Archive for July, 2012

American History–Sand Creek Massacre–Videos

Posted on July 9, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, government, government spending, history, liberty, Life, Links, People, Philosophy, Politics, Security, Video, War, Weapons, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

Sand Creek Massacre Part 1

On Nov, 29th, 1864 Colonel John Chivington with 700 men of the 3rd Colorado Cavalry angered by the Minnesota Massacre, Hungate Family Murder and various other Indian attacks attacked Cheyenne Chief Black Kettles village at Sand Creek. Around 150 Cheyenne Men, Women, and Children were killed many of which were mutilated. The soldiers lost 25 killed and had 51 wounded.

Sand Creek Massacre Part 2

Sand Creek Masacre

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Block on Rothbard, Mises, and Rand–Videos

Posted on July 7, 2012. Filed under: Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Fiscal Policy, history, History of Economic Thought, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

Rothbard, Mises, Rand, and Me | Walter Block

Background Articles and Videos

An Evening with Walter Block – Mises Canada 

Austrian Economics and Libertarianism | Walter Block 

Labor, Unemployment, and Interventionism | Walter Block 

Founder of Jews for Ron Paul Walter Block, PhD – Why Obama/Romney is a Curse to America and Israel 

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Murray Rothbard On Ludwig von Mises–Videos

Posted on July 7, 2012. Filed under: Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, government, History of Economic Thought, Language, Life, Links, Microeconomics, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Talk Radio, Taxes, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , |

Murray Rothbard Gives a Tribute to Ludwig von Mises

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American History–American West, The Frontier and Daniel Boone–Videos

Posted on July 7, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Culture, Economics, Education, High School, history, Immigration, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A History of the Early American West – The Frontier (part 1)

In this mini-documentary, historian Darren R. Reid (University of Edinburgh) explores the development of the frontier in the years leading up to the American Revolution.  From Daniel Boone’s exploration of Kentucky in 1769 to the outbreak of Dunmore’s War in 1774, this video is the perfect introduction to the early American west.
A History of the Early American West is an online series of video podcasts or mini-documentaries which explore the development of the frontier in the trans-Appalachian west, the area that includes Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.  Discover the world of frontier heroes like Daniel Boone and George R. Clark, Indian tribes such as the Shawnee, Mingo, and Delaware, tribal leaders such as Logan and Blackfish, and frontier rogues like Simon Girty and Alexander McKee.
Darren R. Reid is the author of a collection of essays and first hand accounts of the Kentucky and Ohio frontiers entitled Daniel Boone and Others on the Kentucky Frontier: Autobiographies and Narratives, 1769-1775.

A History of the Early American West – The Frontier (part 2)

DANIEL BOONE, TRAIL BLAZER (1956) – Full Movie – Captioned

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Panic of 2012–Only 80,000 Jobs Created in June, 2012–The Panic of 2012 Button Pressed–President Obama Lights Up In Panic Room–Smoke em If You Have em–Videos

Posted on July 6, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Inflation, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Tax Policy, Unemployment, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

Pronk Pops Show 81: July 8, 2012

Pronk Pops Show 80: June 28, 2012

Pronk Pops Show 79: June 27, 2012

Pronk Pops Show 78: June 20, 2012

Pronk Pops Show 77: June 13, 2012

Pronk Pops Show 76: June 6, 2012

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-81

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 22-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1-9

Segment 0: Panic of 2012–Only 80,000 Jobs Created in June, 2012–The Panic of 2012 Button Pressed–President Obama Lights Up In Panic Room–Smoke em If You Have em–Videos

Only 80K jobs added in June; Jobless rate same

What Jobs Data Suggest for the Rest of 2012

Rep. Kevin Brady’s Opening Statement at JEC “Economic Outlook” Hearing

BLS Commissioner: At The Rate, We Will Never Return To Pre-Recession Employment

Obama On 8.2% Unemployment: “Step In The Right Direction

Rep Darrell Issa (R-CA ) Questions BLS Director John Galvin on “Green Jobs” Numbers Reporting


Recent US Federal Deficit Numbers

Obama Deficits

Bush Deficits

FY 2013*: $901 billion

FY 2009: $1,413 billion

FY 2012*: $1,327 billion

FY 2008: $459 billion

FY 2011: $1,300 billion

FY 2007: $161 billion

FY 2010: $1,293 billion

Although the federal deficit is the amount each year by which federal outlays in the federal budget exceed federal receipts, the gross federal debt increases each year by substantially more than the amount of the deficit each year. That is because a substantial amount of federal borrowing is not counted in the budget.

http://www.usgovernmentspending.com/federal_deficit_chart.html

U.S. Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

“Deficit” vs. “Debt”

Suppose you spend more money this month than your income. This situation is called a “budget deficit”. So you borrow (ie; use your credit card). The amount you borrowed (and now owe) is called your debt. You have to pay interest on your debt. If next month you spend more than your income, another deficit, you must borrow some more, and you’ll still have to pay the interest on your debt (now larger). If you have a deficit every month, you keep borrowing and your debt grows. Soon the interest payment on your loan is bigger than any other item in your budget. Eventually, all you can do is pay the interest payment, and you don’t have any money left over for anything else. This situation is known as bankruptcy.

http://www.federalbudget.com/

Total Government Debt

“…At the beginning of the 20th century debt was equally divided between federal and state and local debt, totaling less than 20 percent of GDP. After World War I, the federal debt surged to 35% of GDP. But by the mid 1920s federal debt had declined to below 20 percent of GDP with state and local debt rising to 16 percent of GDP.

Chart Key:
– Federal gross debt
– State gross debt
– Local gross debt

Then came the Great Depression, and President Roosevelt decided to spend his way out of trouble, boosting federal debt to 40 percent of GDP. So did the local governments, with state debt peaking at over 5 percent of GDP in 1933 and local debt peaking at over 28 percent in 1933. Government debt, including federal and state and local debt rose to 70 percent of GDP.

But it was in World War II that the US really entered new debt territory. Starting at 45 percent of GDP in 1941 federal debt zoomed, reaching almost 122 percent of GDP in 1946 after the end of the war, with state and local debt adding another 7 percent. For the next 35 years successive governments brought down the debt, but then came President Reagan. He increased the federal debt up over 50 percent of GDP to win the Cold War. President Bush increased the debt to fight a war on terror and bail out the banks. President Obama is increasing the debt to fund a plan to revive the economy in the aftermath of the Crash of 2008. …”

http://www.usgovernmentspending.com/debt_deficit_history

Employment Level

Series Id: LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title: (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status: Employed
Type of data: Number in thousands
Age: 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146397(1) 146157 146108 146130 145929 145738 145530 145196 145059 144792 144078 143328
2009 142187(1) 141660 140754 140654 140294 140003 139891 139458 138775 138401 138607 137968
2010 138500(1) 138665 138836 139306 139340 139137 139139 139338 139344 139072 138937 139220
2011 139330(1) 139551 139764 139628 139808 139385 139450 139754 140107 140297 140614 140790
2012 141637(1) 142065 142034 141865 142287 142415
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Background Articles and Videos

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed                 USDL-12-1332
until 8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, July 6, 2012

Technical information:
 Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- JUNE 2012

Nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000), and the 
unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor 
Statistics reported today. Professional and business services added jobs, 
and employment in other major industries changed little over the month.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (12.7 million) was essentially unchanged 
in June, and the unemployment rate held at 8.2 percent. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for blacks (14.4 percent)
edged up over the month, while the rates for adult men (7.8 percent), 
adult women (7.4 percent), teenagers (23.7 percent), whites (7.4 percent),
and Hispanics (11.0 percent) showed little or no change. The jobless rate
for Asians was 6.3 percent in June (not seasonally adjusted), little changed
from a year earlier. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

In June, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks 
and over) was essentially unchanged at 5.4 million. These individuals 
accounted for 41.9 percent of the unemployed. (See table A-12.)

Both the civilian labor force participation rate and the employment-
population ratio were unchanged in June at 63.8 and 58.6 percent,
respectively. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes 
referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 
8.2 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours 
had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. 
(See table A-8.)

In June, 2.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, 
down from 2.7 million a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally 
adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were 
available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 
months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched 
for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 821,000 discouraged workers 
in June, a decline of 161,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not
seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently
looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them.
The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor
force in June had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the
survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. 
(See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000). 
In the second quarter, employment growth averaged 75,000 per month, 
compared with an average monthly gain of 226,000 for the first quarter of 
the year. Slower job growth in the second quarter occurred in most major 
industries. (See table B-1.)

Professional and business services added 47,000 jobs in June, with temporary 
help services accounting for 25,000 of the increase. Employment also rose 
in management and technical consulting services (+9,000) and in computer 
systems design and related services (+7,000). Employment in professional 
and business services has grown by 1.5 million since its most recent low
point in September 2009.

Employment in manufacturing continued to edge up in June (+11,000).
Growth in the second quarter averaged 10,000 per month, compared with
an average of 41,000 per month during the first quarter. In June,
employment increased in motor vehicles and parts (+7,000) and in
fabricated metal products (+5,000).

Employment continued to trend up in health care (+13,000) and wholesale 
trade (+9,000) in June.

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging,
construction, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, financial
activities, leisure and hospitality, and government, showed little or
no change.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls
edged up by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours in June. The manufacturing workweek 
edged up by 0.1 hour to 40.7 hours, and factory overtime was 3.3 hours 
for the fifth consecutive month. The average workweek for production and
nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1
hour to 33.8 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In June, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm
payrolls increased by 6 cents to $23.50. Over the year, average hourly
earnings have increased by 2.0 percent. In June, average hourly earnings 
of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 
5 cents to $19.74. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for April was revised
from +77,000 to +68,000, and the change for May was revised from
+69,000 to +77,000.

____________
The Employment Situation for July is scheduled to be released on
Friday, August 3, 2012, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).

Only 80K jobs added in June; Jobless rate same

What Jobs Data Suggest for the Rest of 2012

[yourtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7H_uVQ8OYpE]

Rep. Kevin Brady’s Opening Statement at JEC “Economic Outlook” Hearing

BLS Commissioner: At The Rate, We Will Never Return To Pre-Recession Employment

Obama On 8.2% Unemployment: “Step In The Right Direction

Rep Darrell Issa (R-CA ) Questions BLS Director John Galvin on “Green Jobs” Numbers Reporting


U.S. Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

“Deficit” vs. “Debt”

Suppose you spend more money this month than your income. This situation is called a “budget deficit”. So you borrow (ie; use your credit card). The amount you borrowed (and now owe) is called your debt. You have to pay interest on your debt. If next month you spend more than your income, another deficit, you must borrow some more, and you’ll still have to pay the interest on your debt (now larger). If you have a deficit every month, you keep borrowing and your debt grows. Soon the interest payment on your loan is bigger than any other item in your budget. Eventually, all you can do is pay the interest payment, and you don’t have any money left over for anything else. This situation is known as bankruptcy.

http://www.federalbudget.com/

Recent US Federal Deficit Numbers

Obama Deficits

Bush Deficits

FY 2013*: $901 billion

FY 2009: $1,413 billion

FY 2012*: $1,327 billion

FY 2008: $459 billion

FY 2011: $1,300 billion

FY 2007: $161 billion

FY 2010: $1,293 billion

Although the federal deficit is the amount each year by which federal outlays in the federal budget exceed federal receipts, the gross federal debt increases each year by substantially more than the amount of the deficit each year. That is because a substantial amount of federal borrowing is not counted in the budget.

http://www.usgovernmentspending.com/federal_deficit_chart.html

Total Government Debt

“…At the beginning of the 20th century debt was equally divided between federal and state and local debt, totaling less than 20 percent of GDP. After World War I, the federal debt surged to 35% of GDP. But by the mid 1920s federal debt had declined to below 20 percent of GDP with state and local debt rising to 16 percent of GDP.

Chart Key:
– Federal gross debt
– State gross debt
– Local gross debt

Then came the Great Depression, and President Roosevelt decided to spend his way out of trouble, boosting federal debt to 40 percent of GDP. So did the local governments, with state debt peaking at over 5 percent of GDP in 1933 and local debt peaking at over 28 percent in 1933. Government debt, including federal and state and local debt rose to 70 percent of GDP.

But it was in World War II that the US really entered new debt territory. Starting at 45 percent of GDP in 1941 federal debt zoomed, reaching almost 122 percent of GDP in 1946 after the end of the war, with state and local debt adding another 7 percent. For the next 35 years successive governments brought down the debt, but then came President Reagan. He increased the federal debt up over 50 percent of GDP to win the Cold War. President Bush increased the debt to fight a war on terror and bail out the banks. President Obama is increasing the debt to fund a plan to revive the economy in the aftermath of the Crash of 2008. …”

http://www.usgovernmentspending.com/debt_deficit_history

Employment Level

Series Id: LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title: (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status: Employed
Type of data: Number in thousands
Age: 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146397(1) 146157 146108 146130 145929 145738 145530 145196 145059 144792 144078 143328
2009 142187(1) 141660 140754 140654 140294 140003 139891 139458 138775 138401 138607 137968
2010 138500(1) 138665 138836 139306 139340 139137 139139 139338 139344 139072 138937 139220
2011 139330(1) 139551 139764 139628 139808 139385 139450 139754 140107 140297 140614 140790
2012 141637(1) 142065 142034 141865 142287 142415
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Background Articles and Videos

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed                 USDL-12-1332
until 8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, July 6, 2012

Technical information:
 Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- JUNE 2012

Nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000), and the 
unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor 
Statistics reported today. Professional and business services added jobs, 
and employment in other major industries changed little over the month.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (12.7 million) was essentially unchanged 
in June, and the unemployment rate held at 8.2 percent. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for blacks (14.4 percent)
edged up over the month, while the rates for adult men (7.8 percent), 
adult women (7.4 percent), teenagers (23.7 percent), whites (7.4 percent),
and Hispanics (11.0 percent) showed little or no change. The jobless rate
for Asians was 6.3 percent in June (not seasonally adjusted), little changed
from a year earlier. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

In June, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks 
and over) was essentially unchanged at 5.4 million. These individuals 
accounted for 41.9 percent of the unemployed. (See table A-12.)

Both the civilian labor force participation rate and the employment-
population ratio were unchanged in June at 63.8 and 58.6 percent,
respectively. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes 
referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 
8.2 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours 
had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. 
(See table A-8.)

In June, 2.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, 
down from 2.7 million a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally 
adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were 
available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 
months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched 
for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 821,000 discouraged workers 
in June, a decline of 161,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not
seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently
looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them.
The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor
force in June had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the
survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. 
(See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000). 
In the second quarter, employment growth averaged 75,000 per month, 
compared with an average monthly gain of 226,000 for the first quarter of 
the year. Slower job growth in the second quarter occurred in most major 
industries. (See table B-1.)

Professional and business services added 47,000 jobs in June, with temporary 
help services accounting for 25,000 of the increase. Employment also rose 
in management and technical consulting services (+9,000) and in computer 
systems design and related services (+7,000). Employment in professional 
and business services has grown by 1.5 million since its most recent low
point in September 2009.

Employment in manufacturing continued to edge up in June (+11,000).
Growth in the second quarter averaged 10,000 per month, compared with
an average of 41,000 per month during the first quarter. In June,
employment increased in motor vehicles and parts (+7,000) and in
fabricated metal products (+5,000).

Employment continued to trend up in health care (+13,000) and wholesale 
trade (+9,000) in June.

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging,
construction, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, financial
activities, leisure and hospitality, and government, showed little or
no change.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls
edged up by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours in June. The manufacturing workweek 
edged up by 0.1 hour to 40.7 hours, and factory overtime was 3.3 hours 
for the fifth consecutive month. The average workweek for production and
nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1
hour to 33.8 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In June, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm
payrolls increased by 6 cents to $23.50. Over the year, average hourly
earnings have increased by 2.0 percent. In June, average hourly earnings 
of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 
5 cents to $19.74. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for April was revised
from +77,000 to +68,000, and the change for May was revised from
+69,000 to +77,000.

____________
The Employment Situation for July is scheduled to be released on
Friday, August 3, 2012, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).



Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Obama: “The Law I Passed Is Here To Stay”–American People: “The Tax You Passed Will Be Repealed and Obama Will Be A One-Term Failed President”–Obama Is Not Working–One And Done!–Videos

Posted on July 5, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Health Care, history, Inflation, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Public Sector, Raves, Tax Policy, Taxes, Unemployment, Unions, Video, Wealth, Weather, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

FLASHBACK: Obama: My Presidency Will Be ‘A One-Term Proposition’ If Economy Doesn’t Turn In 3 Years

Obama in 2009 ‘Absolutely Not a Tax Increase’

President Obama’s Pledge Never to Raise Taxes on Anyone Making Less Than $250,000 a Year

Dr. Truth Hurts – Why we must Repeal ObamaCare

Dr. Truth Hurts Warns us about Obama care on this Xtranormal Video.

Dr. ACO Says: “There is no ‘Best practice’ for “Sick”.  I am not sure I will be able to get my bonus!”

Dr. Good has decided to join an ACO (Accountable Care Organization) created by ObamaCare.

He will now have to follow government practices or lose his bonus.

His patient is discovering that she doesn’t like this very much.

The Accountable Care Organization Was created by PPACA (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act). Medicare patients will be assigned to it.

The Secretary of Health and Human Services will decide who qualifies for the bonus.

The Secretary will have incredible power over your doctors through the ACO since she will:

 1. Require doctors to follow cook book medicine guidelines calls “best practices”

2. Decide what a “best practice” is.

3. Require doctors to be more “efficient” – which means spending less money on you.

4. Penalize doctors by withholding bonuses if they don’t ration care.

 5. Allow the insurance companies to use these same best practices and rationing methods.

6. Force Medicare patients to see doctors in the ACO.

7. Allow insurance companies to force patients into an ACO.

8. Create a huge challenge for doctors who don’t join the ACO – driving the best doctors out of business.

 9. Removing the right to go to court to appeal decisions made by the secretary.

10. Basically the Secretary of Health and Human Services and her 159 new government agencies will take over health care.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Obama Boy and Obama Girl Have A Crush on Obama–Reality Check–Out of The Mouths of Babes–Videos

Posted on July 5, 2012. Filed under: American History, Babies, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Federal Government, government, government spending, Health Care, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Taxes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“Pleasure chasing and dissipation are ineffective palliatives. Where people live autonomous lives and are not badly off, yet are without abilities or opportunities for creative work or useful action, there is no telling to what desperate and fantastic shifts they might resort in order to give meaning and purpose to their lives.”

Eric Hoffer, True Believer, page 54

Best of Obama Girl:      Crush On Obama

Obama Boy – I Have A Crush On Obama

“It is the true believer’s ability to “shut his eyes and stop his ears” to facts that do not deserve to be either seen or heard which is the source of his unequaled fortitude and constancy. He cannot be frightened by danger nor disheartened by obstacle not baffled by contradictions because he denies their existence.”

~Eric Hoffer, The True Believer, page 76

Reality Check–Crush Obama

DEBT LIMIT – A GUIDE TO AMERICAN FEDERAL DEBT MADE EASY

The Collapse of The American Dream Explained in Animation

President Obama’s Spending

“…Spending has gone up from $2.98 trillion in 2008—the year before Obama came into office—to a proposed $3.80 trillion in 2013. That is a 28-percent increase in five years, which represents a compound annual growth rate of 5.0 percent. Because the economy has stagnated during this period, spending has increased as a share of GDP. …”

http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/president-obamas-spending/

Recent US Federal Deficit Numbers

Obama Deficits

Bush Deficits

FY 2013*: $901 billion

FY 2009: $1,413 billion

FY 2012*: $1,327 billion

FY 2008: $459 billion

FY 2011: $1,300 billion

FY 2007: $161 billion

FY 2010: $1,293 billion

Although the federal deficit is the amount each year by which federal outlays in the federal budget exceed federal receipts, the gross federal debt increases each year by substantially more than the amount of the deficit each year. That is because a substantial amount of federal borrowing is not counted in the budget.

http://www.usgovernmentspending.com/federal_deficit_chart.html

U.S. Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

George Carlin – You are a slave

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The Meaning of Independence Day–Videos

Posted on July 3, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics | Tags: , , , , , , |

The Meaning of Independence Day – Ayn Rand Center for Individual Rights

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Americqn History–The Civil War–Videos

Posted on July 3, 2012. Filed under: Agriculture, American History, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government spending, history, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Technology, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , |

1/9   America The Story of Us –  Civil War Episodes 5&6

2/9 – America The Story of Us – Civil War Episodes 5&6

3/9 – America The Story of Us – Civil War Episodes 5&6

4/9 – America The Story of Us – Civil War Episodes 5&6

5/9 – America The Story of Us – Civil War Episodes 5&6

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American History–The Causes of The Civil War–Videos

Posted on July 3, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Foreign Policy, history, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Unemployment, Unions, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , |

Causes of the Civil War Part 1

Causes of the Civil War Part 2

Causes of the Civil War – Popular sovereignty and westward expansion

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