Archive for December 5th, 2009

Gold Standard And Sound Money–Videos

Posted on December 5, 2009. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Taxes, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

 

Ludwig von Mises

“Sound money still means today what it meant in the nineteenth century: the gold standard.”

The Theory of Money and Credit, page 490 

 

“The gold standard has one tremendous virtue: the quantity of the money supply, under the gold standard, is independent of the policies of governments and political parties. This is its advantage. It is a form of protection against spendthrift governments.”

Economic Policy, page 65 

 

Monetary Lessons from America’s Past

The Gold Dollar

Milton Friedman on The Gold Standard

Gold and the Good Guys

The Gold Standard Before the Civil War

The Gilded Age and the Gold Standard

The Costs of a Gold Standard

 

Entrepreneurship Under the Gold Standard

The Gold Standard

Gold, Peace, and Prosperity [Part 1]

Gold, Peace, and Prosperity [Part 2]

The Founding of the Federal Reserve

 

Why the Meltdown Should Have Surprised No One

Ending the Monetary Fiasco and Returning to Sound Money

Ludwig von Mises

“Inflationism, however, is not an isolated phenomenon. It is only one piece in the total framework of politico-economic and socio-philosophical ideas of our time. Just as the sound money policy of gold standard advocates went hand in hand with liberalism, free trade, capitalism and peace, so is inflationism part and parcel of imperialism, militarism, protectionism, statism and socialism.”

On the Manipulation of Money and Credit, page 48

“Every nation, whether rich or poor, powerful or feeble, can at any hour once again adopt the gold standard.”

Omnipotent Government, page 252

 

 

Background Articles and Videos

The Shrinking Value of the Dollar

The CPI inflation calculator uses the average Consumer Price Index for a given calendar year. This data represents changes in prices of all goods and services purchased for consumption by urban households. This index value has been calculated every year since 1913. For the current year, the latest monthly index value is used. In 2008, for example, it took $21.57 to buy what $1 bought in 1913. Note that in 1920, it cost $2.02, and declined in 1925 and through the 1930s, illustrating the effect of the Great Depression, when prices slumped. Prices did not pass $2 again until 1950.

Year Amount it took to
equal $1 in 1913
1913 $1.00
1920 2.02
1925 1.77
1930 1.69
1935 1.38
1940 1.41
1945 $1.82
1950 2.43
1955 2.71
1960 2.99
1965 3.18
1970 3.92
1975 $5.43
1980 8.32
1985 10.87
1990 13.20
1995 15.39
2000 17.39
2001 $17.89
2002 18.17
2003 18.59
2004 19.08
2005 19.73
2006 20.18
2007 20.94
2008 21.57
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Web: http://stats.bls.gov/ .

Sound Money vs. Fiat Money -Bob Chapman on Economics 101

 

Austrian Monetary Economics

FDR Ends Gold Standard in 1933

Nixon Ends Bretton Woods International Monetary System

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

The Battle For The World Economy–Videos

Frederic Bastiat–The Law–Videos

Yaron Brook–Videos

Friedrich Hayek–Videos

The Great Depression and the Current Recession–Robert Higgs–Videos

Milton Friedman–Videos

Milton Friedman on Education–Videos

Ludwig von Mises–Videos

The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and The Ideas of Ayn Rand

Murray Rothbard–Videos

Rothbard On Keynes–Videos

Peter Schiff–Videos

Schiff, Forbers and Bloomberg Nail The Financial Crisis and Recession–Mistakes Were Made–Greed, Arrogance, Stupidity–Three Chinese Curses!

L. William Seidman on The Economic Crisis: Causes and Cures–Videos

Amity Shlaes–Videos

Julian Simon–Videos

Thomas Sowell and Conflict of Visions–Videos

Thomas E. Woods, Jr.–Videos

Banking Cartel’s Public Relations Campaign Continues:Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke On The Record

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression–Videos

Posted on December 5, 2009. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Demographics, Employment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government spending, history, Immigration, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Monetary Policy, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Taxes, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

1929 – The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression: Part 1 of 6

1929 – The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression: Part 2 of 6

1929 – The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression: Part 3 of 6

1929 – The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression: Part 4 of 6

1929 – The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression: Part 5 of 6

1929 – The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression: Part 6 of 6

Background Articles and Videos

Wall Street Crash of 1929

“…The crash followed a speculative boom that had taken hold in the late 1920s, which had led hundreds of thousands of Americans to invest heavily in the stock market, a significant number even borrowing money to buy more stocks. By August 1929, brokers were routinely lending small investors more than ⅔ of the face value of the stocks they were buying. Over $8.5 billion was out on loan,[20] more than the entire amount of currency circulating in the U.S. at the time.[21]The rising share prices encouraged more people to invest; people hoped the share prices would rise further. Speculation thus fueled further rises and created an economic bubble. The average P/E (price to earnings) ratio of S&P Composite stocks was 32.6 in September 1929,[22] clearly above historical norms. Most economists view this event as the most dramatic in modern economic history.

On October 24, 1929 (with the Dow just past its September 3 peak of 381.17), the market finally turned down, and panic selling started. In 1931, the Pecora Commission was established by the U.S. Senate to study the causes of the crash. The U.S. Congress passed the Glass-Steagall Act in 1933, which mandated a separation between commercial banks, which take deposits and extend loans, and investment banks, which underwrite, issue, and distribute stocks, bonds, and other securities.

After the experience of the 1929 crash, stock markets around the world instituted measures to temporarily suspend trading in the event of rapid declines, claiming that they would prevent such panic sales. The one-day crash of Black Monday, October 19, 1987, however, was even more severe than the crash of 1929, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell a full 22.6%.[13] (The markets quickly recovered, posting the largest one-day increase since 1933 only two days later.) …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wall_Street_Crash_of_1929

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

The Great Wall Street Crash & Depression–Videos

The Battle For The World Economy–Videos

Frederic Bastiat–The Law–Videos

Yaron Brook–Videos

Friedrich Hayek–Videos

The Great Depression and the Current Recession–Robert Higgs–Videos

Milton Friedman–Videos

Milton Friedman on Education–Videos

Ludwig von Mises–Videos

The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and The Ideas of Ayn Rand

Murray Rothbard–Videos

Rothbard On Keynes–Videos

Peter Schiff–Videos

Schiff, Forbers and Bloomberg Nail The Financial Crisis and Recession–Mistakes Were Made–Greed, Arrogance, Stupidity–Three Chinese Curses!

L. William Seidman on The Economic Crisis: Causes and Cures–Videos

Amity Shlaes–Videos

Julian Simon–Videos

Thomas Sowell and Conflict of Visions–Videos

Thomas E. Woods, Jr.–Videos

Banking Cartel’s Public Relations Campaign Continues:Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke On The Record

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...