extreme Spying?

FOX NEWS: NSA Tracking Of American People

“NSA Spying Now Protected From Any Challenges Under The Fourth Amendment”

Rand Paul on NSA Spying   ‘An Utter, Frank Hypocrisy’   But will he do anything about it

Background Articles and Videos

NSA Whistle-blower Reveals “Stellar Wind” Spying on You – code named The Program

NSA Whistleblower: ‘Everyone In U.S. Under Virtual Surveillance’

NSA Collects ‘Word for Word’ Every Domestic Communication

NSA Whistleblowers:  “All U.S.Citizens” Targeted By Surveillance Program, Not Just Verizon Customers

“Obama Is BIG BROTHER And He’s A LIAR!”

NSA Spying is Far Worse Than You Thought

UNBELIEVABE  NSA, FBI Secretly Mines Data from Major Internet Companies Google, Yahoo

NSA Spying on All Americans Part 1

NSA spying on All Americans Part 2

James Bamford: Inside the NSA’s Largest  Secret Domestic Spy Center

NSA Whistleblower Speaks Live: “The Government Is Lying To You” Part 2

NSA Whistleblower Speaks Live: “The Government Is Lying To You” Part 3

NSA Whistleblower Speaks Live: “The Government Is Lying To You” Part 4

NSA whistleblower William Binney Keynote at HOPE Number Nine

NSA Whistleblower Thomas Drake speaks at National Press Club – March 15, 2013

The Reality

Enemies of the State [29C3]

The Movie

ENEMY OF THE STATE… (1998) MUST WATCH..TAKE SERIOUSLY..

NSA and the One Trillion Dollar scam [Empire]

Nova: The Spy Factory Full Video

Inside NSA – The National Security Agency – Documentary

Inside The NSA~Americas Cyber Secrets

Why Shouldn’t I Work for the NSA?  (Good Will Hunting)

The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center (Watch What You Say)

The spring air in the small, sand-dusted town has a soft haze to it, and clumps of green-gray sagebrush rustle in the breeze. Bluffdale sits in a bowl-shaped valley in the shadow of Utah’s Wasatch Range to the east and the Oquirrh Mountains to the west. It’s the heart of Mormon country, where religious pioneers first arrived more than 160 years ago. They came to escape the rest of the world, to understand the mysterious words sent down from their god as revealed on buried golden plates, and to practice what has become known as “the principle,” marriage to multiple wives.

Today Bluffdale is home to one of the nation’s largest sects of polygamists, the Apostolic United Brethren, with upwards of 9,000 members. The brethren’s complex includes a chapel, a school, a sports field, and an archive. Membership has doubled since 1978—and the number of plural marriages has tripled—so the sect has recently been looking for ways to purchase more land and expand throughout the town.

But new pioneers have quietly begun moving into the area, secretive outsiders who say little and keep to themselves. Like the pious polygamists, they are focused on deciphering cryptic messages that only they have the power to understand. Just off Beef Hollow Road, less than a mile from brethren headquarters, thousands of hard-hatted construction workers in sweat-soaked T-shirts are laying the groundwork for the newcomers’ own temple and archive, a massive complex so large that it necessitated expanding the town’s boundaries. Once built, it will be more than five times the size of the US Capitol.

Rather than Bibles, prophets, and worshippers, this temple will be filled with servers, computer intelligence experts, and armed guards. And instead of listening for words flowing down from heaven, these newcomers will be secretly capturing, storing, and analyzing vast quantities of words and images hurtling through the world’s telecommunications networks. In the little town of Bluffdale, Big Love and Big Brother have become uneasy neighbors.

The NSA has become the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever.

Under construction by contractors with top-secret clearances, the blandly named Utah Data Center is being built for the National Security Agency. A project of immense secrecy, it is the final piece in a complex puzzle assembled over the past decade. Its purpose: to intercept, decipher, analyze, and store vast swaths of the world’s communications as they zap down from satellites and zip through the underground and undersea cables of international, foreign, and domestic networks. The heavily fortified $2 billion center should be up and running in September 2013. Flowing through its servers and routers and stored in near-bottomless databases will be all forms of communication, including the complete contents of private emails, cell phone calls, and Google searches, as well as all sorts of personal data trails—parking receipts, travel itineraries, bookstore purchases, and other digital “pocket litter.” It is, in some measure, the realization of the “total information awareness” program created during the first term of the Bush administration—an effort that was killed by Congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential for invading Americans’ privacy.

But “this is more than just a data center,” says one senior intelligence official who until recently was involved with the program. The mammoth Bluffdale center will have another important and far more secret role that until now has gone unrevealed. It is also critical, he says, for breaking codes. And code-breaking is crucial, because much of the data that the center will handle—financial information, stock transactions, business deals, foreign military and diplomatic secrets, legal documents, confidential personal communications—will be heavily encrypted. According to another top official also involved with the program, the NSA made an enormous breakthrough several years ago in its ability to cryptanalyze, or break, unfathomably complex encryption systems employed by not only governments around the world but also many average computer users in the US. The upshot, according to this official: “Everybody’s a target; everybody with communication is a target.”

For the NSA, overflowing with tens of billions of dollars in post-9/11 budget awards, the cryptanalysis breakthrough came at a time of explosive growth, in size as well as in power. Established as an arm of the Department of Defense following Pearl Harbor, with the primary purpose of preventing another surprise assault, the NSA suffered a series of humiliations in the post-Cold War years. Caught offguard by an escalating series of terrorist attacks—the first World Trade Center bombing, the blowing up of US embassies in East Africa, the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen, and finally the devastation of 9/11—some began questioning the agency’s very reason for being. In response, the NSA has quietly been reborn. And while there is little indication that its actual effectiveness has improved—after all, despite numerous pieces of evidence and intelligence-gathering opportunities, it missed the near-disastrous attempted attacks by the underwear bomber on a flight to Detroit in 2009 and by the car bomber in Times Square in 2010—there is no doubt that it has transformed itself into the largest, most covert, and potentially most intrusive intelligence agency ever created.

In the process—and for the first time since Watergate and the other scandals of the Nixon administration—the NSA has turned its surveillance apparatus on the US and its citizens. It has established listening posts throughout the nation to collect and sift through billions of email messages and phone calls, whether they originate within the country or overseas. It has created a supercomputer of almost unimaginable speed to look for patterns and unscramble codes. Finally, the agency has begun building a place to store all the trillions of words and thoughts and whispers captured in its electronic net. And, of course, it’s all being done in secret. To those on the inside, the old adage that NSA stands for Never Say Anything applies more than ever.

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A swath of freezing fog blanketed Salt Lake City on the morning of January 6, 2011, mixing with a weeklong coating of heavy gray smog. Red air alerts, warning people to stay indoors unless absolutely necessary, had become almost daily occurrences, and the temperature was in the bone-chilling twenties. “What I smell and taste is like coal smoke,” complained one local blogger that day. At the city’s international airport, many inbound flights were delayed or diverted while outbound regional jets were grounded. But among those making it through the icy mist was a figure whose gray suit and tie made him almost disappear into the background. He was tall and thin, with the physique of an aging basketball player and dark caterpillar eyebrows beneath a shock of matching hair. Accompanied by a retinue of bodyguards, the man was NSA deputy director Chris Inglis, the agency’s highest-ranking civilian and the person who ran its worldwide day-to-day operations.

A short time later, Inglis arrived in Bluffdale at the site of the future data center, a flat, unpaved runway on a little-used part of Camp Williams, a National Guard training site. There, in a white tent set up for the occasion, Inglis joined Harvey Davis, the agency’s associate director for installations and logistics, and Utah senator Orrin Hatch, along with a few generals and politicians in a surreal ceremony. Standing in an odd wooden sandbox and holding gold-painted shovels, they made awkward jabs at the sand and thus officially broke ground on what the local media had simply dubbed “the spy center.” Hoping for some details on what was about to be built, reporters turned to one of the invited guests, Lane Beattie of the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce. Did he have any idea of the purpose behind the new facility in his backyard? “Absolutely not,” he said with a self-conscious half laugh. “Nor do I want them spying on me.”

For his part, Inglis simply engaged in a bit of double-talk, emphasizing the least threatening aspect of the center: “It’s a state-of-the-art facility designed to support the intelligence community in its mission to, in turn, enable and protect the nation’s cybersecurity.” While cybersecurity will certainly be among the areas focused on in Bluffdale, what is collected, how it’s collected, and what is done with the material are far more important issues. Battling hackers makes for a nice cover—it’s easy to explain, and who could be against it? Then the reporters turned to Hatch, who proudly described the center as “a great tribute to Utah,” then added, “I can’t tell you a lot about what they’re going to be doing, because it’s highly classified.”

And then there was this anomaly: Although this was supposedly the official ground-breaking for the nation’s largest and most expensive cybersecurity project, no one from the Department of Homeland Security, the agency responsible for protecting civilian networks from cyberattack, spoke from the lectern. In fact, the official who’d originally introduced the data center, at a press conference in Salt Lake City in October 2009, had nothing to do with cybersecurity. It was Glenn A. Gaffney, deputy director of national intelligence for collection, a man who had spent almost his entire career at the CIA. As head of collection for the intelligence community, he managed the country’s human and electronic spies.

Within days, the tent and sandbox and gold shovels would be gone and Inglis and the generals would be replaced by some 10,000 construction workers. “We’ve been asked not to talk about the project,” Rob Moore, president of Big-D Construction, one of the three major contractors working on the project, told a local reporter. The plans for the center show an extensive security system: an elaborate $10 million antiterrorism protection program, including a fence designed to stop a 15,000-pound vehicle traveling 50 miles per hour, closed-circuit cameras, a biometric identification system, a vehicle inspection facility, and a visitor-control center.

Inside, the facility will consist of four 25,000-square-foot halls filled with servers, complete with raised floor space for cables and storage. In addition, there will be more than 900,000 square feet for technical support and administration. The entire site will be self-sustaining, with fuel tanks large enough to power the backup generators for three days in an emergency, water storage with the capability of pumping 1.7 million gallons of liquid per day, as well as a sewage system and massive air-conditioning system to keep all those servers cool. Electricity will come from the center’s own substation built by Rocky Mountain Power to satisfy the 65-megawatt power demand. Such a mammoth amount of energy comes with a mammoth price tag—about $40 million a year, according to one estimate.

Given the facility’s scale and the fact that a terabyte of data can now be stored on a flash drive the size of a man’s pinky, the potential amount of information that could be housed in Bluffdale is truly staggering. But so is the exponential growth in the amount of intelligence data being produced every day by the eavesdropping sensors of the NSA and other intelligence agencies. As a result of this “expanding array of theater airborne and other sensor networks,” as a 2007 Department of Defense report puts it, the Pentagon is attempting to expand its worldwide communications network, known as the Global Information Grid, to handle yottabytes (1024 bytes) of data. (A yottabyte is a septillion bytes—so large that no one has yet coined a term for the next higher magnitude.)

It needs that capacity because, according to a recent report by Cisco, global Internet traffic will quadruple from 2010 to 2015, reaching 966 exabytes per year. (A million exabytes equal a yottabyte.) In terms of scale, Eric Schmidt, Google’s former CEO, once estimated that the total of all human knowledge created from the dawn of man to 2003 totaled 5 exabytes. And the data flow shows no sign of slowing. In 2011 more than 2 billion of the world’s 6.9 billion people were connected to the Internet. By 2015, market research firm IDC estimates, there will be 2.7 billion users. Thus, the NSA’s need for a 1-million-square-foot data storehouse. Should the agency ever fill the Utah center with a yottabyte of information, it would be equal to about 500 quintillion (500,000,000,000,000,000,000) pages of text.

The data stored in Bluffdale will naturally go far beyond the world’s billions of public web pages. The NSA is more interested in the so-called invisible web, also known as the deep web or deepnet—data beyond the reach of the public. This includes password-protected data, US and foreign government communications, and noncommercial file-sharing between trusted peers. “The deep web contains government reports, databases, and other sources of information of high value to DOD and the intelligence community,” according to a 2010 Defense Science Board report. “Alternative tools are needed to find and index data in the deep web … Stealing the classified secrets of a potential adversary is where the [intelligence] community is most comfortable.” With its new Utah Data Center, the NSA will at last have the technical capability to store, and rummage through, all those stolen secrets. The question, of course, is how the agency defines who is, and who is not, “a potential adversary.”

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Before yottabytes of data from the deep web and elsewhere can begin piling up inside the servers of the NSA’s new center, they must be collected. To better accomplish that, the agency has undergone the largest building boom in its history, including installing secret electronic monitoring rooms in major US telecom facilities. Controlled by the NSA, these highly secured spaces are where the agency taps into the US communications networks, a practice that came to light during the Bush years but was never acknowledged by the agency. The broad outlines of the so-called warrantless-wiretapping program have long been exposed—how the NSA secretly and illegally bypassed the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which was supposed to oversee and authorize highly targeted domestic eavesdropping; how the program allowed wholesale monitoring of millions of American phone calls and email. In the wake of the program’s exposure, Congress passed the FISA Amendments Act of 2008, which largely made the practices legal. Telecoms that had agreed to participate in the illegal activity were granted immunity from prosecution and lawsuits. What wasn’t revealed until now, however, was the enormity of this ongoing domestic spying program.

For the first time, a former NSA official has gone on the record to describe the program, codenamed Stellar Wind, in detail. William Binney was a senior NSA crypto-mathematician largely responsible for automating the agency’s worldwide eavesdropping network. A tall man with strands of black hair across the front of his scalp and dark, determined eyes behind thick-rimmed glasses, the 68-year-old spent nearly four decades breaking codes and finding new ways to channel billions of private phone calls and email messages from around the world into the NSA’s bulging databases. As chief and one of the two cofounders of the agency’s Signals Intelligence Automation Research Center, Binney and his team designed much of the infrastructure that’s still likely used to intercept international and foreign communications.

He explains that the agency could have installed its tapping gear at the nation’s cable landing stations—the more than two dozen sites on the periphery of the US where fiber-optic cables come ashore. If it had taken that route, the NSA would have been able to limit its eavesdropping to just international communications, which at the time was all that was allowed under US law. Instead it chose to put the wiretapping rooms at key junction points throughout the country—large, windowless buildings known as switches—thus gaining access to not just international communications but also to most of the domestic traffic flowing through the US. The network of intercept stations goes far beyond the single room in an AT&T building in San Francisco exposed by a whistle-blower in 2006. “I think there’s 10 to 20 of them,” Binney says. “That’s not just San Francisco; they have them in the middle of the country and also on the East Coast.”

The eavesdropping on Americans doesn’t stop at the telecom switches. To capture satellite communications in and out of the US, the agency also monitors AT&T’s powerful earth stations, satellite receivers in locations that include Roaring Creek and Salt Creek. Tucked away on a back road in rural Catawissa, Pennsylvania, Roaring Creek’s three 105-foot dishes handle much of the country’s communications to and from Europe and the Middle East. And on an isolated stretch of land in remote Arbuckle, California, three similar dishes at the company’s Salt Creek station service the Pacific Rim and Asia.

The former NSA official held his thumb and forefinger close together: “We are that far from a turnkey totalitarian state.”

Binney left the NSA in late 2001, shortly after the agency launched its warrantless-wiretapping program. “They violated the Constitution setting it up,” he says bluntly. “But they didn’t care. They were going to do it anyway, and they were going to crucify anyone who stood in the way. When they started violating the Constitution, I couldn’t stay.” Binney says Stellar Wind was far larger than has been publicly disclosed and included not just eavesdropping on domestic phone calls but the inspection of domestic email. At the outset the program recorded 320 million calls a day, he says, which represented about 73 to 80 percent of the total volume of the agency’s worldwide intercepts. The haul only grew from there. According to Binney—who has maintained close contact with agency employees until a few years ago—the taps in the secret rooms dotting the country are actually powered by highly sophisticated software programs that conduct “deep packet inspection,” examining Internet traffic as it passes through the 10-gigabit-per-second cables at the speed of light.

The software, created by a company called Narus that’s now part of Boeing, is controlled remotely from NSA headquarters at Fort Meade in Maryland and searches US sources for target addresses, locations, countries, and phone numbers, as well as watch-listed names, keywords, and phrases in email. Any communication that arouses suspicion, especially those to or from the million or so people on agency watch lists, are automatically copied or recorded and then transmitted to the NSA.

The scope of surveillance expands from there, Binney says. Once a name is entered into the Narus database, all phone calls and other communications to and from that person are automatically routed to the NSA’s recorders. “Anybody you want, route to a recorder,” Binney says. “If your number’s in there? Routed and gets recorded.” He adds, “The Narus device allows you to take it all.” And when Bluffdale is completed, whatever is collected will be routed there for storage and analysis.

According to Binney, one of the deepest secrets of the Stellar Wind program—again, never confirmed until now—was that the NSA gained warrantless access to AT&T’s vast trove of domestic and international billing records, detailed information about who called whom in the US and around the world. As of 2007, AT&T had more than 2.8 trillion records housed in a database at its Florham Park, New Jersey, complex.

Verizon was also part of the program, Binney says, and that greatly expanded the volume of calls subject to the agency’s domestic eavesdropping. “That multiplies the call rate by at least a factor of five,” he says. “So you’re over a billion and a half calls a day.” (Spokespeople for Verizon and AT&T said their companies would not comment on matters of national security.)

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Angelo Codevilla — The Ruling Class — Citizens v. the Ruling Elite — Videos

Posted on August 10, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Constitution, Crime, Economics, Education, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Inflation, Investments, IRS, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, Macroeconomics, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Press, Private Sector, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Security, Tax Policy, Taxes, Technology, Terrorism, Unemployment, Unions, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

AmericasRulingClass_FINAL

Angelo_Codevilla

Angelo Codevilla – First Principles on First Fridays

Citizens v. the Ruling Elite

Featuring Mark Meckler, Co-founder, Tea Party Patriots; Eric O’Keefe, Co-Chairman, Campaign for Primary Accountability; Geoff Pallay, Special Projects Director, Ballotpedia; moderated by John Samples, Director of the Center for Representative Government, Cato Institute.

Only 12 percent of Americans now approve of the job Congress is doing. Despite that, incumbents are overwhelmingly re-elected. Eighty-six percent of them survived the 2010 elections for the House of Representatives. That’s not much of a surprise when you consider that 80 percent of House districts are safe for one of the two major parties and 62 percent of incumbents face no primary challenge at all. No wonder many Americans feel those who “represent” them in Washington don’t really represent them at all. A new organization, the Campaign for Primary Accountability, is trying to level the playing field and to restore real representation by making incumbents more accountable to citizens. Its efforts have won praise across the political spectrum and condemnation from fans of the status quo. But it is not alone. Mark Meckler, a founder of the Tea Party Patriots, is launching a new effort to change American elections for the better. Please join us to hear these leaders talk about their continuing struggle to take back America.

MARK MECKLER OF THE TEA PARTY PATRIOTS – DYLAN RATIGAN SHOW

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G. Edward Griffin — The Creature from Jekyll Island — Interviewed By Glenn Beck — Videos

Posted on August 10, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Books, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, history, History of Economic Thought, Inflation, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Public Sector, Raves, Resources, Tax Policy, Unions, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

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Glenn Beck discuss the Fed w/ G. Edward Griffin about his book The Creature from Jekyll Island

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All Aboard The Train Wreck Obamacare — Whitehouse Fear American People Will Not Get On Board — Why Should They? — Congress and Staffs Just Got Off Obamacare Train Wreck — Defund Obamacare Now! — Videos

Posted on August 10, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Constitution, Economics, Education, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Rants, Raves, Resources, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Technology, Unemployment, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ObamaCare-Train-Wreck

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IRS Commissioner: I Would Rather Keep My Health Plan Than Have Obamacare

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Latest News Bulletin – Another Dem Rips ‘Terribly Inefficient’ WH on Obamacare

Mike Lee On Defunding Obamacare – TheBlazeTV – The Glenn Beck Program – 2013.07.23

Ted Cruz: ‘Why is President Obama threatening to shut down the federal government?’

Dr. Coburn on the Senate Floor: Obamacare Will Only End With Full Repeal

 

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Senator Mike Lee On Obamacare – TheBlazeTV – The Glenn Beck Radio Program – 2013.07.25

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Harry Reid and Tom Coburn Agree: Obamacare Was Designed to Fail, Pave Way for Single-Payer

In just about seven weeks, people will be able to start buying Obamacare-approved insurance plans through the new health care exchanges.

But already, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is predicting those plans, and the whole system of distributing them, will eventually be moot.

Reid said he thinks the country has to “work our way past” insurance-based health care during a Friday night appearance on Vegas PBS’ program “Nevada Week in Review.”

“What we’ve done with Obamacare is have a step in the right direction, but we’re far from having something that’s going to work forever,” Reid said.

When then asked by panelist Steve Sebelius whether he meant ultimately the country would have to have a health care system that abandoned insurance as the means of accessing it, Reid said: “Yes, yes. Absolutely, yes.”

The idea of introducing a single-payer national health care system to the United States, or even just a public option, sent lawmakers into a tizzy back in 2009, when Reid was negotiating the health care bill.

And so we have a rare moment of bipartisan agreement in the United States Senate. Reid now appears to concur with Republican senator Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, who has has been warning for quite some time that Obamacare was “rigged to fail” in order to pave  the way for a total government takeover of the health insurance industry.

“More than two years after the passage of Obamacare, the data overwhelming show the law will fail to achieve its core objectives of lowering costs and improving access,” Coburn wrote in 2012. “That, ironically, may have been the design. By making private insurance unaffordable for everyone, it will become available to no one. All that will be left is government-centered, government-run, single-payer health care.”

As liberal Washington Post blogger Ezra Klein said in 2008, organizations on the left pushing for health care reform were pursuing a “sneaky strategy” to “put in place something that over time the natural incentives … move it to single payer.”

So the big question on the left and right isn’t really whether or not Obamacare will eventually fail, but what comes after it fails.

When Obamacare starts to unravel, will the American people really trust the Democrats who designed it to fix it by giving the government more power and more control? Or will Obamacare’s failure provide an opportunity to repeal it and replace it with a more conservative, free-market reform?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPxhbYUaT-s

Reid says Obamacare just a step toward eventual single-payer system

By

In just about seven weeks, people will be able to start buying Obamacare-approved insurance plans through the new health care exchanges.

But already, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is predicting those plans, and the whole system of distributing them, will eventually be moot.

Reid said he thinks the country has to “work our way past” insurance-based health care during a Friday night appearance on Vegas PBS’ program “Nevada Week in Review.”

“What we’ve done with Obamacare is have a step in the right direction, but we’re far from having something that’s going to work forever,” Reid said.

When then asked by panelist Steve Sebelius whether he meant ultimately the country would have to have a health care system that abandoned insurance as the means of accessing it, Reid said: “Yes, yes. Absolutely, yes.”

The idea of introducing a single-payer national health care system to the United States, or even just a public option, sent lawmakers into a tizzy back in 2009, when Reid was negotiating the health care bill.

“We had a real good run at the public option … don’t think we didn’t have a tremendous number of people who wanted a single-payer system,” Reid said on the PBS program, recalling how then-Sen. Joe Lieberman’s opposition to the idea of a public option made them abandon the notion and start from scratch.

Eventually, Reid decided the public option was unworkable.

“We had to get a majority of votes,” Reid said. “In fact, we had to get a little extra in the Senate, we have to get 60.”

Reid cited the post-WWII auto industry labor negotiations that made employer-backed health insurance the norm, remarking that “we’ve never been able to work our way out of that” before predicting that Congress would someday end the insurance-based health care system.

Reid also had some strong words for Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval and Sen. Dean Heller concerning their ongoing dispute with Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz over shipments of low-level nuclear waste from Oak Ridge, Tenn., to Nevada.

Sandoval disputes the existence of “many memos” that Moniz said were signed between state and federal officials, permitting the import of the spent fuel rods. Heller has asked Moniz to clarify the existence of the memos, which Moniz first referred to in testimony before the Senate Energy Committee on July 30.

Reid suggested that Sandoval and Heller were “flailing away” with their complaints, before establishing the facts, which Reid said he “just do[es]n’t think we have.”

“If there are these memos flying around then somebody should be able to find them someplace, but this is not the point,” Reid said. “Gov. Sandoval knows his powers are limited. This is interstate commerce … you can’t just say ‘we’re not going to take it.’ It doesn’t work that way.”

http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2013/aug/10/reid-says-obamacare-just-step-toward-eventual-sing

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Al_Sharpton_Jesse_Jackson

jess_jackson_al_sharpton

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Charlatan

A charlatan (also called swindler or mountebank) is a person practicing quackery or some similar confidence trick in order to obtain money, fame or other advantages via some form of pretense or deception.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlatan

Racket

A racket is a service that is fraudulently offered to solve a problem, such as for a problem that does not actually exist, will not be affected, or would not otherwise exist. Conducting a racket is racketeering.[1] Particularly, the potential problem may be caused by the same party that offers to solve it, although that fact may be concealed, with the specific intent to engender continual patronage for this party. A prototype is the protection racket, wherein a person or group indicates that they could protect a store from potential damage, damage that the same person or group would otherwise inflict, while the correlation of threat and protection may be more or less deniably veiled, distinguishing it from the more direct act of extortion.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racketeer

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Ruling Elite To American People–Congress and Staff is Exempt From Obamacare Despite The Fact The Law Clearly States Congress Is Not! — Stop Funding Obamacare Now! — Sign The Petition — Videos

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ExemptCongressObamacare

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Obamacare requirement is delayed

Administration will fix huge increase in health care premiums for Congress

The Obama administration detailed  Wednesday how the government can keep contributing to health care premiums of  members of Congress and their staffers even as  they purchase coverage through state exchanges tied to the president’s health  care law.

Guidance from the Office of  Personnel Management follows up an announcement last week that Congress and its staffers won’t face massive increases in their health care premiums next  year, as many feared, because of a clause in the Affordable Care Act  that compels them to buy insurance through the exchanges.


SPECIAL COVERAGE: Health  Care Reform


The decision stirred relief on Capitol Hill and controversy among the public.  Republican opponents of the law could argue that Congress excused itself from a deleterious aspect  of legislation it passed in 2010.

OPM’s new rule says  congressional members and staff should buy coverage through the exchanges in the  states where they reside. For staffers, that likely will mean enrolling through  the District, Maryland or Virginia.

The rule also says members of Congress should  designate, by October each year, which staff members work in their official  offices and “therefore, must choose health plans from the Exchanges.”

The administrative fix was made because Sen.  Chuck Grassley, Iowa Republican, put a provision into the original  legislation saying members of Congress and their  aides have to be covered by plans “created” by the Affordable Care Act or  “offered through an exchange.”

Even though it may have been symbolic or a political ploy, the provision was  approved.

Under the old system, the federal government contributed to about 75 percent  of premiums; members and staffers are covered through the Federal Employees  Health Benefits Program,  but it was unclear whether the program could subsidize premiums of plans in the  exchanges.

The OPM makes clear  that members and staff still can receive the contribution, although they are not  eligible for tax credits or subsidies on the exchanges.

Sen. David Vitter, Louisiana Republican  and a vocal critic of the administration’s  decision, complained about the developments in a letter to congressional leaders  Wednesday. When Congress reconvenes next month,  the senator will introduce legislation that forces the president, vice  president, political appointees and certain exempted congressional staffers to  buy their health coverage through the exchanges.

“The Obamacare statute states very clearly that all Members of Congress and their staffs are to procure their health insurance through the Obamacare  Exchange,” his letter said. “Just as clearly, it does not reconstitute  government support of their present coverage under the separate Federal  Employees Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP) as payment toward the Exchange. … Until  Obamacare is fully repealed, those elected by the public must abide by the same  law Americans are being forced to live with.”

He said the provision that allows members of Congress “to define what staff is even covered at  all is particularly offensive and obnoxious.”

“It’s obviously intended to allow for a significant portion of congressional  staff, like leadership staff, to  be exempted from even having to deal with the Exchange at all, notwithstanding  the whopping subsidy that the rule creates,” he said in his letter.

Enrollment in the exchanges — marketplaces where consumers can shop for and  buy insurance — is scheduled to begin Oct. 1. Democrats and Republicans are  planning significant public  relations campaigns on the law  during the congressional summer recess.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/7/opm-fleshes-out-congresss-obamacare-subsidy-rule/#ixzz2bQalPaac

Members, staff will keep health-care subsidies under Obamacare

Members of Congress and Hill staffers will not lose their health-care  subsidies from the government when Obamacare is implemented because of an  exception proposed Wednesday by the Office of Personnel Management.

Under the current system, the government covers most of the cost of  health-care premiums for members and their staffers. But an amendment to the Affordable Care Act —  proposed by Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley — threw those subsidies into  question, saying that members and staff must enter into the exchanges or be  covered by insurance “created” by law.

The potential for staff losing the subsidies led to concerns of “brain drain”  from the Hill if staffers left as a result of the increased costs.

Last week, when President Barack Obama came to the Hill to meet with Senate  Democrats, he informed them that he would personally get  involved to sort out the confusion, and the White House said that OPM would issue guidelines this  week.

The guidelines, released Wednesday, allow for members and staff to retain  their subsidies from the government, an exception in exchange for giving up  “premium tax credits” that they would otherwise be eligible for under  Obamacare.

“The amount of the employer contribution toward their Exchange premiums is no  more than would otherwise be made toward coverage under the [Federal Employee  Health Benefits] Program,”  the OPM release notes.

“These proposed regulations implement the administrative aspects of switching  Members of Congress and congressional staff to their new insurance plans — the  same plans available to millions of Americans through the new Exchanges,” said  Jon Foley, OPM Director of Planning  and Policy, in a statement.

Read more:  http://dailycaller.com/2013/08/07/members-staff-will-keep-healthcare-subsidies-under-obamacare/#ixzz2bQkhJvcp

Congress and an Exemption from ‘Obamacare’?

Q: Is it true that there are bills in Congress that would exempt members and their staffs and families from buying into “Obamacare”?

A: No. Congress members and staffers will be required to buy insurance through the exchanges on Jan. 1.

FULL QUESTION

Is it true that there are bills in the House and Senate that will exempt members and their staff and families from buying into Obamacare?

FULL ANSWER

Several readers have asked us about Congress attempting to exempt itself from the requirements of the Affordable Care Act. A few said that a Facebook post claimed that President Barack Obama, Sen. Harry Reid and Democrats in Congress were trying to “get themselves exempted from Obamacare,” in the words of one reader.

But there is no bill in Congress calling for an exemption from the health care law. In fact, members of Congress and their staffs face additional requirements that most Americans don’t have to meet.

Under the health care law, their insurance coverage will have to switch from the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, the group of private insurance plans that cover 8 million federal employees and retirees, to the exchanges created by the law. Those exchanges are meant for those who buy coverage on their own, the currently uninsured and small businesses. Members of Congress and their staffs would be the only employees of a large employer in the exchanges, which are set to begin offering insurance in January.

So, why is the false “exempt” claim making the Facebook rounds? There is reportedly concern on Capitol Hill that the Office of Personnel Management, which administers the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, won’t be able to smoothly transition members and their staffs into an exchange. The concern, as a Roll Call story explained, was that the government wouldn’t be able to make contributions toward the federal employees’ premiums, at least at the beginning of 2014. That would mean employees would pick up the whole tab for their insurance policies. Right now, the government pays 72 percent of premiums on average.

The “exempt” claims were sparked by a Politico report on April 24 that said secret talks were being held by lawmakers to change the requirement to get insurance through the exchanges because of this concern. The headline on the story said “Lawmakers, aides may get Obamacare exemption.”

After the story was published, a spokesman for Sen. Harry Reid said there hadn’t been any discussions to exempt Congress from “provisions that apply to any employees of any other public or private employer offering health care.” And Democratic Rep. Henry Waxman of California told Politico that lawmakers and their staffs will indeed get insurance through the exchanges. “[T]he federal government will offer them health insurance coverage that they obtained through the exchanges because we want to get the same health care coverage everybody else has available to them,” he said.

We contacted the Office of Personnel Management and received this statement from an administration official: “Members of Congress will not receive anything that is not available to the public. The law doesn’t allow them to get insurance from FEHB, they are going to get insurance on the market place, just like uninsured individuals and small businesses.”

We can’t say what did or didn’t happen in any secret meetings. But we can say that no bill has been introduced to exempt members of Congress from the Affordable Care Act — and they were never exempt in the first place. Even if, hypothetically, Congress were to nullify the provision requiring members and their staffs to get insurance on the exchanges, it still wouldn’t amount to an exemption from the law. Lawmakers and staffers would be subject to the mandate to have health insurance or pay a fine, just as everyone else is.

The law provides a few exemptions from the requirement to have insurance, but only for those who earn too little to file taxes, those with financial hardships, those who can’t find affordable coverage, and some religious groups that qualify for Social Security exemptions, mainly Mennonite or Amish.

An Old Falsehood

Bogus claims about Congress being “exempt” date back to early 2010, when different health care bills were still being debated. Some Republicans claimed that Americans, except for members of Congress, would be forced into the government-run “public option” (which wasn’t part of the final bill that became law) or state-based exchanges (which are part of the law).

As we said previously, members of Congress get private health insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, which actually served as a model for the exchanges. Federal workers pick from among many health plans. The exchanges would operate in the same way — like a marketplace for those shopping for private insurance.

But some Republicans pushed the idea that if the exchanges were good enough for other Americans, they should be good enough for Congress. So, an amendment by Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa was added to the Senate bill requiring that the federal government offer only health plans that were part of an exchange to members of Congress and their staffs. The law’s final language on this, written by Sen. Tom Coburn, says that: “the only health plans that the Federal Government may make available to Members of Congress and congressional staff with respect to their service as a Member of Congress or congressional staff shall be health plans that are — (I) created under this Act (or an amendment made by this Act); or (II) offered through an Exchange established under this Act.”

Congressional “staff” is defined as “all full-time and part-time employees employed by the official office of a Member of Congress, whether in Washington, DC or outside of Washington, DC.” As we reported before, Coburn said the provision wouldn’t apply to those working for committees or leadership staff, and a Congressional Research Service report agreed that could be the case.

In other words, the Affordable Care Act places on lawmakers and their staffs additional requirements that don’t pertain to other Americans with work-based insurance.

Update, Aug. 7, 2013: The Office of Personnel Management issued a proposed rule on Aug. 7 explaining that members of Congress and applicable congressional staff will be required to purchase health insurance coverage through the exchanges created by the law. However, according to the proposed rule, the federal government, as the employer, will still be able to make a contribution to health insurance premiums as it currently does. The contribution will be no greater than that now offered to members and their staffs under the FEHB program, and members and their staffs will not be eligible for premium tax credits made available to other persons purchasing health insurance through the exchanges.

– Lori Robertson

http://www.factcheck.org/2013/05/congress-and-an-exemption-from-obamacare/

Sources

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Public Law 111–148. 111th Congress

The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program. OPM.gov. accessed 3 May 2013.

Ethridge, Emily. “Health Insurance Anxiety on Capitol Hill.” 25 Apr 2013.

Robertson, Lori. “Congress Exempt from Health Bill?” FactCheck.org. 20 Jan 2010.

Jackson, Brooks. “Health Care for Members of Congress?” FactCheck.org. 25 Aug 2009.

Bresnahan, John and Jake Sherman. “Lawmakers, aides may get Obamacare exemption.” Politico. 24 Apr 2013.

Baker, Sam. “Dems won’t seek ObamaCare exemption.” The Hill. 25 Apr 3013.

Henig, Jess. “More Malarkey About Health Care.” FactCheck.org. 19 Apr 2010.

UPDATE 1-U.S. Congress wins relief on Obamacare health plan subsidies

Congress, staff, to keep federal health premium payments

* Ruling aimed at avoiding “brain drain” on Capitol Hill (Adds comments from Republicans, Pelosi, edits)

By David Lawder

WASHINGTON, Aug 7 (Reuters) – Congress has won some partial relief for lawmakers and their staffs from the “Obamacare” health reforms that it passed and subjected itself to three years ago.

In a ruling issued on Wednesday, U.S. lawmakers and their staffs will continue to receive a federal contribution toward the health insurance that they must purchase through soon-to-open exchanges created by President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law.

The decision by the Office of Personnel Management, with Obama’s blessing, will prevent the largely unintended loss of healthcare benefits for 535 members of the Senate and House of Representatives and thousands of Capitol Hill staff.

When Congress passed the health reform law known as Obamacare in 2010, an amendment required that lawmakers and their staff members purchase health insurance through the online exchanges that the law created. They would lose generous coverage under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.

The amendment’s author, Republican Senator Charles Grassley, argued that if Obamacare plans were good enough for the American public, they were good enough for Congress. Democrats, eager to pass the reforms, went along with it.

But it soon became apparent the provision contained no language that allowed federal contributions toward their health plans that cover about 75 percent of the premium costs.

This caused fears that staff would suddenly face sharply higher healthcare costs and leave federal service, causing a “brain drain” on Capitol Hill.

But Wednesday’s proposed rule from the OPM, the federal government’s human resources agency, means that Congress will escape the most onerous impact of law as it was written.

The OPM said the federal contributions will be allowed to continue for exchange-purchased plans for lawmakers and their staffs, ensuring that those working on Capitol Hill will effectively get the same health contributions as millions of other federal workers who keep their current plan.

The problem surrounding the Obamacare language for Capitol Hill staff was the subject of intense negotiations in recent weeks between House and Senate leaders and the Obama administration.

Some Republicans immediately slammed the OPM decision, using it as fuel for their campaign to turn public opinion against Obamacare just as its core provisions are due to go into effect.

“While the administration has handed out waiver after waiver and exemption after exemption for the well-connected in Washington, they have done nothing to lower health care costs for families in Michigan,” said Dave Camp, chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee.

Camp said the OPM ruling is the “latest proof” of impending failure for the reforms and pledged that Republicans would keep trying to repeal them.

Last week, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi said the language problem would have caused unintended “collateral damage” on congressional staff, causing many to leave for the private sector.

“They are a tremendous intellectual resource, people who could, shall we say, be better compensated financially outside” of government, said Pelosi, who spearheaded passage of the health care law in 2010 as House Speaker.

STILL MUST PURCHASE PLANS

Lawmakers and staff still must purchase plans on the exchanges for coverage that starts in January, OPM said, and they will not be eligible for tax credits to offset premium payments. These credits are the main federal subsidy mechanism for all other health plans purchased through Obamacare exchanges due to open in October. These tax subsidies fall off quickly as income rises.

Tim Jost, a healthcare law expert at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, said it was probably never Congress’ intention to take away federal benefit contributions from Capitol Hill employees, just to push them into them into the exchanges.

“This clarifies what they really intended to do all along,” Jost said. “Congress had subjected itself to a requirement that applied to nobody else in the country.”

Republican Senator David Vitter vowed to reverse the OPM ruling to ensure that no members of Congress, Capitol Hill staff nor Obama administration appointees get any federal subsidies for health insurance purchased on Obamacare health exchanges.

“These recent maneuverings inside the beltway are precisely why the American people rightly despise Congress,” said Vitter, of Louisiana. “Perhaps if White House appointees and Congress have to live under these same Obamacare rules, things would be changed quickly for the better.” (Reporting By David Lawder; Editing by Bill Trott and Cynthia Osterman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/07/usa-health-congress-idUSL1N0G820F20130807?feedType=RSS&feedName=rbssHealthcareNews&rpc=22

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Yakety Yak –Don’t Talk Back! — Increased Terrorist Chatter or Increased Obama Distractions To Justify NSA Spying on American People? Congress Goes Home To Face American People and Charges of Invading Their Privacy, Betraying Their Oaths and Destroying the Fourth Amendment — Terrorist Alert or Wag The Dog? — Videos

Posted on August 6, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Constitution, Economics, Energy, European History, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Genocide, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power, Oil, People, Philosophy, Press, Rants, Raves, Security, Talk Radio, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

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us embassies_closed

Yakety Yak –Don’t Talk Back!

The Coasters- Yakety Yak

Take out the papers and the trash
Or you don’t get no spendin’ cash
If you don’t scrub that kitchen floor
You ain’t gonna rock and roll no more
Yakety yak (don’t talk back)

Just finish cleanin’ up your room
Let’s see that dust fly with that broom
Get all that garbage out of sight
Or you don’t go out Friday night
Yakety yak (don’t talk back)

You just put on your coat and hat
And walk yourself to the laundromat
And when you finish doin’ that
Bring in the dog and put out the cat
Yakety yak (don’t talk back)

Don’t you give me no dirty looks
Your father’s hip; he knows what cooks
Just tell your hoodlum friend outside
You ain’t got time to take a ride
Yakety yak (don’t talk back)

Yakety yak, yakety yak
Yakety yak, yakety yak
Yakety yak, yakety yak
Yakety yak, yakety yak

ACCOUNTABILITY – Movie Trailer

Wag The Dog

Wag The Dog – War On Terror

Good Ol’ Shoe – Working [from Wag the Dog]

Wag The Dog – Obama’s Admin Script, I Have Seen This Movie Before! – Judge Jeanine Pirro

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Breaking Propaganda Serious Threat shuts down U S Embassies on Obama’s Birthday Aug 01, 2013)

U.S issues travel alert, closes embassies

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youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxeNZpJefG8]

U.S. Sees Threat of al Qaeda Attack

State Department Issues Global Travel Alert

By JAY SOLOMON And SIOBHAN GORMAN

Al Qaeda re-emerged as a top global security threat after suspected plots by an affiliate of the terror group led the State Department to issue a world-wide travel alert for the entire month of August.

Senior U.S. officials said they were particularly focused on Yemen-based al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, saying the affiliate was plotting attacks that Washington feared could be executed in the Middle East, Africa or beyond.

These officials cited increased communications, or “chatter,” between terrorist operatives in the field as the primary reason behind the State Department’s alert. The Obama administration said on Thursday that it would close most of its embassies in the Middle East on Sunday because of the threat.

“Current information suggests that al Qaeda and affiliated organizations continue to plan terrorist attacks both in the region and beyond, and that they may focus efforts to conduct attacks in the period between now and the end of August,” the State Department said in a statement on Friday.

The warning didn’t tell travelers to abandon their journeys, advising caution and recommending that U.S. citizens register their travel plans on the department’s website.

The State Department has issued such alerts and warnings in the recent past, but the threat is the most serious the U.S. has seen in a few years, an administration official said.

While officials across the U.S. government described the threat as serious and imminent, they also said it they didn’t know who would be targeted, where, or how, making it hard to assess. For some officials, the lack of detail has provoked more anxiety. It was possible the alerts themselves were issued to disrupt the planning of what a former U.S. official familiar with the intelligence described as an active AQAP operation.

A senior U.S. official said the threat from AQAP emerged “over the last week.”

Another set of intelligence reports pointed to indications of plots around the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in the coming week, though it wasn’t clear if those indicators were linked to the AQAP chatter, the former official said. On Sunday, Muslims world-wide will celebrate the Night of Power, commemorating the Quran’s presentation to the Prophet Muhammad.

In the wake of the uproar over the Obama administration’s handling of the attack last year on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, the State Department is inclined to issue advance warning when they have any credible information, said Seth Jones, an al Qaeda specialist at the Rand Corp.

“There do appear to be multiple threats against U.S. embassies in North Africa, in the Persian Gulf and in South Asia,” he said. “After the experience in Benghazi, it’s better to get that out beforehand and pre-empt that.”

The latest alert follows an uptick in threats against embassies in North Africa and the Middle East that started a few months ago. U.S. intelligence officials in May saw a spike in threats against U.S. missions and against its embassies in Libya, Yemen and Egypt, which were believed to involve bomb plots by Sunni extremists and perhaps al Qaeda-linked individuals.

Late last year, the State Department released a similarly worded warning stating al Qaeda and its affiliates could seek to strike U.S. interests on or about Sept. 11, 2012. In February, it did so again.

Friday’s alert, though, warning of a heightened risk during all of August, was unusual in that it specifically warned of a terrorist attack, cited such a large area—the Middle East and Africa—and mentioned al Qaeda.

The French Foreign Ministry said Saturday that it would close its embassy in Yemen on Sunday and Monday over security concerns. The decision comes after the U.K. and Germany also decided to close their embassies in Yemen temporarily.

Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird warned Friday that Canadian travelers and diplomats in the Middle East face an elevated security risk, and urged “a high degree of caution.”

William Daly, who heads the New York office of Control Risks Group LLC, a global consultancy specializing in political and security risk, said his firm was telling its business clients as of Friday not to cancel trips—but suggested it would be prudent to postpone discretionary travel until fall.

The State Department, in addition to shutting embassies in countries including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Egypt, warned that tourist resorts, bus and rail systems and airlines could be targets, standard language that accompanies such alerts.

AQAP has successfully honed bombing technology that has previously threatened U.S.-bound air travel on passenger and cargo planes, making the organization one of the prime threats facing America and Yemen—and making Yemen of the most frequently targeted sites of the U.S. drone campaign.

The U.S. launched three strikes within the past week in remote areas of Yemen where AQAP operatives were thought to be hiding. It marked the first time in more than a month that America launched such attacks there. Yemeni media reported at least five alleged members of al Qaeda were killed in strikes.

It isn’t known whether the uptick in American strikes is related to the current threat. “The threat is from Yemen but it can’t be confined to Yemen,” a senior U.S. counterterrorism official said. “They always talk big, but you never know.”

Separately, intelligence officials have been tracking a number of other al Qaeda-related threats in Africa and South Asia. In Tunisia, intelligence officials are monitoring possible plots against U.S. or European targets in Tunis by al Qaeda and a local militant group, Ansar al Sharia.

AQAP has risen in importance to the larger al Qaeda organization, U.S. counterterrorism officials believe, because they have seen indications that al Qaeda leader Ayman al Zawahiri has appointed the emir of AQAP to be a kind of general manager of the al Qaeda organization.

President Barack Obama met with Yemen’s President Abdo Rabu Mansour Hadi at the White House on Thursday to discuss joint counterterrorism programs against AQAP and other bilateral issues, according to U.S. and Yemeni officials.

U.S. defense officials said there have been no shifts of assets in response to the embassy closures. Defense officials noted that in recent months the Marine Corps has built up quick reaction forces in the region, in large measure to respond to threats against embassies and other diplomatic outposts.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324635904578643890167811634.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_LEFTTopStories

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Love Potion #9 — Videos

Posted on August 2, 2013. Filed under: Uncategorized |

love_portion_number_9

Love Potion #9

Love Potion No. 9

Love Potion No. 9 is a 1992 movie starring Sandra Bullock and Tate Donovan. Inspired by the famous doo-wop song of the same title, it’s about a special elixir (Love Potion No. 8) that enables a person to make people of the opposite sex become completely infatuated with them by simply talking. The potion also makes people of the same sex loathe, and sometimes physically attack, the one who is using the potion.[1]

Plot

Paul Matthews (Tate Donovan) is a lonely biochemist with a crush on his unavailable co-worker, biologist Diane Farrow (Sandra Bullock). His friends take him to a gypsy on 34th and Vine named Madame Ruth (Anne Bancroft). After reading his palm and seeing absolutely no romance in his life, Ruth gives him a small amount Love Potion No. 8 on a piece of paper. As a scientist, Paul has doubts and ends up throwing it in the trash when he gets home. Around this time, Paul’s friends buy him the services of Marisa, but all they do is talk.

His cat gets into the trash and eats some of the potion; then it meows and attracts all the other cats in the neighborhood. When Paul sees the results, he takes it to Diane, and they find out the “scientific” properties of it. After analyzing it, they decide to use themselves as human test subjects. Diane ends up attracting an Italian car mogul and the prince of England, ending up getting a makeover in the process, while Paul has a string of hookups with women in bars, supermarkets, cars, and sorority houses.

Paul and Diane realize their romantic attraction to each other and become involved. Eventually, Paul plans a proposal to Diane; however, when he comes by her house to do so, she has fallen into the arms of Gary, who was originally only using her for sex, since she’s under the influence of the potion. Paul gathers his friends and tells them about the potion, which causes them to laugh in his face. Marisa arrives at the house and uses the potion (which she earlier found and used to rob Paul) and uses it on Paul and his friends, proving the power of the potion.

By this time, Diane and Gary are getting married. Paul goes back to Madame Ruth, who gives him Love Potion No. 9, which will purify Diane and Paul’s love forever (unless Diane was never entirely in love with him, in which case Paul will love Diane for his entire life and Diane will eternally hate him). Paul and friends coerce the matron of honor at Diane’s wedding to help them, and Diane ends up running out of the wedding into Paul’s arms.

Note[edit]

The film gives a pseudoscientific explanation as to how Love Potion No. 8 “works.” It’s explained:

When swallowed it affects the vocal cords directly so that when you speak micro-tremors encoded within your voice stimulate tiny little hairs in the inner ear of the opposite sex. The hair vibrates, sending a signal along a nerve to the brain, which in turn produces a combination of mood-altering, endogenous chemicals responsible for the biochemical process of falling in love. It makes members of the same sex hostile. It only works for four hours at a time.

Love Potion No. 9 prevents love from fading, and overrides the effects of Love Potion No. 8.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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Powder — Videos

Posted on August 2, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Education, Energy, Entertainment, Farming, Films, liberty, Life, Movies, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

 

powder

Powder

Powder is a film about a boy nicknamed “Powder,” with incredible intellect, telepathy, and paranormal powers. It stars Sean Patrick Flanery in the title role, with Jeff Goldblum, Mary Steenburgen, Bradford Tatum, Lance Henriksen, and Brandon Smith in supporting roles. The film questions the limits of the human mind and body while also displaying our capacity for cruelty; it raises hope that humanity will advance to a state of better understanding.

Powder is a 1995 American drama film written and directed by Victor Salva and starring Sean Patrick Flanery in the title role, with Jeff Goldblum, Mary Steenburgen, Bradford Tatum and Lance Henriksen in supporting roles. It is about a boy nicknamed “Powder”, who has incredible intellect, telepathy and paranormal powers. The film questions the limits of the human mind and body while also displaying our capacity for cruelty, although it raises hope that humanity will advance to a state of better understanding.

Plot

Jeremy Reed, whose nickname is Powder, is an albino young man who has incredible intellect and is able to sense the thoughts of the people around him. Jeremy’s brain possesses a powerful electromagnetic charge, which causes electrical objects to function abnormally when he is around them, as well as when he becomes emotional. The electrical charge also prevents hair from growing on his body. Jeremy’s mother was struck by lightning while pregnant with him; she died shortly after the strike, but Jeremy survived. His father disowned him shortly after his premature birth, and he was raised by his grandparents. Jeremy lived in the basement and worked on their farm but never left their property, learning everything he knew from books. He is taken from his home when his grandfather is found dead of natural causes. Jessie Caldwell (Mary Steenburgen), a child services psychologist called in by Sheriff Doug Barnum, takes him to a boy’s home because he is now effectively a ward of the state.

Jessie enrolls him in high school, where Powder meets physics teacher Donald Ripley. Donald finds out that Powder has supernatural powers as well as the highest IQ in the history of mankind. While his abilities mark him as special, they also make him an outcast. On a hunting trip with his schoolmates, Powder is threatened with a gun by John Box (Bradford Tatum), an aggressive student who views him as a freak. Before John can fire, a gun goes off in the distance and everyone rushes to see that Harley Duncan, one of Doug’s deputy who is hunting with the boys, has shot a doe, which is now dying. Anguished by the animal’s death, Powder touches the deer and Harley, inducing in Harley what the students assume is a seizure. However, Harley admits to Doug that Powder had actually caused him to feel the pain and fear of the dying deer, and he cannot bring himself to take another life. Because of the experience, Harley removes all of his guns from his house although Doug allows him to remain as a sheriff’s deputy without a sidearm.

Doug enlists Powder to help speak to his dying wife through telepathy. Through Powder, the sheriff learns that his wife clings onto life because she didn’t want to leave without her wedding ring on her finger and without him reconciling with his estranged son, Steven. She tells him that Steven found the ring and it has been sitting in a silver box on her nightstand throughout the entire movie. Doug then places the ring on his wife’s finger and reconciles with Steven, letting his wife die peacefully.

Powder meets Lindsey Kelloway, a romantic interest, but their relationship is broken by Lindsey’s father. Before the interruption, he tells Lindsey that he can see the truth about people: that they are scared and feel disconnected from the rest of the world, but in truth are all connected to everything that exists. Powder goes back to the juvenile facility and packs away his belongings, planning to run away to his deceased grandparents’ farm. He pauses in the gym to stare at a male student washing, noticing the latter’s luxurious head of hair as well as body hair which he himself lacks, and is caught at it by John Box, who accuses him of homosexuality. John steals Jeremy’s hat and taunts him, but Powder reveals that John’s words mimic what his stepfather said before beating him when he was 12, further angering him. John and the other boys humiliate Powder, stripping him naked and taunting him. His powers begin to manifest by pulling at their metal buttons and any piercings. Eventually a large spherical electric burst erupts throwing Jeremy in a mud puddle and everyone else to the ground. His classmate John is found still, with his heart stopped. Powder uses an electric shock to revive him.

In the final scene Powder returns to the farm where he grew up, now in probate with the bank, and finds that all of his possessions have been removed. He is joined by Jessie, Donald and Doug, who persuade Powder to come with them to find a place where he will not be feared and misunderstood. Instead, a thunderstorm arrives and he runs into a field where a lightning bolt strikes him, and he disappears in a blinding flash of light.

Cast

Reception[edit]

Powder received generally mixed reviews from critics. It currently holds a rating of 47% (“Rotten”) on Rotten Tomatoes based on 19 reviews, as of May 2011. Caryn James of The New York Times described the film as “lethally dull” and said, “This intensely self-important film has no idea how absurd and unconvincing it is.”[1]

Since its release, the film has grossed approximately $31 million worldwide.

Controversy[edit]

The film’s production by Disney resulted in a controversy over the choice of director Victor Salva, who had been convicted of molesting a 12-year-old child actor in 1988. When Powder was released, the victim came forward again in an attempt to get others to boycott the film in protest at Disney’s hiring Salva. Since then, Disney has not picked up any more pictures by Salva.[2][3]

Remake[edit]

The film was remade by Bollywood under the title of Alag.

References[edit]

  1. ^ James, Caryn (October 27, 1995). “Powder (1995)”. The New York Times. Retrieved May 15, 2011.
  2. ^ Infamy that has no end, Chicago Tribune, October 29, 1995
  3. ^ Victim speaks out against molester, TimesDaily, October 25, 1995

External links[edit]

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Only 162,000 Nonfarm Payroll Jobs Created in July 2013 — 300,000 New Jobs Needed To Reduce Unemployment by .1%– Unemployment Rate Declines .2% to 7.4% — Labor Participation Rate Declines .1% to 63.5% As Number of Discourage Workers Increases By 136,000 — Obama’s Jobs Gap 10 Million Jobs Widens — Videos

Posted on August 2, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Constitution, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, history, History of Economic Thought, Illegal, Immigration, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, media, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Private Sector, Public Sector, Raves, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Technology, Terrorism, Transportation, Unemployment, Unions, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Obama-Unemployment

obama-unemployed-college-grad-empty-nest-syndrome-cartoon

ITS-THE-ECONOMY-OBAMA-WHITE-HOUSE-ATTIC-CAI-012610-COLOR

Obama-Dept-of-Labor-overpaid-unemploymen

sgs-emp

Unemployment Rate Drops to Near Five-Year Low

US jobs numbers disappoint but ‘underlying tone is bullish’

Data extracted on: August 2, 2013 (2:01:21 PM)

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

Employment Level

144,285,000

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

employment_level
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142153(1) 141644 140721 140652 140250 140005 139898 139481 138810 138421 138665 138025
2010 138439(1) 138624 138767 139296 139255 139148 139167 139405 139388 139097 139046 139295
2011 139253(1) 139471 139643 139606 139681 139405 139509 139870 140164 140314 140771 140896
2012 141608(1) 142019 142020 141934 142302 142448 142250 142164 142974 143328 143277 143305
2013 143322(1) 143492 143286 143579 143898 144058 144285
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Civilian Labor Force

155,798,000

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

civilian_labor_force_level
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154232(1) 154526 154142 154479 154742 154710 154505 154300 153815 153804 153887 153120
2010 153455(1) 153702 153960 154577 154110 153623 153709 154078 153966 153681 154140 153649
2011 153244(1) 153269 153358 153478 153552 153369 153325 153707 154074 154010 154096 153945
2012 154356(1) 154825 154707 154451 154998 155149 154995 154647 155056 155576 155319 155511
2013 155654(1) 155524 155028 155238 155658 155835 155798

Labor Force Participation Rate

63.4%

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

civilian_labor_force_participation_rate
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.1 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.9 63.8 63.6 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.6
2013 63.6 63.5 63.3 63.3 63.4 63.5 63.4

Unemployment Level

11,514,000

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

unemployment_level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12079 12881 13421 13826 14492 14705 14607 14819 15005 15382 15223 15095
2010 15016 15078 15192 15281 14856 14475 14542 14673 14577 14584 15094 14354
2011 13992 13798 13716 13872 13871 13964 13817 13837 13910 13696 13325 13049
2012 12748 12806 12686 12518 12695 12701 12745 12483 12082 12248 12042 12206
2013 12332 12032 11742 11659 11760 11777 11514

Unemployment Rate U-3

7.4%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

unemployment_rate_u3

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 8.9 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.9 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.9 7.8 7.8
2013 7.9 7.7 7.6 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.4

Employment-Population Ratio

58.7%

Series Id:           LNS12300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment-Population Ratio
Labor force status:  Employment-population ratio
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Employment-Population Ratio

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 64.6 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.4 64.5 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.3 64.4
2001 64.4 64.3 64.3 64.0 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.2 63.5 63.2 63.0 62.9
2002 62.7 63.0 62.8 62.7 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.7 63.0 62.7 62.5 62.4
2003 62.5 62.5 62.4 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.1 62.1 62.0 62.1 62.3 62.2
2004 62.3 62.3 62.2 62.3 62.3 62.4 62.5 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.5 62.4
2005 62.4 62.4 62.4 62.7 62.8 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.7 62.8
2006 62.9 63.0 63.1 63.0 63.1 63.1 63.0 63.1 63.1 63.3 63.3 63.4
2007 63.3 63.3 63.3 63.0 63.0 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.9 62.7 62.9 62.7
2008 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7 62.5 62.4 62.2 62.0 61.9 61.7 61.4 61.0
2009 60.6 60.3 59.9 59.8 59.6 59.4 59.3 59.1 58.7 58.5 58.6 58.3
2010 58.5 58.5 58.5 58.7 58.6 58.5 58.5 58.5 58.5 58.3 58.2 58.3
2011 58.3 58.4 58.4 58.4 58.4 58.2 58.2 58.3 58.4 58.4 58.5 58.6
2012 58.5 58.6 58.5 58.5 58.6 58.6 58.5 58.4 58.7 58.7 58.7 58.6
2013 58.6 58.6 58.5 58.6 58.6 58.7 58.7

Unemployment Rate 16-19 Years Old

 

23.7%


Series Id:           LNS14000012
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - 16-19 yrs.
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 to 19 years


unemployment_rate_teenagers

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 12.7 13.8 13.3 12.6 12.8 12.3 13.4 14.0 13.0 12.8 13.0 13.2
2001 13.8 13.7 13.8 13.9 13.4 14.2 14.4 15.6 15.2 16.0 15.9 17.0
2002 16.5 16.0 16.6 16.7 16.6 16.7 16.8 17.0 16.3 15.1 17.1 16.9
2003 17.2 17.2 17.8 17.7 17.9 19.0 18.2 16.6 17.6 17.2 15.7 16.2
2004 17.0 16.5 16.8 16.6 17.1 17.0 17.8 16.7 16.6 17.4 16.4 17.6
2005 16.2 17.5 17.1 17.8 17.8 16.3 16.1 16.1 15.5 16.1 17.0 14.9
2006 15.1 15.3 16.1 14.6 14.0 15.8 15.9 16.0 16.3 15.2 14.8 14.6
2007 14.8 14.9 14.9 15.9 15.9 16.3 15.3 15.9 15.9 15.4 16.2 16.8
2008 17.8 16.6 16.1 15.9 19.0 19.2 20.7 18.6 19.1 20.0 20.3 20.5
2009 20.7 22.2 22.2 22.2 23.4 24.7 24.3 25.0 25.9 27.1 26.9 26.6
2010 26.0 25.4 26.2 25.5 26.6 26.0 26.0 25.7 25.8 27.2 24.6 25.1
2011 25.5 24.0 24.4 24.7 24.0 24.7 24.9 25.2 24.4 24.1 23.9 22.9
2012 23.4 23.7 25.0 24.9 24.4 23.7 23.9 24.5 23.7 23.7 23.6 23.5
2013 23.4 25.1 24.2 24.1 24.5 24.0 23.7

White Unemployment Rate

 

6.6%

 

Series Id:           LNS14000003
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - White
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Race:                White

white_unemployment_rate

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 3.4 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.5
2001 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.3 4.3 4.7 4.9 5.1
2002 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1 5.1
2003 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.3 5.1 5.2 5.0
2004 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 4.9 5.0 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.6 4.5
2005 4.5 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.2 4.2 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.2
2006 4.1 4.1 4.0 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.9 4.0 3.9
2007 4.2 4.1 3.8 4.0 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.2 4.4
2008 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.4 5.4 5.9 6.2 6.7
2009 7.1 7.6 8.0 8.1 8.6 8.7 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.2 9.0
2010 8.8 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.6 8.6 8.6 8.9 8.5
2011 8.1 8.1 8.0 8.1 8.0 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.9 8.0 7.7 7.5
2012 7.4 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.2 7.0 6.9 6.8 6.9
2013 7.0 6.8 6.7 6.7 6.7 6.6 6.6

Black Unemployment Rate

 

Series Id:           LNS14000006
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - Black or African American
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Race:                Black or African American

Employment Situation News Release

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed                                  USDL-13-1527
until 8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, August 2, 2013

Technical information:
 Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- JULY 2013

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 162,000 in July, and the unemployment rate edged
down to 7.4 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment rose in
retail trade, food services and drinking places, financial activities, and wholesale trade.

Household Survey Data

Both the number of unemployed persons, at 11.5 million, and the unemployment rate, at 7.4 percent,
edged down in July. Over the year, these measures were down by 1.2 million and 0.8 percentage
point, respectively. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult women (6.5 percent) and blacks
(12.6 percent) declined in July. The rates for adult men (7.0 percent), teenagers (23.7 percent),
whites (6.6 percent), and Hispanics (9.4 percent) showed little or no change. The jobless rate
for Asians was 5.7 percent (not seasonally adjusted), little changed from a year earlier. (See
tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

In July, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was little
changed at 4.2 million. These individuals accounted for 37.0 percent of the unemployed. The
number of long-term unemployed has declined by 921,000 over the past year. (See table A-12.)

The civilian labor force participation rate was 63.4 percent in July, little changed over the
month. The employment-population ratio was unchanged at 58.7 percent. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary
part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 8.2 million in July. These individuals were working
part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time
job. (See table A-8.)

In July, 2.4 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little changed from a
year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor
force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12
months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks
preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 988,000 discouraged workers in July, up by 136,000 from
a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not
currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining
1.4 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in July had not searched for work for
reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 162,000 in July, with gains in retail trade, food
services and drinking places, financial activities, and wholesale trade. Over the prior 12 months,
nonfarm employment growth averaged 189,000 per month. (See table B-1.)

Retail trade added 47,000 jobs in July and has added 352,000 over the past 12 months. In July, job
growth occurred in general merchandise stores (+9,000), motor vehicle and parts dealers (+6,000),
building material and garden supply stores (+6,000), and health and personal care stores (+5,000).

Within leisure and hospitality, employment in food services and drinking places increased by 38,000
in July and by 381,000 over the year.

Financial activities employment increased by 15,000 in July, with a gain of 6,000 in securities,
commodity contracts, and investments. Over the year, financial activities has added 120,000 jobs.

Employment increased in wholesale trade (+14,000) in July. Over the past 12 months, this industry
has added 83,000 jobs.

Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up in July (+36,000). Within
the industry, job growth continued in management of companies and enterprises (+7,000) and in
management and technical consulting services (+7,000). Employment in temporary help services
changed little over the month.

Manufacturing employment was essentially unchanged in July and has changed little, on net, over
the past 12 months. Within the industry, employment in motor vehicles and parts rose by 9,000
in July.

Employment in health care was essentially unchanged over the month. Thus far in 2013, health
care has added an average of 16,000 jobs per month, compared with an average monthly increase
of 27,000 in 2012.

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, construction, transportation
and warehousing, and government, showed little change in July.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 0.1 hour in July
to 34.4 hours. In manufacturing, the workweek decreased by 0.2 hour to 40.6 hours, and overtime
declined by 0.2 hour to 3.2 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees
on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 0.1 hour to 33.6 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In July, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged down by 2 cents
to $23.98, following a 10-cent increase in June. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen
by 44 cents, or 1.9 percent. In July, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and
nonsupervisory employees were unchanged at $20.14. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for May was revised from +195,000 to +176,000, and
the change for June was revised from +195,000 to +188,000. With these revisions, employment gains
in May and June combined were 26,000 less than previously reported.

_____________
The Employment Situation for August is scheduled to be released on Friday, September 6, 2013, at
8:30 a.m. (EDT).
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Category July
2012
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
Change from:
June
2013-
July
2013
Employment status
Civilian noninstitutional population 243,354 245,363 245,552 245,756 204
Civilian labor force 154,995 155,658 155,835 155,798 -37
Participation rate 63.7 63.4 63.5 63.4 -0.1
Employed 142,250 143,898 144,058 144,285 227
Employment-population ratio 58.5 58.6 58.7 58.7 0.0
Unemployed 12,745 11,760 11,777 11,514 -263
Unemployment rate 8.2 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.2
Not in labor force 88,359 89,705 89,717 89,957 240
Unemployment rates
Total, 16 years and over 8.2 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.2
Adult men (20 years and over) 7.7 7.2 7.0 7.0 0.0
Adult women (20 years and over) 7.5 6.5 6.8 6.5 -0.3
Teenagers (16 to 19 years) 23.9 24.5 24.0 23.7 -0.3
White 7.4 6.7 6.6 6.6 0.0
Black or African American 14.1 13.5 13.7 12.6 -1.1
Asian (not seasonally adjusted) 6.2 4.3 5.0 5.7
Hispanic or Latino ethnicity 10.3 9.1 9.1 9.4 0.3
Total, 25 years and over 6.9 6.1 6.2 6.1 -0.1
Less than a high school diploma 12.7 11.1 10.7 11.0 0.3
High school graduates, no college 8.6 7.4 7.6 7.6 0.0
Some college or associate degree 7.1 6.5 6.4 6.0 -0.4
Bachelor’s degree and higher 4.1 3.8 3.9 3.8 -0.1
Reason for unemployment
Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs 7,106 6,147 6,119 5,921 -198
Job leavers 879 944 1,030 979 -51
Reentrants 3,374 3,333 3,291 3,258 -33
New entrants 1,299 1,268 1,259 1,254 -5
Duration of unemployment
Less than 5 weeks 2,697 2,706 2,692 2,563 -129
5 to 14 weeks 3,102 2,669 2,864 2,869 5
15 to 26 weeks 1,756 1,950 1,896 1,788 -108
27 weeks and over 5,167 4,357 4,328 4,246 -82
Employed persons at work part time
Part time for economic reasons 8,245 7,904 8,226 8,245 19
Slack work or business conditions 5,319 4,841 5,193 5,177 -16
Could only find part-time work 2,568 2,721 2,652 2,665 13
Part time for noneconomic reasons 18,846 18,934 19,044 19,128 84
Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)
Marginally attached to the labor force 2,529 2,164 2,582 2,414
Discouraged workers 852 780 1,027 988
– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)
Total nonfarm 153 176 188 162
Total private 177 187 196 161
Goods-producing 26 -4 8 4
Mining and logging -1 2 3 4
Construction 5 -1 8 -6
Manufacturing 22 -5 -3 6
Durable goods(1) 20 1 0 8
Motor vehicles and parts 12.0 6.0 6.4 9.1
Nondurable goods 2 -6 -3 -2
Private service-providing(1) 151 191 188 157
Wholesale trade 10.1 7.3 7.0 13.7
Retail trade 3.1 32.6 39.7 46.8
Transportation and warehousing 11.3 -5.7 0.7 4.6
Information 9 3 -4 9
Financial activities 0 7 13 15
Professional and business services(1) 52 70 61 36
Temporary help services 15.3 26.8 16.2 7.7
Education and health services(1) 35 20 16 13
Health care and social assistance 25.5 9.7 18.4 8.3
Leisure and hospitality 27 43 57 23
Other services 10 13 -3 -2
Government -24 -11 -8 1
WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES(2)
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES
Total nonfarm women employees 49.4 49.4 49.4 49.4
Total private women employees 47.9 47.9 47.9 47.9
Total private production and nonsupervisory employees 82.6 82.6 82.6 82.6
HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES
Total private
Average weekly hours 34.4 34.5 34.5 34.4
Average hourly earnings $23.54 $23.90 $24.00 $23.98
Average weekly earnings $809.78 $824.55 $828.00 $824.91
Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3) 96.4 98.4 98.5 98.4
Over-the-month percent change 0.2 0.2 0.1 -0.1
Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4) 108.2 112.1 112.8 112.5
Over-the-month percent change 0.3 0.2 0.6 -0.3
HOURS AND EARNINGS
PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
Total private
Average weekly hours 33.7 33.7 33.7 33.6
Average hourly earnings $19.77 $20.08 $20.14 $20.14
Average weekly earnings $666.25 $676.70 $678.72 $676.70
Index of aggregate weekly hours (2002=100)(3) 104.0 105.7 105.9 105.8
Over-the-month percent change 0.2 0.2 0.2 -0.1
Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2002=100)(4) 137.2 141.8 142.4 142.2
Over-the-month percent change 0.2 0.2 0.4 -0.1
DIFFUSION INDEX(5)
(Over 1-month span)
Total private (266 industries) 56.0 58.1 57.3 54.5
Manufacturing (81 industries) 51.2 45.1 45.7 50.0
Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(p) Preliminary
Frequently Asked Questions about Employment and Unemployment Estimates

1. Why are there two monthly measures of employment?

   The household survey and establishment survey both produce sample-based estimates
   of   employment, and both have strengths and limitations. The establishment survey
   employment series has a   smaller margin of error on the measurement of month-to-
   month change   than the household survey because of its much larger sample size. An
   over-the-month employment change of about 100,000 is statistically significant in
   the establishment survey, while the threshold for a statistically significant change
   in the household survey is about 400,000. However, the household survey has a more
   expansive scope than the establishment survey because it includes self-employed
   workers whose businesses are unincorporated, unpaid family workers, agricultural
   workers, and private household workers, who are excluded by the establishment survey.
   The household survey also provides estimates of employment for demographic groups.
   For more information on the differences between the two surveys, please visit
   www.bls.gov/web/empsit/ces_cps_trends.pdf.

2. Are undocumented immigrants counted in the surveys?

   It is likely that both surveys include at least some undocumented immigrants. However,
   neither the establishment nor the household survey is designed to identify the legal
   status of workers. Therefore, it is not possible to determine how many are counted in
   either survey. The establishment survey does not collect data on the legal status of
   workers. The household survey does include questions which identify the foreign and
   native born, but it does not include questions about the legal status of the foreign
   born. Data on the foreign and native born are published each month in table A-7 of
   The Employment Situation news release.

3. Why does the establishment survey have revisions?

   The establishment survey revises published estimates to improve its data series by
   incorporating additional information that was not available at the time of the
   initial publication of the estimates. The establishment survey revises its initial
   monthly estimates twice, in the immediately succeeding 2 months, to incorporate
   additional sample receipts from respondents in the survey and recalculated seasonal
   adjustment factors. For more information on the monthly revisions, please visit
   www.bls.gov/ces/cesrevinfo.htm.

   On an annual basis, the establishment survey incorporates a benchmark revision that
   re-anchors estimates to nearly complete employment counts available from unemployment
   insurance tax records. The benchmark helps to control for sampling and modeling errors
   in the estimates. For more information on the annual benchmark revision, please visit
   www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cesbmart.htm.

4. Does the establishment survey sample include small firms?

   Yes; about 40 percent of the establishment survey sample is comprised of business
   establishments with fewer than 20 employees. The establishment survey sample is
   designed to maximize the reliability of the statewide total nonfarm employment
   estimate; firms from all states, size classes, and industries are appropriately
   sampled to achieve that goal.

5. Does the establishment survey account for employment from new businesses?

   Yes; monthly establishment survey estimates include an adjustment to account for
   the net employment change generated by business births and deaths. The adjustment
   comes from an econometric model that forecasts the monthly net jobs impact of
   business births and deaths based on the actual past values of the net impact that
   can be observed with a lag from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. The
   establishment survey uses modeling rather than sampling for this purpose because
   the survey is not immediately able to bring new businesses into the sample. There
   is an unavoidable lag between the birth of a new firm and its appearance on the
   sampling frame and availability for selection. BLS adds new businesses to the survey
   twice a year.

6. Is the count of unemployed persons limited to just those people receiving unemployment
   insurance benefits?

   No; the estimate of unemployment is based on a monthly sample survey of households.
   All persons who are without jobs and are actively seeking and available to work are
   included among the unemployed. (People on temporary layoff are included even if
   they do not actively seek work.) There is no requirement or question relating to
   unemployment insurance benefits in the monthly survey.

7. Does the official unemployment rate exclude people who want a job but are not currently
   looking for work?

   Yes; however, there are separate estimates of persons outside the labor force who
   want a job, including those who are not currently looking because they believe no
   jobs are available (discouraged workers). In addition, alternative measures of labor
   underutilization (some of which include discouraged workers and other groups not
   officially counted as unemployed) are published each month in table A-15 of The
   Employment Situation news release. For more information about these alternative
   measures, please visit www.bls.gov/cps/lfcharacteristics.htm#altmeasures.

8. How can unusually severe weather affect employment and hours estimates?

   In the establishment survey, the reference period is the pay period that includes
   the 12th of the month. Unusually severe weather is more likely to have an impact on
   average weekly hours than on employment. Average weekly hours are estimated for paid
   time during the pay period, including pay for holidays, sick leave, or other time off.
   The impact of severe weather on hours estimates typically, but not always, results in
   a reduction in average weekly hours. For example, some employees may be off work for
   part of the pay period and not receive pay for the time missed, while some workers,
   such as those dealing with cleanup or repair, may work extra hours.

   In order for severe weather conditions to reduce the estimate of payroll employment,
   employees have to be off work without pay for the entire pay period. Slightly more
   than 20 percent of all employees in the payroll survey sample have a weekly pay
   period. Employees who receive pay for any part of the pay period, even 1 hour, are
   counted in the payroll employment figures. It is not possible to quantify the effect
   of extreme weather on estimates of over-the-month change in employment.

   In the household survey, the reference period is generally the calendar week that
   includes the 12th of the month. Persons who miss the entire week's work for weather-
   related events are counted as employed whether or not they are paid for the time
   off. The household survey collects data on the number of persons who had a job but
   were not at work due to bad weather. It also provides a measure of the number of
   persons who usually work full time but had reduced hours. Current and historical
   data are available on the  household survey's most requested statistics page at
   http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/surveymost?ln.
Technical Note

   This news release presents statistics from two major surveys, the Current
Population Survey (CPS; household survey) and the Current Employment Statistics
survey (CES; establishment survey). The household survey provides information
on the labor force, employment, and unemployment that appears in the "A" tables,
marked HOUSEHOLD DATA. It is a sample survey of about 60,000 eligible households
conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

   The establishment survey provides information on employment, hours, and
earnings of employees on nonfarm payrolls; the data appear in the "B" tables,
marked ESTABLISHMENT DATA. BLS collects these data each month from the payroll
records of a sample of nonagricultural business establishments. Each month
the CES program surveys about 145,000 businesses and government agencies,
representing approximately 557,000 individual worksites, in order to provide
detailed industry data on employment, hours, and earnings of workers on nonfarm
payrolls. The active sample includes approximately one-third of all nonfarm
payroll employees.

   For both surveys, the data for a given month relate to a particular week or
pay period. In the household survey, the reference period is generally the
calendar week that contains the 12th day of the month. In the establishment
survey, the reference period is the pay period including the 12th, which may or
may not correspond directly to the calendar week.

Coverage, definitions, and differences between surveys

   Household survey. The sample is selected to reflect the entire civilian 
noninstitutional population. Based on responses to a series of questions on 
work and job search activities, each person 16 years and over in a sample
household is classified as employed, unemployed, or not in the labor force.

   People are classified as employed if they did any work at all as paid employees
during the reference week; worked in their own business, profession, or on their
own farm; or worked without pay at least 15 hours in a family business or farm.
People are also counted as employed if they were temporarily absent from their jobs
because of illness, bad weather, vacation, labor-management disputes, or personal
reasons.

   People are classified as unemployed if they meet all of the following criteria:
they had no employment during the reference week; they were available for work at
that time; and they made specific efforts to find employment sometime during the
4-week period ending with the reference week. Persons laid off from a job and
expecting recall need not be looking for work to be counted as unemployed. The
unemployment data derived from the household survey in no way depend upon the
eligibility for or receipt of unemployment insurance benefits.

   The civilian labor force is the sum of employed and unemployed persons.
Those persons not classified as employed or unemployed are not in the labor 
force. The unemployment rate is the number unemployed as a percent of the 
labor force. The labor force participation rate is the labor force as a 
percent of the population, and the employment-population ratio is the 
employed as a percent of the population. Additional information about the 
household survey can be found at www.bls.gov/cps/documentation.htm.

   Establishment survey. The sample establishments are drawn from private
nonfarm businesses such as factories, offices, and stores, as well as
from federal, state, and local government entities. Employees on nonfarm
payrolls are those who received pay for any part of the reference pay
period, including persons on paid leave. Persons are counted in each job
they hold. Hours and earnings data are produced for the private sector for
all employees and for production and nonsupervisory employees. Production
and nonsupervisory employees are defined as production and related employees
in manufacturing and mining and logging, construction workers in construction,
and nonsupervisory employees in private service-providing industries.

   Industries are classified on the basis of an establishment’s principal
activity in accordance with the 2012 version of the North American Industry
Classification System. Additional information about the establishment survey
can be found at www.bls.gov/ces/.

   Differences in employment estimates. The numerous conceptual and methodological
differences between the household and establishment  surveys result in important
distinctions in the employment estimates derived from the surveys. Among these are:

   --The household survey includes agricultural workers, self-employed workers
     whose businesses are unincorporated, unpaid family workers, and private
     household workers among the employed. These groups are excluded from the
     establishment survey.

   --The household survey includes people on unpaid leave among the employed.
     The establishment survey does not.

   --The household survey is limited to workers 16 years of age and older.
     The establishment survey is not limited by age.

   --The household survey has no duplication of individuals, because
     individuals are counted only once, even if they hold more than one
     job. In the establishment survey, employees working at more than one
     job and thus appearing on more than one payroll are counted separately
     for each appearance.

Seasonal adjustment

   Over the course of a year, the size of the nation's labor force and the levels
of employment and unemployment undergo regularly occurring fluctuations. These 
events may result from seasonal changes in weather, major holidays, and the opening
and closing of schools. The effect of such seasonal variation can be very large.

   Because these seasonal events follow a more or less regular pattern each year,
their influence on the level of a series can be tempered by adjusting for regular
seasonal variation. These adjustments make nonseasonal developments, such as
declines in employment or increases in the participation of women in the labor
force, easier to spot. For example, in the household survey, the large number of
youth entering the labor force each June is likely to obscure any other changes
that have taken place relative to May, making it difficult to determine if the 
level of economic activity has risen or declined. Similarly, in the establishment
survey, payroll employment in education declines by about 20 percent at the end
of the spring term and later rises with the start of the fall term, obscuring the
underlying employment trends in the industry. Because seasonal employment changes
at the end and beginning of the school year can be estimated, the statistics can be
adjusted to make underlying employment patterns more discernable.  The seasonally
adjusted figures provide a more useful tool with which to analyze changes in
month-to-month economic activity.

   Many seasonally adjusted series are independently adjusted in both the household
and establishment surveys. However, the adjusted series for many major estimates,
such as total payroll employment, employment in most major sectors, total employment,
and unemployment are computed by aggregating independently adjusted component series.
For example, total unemployment is derived by summing the adjusted series for four
major age-sex components; this differs from the unemployment estimate that would be
obtained by directly adjusting the total or by combining
the duration, reasons, or more detailed age categories.

   For both the household and establishment surveys, a concurrent seasonal adjustment
methodology is used in which new seasonal factors are calculated each month using all
relevant data, up to and including the data for the current month. In the household
survey, new seasonal factors are used to adjust only the current month's data. In the
establishment survey, however, new seasonal factors are used each month to adjust the
three most recent monthly estimates. The prior 2 months are routinely revised to
incorporate additional sample reports and recalculated seasonal adjustment factors.
In both surveys, 5-year revisions to historical data are made once a year.

Reliability of the estimates

   Statistics based on the household and establishment surveys are subject to both
sampling and nonsampling error. When a sample, rather than the entire population,
is surveyed, there is a chance that the sample estimates may differ from the true
population values they represent. The component of this difference that occurs
because samples differ by chance is known as sampling error, and its variability
is measured by the standard error of the estimate. There is about a 90-percent
chance, or level of confidence, that an estimate based on a sample will differ by
no more than 1.6 standard errors from the true population value because of sampling
error. BLS analyses are generally conducted at the 90-percent level of confidence.

   For example, the confidence interval for the monthly change in total nonfarm
employment from the establishment survey is on the order of plus or minus 90,000.
Suppose the estimate of nonfarm employment increases by 50,000 from one month to
the next. The 90-percent confidence interval on the monthly change would range from
-40,000 to +140,000 (50,000 +/- 90,000). These figures do not mean that the sample
results are off by these magnitudes, but rather that there is about a 90-percent
chance that the true over-the-month change lies within this interval. Since this
range includes values of less than zero, we could not say with confidence that
nonfarm employment had, in fact, increased that month. If, however, the reported
nonfarm employment rise was 250,000, then all of the values within the 90- percent
confidence interval would be greater than zero. In this case, it is likely (at
least a 90-percent chance) that nonfarm employment had, in fact, risen that month.
At an unemployment rate of around 6.0 percent, the 90-percent confidence interval
for the monthly change in unemployment as measured by the household survey is
about +/- 300,000, and for the monthly change in the unemployment rate it is about
+/- 0.2 percentage point.

   In general, estimates involving many individuals or establishments have lower
standard errors (relative to the size of the estimate) than estimates which are based
on a small number of observations. The precision of estimates also is improved when
the data are cumulated over time, such as for quarterly and annual averages.

   The household and establishment surveys are also affected by nonsampling error,
which can occur for many reasons, including the failure to sample a segment of the
population, inability to obtain information for all respondents in the sample,
inability or unwillingness of respondents to provide correct information on a
timely basis, mistakes made by respondents, and errors made in the collection or
processing of the data.

   For example, in the establishment survey, estimates for the most recent 2 months
are based on incomplete returns; for this reason, these estimates are labeled
preliminary in the tables. It is only after two successive revisions to a monthly
estimate, when nearly all sample reports have been received, that the estimate is
considered final.

   Another major source of nonsampling error in the establishment survey is the
inability to capture, on a timely basis, employment generated by new firms. To
correct for this systematic underestimation of employment growth, an estimation
procedure with two components is used to account for business births. The first
component excludes employment losses from business deaths from sample-based
estimation in order to offset the missing employment gains from business births.
This is incorporated into the sample-based estimation procedure by simply not
reflecting sample units going out of business, but imputing to them the same
employment trend as the other firms in the sample. This procedure accounts for
most of the net birth/death employment.

   The second component is an ARIMA time series model designed to estimate the
residual net birth/death employment not accounted for by the imputation. The
historical time series used to create and test the ARIMA model was derived from
the unemployment insurance universe micro- level database, and reflects the actual
residual net of births and deaths over the past 5 years.

   The sample-based estimates from the establishment survey are adjusted once a
year (on a lagged basis) to universe counts of payroll employment obtained from
administrative records of the unemployment insurance program. The difference 
between the March sample-based employment estimates and the March universe counts
is known as a benchmark revision, and serves as a rough proxy for total survey
error. The new benchmarks also incorporate changes in the classification of
industries. Over the past decade, absolute benchmark revisions for total nonfarm
employment have averaged 0.3 percent, with a range from -0.7 to 0.6 percent.

Other information

   Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired
individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay
Service: (800) 877-8339.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-1. Employment status of the civilian population by sex and age

[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, sex, and age Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted(1)
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
TOTAL
Civilian noninstitutional population 243,354 245,552 245,756 243,354 244,995 245,175 245,363 245,552 245,756
Civilian labor force 156,526 157,089 157,196 154,995 155,028 155,238 155,658 155,835 155,798
Participation rate 64.3 64.0 64.0 63.7 63.3 63.3 63.4 63.5 63.4
Employed 143,126 144,841 145,113 142,250 143,286 143,579 143,898 144,058 144,285
Employment-population ratio 58.8 59.0 59.0 58.5 58.5 58.6 58.6 58.7 58.7
Unemployed 13,400 12,248 12,083 12,745 11,742 11,659 11,760 11,777 11,514
Unemployment rate 8.6 7.8 7.7 8.2 7.6 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.4
Not in labor force 86,828 88,463 88,560 88,359 89,967 89,936 89,705 89,717 89,957
Persons who currently want a job 6,837 7,152 6,862 6,587 6,722 6,413 6,712 6,580 6,619
Men, 16 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 117,381 118,490 118,595 117,381 118,204 118,296 118,393 118,490 118,595
Civilian labor force 83,554 83,837 83,965 82,407 82,584 82,621 82,862 82,898 82,852
Participation rate 71.2 70.8 70.8 70.2 69.9 69.8 70.0 70.0 69.9
Employed 76,691 77,277 77,569 75,512 76,329 76,239 76,299 76,447 76,466
Employment-population ratio 65.3 65.2 65.4 64.3 64.6 64.4 64.4 64.5 64.5
Unemployed 6,863 6,560 6,396 6,895 6,255 6,382 6,564 6,451 6,387
Unemployment rate 8.2 7.8 7.6 8.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 7.8 7.7
Not in labor force 33,828 34,654 34,630 34,975 35,619 35,675 35,531 35,592 35,743
Men, 20 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 108,727 109,943 110,054 108,727 109,635 109,736 109,839 109,943 110,054
Civilian labor force 79,758 80,186 80,275 79,376 79,747 79,803 79,878 79,883 79,909
Participation rate 73.4 72.9 72.9 73.0 72.7 72.7 72.7 72.7 72.6
Employed 73,863 74,717 74,854 73,288 74,228 74,159 74,124 74,276 74,328
Employment-population ratio 67.9 68.0 68.0 67.4 67.7 67.6 67.5 67.6 67.5
Unemployed 5,894 5,469 5,421 6,089 5,519 5,644 5,754 5,607 5,581
Unemployment rate 7.4 6.8 6.8 7.7 6.9 7.1 7.2 7.0 7.0
Not in labor force 28,969 29,757 29,778 29,351 29,888 29,933 29,961 30,060 30,145
Women, 16 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 125,972 127,062 127,161 125,972 126,791 126,878 126,970 127,062 127,161
Civilian labor force 72,972 73,253 73,231 72,588 72,443 72,617 72,796 72,938 72,946
Participation rate 57.9 57.7 57.6 57.6 57.1 57.2 57.3 57.4 57.4
Employed 66,435 67,565 67,543 66,738 66,956 67,340 67,599 67,612 67,819
Employment-population ratio 52.7 53.2 53.1 53.0 52.8 53.1 53.2 53.2 53.3
Unemployed 6,537 5,688 5,688 5,850 5,487 5,277 5,197 5,326 5,127
Unemployment rate 9.0 7.8 7.8 8.1 7.6 7.3 7.1 7.3 7.0
Not in labor force 53,000 53,809 53,930 53,384 54,348 54,261 54,174 54,124 54,215
Women, 20 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 117,648 118,804 118,907 117,648 118,520 118,612 118,708 118,804 118,907
Civilian labor force 69,402 69,899 69,656 69,673 69,544 69,744 69,895 70,075 70,033
Participation rate 59.0 58.8 58.6 59.2 58.7 58.8 58.9 59.0 58.9
Employed 63,703 64,981 64,754 64,437 64,707 65,101 65,329 65,314 65,489
Employment-population ratio 54.1 54.7 54.5 54.8 54.6 54.9 55.0 55.0 55.1
Unemployed 5,700 4,918 4,902 5,236 4,837 4,642 4,566 4,761 4,544
Unemployment rate 8.2 7.0 7.0 7.5 7.0 6.7 6.5 6.8 6.5
Not in labor force 48,246 48,905 49,251 47,975 48,976 48,868 48,813 48,730 48,875
Both sexes, 16 to 19 years
Civilian noninstitutional population 16,979 16,805 16,795 16,979 16,840 16,827 16,816 16,805 16,795
Civilian labor force 7,366 7,004 7,264 5,945 5,737 5,692 5,886 5,878 5,857
Participation rate 43.4 41.7 43.3 35.0 34.1 33.8 35.0 35.0 34.9
Employed 5,560 5,143 5,504 4,525 4,351 4,320 4,445 4,469 4,469
Employment-population ratio 32.7 30.6 32.8 26.7 25.8 25.7 26.4 26.6 26.6
Unemployed 1,806 1,860 1,760 1,420 1,386 1,372 1,441 1,409 1,388
Unemployment rate 24.5 26.6 24.2 23.9 24.2 24.1 24.5 24.0 23.7
Not in labor force 9,613 9,801 9,530 11,033 11,103 11,135 10,930 10,927 10,938
Footnotes
(1) The population figures are not adjusted for seasonal variation; therefore, identical numbers appear in the unadjusted and seasonally adjusted columns.
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-2. Employment status of the civilian population by race, sex, and age

[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, race, sex, and age Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted(1)
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
WHITE
Civilian noninstitutional population 193,245 194,254 194,373 193,245 193,946 194,041 194,147 194,254 194,373
Civilian labor force 124,749 124,627 124,807 123,578 123,382 123,504 123,844 123,766 123,719
Participation rate 64.6 64.2 64.2 63.9 63.6 63.6 63.8 63.7 63.7
Employed 115,255 116,132 116,321 114,428 115,080 115,266 115,557 115,563 115,552
Employment-population ratio 59.6 59.8 59.8 59.2 59.3 59.4 59.5 59.5 59.4
Unemployed 9,493 8,495 8,486 9,151 8,302 8,238 8,287 8,204 8,167
Unemployment rate 7.6 6.8 6.8 7.4 6.7 6.7 6.7 6.6 6.6
Not in labor force 68,496 69,628 69,565 69,667 70,565 70,537 70,303 70,488 70,654
Men, 20 years and over
Civilian labor force 64,795 64,843 64,906 64,485 64,549 64,674 64,680 64,625 64,595
Participation rate 73.8 73.3 73.3 73.4 73.1 73.2 73.2 73.1 73.0
Employed 60,588 60,951 60,995 60,073 60,594 60,540 60,545 60,620 60,528
Employment-population ratio 69.0 68.9 68.9 68.4 68.7 68.6 68.5 68.6 68.4
Unemployed 4,208 3,892 3,911 4,413 3,955 4,135 4,135 4,005 4,067
Unemployment rate 6.5 6.0 6.0 6.8 6.1 6.4 6.4 6.2 6.3
Women, 20 years and over
Civilian labor force 54,141 54,239 54,204 54,380 54,255 54,221 54,447 54,469 54,501
Participation rate 58.4 58.1 58.0 58.6 58.2 58.2 58.4 58.4 58.4
Employed 50,115 50,893 50,794 50,653 50,940 51,123 51,311 51,222 51,339
Employment-population ratio 54.0 54.5 54.4 54.6 54.7 54.8 55.0 54.9 55.0
Unemployed 4,026 3,346 3,410 3,727 3,315 3,098 3,136 3,247 3,162
Unemployment rate 7.4 6.2 6.3 6.9 6.1 5.7 5.8 6.0 5.8
Both sexes, 16 to 19 years
Civilian labor force 5,812 5,545 5,698 4,713 4,578 4,608 4,717 4,672 4,623
Participation rate 45.9 44.3 45.6 37.2 36.5 36.8 37.7 37.3 37.0
Employed 4,553 4,289 4,532 3,702 3,546 3,603 3,700 3,721 3,685
Employment-population ratio 36.0 34.3 36.2 29.3 28.3 28.8 29.6 29.7 29.5
Unemployed 1,259 1,256 1,165 1,010 1,032 1,005 1,017 951 938
Unemployment rate 21.7 22.7 20.5 21.4 22.5 21.8 21.6 20.4 20.3
BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN
Civilian noninstitutional population 29,918 30,355 30,390 29,918 30,255 30,290 30,322 30,355 30,390
Civilian labor force 18,643 18,852 18,825 18,424 18,524 18,617 18,723 18,636 18,671
Participation rate 62.3 62.1 61.9 61.6 61.2 61.5 61.7 61.4 61.4
Employed 15,845 16,154 16,311 15,833 16,068 16,167 16,202 16,090 16,318
Employment-population ratio 53.0 53.2 53.7 52.9 53.1 53.4 53.4 53.0 53.7
Unemployed 2,799 2,698 2,513 2,590 2,456 2,450 2,521 2,546 2,353
Unemployment rate 15.0 14.3 13.4 14.1 13.3 13.2 13.5 13.7 12.6
Not in labor force 11,274 11,502 11,565 11,494 11,731 11,673 11,599 11,719 11,719
Men, 20 years and over
Civilian labor force 8,307 8,411 8,450 8,277 8,447 8,377 8,441 8,358 8,434
Participation rate 68.1 67.5 67.7 67.9 68.1 67.4 67.9 67.1 67.6
Employed 7,071 7,331 7,398 7,049 7,370 7,319 7,301 7,270 7,382
Employment-population ratio 58.0 58.9 59.3 57.8 59.4 58.9 58.7 58.4 59.2
Unemployed 1,236 1,079 1,052 1,228 1,077 1,058 1,140 1,088 1,052
Unemployment rate 14.9 12.8 12.4 14.8 12.7 12.6 13.5 13.0 12.5
Women, 20 years and over
Civilian labor force 9,361 9,551 9,444 9,371 9,365 9,529 9,562 9,556 9,508
Participation rate 62.1 62.3 61.5 62.1 61.3 62.3 62.5 62.3 62.0
Employed 8,170 8,365 8,382 8,290 8,226 8,425 8,487 8,413 8,510
Employment-population ratio 54.2 54.6 54.6 55.0 53.9 55.1 55.4 54.9 55.5
Unemployed 1,190 1,186 1,063 1,080 1,139 1,105 1,074 1,143 998
Unemployment rate 12.7 12.4 11.3 11.5 12.2 11.6 11.2 12.0 10.5
Both sexes, 16 to 19 years
Civilian labor force 976 891 930 776 713 711 720 722 729
Participation rate 37.0 34.7 36.3 29.4 27.6 27.5 28.0 28.1 28.4
Employed 604 458 531 494 472 423 413 407 426
Employment-population ratio 22.9 17.8 20.7 18.7 18.2 16.4 16.1 15.8 16.6
Unemployed 372 433 399 282 241 287 307 315 303
Unemployment rate 38.1 48.6 42.9 36.3 33.8 40.5 42.6 43.6 41.6
ASIAN
Civilian noninstitutional population 12,812 13,291 13,298
Civilian labor force 8,346 8,737 8,641
Participation rate 65.1 65.7 65.0
Employed 7,830 8,302 8,153
Employment-population ratio 61.1 62.5 61.3
Unemployed 516 435 488
Unemployment rate 6.2 5.0 5.7
Not in labor force 4,466 4,554 4,657
Footnotes
(1) The population figures are not adjusted for seasonal variation; therefore, identical numbers appear in the unadjusted and seasonally adjusted columns.
– Data not available.
NOTE: Estimates for the above race groups will not sum to totals shown in table A-1 because data are not presented for all races. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-3. Employment status of the Hispanic or Latino population by sex and age

[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, sex, and age Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted(1)
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
HISPANIC OR LATINO ETHNICITY
Civilian noninstitutional population 36,792 37,471 37,548 36,792 37,242 37,320 37,395 37,471 37,548
Civilian labor force 24,627 24,975 25,220 24,467 24,354 24,512 24,848 24,869 25,040
Participation rate 66.9 66.7 67.2 66.5 65.4 65.7 66.4 66.4 66.7
Employed 22,092 22,698 22,822 21,950 22,122 22,310 22,583 22,601 22,675
Employment-population ratio 60.0 60.6 60.8 59.7 59.4 59.8 60.4 60.3 60.4
Unemployed 2,536 2,277 2,398 2,517 2,232 2,202 2,265 2,267 2,366
Unemployment rate 10.3 9.1 9.5 10.3 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.1 9.4
Not in labor force 12,164 12,495 12,328 12,325 12,888 12,808 12,547 12,602 12,508
Men, 20 years and over
Civilian labor force 13,426 13,768 13,847
Participation rate 81.0 81.4 81.7
Employed 12,325 12,731 12,784
Employment-population ratio 74.4 75.3 75.5
Unemployed 1,102 1,036 1,063
Unemployment rate 8.2 7.5 7.7
Women, 20 years and over
Civilian labor force 9,814 9,914 9,930
Participation rate 59.3 58.6 58.6
Employed 8,788 9,057 9,041
Employment-population ratio 53.1 53.5 53.3
Unemployed 1,027 857 889
Unemployment rate 10.5 8.6 9.0
Both sexes, 16 to 19 years
Civilian labor force 1,386 1,293 1,443
Participation rate 37.9 35.4 39.5
Employed 979 910 997
Employment-population ratio 26.8 24.9 27.3
Unemployed 407 383 446
Unemployment rate 29.4 29.6 30.9
Footnotes
(1) The population figures are not adjusted for seasonal variation; therefore, identical numbers appear in the unadjusted and seasonally adjusted columns.
– Data not available.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-4. Employment status of the civilian population 25 years and over by educational attainment

[Numbers in thousands]
Educational attainment Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
Less than a high school diploma
Civilian labor force 11,457 11,414 10,886 11,446 11,264 10,999 11,237 11,161 10,889
Participation rate 46.2 45.5 45.4 46.2 46.0 44.8 45.0 44.5 45.4
Employed 10,062 10,312 9,723 9,997 10,012 9,725 9,993 9,969 9,692
Employment-population ratio 40.6 41.1 40.5 40.3 40.9 39.6 40.0 39.8 40.4
Unemployed 1,395 1,102 1,163 1,449 1,252 1,274 1,243 1,192 1,197
Unemployment rate 12.2 9.7 10.7 12.7 11.1 11.6 11.1 10.7 11.0
High school graduates, no college(1)
Civilian labor force 36,782 36,324 36,722 37,014 36,121 36,200 36,236 36,320 36,741
Participation rate 59.2 59.1 59.0 59.6 58.6 58.7 58.9 59.1 59.0
Employed 33,676 33,681 33,995 33,823 33,359 33,510 33,572 33,562 33,950
Employment-population ratio 54.2 54.8 54.6 54.5 54.1 54.3 54.6 54.6 54.5
Unemployed 3,105 2,643 2,727 3,191 2,762 2,689 2,664 2,757 2,791
Unemployment rate 8.4 7.3 7.4 8.6 7.6 7.4 7.4 7.6 7.6
Some college or associate degree
Civilian labor force 37,299 36,943 37,252 37,414 37,232 37,371 37,470 37,297 37,341
Participation rate 68.1 67.4 67.1 68.3 68.1 68.4 68.5 68.1 67.3
Employed 34,546 34,561 34,931 34,772 34,845 34,992 35,036 34,925 35,105
Employment-population ratio 63.1 63.1 62.9 63.5 63.8 64.1 64.0 63.7 63.2
Unemployed 2,752 2,382 2,320 2,642 2,387 2,379 2,435 2,372 2,237
Unemployment rate 7.4 6.4 6.2 7.1 6.4 6.4 6.5 6.4 6.0
Bachelor’s degree and higher(2)
Civilian labor force 47,517 49,086 48,831 47,675 49,236 49,492 49,473 49,466 49,173
Participation rate 75.5 75.1 75.0 75.8 75.3 75.6 75.8 75.6 75.5
Employed 45,381 47,163 46,779 45,711 47,371 47,563 47,581 47,537 47,281
Employment-population ratio 72.1 72.1 71.8 72.6 72.5 72.7 72.9 72.7 72.6
Unemployed 2,136 1,923 2,051 1,964 1,865 1,929 1,892 1,929 1,891
Unemployment rate 4.5 3.9 4.2 4.1 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8
Footnotes
(1) Includes persons with a high school diploma or equivalent.
(2) Includes persons with bachelor’s, master’s, professional, and doctoral degrees.
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-5. Employment status of the civilian population 18 years and over by veteran status, period of service, and sex, not seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, veteran status, and period of service Total Men Women
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
VETERANS, 18 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 21,163 21,384 19,349 19,159 1,814 2,225
Civilian labor force 10,925 10,923 9,845 9,529 1,080 1,395
Participation rate 51.6 51.1 50.9 49.7 59.5 62.7
Employed 10,173 10,221 9,171 8,918 1,002 1,303
Employment-population ratio 48.1 47.8 47.4 46.5 55.2 58.6
Unemployed 752 702 674 610 79 92
Unemployment rate 6.9 6.4 6.8 6.4 7.3 6.6
Not in labor force 10,238 10,461 9,504 9,630 734 830
Gulf War-era II veterans
Civilian noninstitutional population 2,453 2,728 2,056 2,197 397 530
Civilian labor force 1,945 2,155 1,683 1,800 263 355
Participation rate 79.3 79.0 81.9 81.9 66.1 67.0
Employed 1,771 1,989 1,524 1,661 247 328
Employment-population ratio 72.2 72.9 74.2 75.6 62.2 61.8
Unemployed 174 166 159 138 15 27
Unemployment rate 8.9 7.7 9.4 7.7 5.9 7.7
Not in labor force 507 573 373 397 135 175
Gulf War-era I veterans
Civilian noninstitutional population 3,158 3,291 2,668 2,664 489 627
Civilian labor force 2,599 2,713 2,237 2,208 361 504
Participation rate 82.3 82.4 83.8 82.9 73.8 80.5
Employed 2,428 2,572 2,098 2,093 330 479
Employment-population ratio 76.9 78.1 78.6 78.6 67.5 76.4
Unemployed 170 141 139 115 31 26
Unemployment rate 6.5 5.2 6.2 5.2 8.5 5.1
Not in labor force 559 578 431 456 128 122
World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam-era veterans
Civilian noninstitutional population 9,868 9,789 9,551 9,421 318 368
Civilian labor force 3,217 2,922 3,125 2,835 92 87
Participation rate 32.6 29.9 32.7 30.1 29.1 23.7
Employed 3,020 2,727 2,932 2,644 88 84
Employment-population ratio 30.6 27.9 30.7 28.1 27.7 22.7
Unemployed 197 195 193 192 4 4
Unemployment rate 6.1 6.7 6.2 6.8 4.6 4.0
Not in labor force 6,652 6,867 6,426 6,586 225 281
Veterans of other service periods
Civilian noninstitutional population 5,684 5,576 5,074 4,876 610 700
Civilian labor force 3,164 3,133 2,800 2,685 364 448
Participation rate 55.7 56.2 55.2 55.1 59.7 64.0
Employed 2,953 2,933 2,617 2,520 336 413
Employment-population ratio 52.0 52.6 51.6 51.7 55.1 58.9
Unemployed 211 200 183 165 28 36
Unemployment rate 6.7 6.4 6.5 6.1 7.7 7.9
Not in labor force 2,520 2,443 2,274 2,191 246 252
NONVETERANS, 18 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 213,366 215,592 93,604 94,951 119,762 120,641
Civilian labor force 142,848 143,519 72,405 73,049 70,443 70,470
Participation rate 66.9 66.6 77.4 76.9 58.8 58.4
Employed 130,997 133,021 66,608 67,722 64,389 65,299
Employment-population ratio 61.4 61.7 71.2 71.3 53.8 54.1
Unemployed 11,850 10,498 5,797 5,327 6,054 5,171
Unemployment rate 8.3 7.3 8.0 7.3 8.6 7.3
Not in labor force 70,518 72,072 21,199 21,902 49,319 50,171
NOTE: Veterans served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces and were not on active duty at the time of the survey. Nonveterans never served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces. Veterans could have served anywhere in the world during these periods of service: Gulf War era II (September 2001-present), Gulf War era I (August 1990-August 2001), Vietnam era (August 1964-April 1975), Korean War (July 1950-January 1955), World War II (December 1941-December 1946), and other service periods (all other time periods). Veterans who served in more than one wartime period are classified only in the most recent one. Veterans who served during one of the selected wartime periods and another period are classified only in the wartime period. Beginning with data for January 2013, estimates for veterans incorporate population controls derived from the updated Department of Veterans Affairs’ population model.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-6. Employment status of the civilian population by sex, age, and disability status, not seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, sex, and age Persons with a disability Persons with no disability
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
TOTAL, 16 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 28,007 28,406 215,346 217,349
Civilian labor force 5,791 5,778 150,735 151,418
Participation rate 20.7 20.3 70.0 69.7
Employed 5,004 4,926 138,122 140,186
Employment-population ratio 17.9 17.3 64.1 64.5
Unemployed 787 852 12,613 11,231
Unemployment rate 13.6 14.7 8.4 7.4
Not in labor force 22,216 22,628 64,611 65,932
Men, 16 to 64 years
Civilian labor force 2,612 2,638 76,636 76,858
Participation rate 34.4 35.3 83.9 83.6
Employed 2,289 2,240 70,401 71,084
Employment-population ratio 30.2 30.0 77.0 77.3
Unemployed 323 398 6,235 5,774
Unemployment rate 12.4 15.1 8.1 7.5
Not in labor force 4,971 4,841 14,742 15,073
Women, 16 to 64 years
Civilian labor force 2,207 2,188 67,470 67,576
Participation rate 28.7 28.3 71.2 71.0
Employed 1,817 1,778 61,567 62,468
Employment-population ratio 23.6 23.0 64.9 65.7
Unemployed 390 410 5,903 5,108
Unemployment rate 17.7 18.7 8.7 7.6
Not in labor force 5,487 5,556 27,352 27,574
Both sexes, 65 years and over
Civilian labor force 973 953 6,629 6,984
Participation rate 7.6 7.2 22.7 23.1
Employed 898 908 6,155 6,634
Employment-population ratio 7.1 6.9 21.1 21.9
Unemployed 74 44 474 350
Unemployment rate 7.6 4.7 7.2 5.0
Not in labor force 11,758 12,232 22,517 23,285
NOTE: A person with a disability has at least one of the following conditions: is deaf or has serious difficulty hearing; is blind or has serious difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses; has serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition; has serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs; has difficulty dressing or bathing; or has difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor’s office or shopping because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-7. Employment status of the civilian population by nativity and sex, not seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status and nativity Total Men Women
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
Foreign born, 16 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 37,627 37,941 18,428 18,391 19,199 19,550
Civilian labor force 25,180 25,382 14,575 14,634 10,606 10,748
Participation rate 66.9 66.9 79.1 79.6 55.2 55.0
Employed 23,211 23,689 13,553 13,767 9,657 9,922
Employment-population ratio 61.7 62.4 73.5 74.9 50.3 50.8
Unemployed 1,970 1,693 1,021 867 948 825
Unemployment rate 7.8 6.7 7.0 5.9 8.9 7.7
Not in labor force 12,446 12,559 3,853 3,757 8,593 8,802
Native born, 16 years and over
Civilian noninstitutional population 205,727 207,815 98,954 100,204 106,774 107,611
Civilian labor force 131,346 131,814 68,979 69,331 62,367 62,483
Participation rate 63.8 63.4 69.7 69.2 58.4 58.1
Employed 119,916 121,424 63,137 63,803 56,778 57,621
Employment-population ratio 58.3 58.4 63.8 63.7 53.2 53.5
Unemployed 11,430 10,390 5,842 5,528 5,589 4,862
Unemployment rate 8.7 7.9 8.5 8.0 9.0 7.8
Not in labor force 74,381 76,001 29,975 30,873 44,407 45,128
NOTE: The foreign born are those residing in the United States who were not U.S. citizens at birth. That is, they were born outside the United States or one of its outlying areas such as Puerto Rico or Guam, to parents neither of whom was a U.S. citizen. The native born are persons who were born in the United States or one of its outlying areas such as Puerto Rico or Guam or who were born abroad of at least one parent who was a U.S. citizen. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-8. Employed persons by class of worker and part-time status

[In thousands]
Category Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
CLASS OF WORKER
Agriculture and related industries 2,477 2,234 2,435 2,224 2,001 2,017 2,059 2,067 2,159
Wage and salary workers(1) 1,584 1,380 1,494 1,397 1,250 1,227 1,263 1,268 1,303
Self-employed workers, unincorporated 843 836 915 786 710 772 793 790 842
Unpaid family workers 49 18 25
Nonagricultural industries 140,649 142,607 142,678 140,013 141,317 141,592 141,890 142,004 142,165
Wage and salary workers(1) 131,619 133,652 133,606 131,154 132,761 132,847 133,201 133,273 133,224
Government 19,332 19,719 19,151 20,100 20,633 20,269 20,361 20,157 20,041
Private industries 112,287 113,932 114,455 110,990 112,147 112,558 112,865 113,167 113,164
Private households 818 702 704
Other industries 111,469 113,230 113,752 110,255 111,462 111,932 112,274 112,552 112,535
Self-employed workers, unincorporated 8,957 8,885 9,010 8,845 8,407 8,651 8,597 8,643 8,831
Unpaid family workers 74 71 62
PERSONS AT WORK PART TIME(2)
All industries
Part time for economic reasons(3) 8,316 8,440 8,324 8,245 7,638 7,916 7,904 8,226 8,245
Slack work or business conditions 5,235 5,222 5,140 5,319 4,906 5,129 4,841 5,193 5,177
Could only find part-time work 2,637 2,748 2,757 2,568 2,576 2,527 2,721 2,652 2,665
Part time for noneconomic reasons(4) 17,200 17,931 17,503 18,846 18,745 18,908 18,934 19,044 19,128
Nonagricultural industries
Part time for economic reasons(3) 8,218 8,328 8,207 8,104 7,544 7,793 7,797 8,111 8,101
Slack work or business conditions 5,175 5,150 5,068 5,258 4,832 5,058 4,778 5,120 5,106
Could only find part-time work 2,607 2,717 2,732 2,558 2,510 2,454 2,686 2,632 2,665
Part time for noneconomic reasons(4) 16,863 17,644 17,201 18,519 18,435 18,542 18,511 18,696 18,779
Footnotes
(1) Includes self-employed workers whose businesses are incorporated.
(2) Refers to those who worked 1 to 34 hours during the survey reference week and excludes employed persons who were absent from their jobs for the entire week.
(3) Refers to those who worked 1 to 34 hours during the reference week for an economic reason such as slack work or unfavorable business conditions, inability to find full-time work, or seasonal declines in demand.
(4) Refers to persons who usually work part time for noneconomic reasons such as childcare problems, family or personal obligations, school or training, retirement or Social Security limits on earnings, and other reasons. This excludes persons who usually work full time but worked only 1 to 34 hours during the reference week for reasons such as vacations, holidays, illness, and bad weather.
– Data not available.
NOTE: Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-9. Selected employment indicators

[Numbers in thousands]
Characteristic Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
AGE AND SEX
Total, 16 years and over 143,126 144,841 145,113 142,250 143,286 143,579 143,898 144,058 144,285
16 to 19 years 5,560 5,143 5,504 4,525 4,351 4,320 4,445 4,469 4,469
16 to 17 years 1,956 1,676 1,870 1,538 1,482 1,490 1,505 1,451 1,460
18 to 19 years 3,604 3,467 3,634 3,007 2,868 2,834 2,937 3,027 3,034
20 years and over 137,566 139,698 139,608 137,725 138,935 139,260 139,453 139,589 139,816
20 to 24 years 13,901 13,981 14,180 13,380 13,382 13,569 13,412 13,605 13,654
25 years and over 123,665 125,717 125,428 124,279 125,615 125,678 126,057 125,978 126,087
25 to 54 years 93,769 94,390 94,247 94,000 94,409 94,393 94,569 94,461 94,476
25 to 34 years 30,601 31,206 31,168 30,554 31,180 31,133 31,292 31,217 31,176
35 to 44 years 30,389 30,523 30,582 30,523 30,620 30,637 30,691 30,570 30,686
45 to 54 years 32,779 32,661 32,497 32,924 32,610 32,623 32,586 32,675 32,613
55 years and over 29,896 31,326 31,181 30,279 31,206 31,285 31,488 31,517 31,612
Men, 16 years and over 76,691 77,277 77,569 75,512 76,329 76,239 76,299 76,447 76,466
16 to 19 years 2,827 2,560 2,715 2,224 2,101 2,080 2,175 2,171 2,138
16 to 17 years 912 832 929 666 645 653 686 696 679
18 to 19 years 1,916 1,728 1,786 1,560 1,444 1,426 1,485 1,495 1,457
20 years and over 73,863 74,717 74,854 73,288 74,228 74,159 74,124 74,276 74,328
20 to 24 years 7,313 7,193 7,412 6,936 7,006 6,990 6,917 6,952 7,037
25 years and over 66,550 67,524 67,442 66,323 67,205 67,095 67,192 67,331 67,270
25 to 54 years 50,581 50,878 50,882 50,263 50,669 50,565 50,613 50,672 50,592
25 to 34 years 16,726 16,987 16,971 16,561 16,980 16,887 16,961 16,944 16,849
35 to 44 years 16,583 16,607 16,680 16,500 16,655 16,673 16,660 16,602 16,597
45 to 54 years 17,272 17,284 17,231 17,202 17,034 17,005 16,992 17,125 17,146
55 years and over 15,969 16,646 16,560 16,060 16,536 16,530 16,578 16,659 16,678
Women, 16 years and over 66,435 67,565 67,543 66,738 66,956 67,340 67,599 67,612 67,819
16 to 19 years 2,733 2,584 2,789 2,301 2,250 2,239 2,271 2,298 2,330
16 to 17 years 1,045 844 941 871 837 837 819 755 781
18 to 19 years 1,688 1,739 1,848 1,447 1,424 1,408 1,452 1,532 1,577
20 years and over 63,703 64,981 64,754 64,437 64,707 65,101 65,329 65,314 65,489
20 to 24 years 6,588 6,789 6,768 6,443 6,376 6,578 6,495 6,653 6,617
25 years and over 57,115 58,192 57,986 57,956 58,411 58,583 58,866 58,647 58,817
25 to 54 years 43,188 43,512 43,365 43,737 43,740 43,828 43,955 43,790 43,884
25 to 34 years 13,875 14,220 14,197 13,992 14,200 14,246 14,330 14,272 14,327
35 to 44 years 13,805 13,915 13,902 14,023 13,965 13,964 14,030 13,968 14,089
45 to 54 years 15,507 15,377 15,265 15,722 15,575 15,619 15,595 15,550 15,467
55 years and over 13,927 14,680 14,621 14,219 14,670 14,755 14,910 14,857 14,934
MARITAL STATUS
Married men, spouse present 43,743 43,923 43,873 43,764 44,007 44,024 44,176 43,963 43,914
Married women, spouse present 33,734 34,276 33,950 34,365 34,319 34,346 34,716 34,672 34,622
Women who maintain families 9,354 9,348 9,291
FULL- OR PART-TIME STATUS
Full-time workers(1) 116,131 117,400 117,688 114,478 115,903 116,053 116,238 115,998 116,090
Part-time workers(2) 26,995 27,442 27,425 27,890 27,442 27,549 27,699 28,059 28,233
MULTIPLE JOBHOLDERS
Total multiple jobholders 6,741 6,990 6,897 6,871 7,102 6,983 6,918 7,065 7,036
Percent of total employed 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.8 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.9 4.9
SELF-EMPLOYMENT
Self-employed workers, incorporated 5,256 5,170 5,187
Self-employed workers, unincorporated 9,800 9,720 9,925 9,630 9,117 9,423 9,390 9,432 9,673
Footnotes
(1) Employed full-time workers are persons who usually work 35 hours or more per week.
(2) Employed part-time workers are persons who usually work less than 35 hours per week.
– Data not available.
NOTE: Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-10. Selected unemployment indicators, seasonally adjusted
Characteristic Number of
unemployed persons
(in thousands)
Unemployment rates
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
AGE AND SEX
Total, 16 years and over 12,745 11,777 11,514 8.2 7.6 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.4
16 to 19 years 1,420 1,409 1,388 23.9 24.2 24.1 24.5 24.0 23.7
16 to 17 years 564 522 599 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 26.5 29.1
18 to 19 years 859 882 755 22.2 22.1 22.6 22.4 22.6 19.9
20 years and over 11,325 10,368 10,125 7.6 6.9 6.9 6.9 6.9 6.8
20 to 24 years 2,082 2,123 1,962 13.5 13.3 13.1 13.2 13.5 12.6
25 years and over 9,266 8,274 8,163 6.9 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.2 6.1
25 to 54 years 7,248 6,491 6,463 7.2 6.4 6.4 6.4 6.4 6.4
25 to 34 years 2,735 2,579 2,544 8.2 7.4 7.4 7.2 7.6 7.5
35 to 44 years 2,213 1,932 1,952 6.8 6.0 5.8 6.2 5.9 6.0
45 to 54 years 2,299 1,981 1,967 6.5 5.7 5.9 5.9 5.7 5.7
55 years and over 1,973 1,777 1,657 6.1 5.5 5.5 5.3 5.3 5.0
Men, 16 years and over 6,895 6,451 6,387 8.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 7.8 7.7
16 to 19 years 806 844 805 26.6 25.9 26.2 27.1 28.0 27.4
16 to 17 years 286 309 327 30.0 30.7 31.2 31.6 30.8 32.5
18 to 19 years 512 521 460 24.7 23.4 23.9 24.0 25.8 24.0
20 years and over 6,089 5,607 5,581 7.7 6.9 7.1 7.2 7.0 7.0
20 to 24 years 1,224 1,228 1,158 15.0 14.4 14.0 14.6 15.0 14.1
25 years and over 4,865 4,406 4,415 6.8 6.0 6.3 6.3 6.1 6.2
25 to 54 years 3,752 3,436 3,431 6.9 6.1 6.5 6.5 6.4 6.4
25 to 34 years 1,420 1,362 1,404 7.9 7.1 7.6 7.3 7.4 7.7
35 to 44 years 1,150 1,015 1,028 6.5 5.6 5.7 6.1 5.8 5.8
45 to 54 years 1,181 1,059 999 6.4 5.6 6.2 6.2 5.8 5.5
55 years and over 1,113 970 984 6.5 5.7 5.7 5.8 5.5 5.6
Women, 16 years and over 5,850 5,326 5,127 8.1 7.6 7.3 7.1 7.3 7.0
16 to 19 years 614 565 583 21.1 22.4 22.1 21.7 19.7 20.0
16 to 17 years 278 214 272 24.2 24.0 23.8 23.6 22.0 25.8
18 to 19 years 347 361 295 19.3 20.7 21.2 20.6 19.1 15.8
20 years and over 5,236 4,761 4,544 7.5 7.0 6.7 6.5 6.8 6.5
20 to 24 years 858 895 804 11.8 12.0 12.3 11.8 11.9 10.8
25 years and over 4,401 3,868 3,748 7.1 6.3 5.9 5.9 6.2 6.0
25 to 54 years 3,496 3,055 3,032 7.4 6.6 6.2 6.3 6.5 6.5
25 to 34 years 1,315 1,217 1,140 8.6 7.7 7.3 7.1 7.9 7.4
35 to 44 years 1,063 916 924 7.0 6.5 6.0 6.4 6.2 6.2
45 to 54 years 1,118 921 968 6.6 5.7 5.5 5.7 5.6 5.9
55 years and over(1) 979 836 750 6.6 5.2 4.8 4.3 5.4 4.9
MARITAL STATUS
Married men, spouse present 2,276 1,975 1,967 4.9 4.3 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.3
Married women, spouse present 2,074 1,677 1,678 5.7 4.7 4.4 4.4 4.6 4.6
Women who maintain families(1) 1,239 1,123 1,095 11.7 10.7 10.3 9.9 10.7 10.5
FULL- OR PART-TIME STATUS
Full-time workers(2) 10,787 9,956 9,604 8.6 7.9 7.9 7.9 7.9 7.6
Part-time workers(3) 1,953 1,834 1,882 6.5 5.9 6.0 5.9 6.1 6.2
Footnotes
(1) Not seasonally adjusted.
(2) Full-time workers are unemployed persons who have expressed a desire to work full time (35 hours or more per week) or are on layoff from full-time jobs.
(3) Part-time workers are unemployed persons who have expressed a desire to work part time (less than 35 hours per week) or are on layoff from part-time jobs.
NOTE: Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-11. Unemployed persons by reason for unemployment

[Numbers in thousands]
Reason Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
NUMBER OF UNEMPLOYED
Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs 7,151 5,939 5,934 7,106 6,329 6,410 6,147 6,119 5,921
On temporary layoff 1,525 1,139 1,337 1,429 1,107 1,170 997 1,199 1,221
Not on temporary layoff 5,626 4,800 4,597 5,677 5,223 5,240 5,151 4,920 4,700
Permanent job losers 4,377 3,639 3,548 4,368 3,959 3,976 3,822 3,700 3,589
Persons who completed temporary jobs 1,248 1,161 1,049 1,308 1,264 1,264 1,329 1,220 1,111
Job leavers 897 981 996 879 986 864 944 1,030 979
Reentrants 3,579 3,600 3,450 3,374 3,176 3,151 3,333 3,291 3,258
New entrants 1,773 1,728 1,703 1,299 1,316 1,280 1,268 1,259 1,254
PERCENT DISTRIBUTION
Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs 53.4 48.5 49.1 56.1 53.6 54.8 52.6 52.3 51.9
On temporary layoff 11.4 9.3 11.1 11.3 9.4 10.0 8.5 10.2 10.7
Not on temporary layoff 42.0 39.2 38.0 44.8 44.2 44.8 44.1 42.1 41.2
Job leavers 6.7 8.0 8.2 6.9 8.4 7.4 8.1 8.8 8.6
Reentrants 26.7 29.4 28.6 26.7 26.9 26.9 28.5 28.1 28.5
New entrants 13.2 14.1 14.1 10.3 11.1 10.9 10.8 10.8 11.0
UNEMPLOYED AS A PERCENT OF THE
CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE
Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs 4.6 3.8 3.8 4.6 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.8
Job leavers 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.6
Reentrants 2.3 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1
New entrants 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-12. Unemployed persons by duration of unemployment

[Numbers in thousands]
Duration Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
NUMBER OF UNEMPLOYED
Less than 5 weeks 3,021 3,569 2,842 2,697 2,464 2,474 2,706 2,692 2,563
5 to 14 weeks 3,585 2,592 3,348 3,102 2,838 2,848 2,669 2,864 2,869
15 weeks and over 6,794 6,086 5,892 6,923 6,348 6,320 6,306 6,225 6,034
15 to 26 weeks 1,547 1,841 1,570 1,756 1,737 1,967 1,950 1,896 1,788
27 weeks and over 5,247 4,245 4,322 5,167 4,611 4,353 4,357 4,328 4,246
Average (mean) duration, in weeks 37.4 34.1 35.3 38.8 37.1 36.5 36.9 35.6 36.6
Median duration, in weeks 15.2 14.3 13.8 16.8 18.1 17.5 17.3 16.3 15.7
PERCENT DISTRIBUTION
Less than 5 weeks 22.5 29.1 23.5 21.2 21.1 21.3 23.2 22.9 22.4
5 to 14 weeks 26.8 21.2 27.7 24.4 24.4 24.5 22.8 24.3 25.0
15 weeks and over 50.7 49.7 48.8 54.4 54.5 54.3 54.0 52.8 52.6
15 to 26 weeks 11.5 15.0 13.0 13.8 14.9 16.9 16.7 16.1 15.6
27 weeks and over 39.2 34.7 35.8 40.6 39.6 37.4 37.3 36.7 37.0
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-13. Employed and unemployed persons by occupation, not seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Occupation Employed Unemployed Unemployment
rates
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
Total, 16 years and over(1) 143,126 145,113 13,400 12,083 8.6 7.7
Management, professional, and related occupations 53,165 54,064 2,666 2,286 4.8 4.1
Management, business, and financial operations occupations 22,943 22,754 912 737 3.8 3.1
Professional and related occupations 30,222 31,309 1,753 1,549 5.5 4.7
Service occupations 26,565 26,768 2,666 2,573 9.1 8.8
Sales and office occupations 32,835 33,142 2,836 2,450 8.0 6.9
Sales and related occupations 15,536 15,840 1,400 1,170 8.3 6.9
Office and administrative support occupations 17,299 17,301 1,436 1,280 7.7 6.9
Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations 13,174 13,973 1,529 1,288 10.4 8.4
Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations 1,216 1,157 138 78 10.2 6.3
Construction and extraction occupations 7,157 7,665 1,056 930 12.9 10.8
Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations 4,801 5,151 335 280 6.5 5.2
Production, transportation, and material moving
occupations
17,388 17,167 1,900 1,735 9.8 9.2
Production occupations 8,545 8,337 903 857 9.6 9.3
Transportation and material moving occupations 8,843 8,830 997 878 10.1 9.0
Footnotes
(1) Persons with no previous work experience and persons whose last job was in the U.S. Armed Forces are included in the unemployed total.
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-14. Unemployed persons by industry and class of worker, not seasonally adjusted
Industry and class of worker Number of
unemployed
persons
(in thousands)
Unemployment
rates
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
Total, 16 years and over(1) 13,400 12,083 8.6 7.7
Nonagricultural private wage and salary workers 9,692 8,683 7.9 7.1
Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction 83 57 7.6 5.1
Construction 994 767 12.3 9.1
Manufacturing 1,128 1,082 7.2 6.9
Durable goods 703 619 7.2 6.3
Nondurable goods 426 463 7.3 7.8
Wholesale and retail trade 1,780 1,389 8.6 6.8
Transportation and utilities 392 388 6.5 6.4
Information 190 172 6.7 5.8
Financial activities 458 412 5.1 4.5
Professional and business services 1,378 1,265 9.1 8.1
Education and health services 1,436 1,283 6.5 5.7
Leisure and hospitality 1,420 1,470 9.7 10.0
Other services 433 396 6.7 6.0
Agriculture and related private wage and salary workers 131 97 7.9 6.5
Government workers 1,182 1,073 5.7 5.3
Self-employed workers, unincorporated, and unpaid family workers 623 528 5.9 5.0
Footnotes
(1) Persons with no previous work experience and persons whose last job was in the U.S. Armed Forces are included in the unemployed total.
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-15. Alternative measures of labor underutilization

[Percent]
Measure Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
June
2013
July
2013
July
2012
Mar.
2013
Apr.
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
U-1 Persons unemployed 15 weeks or longer, as a percent of the civilian labor force 4.3 3.9 3.7 4.5 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.0 3.9
U-2 Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs, as a percent of the civilian labor force 4.6 3.8 3.8 4.6 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.8
U-3 Total unemployed, as a percent of the civilian labor force (official unemployment rate) 8.6 7.8 7.7 8.2 7.6 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.4
U-4 Total unemployed plus discouraged workers, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus discouraged workers 9.1 8.4 8.3 8.7 8.1 8.0 8.0 8.2 8.0
U-5 Total unemployed, plus discouraged workers, plus all other persons marginally attached to the labor force, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force 10.0 9.3 9.1 9.7 8.9 8.9 8.8 9.1 8.8
U-6 Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force 15.2 14.6 14.3 14.9 13.8 13.9 13.8 14.3 14.0
NOTE: Persons marginally attached to the labor force are those who currently are neither working nor looking for work but indicate that they want and are available for a job and have looked for work sometime in the past 12 months. Discouraged workers, a subset of the marginally attached, have given a job-market related reason for not currently looking for work. Persons employed part time for economic reasons are those who want and are available for full-time work but have had to settle for a part-time schedule. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-16. Persons not in the labor force and multiple jobholders by sex, not seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Category Total Men Women
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
July
2012
July
2013
NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE
Total not in the labor force 86,828 88,560 33,828 34,630 53,000 53,930
Persons who currently want a job 6,837 6,862 3,062 3,113 3,775 3,749
Marginally attached to the labor force(1) 2,529 2,414 1,328 1,260 1,200 1,154
Discouraged workers(2) 852 988 514 572 338 416
Other persons marginally attached to the labor force(3) 1,676 1,426 815 688 862 738
MULTIPLE JOBHOLDERS
Total multiple jobholders(4) 6,741 6,897 3,409 3,568 3,333 3,329
Percent of total employed 4.7 4.8 4.4 4.6 5.0 4.9
Primary job full time, secondary job part time 3,459 3,689 1,939 2,061 1,520 1,627
Primary and secondary jobs both part time 1,871 1,810 670 715 1,201 1,094
Primary and secondary jobs both full time 271 289 191 174 80 115
Hours vary on primary or secondary job 1,065 1,038 567 584 498 454
Footnotes
(1) Data refer to persons who want a job, have searched for work during the prior 12 months, and were available to take a job during the reference week, but had not looked for work in the past 4 weeks.
(2) Includes those who did not actively look for work in the prior 4 weeks for reasons such as thinks no work available, could not find work, lacks schooling or training, employer thinks too young or old, and other types of discrimination.
(3) Includes those who did not actively look for work in the prior 4 weeks for such reasons as school or family responsibilities, ill health, and transportation problems, as well as a number for whom reason for nonparticipation was not determined.
(4) Includes a small number of persons who work part time on their primary job and full time on their secondary job(s), not shown separately.
NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-1. Employees on nonfarm payrolls by industry sector and selected industry detail

[In thousands]
Industry Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Change from:
June2013 – July2013(p)
Total nonfarm 133,368 136,383 136,777 135,664 133,762 135,688 135,876 136,038 162
Total private 112,746 114,141 114,975 115,081 111,871 113,829 114,025 114,186 161
Goods-producing 18,785 18,663 18,923 18,988 18,436 18,631 18,639 18,643 4
Mining and logging 868 868 881 889 852 868 871 875 4
Logging 52.6 49.6 51.5 52.0 50.8 51.2 51.1 50.2 -0.9
Mining 815.0 818.4 829.7 837.2 800.7 816.3 819.8 824.7 4.9
Oil and gas extraction 190.2 193.1 194.6 196.4 187.6 193.1 192.6 193.9 1.3
Mining, except oil and gas(1) 229.1 226.3 229.8 229.7 221.8 222.3 223.3 223.2 -0.1
Coal mining 86.8 85.6 86.6 86.6 86.4 85.0 85.8 86.1 0.3
Support activities for mining 395.7 399.0 405.3 411.1 391.3 400.9 403.9 407.6 3.7
Construction 5,888 5,834 5,992 6,054 5,627 5,791 5,799 5,793 -6
Construction of buildings 1,274.9 1,259.1 1,290.3 1,301.0 1,236.0 1,261.1 1,261.7 1,262.1 0.4
Residential building 598.7 585.9 602.2 606.8 576.3 584.3 583.6 583.7 0.1
Nonresidential building 676.2 673.2 688.1 694.2 659.7 676.8 678.1 678.4 0.3
Heavy and civil engineering construction 930.2 910.9 940.5 950.4 872.0 888.6 893.2 891.2 -2.0
Specialty trade contractors 3,682.7 3,663.5 3,761.1 3,802.4 3,519.0 3,641.1 3,643.7 3,640.1 -3.6
Residential specialty trade contractors 1,542.7 1,556.0 1,608.7 1,628.8 1,468.7 1,541.9 1,547.2 1,553.4 6.2
Nonresidential specialty trade contractors 2,140.0 2,107.5 2,152.4 2,173.6 2,050.3 2,099.2 2,096.5 2,086.7 -9.8
Manufacturing 12,029 11,961 12,050 12,045 11,957 11,972 11,969 11,975 6
Durable goods 7,525 7,516 7,565 7,548 7,496 7,512 7,512 7,520 8
Wood products 342.6 346.3 349.8 352.9 335.9 345.6 344.8 346.4 1.6
Nonmetallic mineral products 371.8 371.9 375.6 378.4 362.0 367.9 367.2 368.9 1.7
Primary metals 406.7 397.0 395.6 393.0 406.7 395.6 393.9 392.5 -1.4
Fabricated metal products 1,426.3 1,435.2 1,445.2 1,443.8 1,418.5 1,434.3 1,435.3 1,436.8 1.5
Machinery 1,106.1 1,101.7 1,103.7 1,104.3 1,100.9 1,101.1 1,098.3 1,100.0 1.7
Computer and electronic products(1) 1,101.4 1,081.9 1,089.0 1,086.5 1,097.0 1,083.9 1,084.7 1,081.5 -3.2
Computer and peripheral equipment 160.7 161.1 163.3 163.0 159.7 161.6 162.3 161.8 -0.5
Communications equipment 110.0 107.2 107.3 106.6 110.1 107.3 106.9 106.6 -0.3
Semiconductors and electronic components 387.9 378.3 381.0 380.1 386.2 378.9 379.9 378.2 -1.7
Electronic instruments 402.6 396.0 398.2 397.4 400.9 396.5 396.5 395.7 -0.8
Electrical equipment and appliances 373.0 364.3 364.2 366.0 370.6 365.3 362.7 364.1 1.4
Transportation equipment(1) 1,461.6 1,487.6 1,503.2 1,486.7 1,472.0 1,488.0 1,494.2 1,496.2 2.0
Motor vehicles and parts(2) 774.9 802.3 813.2 807.0 788.1 802.5 808.9 818.0 9.1
Furniture and related products 352.5 353.8 358.9 357.9 349.2 352.7 353.8 354.6 0.8
Miscellaneous durable goods manufacturing 582.9 576.1 579.8 578.2 583.1 577.6 577.1 578.5 1.4
Nondurable goods 4,504 4,445 4,485 4,497 4,461 4,460 4,457 4,455 -2
Food manufacturing 1,498.6 1,454.2 1,477.6 1,490.2 1,473.0 1,471.3 1,470.6 1,465.1 -5.5
Textile mills 118.1 114.3 115.9 115.0 118.0 114.3 114.7 114.9 0.2
Textile product mills 116.8 113.7 115.3 114.1 116.1 113.9 113.8 113.6 -0.2
Apparel 147.2 143.7 143.0 139.6 147.6 142.4 141.5 140.7 -0.8
Paper and paper products 380.7 376.1 379.5 379.4 378.9 377.1 377.1 377.4 0.3
Printing and related support activities 464.6 450.0 450.4 449.1 463.5 450.1 448.8 448.0 -0.8
Petroleum and coal products 114.9 115.3 117.0 117.5 111.9 114.0 114.5 114.8 0.3
Chemicals 786.2 795.3 798.9 801.7 782.8 795.6 795.5 797.2 1.7
Plastics and rubber products 649.7 658.7 660.7 662.1 647.4 657.9 657.1 659.7 2.6
Miscellaneous nondurable goods manufacturing 226.9 223.2 226.8 228.7 222.0 223.2 222.9 223.6 0.7
Private service-providing 93,961 95,478 96,052 96,093 93,435 95,198 95,386 95,543 157
Trade, transportation, and utilities 25,485 25,816 25,966 25,978 25,485 25,873 25,921 25,984 63
Wholesale trade 5,721.2 5,758.4 5,791.2 5,803.9 5,685.7 5,748.2 5,755.2 5,768.9 13.7
Durable goods 2,857.4 2,859.0 2,878.3 2,887.1 2,838.2 2,859.5 2,863.1 2,868.8 5.7
Nondurable goods 1,987.2 2,010.7 2,016.8 2,016.8 1,974.3 1,999.4 2,001.2 2,004.3 3.1
Electronic markets and agents and brokers 876.6 888.7 896.1 900.0 873.2 889.3 890.9 895.8 4.9
Retail trade 14,838.5 15,029.7 15,143.8 15,191.7 14,838.9 15,104.5 15,144.2 15,191.0 46.8
Motor vehicle and parts dealers(1) 1,743.4 1,773.1 1,786.2 1,796.9 1,725.1 1,763.5 1,771.5 1,777.7 6.2
Automobile dealers 1,095.3 1,116.1 1,126.3 1,131.0 1,088.5 1,114.2 1,120.4 1,123.9 3.5
Furniture and home furnishings stores 433.7 445.8 444.7 445.8 440.2 452.8 451.3 452.8 1.5
Electronics and appliance stores 502.2 496.3 496.0 498.7 508.2 505.0 505.4 505.9 0.5
Building material and garden supply stores 1,205.2 1,254.1 1,248.2 1,230.4 1,172.7 1,181.7 1,189.9 1,195.6 5.7
Food and beverage stores 2,880.4 2,906.5 2,938.1 2,946.9 2,858.8 2,908.0 2,915.9 2,924.0 8.1
Health and personal care stores 999.1 1,024.6 1,025.1 1,028.0 1,001.3 1,028.7 1,025.4 1,030.5 5.1
Gasoline stations 852.5 856.1 868.4 874.5 839.5 855.6 856.8 860.0 3.2
Clothing and clothing accessories stores 1,380.8 1,388.2 1,412.6 1,429.5 1,396.6 1,440.3 1,449.4 1,453.7 4.3
Sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores 571.7 564.2 568.8 569.3 583.6 579.0 580.4 580.3 -0.1
General merchandise stores(1) 3,036.3 3,076.3 3,095.1 3,109.1 3,069.1 3,129.6 3,131.0 3,140.1 9.1
Department stores 1,455.4 1,453.2 1,458.5 1,466.1 1,485.9 1,494.8 1,495.1 1,495.3 0.2
Miscellaneous store retailers 799.6 810.4 822.5 825.4 798.1 813.5 818.9 822.0 3.1
Nonstore retailers 433.6 434.1 438.1 437.2 445.7 446.8 448.3 448.4 0.1
Transportation and warehousing 4,372.4 4,469.3 4,469.2 4,422.1 4,411.5 4,463.0 4,463.7 4,468.3 4.6
Air transportation 464.4 447.5 449.6 448.5 460.0 446.3 445.3 444.1 -1.2
Rail transportation 230.3 231.5 231.5 231.5 229.9 230.7 230.8 231.1 0.3
Water transportation 65.5 62.9 63.7 64.9 63.6 62.7 62.4 62.8 0.4
Truck transportation 1,375.3 1,385.8 1,396.2 1,407.2 1,356.2 1,384.5 1,381.5 1,387.8 6.3
Transit and ground passenger transportation 381.8 486.7 462.4 394.8 442.8 467.8 466.6 458.0 -8.6
Pipeline transportation 44.0 45.3 45.4 45.6 43.7 45.3 45.1 45.3 0.2
Scenic and sightseeing transportation 34.8 28.2 33.6 33.7 26.0 26.1 26.5 25.6 -0.9
Support activities for transportation 577.4 583.8 586.3 589.8 577.6 583.8 586.2 590.3 4.1
Couriers and messengers 516.4 518.2 517.5 517.7 528.5 530.9 530.6 532.9 2.3
Warehousing and storage 682.5 679.4 683.0 688.4 683.2 684.9 688.7 690.4 1.7
Utilities 552.8 558.4 562.2 560.0 549.0 557.2 557.7 556.1 -1.6
Information 2,691 2,706 2,697 2,710 2,684 2,695 2,691 2,700 9
Publishing industries, except Internet 740.9 725.7 727.7 731.3 738.2 729.3 728.3 728.1 -0.2
Motion picture and sound recording industries 384.0 407.4 389.5 394.6 377.2 390.6 383.9 388.0 4.1
Broadcasting, except Internet 284.4 284.0 286.5 284.3 284.8 284.9 286.1 284.8 -1.3
Telecommunications 856.7 854.5 856.6 859.7 859.2 857.1 857.5 861.1 3.6
Data processing, hosting and related services 249.8 253.4 254.5 257.4 250.6 251.7 254.2 257.8 3.6
Other information services 175.3 180.6 182.4 182.2 173.5 181.2 180.8 180.5 -0.3
Financial activities 7,847 7,875 7,941 7,971 7,788 7,880 7,893 7,908 15
Finance and insurance 5,851.0 5,882.6 5,913.6 5,932.5 5,833.9 5,894.4 5,903.3 5,915.3 12.0
Monetary authorities – central bank 17.4 16.7 16.9 17.0 17.2 16.8 16.9 16.8 -0.1
Credit intermediation and related
activities(1)
2,582.8 2,605.6 2,616.0 2,624.0 2,575.9 2,610.8 2,614.0 2,617.6 3.6
Depository credit intermediation(1) 1,742.7 1,731.8 1,737.2 1,740.1 1,734.8 1,734.7 1,733.8 1,733.2 -0.6
Commercial banking 1,320.5 1,302.4 1,304.3 1,306.7 1,315.1 1,305.0 1,302.8 1,302.2 -0.6
Securities, commodity contracts, investments 819.7 827.0 833.4 838.8 816.2 830.9 829.5 835.1 5.6
Insurance carriers and related activities 2,343.5 2,347.3 2,360.6 2,365.0 2,337.7 2,349.5 2,356.2 2,358.9 2.7
Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles 87.6 86.0 86.7 87.7 86.9 86.4 86.7 86.9 0.2
Real estate and rental and leasing 1,996.3 1,992.5 2,027.0 2,038.5 1,954.4 1,985.3 1,989.6 1,992.8 3.2
Real estate 1,442.4 1,443.9 1,465.9 1,475.1 1,417.8 1,440.9 1,445.0 1,448.0 3.0
Rental and leasing services 529.6 525.7 537.7 540.1 512.5 521.3 521.3 521.7 0.4
Lessors of nonfinancial intangible assets 24.3 22.9 23.4 23.3 24.1 23.1 23.3 23.1 -0.2
Professional and business services 18,053 18,492 18,657 18,691 17,965 18,489 18,550 18,586 36
Professional and technical services(1) 7,881.4 8,051.2 8,087.4 8,121.1 7,904.1 8,104.1 8,118.5 8,139.6 21.1
Legal services 1,135.1 1,125.1 1,134.5 1,138.8 1,123.2 1,126.9 1,124.2 1,127.0 2.8
Accounting and bookkeeping services 839.6 896.7 879.5 874.7 912.6 940.4 942.6 945.1 2.5
Architectural and engineering services 1,341.1 1,352.2 1,368.5 1,372.3 1,322.1 1,351.9 1,355.5 1,352.8 -2.7
Computer systems design and related services 1,633.9 1,683.1 1,690.6 1,704.8 1,627.3 1,686.6 1,694.5 1,698.8 4.3
Management and technical consulting services 1,128.4 1,177.4 1,187.5 1,197.3 1,124.6 1,178.5 1,185.4 1,192.3 6.9
Management of companies and enterprises 2,024.0 2,038.0 2,057.6 2,067.2 2,012.6 2,042.1 2,046.9 2,054.2 7.3
Administrative and waste services 8,147.9 8,402.6 8,512.2 8,502.6 8,048.2 8,342.6 8,384.4 8,392.0 7.6
Administrative and support services(1) 7,764.7 8,023.8 8,126.3 8,113.2 7,674.6 7,964.3 8,003.9 8,012.2 8.3
Employment services(1) 3,149.3 3,331.9 3,381.1 3,358.3 3,166.4 3,345.4 3,367.6 3,367.9 0.3
Temporary help services 2,508.1 2,664.8 2,703.9 2,679.0 2,529.6 2,675.4 2,691.6 2,699.3 7.7
Business support services 813.9 838.5 839.1 843.2 829.4 848.3 851.9 855.4 3.5
Services to buildings and dwellings 1,938.9 1,949.4 1,993.4 2,003.9 1,825.7 1,871.4 1,882.3 1,889.2 6.9
Waste management and remediation services 383.2 378.8 385.9 389.4 373.6 378.3 380.5 379.8 -0.7
Education and health services 19,991 20,714 20,460 20,330 20,331 20,646 20,662 20,675 13
Educational services 3,058.4 3,411.3 3,163.4 3,074.8 3,358.0 3,369.5 3,366.9 3,371.9 5.0
Health care and social assistance 16,933.0 17,302.6 17,296.1 17,255.2 16,973.3 17,276.6 17,295.0 17,303.3 8.3
Health care(3) 14,328.2 14,541.2 14,579.1 14,580.6 14,303.5 14,546.5 14,561.3 14,563.8 2.5
Ambulatory health care services(1) 6,319.7 6,502.3 6,521.1 6,517.0 6,319.2 6,500.7 6,513.4 6,520.0 6.6
Offices of physicians 2,393.6 2,427.7 2,433.7 2,432.4 2,393.7 2,433.1 2,434.5 2,433.8 -0.7
Outpatient care centers 653.7 686.7 689.1 690.9 654.4 685.4 688.5 691.3 2.8
Home health care services 1,195.5 1,277.5 1,282.5 1,281.1 1,197.7 1,274.2 1,280.4 1,284.3 3.9
Hospitals 4,801.9 4,822.3 4,831.4 4,835.1 4,788.7 4,829.1 4,829.5 4,825.1 -4.4
Nursing and residential care facilities(1) 3,206.6 3,216.6 3,226.6 3,228.5 3,195.6 3,216.7 3,218.4 3,218.7 0.3
Nursing care facilities 1,670.4 1,660.6 1,663.8 1,660.9 1,665.5 1,660.3 1,659.6 1,657.2 -2.4
Social assistance(1) 2,604.8 2,761.4 2,717.0 2,674.6 2,669.8 2,730.1 2,733.7 2,739.5 5.8
Child day care services 790.0 880.6 830.0 780.2 855.5 852.3 850.6 847.4 -3.2
Leisure and hospitality 14,387 14,368 14,782 14,864 13,743 14,129 14,186 14,209 23
Arts, entertainment, and recreation 2,267.6 2,095.7 2,301.1 2,343.2 1,960.3 2,025.1 2,043.1 2,032.9 -10.2
Performing arts and spectator sports 426.0 447.6 449.2 447.8 399.5 425.9 426.0 421.9 -4.1
Museums, historical sites, and similar institutions 148.4 141.8 147.3 147.7 133.5 136.5 135.3 134.0 -1.3
Amusements, gambling, and recreation 1,693.2 1,506.3 1,704.6 1,747.7 1,427.3 1,462.7 1,481.8 1,477.0 -4.8
Accommodation and food services 12,119.3 12,272.3 12,480.8 12,521.2 11,782.3 12,103.9 12,142.5 12,175.6 33.1
Accommodation 1,965.7 1,835.8 1,932.7 1,979.8 1,815.7 1,829.9 1,833.5 1,828.2 -5.3
Food services and drinking places 10,153.6 10,436.5 10,548.1 10,541.4 9,966.6 10,274.0 10,309.0 10,347.4 38.4
Other services 5,507 5,507 5,549 5,549 5,439 5,486 5,483 5,481 -2
Repair and maintenance 1,199.6 1,207.1 1,203.6 1,201.7 1,192.8 1,201.3 1,195.7 1,195.0 -0.7
Personal and laundry services 1,322.7 1,346.7 1,350.7 1,343.5 1,313.2 1,332.4 1,334.1 1,334.5 0.4
Membership associations and organizations 2,985.1 2,953.2 2,994.4 3,003.6 2,933.1 2,952.2 2,952.7 2,951.1 -1.6
Government 20,622 22,242 21,802 20,583 21,891 21,859 21,851 21,852 1
Federal 2,826.0 2,757.0 2,761.0 2,761.0 2,805.0 2,758.0 2,748.0 2,746.0 -2.0
Federal, except U.S. Postal Service 2,213.2 2,168.2 2,171.9 2,170.0 2,194.6 2,166.1 2,156.4 2,157.2 0.8
U.S. Postal Service 612.9 589.0 589.1 591.0 610.0 592.0 591.6 588.6 -3.0
State government 4,740.0 5,070.0 4,802.0 4,716.0 5,042.0 5,037.0 5,028.0 5,025.0 -3.0
State government education 2,058.1 2,408.7 2,126.0 2,046.4 2,377.8 2,383.1 2,376.2 2,372.8 -3.4
State government, excluding education 2,682.3 2,661.7 2,676.1 2,669.6 2,664.4 2,653.7 2,651.9 2,652.3 0.4
Local government 13,056.0 14,415.0 14,239.0 13,106.0 14,044.0 14,064.0 14,075.0 14,081.0 6.0
Local government education 6,550.7 8,139.0 7,766.0 6,573.1 7,765.7 7,776.0 7,774.1 7,784.2 10.1
Local government, excluding education 6,505.3 6,275.5 6,473.3 6,533.1 6,278.3 6,287.9 6,301.0 6,297.0 -4.0
Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Includes motor vehicles, motor vehicle bodies and trailers, and motor vehicle parts.
(3) Includes ambulatory health care services, hospitals, and nursing and residential care facilities.
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-2. Average weekly hours and overtime of all employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted
Industry July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS
Total private 34.4 34.5 34.5 34.4
Goods-producing 40.2 40.4 40.4 40.2
Mining and logging 44.1 43.8 44.2 43.9
Construction 38.5 39.1 39.0 38.7
Manufacturing 40.7 40.7 40.8 40.6
Durable goods 41.0 41.1 41.1 40.9
Nondurable goods 40.2 40.2 40.3 40.1
Private service-providing 33.3 33.3 33.3 33.2
Trade, transportation, and utilities 34.5 34.6 34.5 34.5
Wholesale trade 38.6 38.7 38.8 38.7
Retail trade 31.5 31.5 31.4 31.4
Transportation and warehousing 38.3 38.6 38.5 38.5
Utilities 42.0 42.3 42.5 41.9
Information 36.5 36.7 36.9 36.7
Financial activities 37.1 37.3 37.3 37.2
Professional and business services 36.0 36.1 36.0 35.9
Education and health services 32.9 32.8 32.9 32.8
Leisure and hospitality 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.9
Other services 31.7 31.7 31.6 31.7
AVERAGE OVERTIME HOURS
Manufacturing 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.2
Durable goods 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.2
Nondurable goods 3.3 3.4 3.4 3.3
Footnotes
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-3. Average hourly and weekly earnings of all employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted
Industry Average hourly earnings Average weekly earnings
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Total private $23.54 $23.90 $24.00 $23.98 $809.78 $824.55 $828.00 $824.91
Goods-producing 24.72 25.08 25.21 25.18 993.74 1,013.23 1,018.48 1,012.24
Mining and logging 28.73 29.36 29.71 29.32 1,266.99 1,285.97 1,313.18 1,287.15
Construction 25.78 26.10 26.18 26.21 992.53 1,020.51 1,021.02 1,014.33
Manufacturing 23.94 24.28 24.41 24.37 974.36 988.20 995.93 989.42
Durable goods 25.32 25.70 25.83 25.80 1,038.12 1,056.27 1,061.61 1,055.22
Nondurable goods 21.57 21.83 21.95 21.92 867.11 877.57 884.59 878.99
Private service-providing 23.25 23.62 23.71 23.69 774.23 786.55 789.54 786.51
Trade, transportation, and utilities 20.53 20.89 20.97 20.95 708.29 722.79 723.47 722.78
Wholesale trade 26.84 27.62 27.77 27.77 1,036.02 1,068.89 1,077.48 1,074.70
Retail trade 16.33 16.56 16.61 16.58 514.40 521.64 521.55 520.61
Transportation and warehousing 22.02 22.18 22.24 22.31 843.37 856.15 856.24 858.94
Utilities 34.59 35.22 35.12 35.09 1,452.78 1,489.81 1,492.60 1,470.27
Information 31.82 32.58 32.85 32.68 1,161.43 1,195.69 1,212.17 1,199.36
Financial activities 29.22 30.08 30.27 30.26 1,084.06 1,121.98 1,129.07 1,125.67
Professional and business services 28.09 28.43 28.49 28.47 1,011.24 1,026.32 1,025.64 1,022.07
Education and health services 24.22 24.52 24.63 24.61 796.84 804.26 810.33 807.21
Leisure and hospitality 13.40 13.45 13.46 13.48 348.40 349.70 349.96 349.13
Other services 20.83 21.21 21.26 21.28 660.31 672.36 671.82 674.58
Footnotes
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-4. Indexes of aggregate weekly hours and payrolls for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted

[2007=100]
Industry Index of aggregate weekly hours(1) Index of aggregate weekly payrolls(2)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Percent change from:
June
2013 – July
2013(p)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Percent change from:
June
2013 – July
2013(p)
Total private 96.4 98.4 98.5 98.4 -0.1 108.2 112.1 112.8 112.5 -0.3
Goods-producing 84.4 85.8 85.8 85.4 -0.5 94.3 97.2 97.8 97.2 -0.6
Mining and logging 118.1 119.5 121.0 120.7 -0.2 136.2 140.8 144.3 142.1 -1.5
Construction 74.7 78.1 78.0 77.3 -0.9 83.7 88.5 88.7 88.0 -0.8
Manufacturing 87.6 87.7 87.9 87.5 -0.5 97.5 99.0 99.7 99.1 -0.6
Durable goods 86.5 86.9 86.9 86.6 -0.3 97.3 99.2 99.7 99.2 -0.5
Nondurable goods 89.5 89.5 89.6 89.2 -0.4 98.0 99.1 99.8 99.2 -0.6
Private service-providing 99.9 101.8 102.0 101.8 -0.2 112.5 116.4 117.1 116.8 -0.3
Trade, transportation, and utilities 95.6 97.4 97.3 97.5 0.2 105.7 109.5 109.8 109.9 0.1
Wholesale trade 95.8 97.1 97.4 97.4 0.0 107.3 111.9 112.9 112.9 0.0
Retail trade 94.9 96.6 96.6 96.9 0.3 102.5 105.8 106.1 106.2 0.1
Transportation and warehousing 96.7 98.6 98.4 98.5 0.1 108.1 111.0 111.0 111.5 0.5
Utilities 99.8 102.0 102.5 100.8 -1.7 114.0 118.7 119.0 116.9 -1.8
Information 89.5 90.3 90.7 90.5 -0.2 101.4 104.8 106.1 105.3 -0.8
Financial activities 94.6 96.3 96.4 96.3 -0.1 107.9 112.9 113.8 113.7 -0.1
Professional and business services 101.7 105.0 105.0 104.9 -0.1 115.8 120.9 121.2 121.0 -0.2
Education and health services 108.9 110.2 110.7 110.4 -0.3 123.6 126.6 127.7 127.3 -0.3
Leisure and hospitality 102.0 104.8 105.2 105.0 -0.2 110.2 113.7 114.3 114.2 -0.1
Other services 95.5 96.4 96.0 96.3 0.3 112.9 116.0 115.8 116.3 0.4
Footnotes
(1) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding 2007 annual average aggregate hours. Aggregate hours estimates are the product of estimates of average weekly hours and employment.
(2) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding 2007 annual average aggregate weekly payrolls. Aggregate payrolls estimates are the product of estimates of average hourly earnings, average weekly hours, and employment.
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-5. Employment of women on nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted
Industry Women employees (in thousands) Percent of all employees
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Total nonfarm 66,017 66,981 67,083 67,200 49.4 49.4 49.4 49.4
Total private 53,559 54,513 54,628 54,744 47.9 47.9 47.9 47.9
Goods-producing 4,103 4,107 4,104 4,101 22.3 22.0 22.0 22.0
Mining and logging 114 118 116 116 13.4 13.6 13.3 13.3
Construction 726 741 741 740 12.9 12.8 12.8 12.8
Manufacturing 3,263 3,248 3,247 3,245 27.3 27.1 27.1 27.1
Durable goods 1,735 1,734 1,734 1,735 23.1 23.1 23.1 23.1
Nondurable goods 1,528 1,514 1,513 1,510 34.3 33.9 33.9 33.9
Private service-providing 49,456 50,406 50,524 50,643 52.9 52.9 53.0 53.0
Trade, transportation, and utilities 10,281 10,507 10,535 10,569 40.3 40.6 40.6 40.7
Wholesale trade 1,708.0 1,704.9 1,705.5 1,709.1 30.0 29.7 29.6 29.6
Retail trade 7,412.2 7,615.7 7,641.6 7,671.1 50.0 50.4 50.5 50.5
Transportation and warehousing 1,024.1 1,048.1 1,050.0 1,049.7 23.2 23.5 23.5 23.5
Utilities 137.0 138.3 138.0 138.7 25.0 24.8 24.7 24.9
Information 1,079 1,071 1,069 1,075 40.2 39.7 39.7 39.8
Financial activities 4,518 4,543 4,542 4,548 58.0 57.7 57.5 57.5
Professional and business services 7,950 8,224 8,266 8,310 44.3 44.5 44.6 44.7
Education and health services 15,597 15,837 15,853 15,860 76.7 76.7 76.7 76.7
Leisure and hospitality 7,175 7,344 7,376 7,392 52.2 52.0 52.0 52.0
Other services 2,856 2,880 2,883 2,889 52.5 52.5 52.6 52.7
Government 12,458 12,468 12,455 12,456 56.9 57.0 57.0 57.0
Footnotes
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-6. Employment of production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted(1)

[In thousands]
Industry July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Total private 92,421 93,995 94,158 94,309
Goods-producing 13,295 13,395 13,385 13,393
Mining and logging 643 639 640 645
Construction 4,217 4,375 4,377 4,371
Manufacturing 8,435 8,381 8,368 8,377
Durable goods 5,182 5,155 5,148 5,162
Nondurable goods 3,253 3,226 3,220 3,215
Private service-providing 79,126 80,600 80,773 80,916
Trade, transportation, and utilities 21,620 21,890 21,933 21,992
Wholesale trade 4,578.1 4,631.6 4,638.8 4,651.7
Retail trade 12,784.5 12,954.3 12,990.5 13,033.5
Transportation and warehousing 3,819.8 3,854.7 3,853.5 3,857.3
Utilities 437.4 449.8 450.0 449.7
Information 2,172 2,187 2,181 2,189
Financial activities 5,995 6,063 6,075 6,090
Professional and business services 14,845 15,301 15,351 15,390
Education and health services 17,833 18,099 18,117 18,129
Leisure and hospitality 12,114 12,485 12,541 12,556
Other services 4,547 4,575 4,575 4,570
Footnotes
(1) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries. These groups account for approximately four-fifths of the total employment on private nonfarm payrolls.
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-7. Average weekly hours and overtime of production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted(1)
Industry July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS
Total private 33.7 33.7 33.7 33.6
Goods-producing 41.1 41.3 41.3 41.1
Mining and logging 46.8 45.9 45.7 45.7
Construction 39.1 39.7 39.5 39.4
Manufacturing 41.7 41.8 41.8 41.7
Durable goods 42.1 42.1 42.2 42.0
Nondurable goods 41.0 41.2 41.3 41.3
Private service-providing 32.4 32.5 32.4 32.3
Trade, transportation, and utilities 33.7 33.8 33.6 33.5
Wholesale trade 38.6 38.8 38.7 38.6
Retail trade 30.4 30.3 30.1 30.0
Transportation and warehousing 37.9 38.5 38.3 38.3
Utilities 41.3 41.9 41.9 40.9
Information 35.8 35.7 35.9 35.7
Financial activities 36.6 36.7 36.8 36.5
Professional and business services 35.3 35.3 35.2 35.2
Education and health services 32.2 32.2 32.3 32.1
Leisure and hospitality 24.9 25.0 25.0 24.9
Other services 30.7 30.7 30.8 30.6
AVERAGE OVERTIME HOURS
Manufacturing 4.2 4.3 4.3 4.2
Durable goods 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3
Nondurable goods 4.0 4.2 4.3 4.1
Footnotes
(1) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries. These groups account for approximately four-fifths of the total employment on private nonfarm payrolls.
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-8. Average hourly and weekly earnings of production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted(1)
Industry Average hourly earnings Average weekly earnings
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Total private $19.77 $20.08 $20.14 $20.14 $666.25 $676.70 $678.72 $676.70
Goods-producing 20.97 21.26 21.27 21.25 861.87 878.04 878.45 873.38
Mining and logging 25.99 27.13 27.07 26.80 1,216.33 1,245.27 1,237.10 1,224.76
Construction 24.02 24.28 24.29 24.28 939.18 963.92 959.46 956.63
Manufacturing 19.11 19.27 19.29 19.28 796.89 805.49 806.32 803.98
Durable goods 20.19 20.32 20.37 20.40 850.00 855.47 859.61 856.80
Nondurable goods 17.34 17.55 17.53 17.47 710.94 723.06 723.99 721.51
Private service-providing 19.52 19.83 19.90 19.91 632.45 644.48 644.76 643.09
Trade, transportation, and utilities 17.46 17.62 17.69 17.67 588.40 595.56 594.38 591.95
Wholesale trade 22.22 22.59 22.64 22.64 857.69 876.49 876.17 873.90
Retail trade 13.83 13.89 13.97 13.97 420.43 420.87 420.50 419.10
Transportation and warehousing 19.58 19.62 19.67 19.65 742.08 755.37 753.36 752.60
Utilities 32.01 31.97 32.10 32.10 1,322.01 1,339.54 1,344.99 1,312.89
Information 27.04 27.61 27.95 27.61 968.03 985.68 1,003.41 985.68
Financial activities 22.82 23.88 23.98 24.04 835.21 876.40 882.46 877.46
Professional and business services 23.21 23.59 23.66 23.67 819.31 832.73 832.83 833.18
Education and health services 21.08 21.38 21.45 21.47 678.78 688.44 692.84 689.19
Leisure and hospitality 11.64 11.74 11.75 11.76 289.84 293.50 293.75 292.82
Other services 17.60 17.83 17.87 17.90 540.32 547.38 550.40 547.74
Footnotes
(1) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries. These groups account for approximately four-fifths of the total employment on private nonfarm payrolls.
(p) Preliminary
ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Table B-9. Indexes of aggregate weekly hours and payrolls for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls by industry sector, seasonally adjusted(1)

[2002=100]
Industry Index of aggregate weekly hours(2) Index of aggregate weekly payrolls(3)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Percent change from:
June
2013 – July
2013(p)
July
2012
May
2013
June
2013(p)
July
2013(p)
Percent change from:
June
2013 – July
2013(p)
Total private 104.0 105.7 105.9 105.8 -0.1 137.2 141.8 142.4 142.2 -0.1
Goods-producing 83.5 84.5 84.5 84.1 -0.5 107.2 110.1 110.0 109.5 -0.5
Mining and logging 159.9 155.9 155.4 156.6 0.8 241.7 245.9 244.7 244.2 -0.2
Construction 82.6 87.0 86.6 86.2 -0.5 107.1 114.0 113.5 113.1 -0.4
Manufacturing 80.7 80.4 80.3 80.2 -0.1 100.9 101.3 101.3 101.1 -0.2
Durable goods 82.0 81.5 81.6 81.5 -0.1 103.3 103.4 103.8 103.8 0.0
Nondurable goods 78.6 78.3 78.4 78.2 -0.3 96.3 97.1 97.1 96.6 -0.5
Private service-providing 109.4 111.8 111.7 111.6 -0.1 146.4 151.9 152.3 152.2 -0.1
Trade, transportation, and utilities 101.6 103.1 102.7 102.7 0.0 126.5 129.6 129.6 129.5 -0.1
Wholesale trade 104.1 105.8 105.7 105.7 0.0 136.2 140.8 141.0 141.0 0.0
Retail trade 98.4 99.4 99.0 99.0 0.0 116.6 118.3 118.5 118.5 0.0
Transportation and warehousing 109.0 111.7 111.1 111.2 0.1 135.4 139.0 138.6 138.6 0.0
Utilities 92.4 96.4 96.4 94.1 -2.4 123.4 128.6 129.2 126.0 -2.5
Information 88.7 89.1 89.4 89.2 -0.2 118.8 121.8 123.7 121.9 -1.5
Financial activities 103.3 104.7 105.2 104.6 -0.6 145.0 153.9 155.3 154.8 -0.3
Professional and business services 117.4 121.1 121.1 121.4 0.2 162.2 169.9 170.5 171.0 0.3
Education and health services 123.9 125.7 126.2 125.5 -0.6 171.7 176.7 178.0 177.2 -0.4
Leisure and hospitality 110.5 114.3 114.8 114.5 -0.3 146.1 152.4 153.2 152.9 -0.2
Other services 97.9 98.5 98.8 98.1 -0.7 125.5 128.0 128.7 127.9 -0.6
Footnotes
(1) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries. These groups account for approximately four-fifths of the total employment on private nonfarm payrolls.
(2) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding 2002 annual average aggregate hours. Aggregate hours estimates are the product of estimates of average weekly hours and employment.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding 2002 annual average aggregate weekly payrolls. Aggregate payrolls estimates are the product of estimates of average hourly earnings, average weekly hours, and employment.
(p) Preliminary

 

Series Id:           LNS14000006
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - Black or African American
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Race:                Black or African American
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Advance Estimate of Real GDP Growth in Second Quarter of 2013 is 1.7% With First Quarter of 2013 Revised Down to 1.1% (Original Advance Estimate was 2.5%!)! — U.S. Economy Is Stagnating as Growth Continues To Decline — Videos

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National Income and Product Accounts
Gross Domestic Product, second quarter 2013 (advance estimate);
Comprehensive Revision: 1929 through 1st quarter 2013
      Real gross domestic product -- the output of goods and services produced by labor and property
located in the United States -- increased at an annual rate of 1.7 percent in the second quarter of 2013
(that is, from the first quarter to the second quarter), according to the "advance" estimate released by the
Bureau of Economic Analysis.  In the first quarter, real GDP increased 1.1 percent (revised).

      The Bureau emphasized that the second-quarter advance estimate released today is based on
source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency (see the box on page 3
and "Comparisons of Revisions to GDP" on page 18).  The "second" estimate for the second quarter,
based on more complete data, will be released on August 29, 2013.

      The increase in real GDP in the second quarter primarily reflected positive contributions from
personal consumption expenditures (PCE), exports, nonresidential fixed investment, private inventory
investment, and residential investment that were partly offset by a negative contribution from federal
government spending. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased.

      The acceleration in real GDP in the second quarter primarily reflected upturns in nonresidential
fixed investment and in exports, a smaller decrease in federal government spending, and an upturn in
state and local government spending that were partly offset by an acceleration in imports and
decelerations in private inventory investment and in PCE.

BOX._______

     Comprehensive Revision of the National Income and Product Accounts

     The estimates released today reflect the results of the 14th comprehensive (or benchmark) revision
of the national income and product accounts (NIPAs) in conjunction with the second quarter 2013
"advance" estimate.  More information on the revision is available on BEA’s Web site at
www.bea.gov/gdp-revisions.

FOOTNOTE.______

     Quarterly estimates are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, unless otherwise specified.
Quarter-to-quarter dollar changes are differences between these published estimates.  Percent changes are
calculated from unrounded data and are annualized.  "Real" estimates are in chained (2009) dollars.  Price
indexes are chain-type measures.

This news release is available on BEA’s Web site  along with the Technical Note
and Highlights related to this release.
_______________

     The price index for gross domestic purchases, which measures prices paid by U.S. residents,
increased 0.3 percent in the second quarter, compared with an increase of 1.2 percent in the first.
Excluding food and energy prices, the price index for gross domestic purchases increased 0.8 percent in
the second quarter compared with 1.4 percent in the first.

      Real personal consumption expenditures increased 1.8 percent in the second quarter, compared
with an increase of 2.3 percent in the first.  Durable goods increased 6.5 percent, compared with an
increase of 5.8 percent.  Nondurable goods increased 2.0 percent, compared with an increase of 2.7
percent.  Services increased 0.9 percent, compared with an increase of 1.5 percent.

      Real nonresidential fixed investment increased 4.6 percent in the second quarter, in contrast to a
decrease of 4.6 percent in the first.  Nonresidential structures increased 6.8 percent, in contrast to a
decrease of 25.7 percent.  Equipment increased 4.1 percent, compared with an increase of 1.6 percent.
Intellectual property products increased 3.8 percent, compared with an increase of 3.7 percent.  Real
residential fixed investment increased 13.4 percent, compared with an increase of 12.5 percent.

      Real exports of goods and services increased 5.4 percent in the second quarter, in contrast to a
decrease of 1.3 percent in the first.  Real imports of goods and services increased 9.5 percent, compared
with an increase of 0.6 percent.

      Real federal government consumption expenditures and gross investment decreased 1.5 percent
in the second quarter, compared with a decrease of 8.4 percent in the first.  National defense decreased
0.5 percent, compared with a decrease of 11.2 percent.  Nondefense decreased 3.2 percent, compared
with a decrease of 3.6 percent.  Real state and local government consumption expenditures and gross
investment increased 0.3 percent, in contrast to a decrease of 1.3 percent.

      The change in real private inventories added 0.41 percentage point to the second-quarter change
in real GDP after adding 0.93 percentage point to the first-quarter change.  Private businesses increased
inventories $56.7 billion in the second quarter, following increases of $42.2 billion in the first quarter
and $7.3 billion in the fourth.

      Real final sales of domestic product -- GDP less change in private inventories -- increased 1.3
percent in the second quarter, compared with an increase of 0.2 percent in the first.

Gross domestic purchases

      Real gross domestic purchases -- purchases by U.S. residents of goods and services wherever
produced -- increased 2.4 percent in the second quarter, compared with an increase of 1.4 percent in the
first.

Disposition of personal income

      Current-dollar personal income increased $140.1 billion (4.1 percent) in the second quarter, in
contrast to a decrease of $157.1 billion (4.4 percent) in the first.  The upturn in personal income
primarily reflected sharp upturns in personal dividend income and in wages and salaries and a sharp
deceleration in contributions for government social insurance (a subtraction in the calculation of
personal income).

*	Personal dividend income increased in the second quarter, in contrast to a large decrease in the
        first. The first-quarter decline in dividend income primarily reflected the accelerated and special
        dividends that were paid by many companies in the fourth quarter of 2012.

*	Wages and salaries increased in the second quarter, in contrast to a decrease in the first. The
        first-quarter decline in wages and salaries is based on preliminary quarterly census of
        employment and wages data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

*	The sharp deceleration in contributions for government social insurance primarily reflected the
        first-quarter expiration of the "payroll tax holiday" that increased the social security contribution
        rate for employees and self-employed workers by 2.0 percentage points.

      Personal current taxes increased $36.0 billion in the second quarter, compared with an increase
of $74.3 billion in the first.

      Disposable personal income increased $104.1 billion (3.4 percent) in the second quarter, in
contrast to a decrease of $231.5 billion (7.2 percent) in the first.  Real disposable personal income
increased 3.4 percent, in contrast to a decrease of 8.2 percent.

      Personal outlays increased $44.7 billion (1.5 percent) in the second quarter, compared with an
increase of $98.7 billion (3.4 percent) in the first.  Personal saving -- disposable personal income less
personal outlays -- was $553.4 billion in the second quarter, compared with $494.0 billion in the first.

      The personal saving rate -- personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income -- was
4.5 percent in the second quarter, compared with 4.0 percent in the first.  For a comparison of personal
saving in BEA’s national income and product accounts with personal saving in the Federal Reserve
Board’s flow of funds accounts and data on changes in net worth, go to
www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/Nipa-Frb.asp.

Current-dollar GDP

      Current-dollar GDP -- the market value of the nation's output of goods and services -- increased
2.4 percent, or $98.1 billio