Archive for January 28th, 2010

Henry David Thoreau–Walden Pond and Civil Disobedience–Videos

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , |

Thoreau & Walden Pond 

Iconoclastic Individualism – Henry David Thoreau (part 1)

Iconoclastic Individualism – Henry David Thoreau (part 2)

Iconoclastic Individualism – Henry David Thoreau (part 3)

Thoreau on Civil disobedience

Background Articles and Videos

Henry David Thoreau

“…Henry David Thoreau (born David Henry Thoreau; July 12, 1817– May 6, 1862)[1] was an American author, poet, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, philosopher, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

Thoreau’s books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry total over 20 volumes. Among his lasting contributions were his writings on natural history and philosophy, where he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern day environmentalism. His literary style interweaves close natural observation, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore; while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and “Yankee” love of practical detail.[2] He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time imploring one to abandon waste and illusion in order to discover life’s true essential needs.[2]

He was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the Fugitive Slave Law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau’s philosophy of civil disobedience influenced the political thoughts and actions of such later figures as Leo Tolstoy, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thoreau is sometimes cited as an individualist anarchist.[3] Though Civil Disobedience calls for improving rather than abolishing government– “I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government”[4]– the direction of this improvement aims at anarchism: “‘That government is best which governs not at all;’ and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.”[4]

…”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhP7PKoRmmY&NR=1

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The Catcher in The Rye–J.D. Salinger Passes–Rest In Peace

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The Catcher in The Rye–J.D. Salinger Passes–Rest In Peace

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Books, Communications, Culture, Education, Language, liberty, Life, People, Philosophy, Quotations, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , |

 

“This fall I think you’re riding for – it’s a special kind of fall, a horrible kind. The man falling isn’t permitted to feel or hear himself hit bottom. He just keeps falling and falling. The whole arrangement’s designed for men who, at some time or other in their lives, were looking for something their own environment couldn’t supply them with. Or they thought their own environment couldn’t supply them with. So they gave up looking. They gave it up before they ever really even got started.”

~J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye, Ch. 24

J.D. Salinger, Reclusive Literary Icon, Dies at 91

The Catcher in The Rye

Author, Recluse J.D. Salinger Dies

 

Michael Savage Reads Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger – (Aired on November 2, 2009)

“I hope to hell that when I do die somebody has the sense to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetary. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you’re dead? Nobody.”

~J.D. Salinger

“You’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You’re by no means alone on that score, you’ll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You’ll learn from them – if you want. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education. It’s history. It’s poetry.”

Background Articles and Videos

J.D. Salinger

“…Jerome David “J. D.” Salinger (pronounced /ˈsælɪndʒər/; January 1, 1919 – January 27, 2010) was an American author, best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye, as well as his reclusive nature. His last original published work was in 1965; he gave his last interview in 1980.

Raised in Manhattan, Salinger began writing short stories while in secondary school, and published several stories in the early 1940s before serving in World War II. In 1948 he published the critically acclaimed story “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” in The New Yorker magazine, which became home to much of his subsequent work. In 1951 Salinger released his novel The Catcher in the Rye, an immediate popular success. His depiction of adolescent alienation and loss of innocence in the protagonist Holden Caulfield was influential, especially among adolescent readers.[2] The novel remains widely read and controversial,[3] selling around 250,000 copies a year.

The success of The Catcher in the Rye led to public attention and scrutiny: Salinger became reclusive, publishing new work less frequently. He followed Catcher with a short story collection, Nine Stories (1953), a collection of a novella and a short story, Franny and Zooey (1961), and a collection of two novellas, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (1963). His last published work, a novella entitled “Hapworth 16, 1924,” appeared in The New Yorker on June 19, 1965.

Afterward, Salinger struggled with unwanted attention, including a legal battle in the 1980s with biographer Ian Hamilton and the release in the late 1990s of memoirs written by two people close to him: Joyce Maynard, an ex-lover; and Margaret Salinger, his daughter. In 1996, a small publisher announced a deal with Salinger to publish “Hapworth 16, 1924″ in book form, but amid the ensuing publicity, the release was indefinitely delayed. He made headlines around the globe in June 2009, after filing a lawsuit against another writer for copyright infringement resulting from that writer’s use of one of Salinger’s characters from Catcher in the Rye.[4]

Salinger died of natural causes on January 27, 2010, at his home in Cornish, New Hampshire.[5][6]

…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._D._Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye

“…The Catcher in the Rye is a 1951 novel by J. D. Salinger. Originally published for adults, it has since become popular with adolescent readers for its themes of alienation and rebellion.[1] It has been translated into almost all of the world’s major languages.[2] Around 250,000 copies are sold each year, with total sales of more than sixty-five million.[3] The novel’s protagonist and antihero, Holden Caulfield, has become an icon for teenage rebellion.[4]

The novel was included on a 2005 Time Magazine list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923,[5] and it was named by Modern Library and its readers as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. It has been frequently challenged[6][7][8] in the United States for its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and teenage angst. It also deals with complex issues of identity, belonging, connection, and alienation.

Plot summary

The first-person narrative follows Holden Caulfield’s experiences in New York City in the days following his expulsion from Pencey Prep, a fictional college preparatory school in the fictional city of Agerstown, Pennsylvania.

Holden shares encounters he has had with students and faculty of Pencey, whom he criticizes as being superficial, or, as he would say, “phony”. After being expelled from the school for poor grades, Holden packs up and leaves the school in the middle of the night after an altercation with his roommate. He takes a train to New York, but does not want to return to his family and instead checks into the dilapidated Edmont Hotel. There, he spends an evening dancing with three tourist girls and has a clumsy encounter with a prostitute; he refuses to do anything with her and, after he tells her he just wants to talk, she becomes annoyed with him and leaves. However, he still pays her for her time. She demands more money than was originally agreed upon and when Holden refuses to pay he is beaten by her pimp, Maurice.

Holden spends a total of three days in the city, characterized largely by drunkenness and loneliness. At one point he ends up at a museum, where he contrasts his life with the statues of Eskimos on display. For as long as he can remember, the statues have been unchanging. These concerns may have stemmed largely from the death of his brother, Allie. Eventually, he sneaks into his parents’ apartment while they are away in order to visit his younger sister, Phoebe, who is nearly the only person with whom he seems to be able to communicate. Holden shares a fantasy he has been thinking about (based on a mishearing of Robert Burns’ Comin’ Through the Rye): he pictures himself as the sole guardian of numerous children running and playing in a huge rye field on the edge of a cliff. His job is to catch the children if they wander close to the brink; to be a “catcher in the rye”. After leaving his parents’ apartment, Holden then drops by to see his old English teacher, Mr. Antolini, in the middle of the night, and is offered advice on life and a place to sleep. Mr. Antolini tells Holden that it is the stronger man who lives humbly, rather than dies nobly, for a cause. This rebukes Holden’s ideas of becoming a “catcher in the rye,” a godlike figure who symbolically saves children from “falling off a crazy cliff” and being exposed to the evils of adulthood. During the speech on life, Mr. Antolini has a number of “highballs,” referring to a cocktail served in a highball glass. Holden’s comfort is upset when he wakes up in the night to find Mr. Antolini patting his head in a way that he perceives as “flitty.” There is much speculation on whether Mr. Antolini was making a sexual advance on Holden, and it is left up to the reader whether this is true. Holden leaves and spends his last afternoon wandering the city. He later wonders if his interpretation of Mr. Antolini’s actions was correct.

Holden intends to move out west; he relays these plans to his sister, who decides she wants to go with him. He refuses to take her, and when she becomes upset with him, he tells her that he will no longer go. Holden then takes Phoebe to the Central Park Zoo, where he watches with a melancholic joy as she rides a carousel. At the close of the book, Holden decides not to mention much about the present day, finding it inconsequential. He alludes to “getting sick” and living in a mental hospital, and mentions that he’ll be attending another school in September. Holden says that he has found himself missing Stradlater and Ackley (his former classmates), and the others—warning the reader that the same thing could happen to them. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Catcher_in_the_Rye

Catching Salinger: Pencey Prep

 

JD Salinger Overview

 

OMFG CATCHER IN THE RYE!!!
 

The Catcher in the Rye, Part 1

The Catcher in the Rye, Part 2

The Catcher In The Rye Movie Preview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjeOvH0e9uA

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Do You Feel Lucky Progressives–Pass Your Health Care, Energy, Amnesty, Tax, Spend, Jobs/Stimulus Spending II Bills–The American Voters Will Throw The Thieves Out Of Office–Go Ahead Make My Day!

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Climate, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Taxes, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

 
“You may fool all the people some of the time, you can even fool some of the people all of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all the time.”

~Abraham Lincoln

 

Dirty Harry – Do you feel lucky?

We The People Stimulus Package

Ray Stevens – We The People

 

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 1 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 2 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 3 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 4 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 5 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 6 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 7 of 8

Glenn Beck Show – January 28, 2010 – Pt 8 of 8

Sudden Impact – “Go Ahead. Make My Day”

“Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.”

~Thomas Jefferson 

 

Background Articles and Videos

Cato Institute Scholars Analyze the 2010 State of the Union Address

 

Keynesian Economics Is Wrong: Bigger Gov’t Is Not Stimulus

 Obama’s So-Called Stimulus: Good For Government, Bad For the Economy

Stimulus II: A Sequel America Can’t Afford

Kline Rejects Government Takeover of Student Loan Programs

Sen. Wicker Discusses State of the Union Speech with Neil Cavuto

Senator Thune discusses the State of the Union Address on Kudlow and Company

 

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President Barack Obama State of The Union Address–Rush Limbaugh and Ron Paul Response!

The American People Rising In Revolt Against The Progressive Radical Socialists–Democrats and Republicans!

The American People March on Washington D.C.–August 28, 2010–At The Lincoln Memorial! Mark Your Calendar–Be There–Three Million Minimum–Join The Second American Revolution

The Obama Depression: Lessons Learned–Deja Vu!

President Barack Obama–Portrait of A Progressive Radical Socialist Narcissist–A Cult Of Personality!

Barack Obama–A Reader Not A Leader–A Divider Not A Uniter–A Progressive Radical Socialist Not An American Achiever

Obamanomics–New Deal Progressive Radical Socialist Interventionism

Glenn Beck’s Documentary On The Collectivists: Marxists, Socialists, Progressives, Communists, Fascists, National Socialists–Progressive Radical Socialists of The Democratic and Republican Parties!

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United States Department of Energy

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Taxes, Uncategorized, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , |

    Saddling Posterity with Debt

“We believe–or we act as if we believed–that although an individual father cannot alienate the labor of his son, the aggregate body of fathers may alienate the labor of all their sons, of their posterity, in the aggregate, and oblige them to pay for all the enterprises, just or unjust, profitable or ruinous, into which our vices, our passions or our personal interests may lead us. But I trust that this proposition needs only to be looked at by an American to be seen in its true point of view, and that we shall all consider ourselves unauthorized to saddle posterity with our debts, and morally bound to pay them ourselves; and consequently within what may be deemed the period of a generation, or the life of the majority.”

~Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 1813

US Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

 

United States Department of Energy

http://www.energy.gov/

United States Department of Energy

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2010/assets/doe.pdf

Department of Energy – $26.3billion+$38.7billion from the Recovery Act

Although Obama’s $26.3 billion budget allocation to the Department of Energy is far less than the $33.9 billion projected to be spent in 2009 it is still $2billion over the prior 3 years.  A percentage of the budget goes to the promotion of a clean energy agenda and the advancement of Carbon Capture Storage technology. Obama also focuses on improving the safety and disposal of nuclear energy.
Department of Energy

Highlights of Department of Energy Plan

New Energy Infrastructure

  • Provide additional funding to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, which received $11 billion form the Recovery Act – no monetary value given for 2010 budget

Clean Air Technology

  • Supports loan guarantees for renewable energy projects and carbon caputaure store projects. – no monetary value given
  • Along with $3.4 billion from the Recovery Act the 2010 budget supports the advancement of low-carbon coal technologies – no monetary value given

Increased Nuclear Security

  • Supports efforts to secure and dispose of nuclear material – no monetary value given
  • Supports efforts that will deter nuclear smuggling – no monetary value given

http://www.onlineforextrading.com/blog/federal-budget-broken-down/

 

“…Department of Energy

The mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States.

The DOE promotes America’s energy security by encouraging the development of reliable, clean, and affordable energy. It administers federal funding for scientific research to further the goal of discovery and innovation — ensuring American economic competitiveness and improving the quality of life for Americans.

The DOE is also tasked with ensuring America’s nuclear security, and with protecting the environment by providing a responsible resolution to the legacy of nuclear weapons production.

The United States Secretary of Energy oversees a budget of approximately $23 billion and more than 100,000 federal and contract employees. …”

http://www.whitehouse.gov/our-government/executive-branch

United States Department of Energy

“…The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program, nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy, energy conservation, energy-related research, radioactive waste disposal, and domestic energy production. DOE also sponsors more basic and applied scientific research than any other US federal agency; most of this is funded through its system of United States Department of Energy National Laboratories.

The agency is administered by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

The Department of Energy was formed after the oil crisis on August 4, 1977 by President Jimmy Carter’s signing of legislation, The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977.

The United States, eager to make a nuclear bomb before any other nation, started the Manhattan Project under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war, the Atomic Energy Commission was created to control the future of the project.

In 1974, the AEC was abolished and gave way to Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry, and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon, naval reactor, and energy development programs. Only a few years after that, the Energy Crisis called attention to unifying these two groups. The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977, which Carter signed on August 4, 1977, created the Department of Energy, which assumed the responsibilities of the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Power Commission, and programs of various other agencies.

The department began operations on October 1, 1977. …”

Office of Science

The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance.[2]

The Office of Science directs funding for the scientific research via the following Program Offices:

  • Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)
  • Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
  • Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
  • Fusion Energy Sciences (FES)
  • High Energy Physics (HEP)
  • Nuclear Physics (NP)
  • Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists

Each of the Program Offices may be composed of several Divisions. The first six of these Program Offices also have corresponding Advisory Committees (ASCRAC, BERAC and so on).

Other DOE offices may directly fund scientific research related to their needs. For example, studies of materials for nuclear reactors are usually supported by the DOE Nuclear Energy Office, whereas the NP program of the Office of Science only funds the research related to nuclear transformations, and the “Materials Science” Division of the BES program supports studies of other energy-related materials such as photovoltaics.
The Office of Science will invest $777 million over the next five years (from 2009) in 46 new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs). The EFRCs will be established at universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and private firms across the nation, drawing in part on funds provided by the Recovery Act, while also depending on future Congressional appropriations. Twenty EFRCs will focus on renewable energy.[3]

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is an independent agency in the United States Department of Energy. It is the source for official energy statistics from the U.S. Government. EIA collects, analyzes, and publishes data as directed by law to ensure efficient markets, inform policy-making, and support public understanding of energy.

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is part of the United States Department of Energy. It works to improve national security through the military application of nuclear energy. The NNSA also maintains and improves the safety, reliability, and performance of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile, including the ability to design, produce, and test, in order to meet national security requirements.

The Department’s Office of Secure Transportation (OST) provides safe and secure transportation of nuclear weapons and components and special nuclear materials, and conducts other missions supporting the national security of the United States of America. Since 1974, OST has been assigned responsibility to develop, operate, and manage a system for the safe and secure transportation of all government-owned, DOE or NNSA controlled special nuclear materials in “strategic” or “significant” quantities. Shipments are transported in specially designed equipment and are escorted by armed Federal Agents (Nuclear Material Couriers).

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is an independent regulatory agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The Department also manages the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.
Other offices include:

  • Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)
  • Office of Environmental Management (EM)
  • Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
  • Office of River Protection
  • Office of Nuclear Energy
  • Office of Transportation Technology

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Energy

Background Articles and Videos

 

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United States Department of Education

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Education, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Taxes, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

    Saddling Posterity with Debt

“We believe–or we act as if we believed–that although an individual father cannot alienate the labor of his son, the aggregate body of fathers may alienate the labor of all their sons, of their posterity, in the aggregate, and oblige them to pay for all the enterprises, just or unjust, profitable or ruinous, into which our vices, our passions or our personal interests may lead us. But I trust that this proposition needs only to be looked at by an American to be seen in its true point of view, and that we shall all consider ourselves unauthorized to saddle posterity with our debts, and morally bound to pay them ourselves; and consequently within what may be deemed the period of a generation, or the life of the majority.”

~Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 1813

US Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

 

United States Department of Education 

http://www.ed.gov/ 

 

United States Department of Education 

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2010/assets/edu.pdf

 

“…Department of Education
The mission of the Department of Education is to promote student achievement and preparation for competition in a global economy by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access to educational opportunity.

The Department administers federal financial aid for education, collects data on America’s schools to guide improvements in education quality, and works to complement the efforts of state and local governments, parents, and students.

The U.S. Secretary of Education oversees the Department’s 4,200 employees and $68.6 billion budget. …”

http://www.whitehouse.gov/our-government/executive-branch

“…Department of Education – $46.7billion+$81.1billion from Recovery Act

Obama’s commitment to bettering the US educational system can be seen through the $81.1 billion he dedicates to education in the Recovery Act as well as the $46.7 billion in the 2010 federal budget. He wants to strengthen public schools, reward effective teaching and expand opportunities for higher education.

Department of Education Budget Breakdown 2010

Department of Education Budget Highlights

Innovative Solutions

  • Expand access to high quality early childhood education – no monetary value given
  • Funds education research – no monetary value given
  • Increase funding for charter schools – no monetary value given

College Access and Completion

http://www.onlineforextrading.com/blog/federal-budget-broken-down/

United States Department of Education

“…The United States Department of Education, also referred to as ED or the ED for (the) Education Department, is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government. Created by the Department of Education Organization Act (Public Law 96-88), it was signed into law by President Jimmy Carter on October 17, 1979 and began operating on May 16, 1980.

The Department of Education Organization Act divided the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare into the Department of Education and the Department of Health and Human Services. The Department of Education is administered by the United States Secretary of Education.

It is by far the smallest Cabinet-level department, with about 5,000 employees. The agency’s official acronym is ED (and not DOE, which refers to the United States Department of Energy.)

Department of Education is to create programs to generate funds for education and enforcement of privacy and civil rights laws.

On March 23, 2007, President George W. Bush signed into law H.R. 584, which designates the ED Headquarters building as the Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building.[2]

  • Office of Communications and Outreach (OCO)
  • Office of the General Counsel (OGC)
  • Office of Inspector General
  • Office of Legislation and Congressional Affairs (OLCA)
  • Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
  • Institute of Education Sciences (IES)
    • National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
      • National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)
      • Education Resources Information Center (ERIC)
  • Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII)
  • Office of the Chief Financial Officer
  • Office of Management
  • Office of the Chief Information Officer
  • Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development
    • Budget Service
  • Risk Management Service
Chief Operating Officer
Office of the Under Secretary (OUS)
  • Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE)
  • Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE)
  • Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA)
  • President’s Advisory Board on Tribal Colleges and Universities (WHITCU)
  • President’s Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (WHIHBCU)
Office of the Deputy Secretary (ODS)
  • Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE)
    • Office of Migrant Education
    • President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans
  • Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students (OELA)
  • Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS)
    • National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)
    • Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)
    • Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)
  • Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools (OSDFS)
  • Office of Innovation and Improvement
Associated federal organizations
  • Advisory Councils and Committees
  • National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB)[3]
  • National Institute for Literacy (NIFL)[4]
  • Federal Interagency Committee on Education (FICE)
Federally aided organizations
  • Gallaudet University
  • Howard University
  • National Technical Institute for the Deaf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Education

Background Articles and Videos

U.S.: Obama Announces Education Secretary

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United States Department of Agriculture

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United States Department of Health and Human Resources

United States Department of Homeland Security

United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

United States Department of Interior

United States Department of Justice

United States Department of Labor

United States Department of State

United States Department of Transportation

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United States Social Security Administration

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United States Department Of Labor

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Law, liberty, Life, Links, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    Saddling Posterity with Debt

“We believe–or we act as if we believed–that although an individual father cannot alienate the labor of his son, the aggregate body of fathers may alienate the labor of all their sons, of their posterity, in the aggregate, and oblige them to pay for all the enterprises, just or unjust, profitable or ruinous, into which our vices, our passions or our personal interests may lead us. But I trust that this proposition needs only to be looked at by an American to be seen in its true point of view, and that we shall all consider ourselves unauthorized to saddle posterity with our debts, and morally bound to pay them ourselves; and consequently within what may be deemed the period of a generation, or the life of the majority.”

~Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 1813

 

 

US Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

 

 

United States Department of Labor

http://www.dol.gov/

 

United States Department of Labor

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2010/assets/lab.pdf

 

Bureau of Labor Statistics

http://www.bls.gov/

 

History of Department of Labor

http://www.dol.gov/oasam/programs/history/main.htm

 

“…Department of Labor

The Department of Labor oversees federal programs for ensuring a strong American workforce. These programs address job training, safe working conditions, minimum hourly wage and overtime pay, employment discrimination, and unemployment insurance.

The Department of Labor’s mission is to foster and promote the welfare of the job seekers, wage earners, and retirees of the United States by improving their working conditions, advancing their opportunities for profitable employment, protecting their retirement and health care benefits, helping employers find workers, strengthening free collective bargaining, and tracking changes in employment, prices, and other national economic measurements.

Offices within the Department of Labor include the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the federal government’s principal statistics agency for labor economics, and the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, which promotes the safety and health of America’s working men and women.

The Secretary of Labor oversees 15,000 employees on a budget of approximately $50 billion. …”

http://www.whitehouse.gov/our-government/executive-branch

 

Department of Labor – $13.3billion+$4.8billion from the Recovery Act

The 2010 budget for the Department of Labor focuses on modernization and reform on the Unemployment Insurance system, building green jobs and the improvement on American working conditions.

Department of Labor Budget

Highlights from the 2010 Department of Labor Budget

Improve Unemployment Insurance System

  • Reduce improper payments and employer tax evasion by more than $4 billion over the next 10 years through modernization of system – no monetary value given

Increase labor standards

http://www.onlineforextrading.com/blog/federal-budget-broken-down/

United States Department of Labor

“…The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re-employment services, and some economic statistics. Many U.S. states also have such departments. The department is headed by the United States Secretary of Labor. Hilda Solis is the current secretary of labor. Seth Harris is the current Deputy Secretary of Labor.

 

The Frances Perkins Building, the Department of Labor headquarters in Washington, D.C.

The Department of Labor (DOL) fosters and promotes the welfare of the job seekers, wage earners, and retirees of the United States by improving their working conditions, advancing their opportunities for profitable employment, protecting their retirement and health care benefits, helping employers find workers, strengthening free collective bargaining, and tracking changes in employment, prices, and other national economic measurements. In carrying out this mission, the Department administers a variety of Federal labor laws including those that guarantee workers’ rights to safe and healthful working conditions; a minimum hourly wage and overtime pay; freedom from employment discrimination; unemployment insurance; and other income support. The department is housed in the Frances Perkins Building, which gained its name in 1980 when President Jimmy Carter renamed the facility in honor of Frances Perkins, the Secretary of Labor from 1933–1945 and the first female cabinet secretary in U.S. history.[1]

The U.S. Congress first established a Bureau of Labor in 1888 under the Department of the Interior. Later, the Bureau of Labor became an independent Department of Labor but lacked executive rank. It became a bureau again within the Department of Commerce and Labor, which was established February 15, 1903. President William Howard Taft signed the March 4, 1913 bill establishing the Department of Labor as a Cabinet-level Department.

President Lyndon Johnson asked Congress to consider the idea of reuniting Commerce and Labor.[citation needed] He argued that the two departments had similar goals and that they would have more efficient channels of communication in a single department. However, Congress never acted on it.

In the 1970s, following the Civil Rights Movement, the Labor Department under Secretary George P. Shultz was instrumental in promoting racial diversity in unions.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Labor

Background Articles and Videos

 

President Obama Personnel Alert: U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis

 

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United States Department Of Transportation

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, Regulations, Technology, Transportation, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

    Saddling Posterity with Debt

“We believe–or we act as if we believed–that although an individual father cannot alienate the labor of his son, the aggregate body of fathers may alienate the labor of all their sons, of their posterity, in the aggregate, and oblige them to pay for all the enterprises, just or unjust, profitable or ruinous, into which our vices, our passions or our personal interests may lead us. But I trust that this proposition needs only to be looked at by an American to be seen in its true point of view, and that we shall all consider ourselves unauthorized to saddle posterity with our debts, and morally bound to pay them ourselves; and consequently within what may be deemed the period of a generation, or the life of the majority.”

~Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 1813

US Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

 

United States Department of Transportation

http://www.dot.gov/

United States Department of Transportation

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2010/assets/dot.pdf

The United States Department of Transportation:
A Brief History

http://dotlibrary.dot.gov/Historian/history.htm

Department of Transportation – $72.5billion + $48.1billion from the Recovery Act

The Department of Transportation is to use their budget to improve safety and reduce congestion as well as provide a financially viable system for the government.  These improvements should also lead to new jobs for Americans. The money under the authority of the DOT increases from $17 billion to $70 billion. Overall, very few details are given as to why and exactly where the money is going

Department of Transportation

Major Expenditures

Modernize Traffic Control

  • Improve rural access to the aviation system as demand for subsidized commercial airspace increases – $55million
  • Improve the efficiency, safety and capacity of air traffic control through the Next Generation Air Transportation System – $800 million
  • Supports moving from ground-based radar surveillance to satellite surveillance – no amount provided

High-Speed Rail Networks

  • Creation of a high speed rail network as an environmentally friendly alternative to flying or driving – $5billion over 5 years

http://www.onlineforextrading.com/blog/federal-budget-broken-down/

“…Department of Transportation

The mission of the Department of Transportation (DOT) is to ensure a fast, safe, efficient, accessible and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people.

Organizations within the DOT include the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Aviation Administration, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Federal Transit Administration, the Federal Railroad Administration and the Maritime Administration.

The U.S. Secretary of Transportation oversees approximately 55,000 employees and a budget of approximately $70 billion.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/our-government/executive-branch

United States Department of Transportation

“…The United States Department of Transportation (USDOT or just DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. It was established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966 and began operation on April 1, 1967. It is administered by the United States Secretary of Transportation.

Its mission is to “Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people, today and into the future.”

History

Prior to the Department of Transportation, the Under Secretary of Commerce for Transportation administered the functions now associated with the DOT. In 1965, Najeeb Halaby, administrator of the Federal Aviation Agency, suggested to President Lyndon Johnson that transportation be elevated to a cabinet-level post, and that the FAA be folded into the DOT.

Divisions

  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
  • Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
  • Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)
  • Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)
  • Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
  • Maritime Administration (MARAD)
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
  • Office of Climate Change and Environment
  • Office of Inspector General
  • Office of the Secretary of Transportation (OST)
  • Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA)
  • Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA)
  • Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC)
  • Surface Transportation Board (STB)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Department_of_Transportation

Background Articles and Videos

Obama Announces Another Republican for his Cabinet, Illinois Congressman Ray LaHood

Ray LaHood: Witness to History

U.S. DOT Secretary Ray LaHood

President Obama Speech At Department of Transportation ( 1 of 2 )

President Obama Speech At Department of Transportation ( 2 of 2 )

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United States Department of Agriculture

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Agriculture, Blogroll, Climate, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Employment, Farming, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, Health Care, Law, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Resources, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

    Saddling Posterity with Debt

“We believe–or we act as if we believed–that although an individual father cannot alienate the labor of his son, the aggregate body of fathers may alienate the labor of all their sons, of their posterity, in the aggregate, and oblige them to pay for all the enterprises, just or unjust, profitable or ruinous, into which our vices, our passions or our personal interests may lead us. But I trust that this proposition needs only to be looked at by an American to be seen in its true point of view, and that we shall all consider ourselves unauthorized to saddle posterity with our debts, and morally bound to pay them ourselves; and consequently within what may be deemed the period of a generation, or the life of the majority.”

~Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, 1813

US Debt Clock

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

  

United States Department of Agriculture

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usdahome

United States Department of Agriculture

http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2010/assets/agr.pdf

United States Department Of Agriculture

FY 2010

 BUDGET SUMMARY AND ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN

  http://www.obpa.usda.gov/budsum/FY10budsum.pdf

Department of Agriculture – $26billion + $6.9billion from Recovery Act

The $26billion budgeted for the Department of Agriculture is aimed at helping family farmers and rural Americans. Some of the more notable plans are expanding broadband to rural areas,  development of renewable energy and to provide strong support for childhood nutrition.

deptagricobama1

Major Expenditures

Rural and Farm Economic Growth

  • Five Rural Development Programs –  $61,000,000
  • Increase rural broadband – $1,300,000,000
  • Increase national supply of home-grown renewable fuels – $250,000,000
  • Rural teaching incentives and lands grants for minority-serving institutions     – 70,000,000

US Natural Resources

  • Forest Protection – $50,000,000
  • Wildfire Protection – $1,382,000,000
  • Land conservation – $119,000,000

Food Safety and Nutrition Assistance

  • Child Nutrition Reauthorization – $1,000,000,000

 http://www.onlineforextrading.com/blog/federal-budget-broken-down/

US Department of Agriculture

“…Department of AgricultureThe U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) develops and executes policy on farming, agriculture, and food. Its aims include meeting the needs of farmers and ranchers, promoting agricultural trade and production, assuring food safety, protecting natural resources, fostering rural communities, and ending hunger in America and abroad.

The USDA employs more than 100,000 employees and has an annual budget of approximately $95 billion. It consists of 17 agencies, including the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, the Food and Nutrition Service, and the Forest Service. The bulk of the department’s budget goes towards mandatory programs that provide services required by law, such as programs designed to provide nutrition assistance, promote agricultural exports, and conserve our environment. The USDA also plays an important role in overseas aid programs by providing surplus foods to developing countries.

The United States Secretary of Agriculture administers the USDA. …”

http://www.whitehouse.gov/our-government/executive-branch

United States Department of Agriculture

“…The United States Department of Agriculture (informally the Agriculture Department or USDA) is the United States federal executive department responsible for developing and executing U.S. federal government policy on farming, agriculture, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and abroad.

The head of the department is the Secretary of Agriculture, who is a member of the Cabinet. The current Secretary is Tom Vilsack. …”

“…Origins

Early in its history, the economy of the United States was largely agrarian. Officials in the federal government had long sought new and improved varieties of seeds, plants, and animals for importation to the United States. In 1836 Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, a Yale-educated attorney interested in improving agriculture, became Commissioner of Patents, a position within the Department of State. He soon began collecting and distributing new varieties of seeds and plants through members of the Congress and agricultural societies. In 1839 Congress established the Agricultural Division within the Patent Office and allotted $1,000 for “the collection of agricultural statistics and other agricultural purposes.”

Ellsworth’s interest in aiding agriculture was evident in his annual reports that called for a public depository to preserve and distribute the various new seeds and plants, a clerk to collect agricultural statistics, the preparation of statewide reports about crops in different regions, and the application of chemistry to agriculture. Ellsworth’s agricultural focus earned him the sobriquet of “The Father of the Department of Agriculture.”

In 1849 the Patent Office was transferred to the newly created Department of the Interior. In the ensuing years, agitation for a separate bureau of agriculture within the department or a separate department devoted to agriculture kept recurring.

Formation and subsequent history

On May 15, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln established the independent Department of Agriculture to be headed by a Commissioner without Cabinet status.[1] Lincoln called it the “people’s department.” In the 1880s, varied interest groups were lobbying for Cabinet representation. Business interests sought a Department of Commerce and Industry, and farmers tried to raise the Department of Agriculture to Cabinet rank. In 1887, the House of Representatives and Senate passed bills giving Cabinet status to the Department of Agriculture and Labor, but the bill was killed in conference committee after farm interests objected to the addition of labor. Finally, on February 9, 1889, President Grover Cleveland signed a bill into law elevating the Department of Agriculture to Cabinet level.

In 1887, the Hatch Act provided for the federal funding of agricultural experiment stations in each state. The Smith-Lever Act of 1914 then funded cooperative extension services in each state to teach agriculture, home economics and related subjects to the public. With these and similar provisions, the USDA reached out to every county of every state.

During the Great Depression, farming remained a common way of life for millions of Americans. The Department of Agriculture was crucial to providing concerned persons with the assistance that they needed to make it through this difficult period, helping to ensure that food continued to be produced and distributed to those who needed it, assisting with loans for small landowners, and contributing to the education of the rural youth.

Allegations have been made that throughout the agency’s history it discriminated against African-American farmers, denying them loans and access to other programs well into the 1990s.[2] The effect of this discrimination was the near total elimination of African-American farmers in the United States.[3] In 1999, the USDA settled a class action lawsuit (Pigford v. Glickman) alleging discrimination against African-American farmers.

Today, many of the programs concerned with the distribution of food and nutrition to people of America and providing nourishment as well as nutrition education to those in need are run and operated under the USDA Food and Nutrition Service. It also regulates the amount of methane produced by cows. The USDA also concerns itself with assisting farmers and food producers with the sale of crops and food on both a domestic and on the world market. It plays a role in overseas aid programs by providing surplus foods to developing countries. This aid can go through USAID, foreign governments, international bodies such as World Food Program, or approved non profit organizations. The Agricultural Act of 1949, section 416 (b) and Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, also known as Public Law 480 or Food for Peace, provides the legal basis of such actions. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Cabinet

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President Barack Obama State of The Union Address–Rush Limbaugh and Ron Paul Response!

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Health Care, history, Homes, Immigration, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

  

“A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned – this is the sum of good government. ” 

~Thomas Jefferson 

Barack Obama’s Theme Song

Bee Gees – I Started a Joke–

 

I started a joke, which started the whole world crying,
But I didn’t see that the joke was on me, oh no.
I started to cry, which started the whole world laughing,
Oh, if I’d only seen that the joke was on me. 

I looked at the skies, running my hands over my eyes,
And I fell out of bed, hurting my head from things that I’d said. 

Til I finally died, which started the whole world living,
Oh, if I’d only seen that the joke was on me. 

I looked at the skies, running my hands over my eyes,
And I fell out of bed, hurting my head from things that I’d said. 

Til I finally died, which started the whole world living,
Oh, if I’d only seen that the joke was one me. 

  

The 2010 State of the Union Address

  

Part 1| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

Part 2| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

  

Part 3| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

 

  

Part 4| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

Part 5| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

Part 6| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

Part 7| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

Part 8| President Obama’s 2010 State of the Union Address – 01/27/10

Gov. Bob McDonnell (R-VA) Responds to State of the Union

  

Rush Limbaugh – Obama State of Union Reaction

Rush Limbaugh’s Letter to President Obama

  

Ron Paul: State of the Union Address Part 1 of 3

Ron Paul: State of the Union Address Part 2 of 3

Ron Paul: State of the Union Address Part 3 of 3

Cato Institute Scholars Analyze the 2010 State of the Union Address

 

American People Response

Ray Stevens – We The People

Bee Gees – Massachusetts 

Feel I’m going back to Massachusetts
Something’s telling me I must go home
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
The day I left her standing on her own 

Tried to hitch a ride to San Francisco
Gotta do the things I wanna do
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
They brought me back to see my way with you 

Talk about the life in Massachusetts
Speak about the people I have seen
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts 

I will remember Massachusetts
I will remember Massachusetts  

We The People arrived at this moment due to massive Federal Government intervention into the economy with higher  taxes, spending, deficits, debts, bailouts and subsidies.  

Until entire Federal Departments are shut-down and closed permanently and a FairTax replaces all Federal taxes, neither political party is seriously fiscally responsible. 

The progressive radical socialists of both the Democratic and Republican parties are the problem and the cause of massive government intervention into the free market process and the result is the Obama Depression. 

The American people have had enough of the progressive radical socialist political class and elites in Washington D. C. 

President Obama arrogantly reading more lies and promises no longer inspires or impresses the American people. 

The American people no longer believe or trust President Obama. 

The American people know we are broke. 

The American people are marching and rising. 

The Second American Revolution has begun. 

Time to throw the tyrants out of office. 

  

The American People Rising In Revolt Against The Progressive Radical Socialists–Democrats and Republicans!

  

“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.” 

~Thomas Jefferson
 

  

Background Articles and Videos

 

 Obama’s So-Called Stimulus: Good For Government, Bad For the Economy

Stimulus II: A Sequel America Can’t Afford

Transcripts of President Obama’s State of Union Address, January 17, 2010

Text: Obama’s State of the Union Address

 http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/28/us/politics/28obama.text.html 

State of the Union: President Obama’s Speech
President Obama Delivers State of the Union at US Capitol in Washington, D.C.
Jan. 27, 2010

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/State_of_the_Union/state-of-the-union-2010-president-obama-speech-transcript/story?id=9678572 

  

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