All Fifty States Should Institute A Mandatory 21-Day Quarantine For American Citizens Coming From Ebola Infected Countries and Isolation in A Hospital If You Have Any of Ebola Symptoms and Stop Issuing Visas and Ban Travelers From Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — Send In The Clowns — Hillary Clinton Big Government Collectivist On Minimum Wages and Job Creation — Videos

Posted on October 28, 2014. Filed under: American History, Banking, Books, Business, Communications, Constitution, Corruption, Crisis, Culture, Documentary, Economics, Employment, Faith, Family, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Freedom, government, government spending, Health Care, Heroes, history, Illegal, Immigration, Inflation, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, Medicine, Monetary Policy, Money, Music, Non-Fiction, Obamacare, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Radio, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Unemployment, Video, War, Wealth, Welfare, Wisdom, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 357: October 27, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 356: October 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 355: October 23, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 354: October 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 353: October 21, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 352: October 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 351: October 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 350: October 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 349: October 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 348: October 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 347: October 13, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 346: October 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 345: October 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 344: October 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 343: October 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 342: October 2, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 341: October 1, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 340: September 30, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 339: September 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 338: September 26, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 337: September 25, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 336: September 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 335: September 23 2014

Pronk Pops Show 334: September 22 2014

Pronk Pops Show 333: September 19 2014

Pronk Pops Show 332: September 18 2014

Pronk Pops Show 331: September 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 330: September 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 329: September 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 328: September 12, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 327: September 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 326: September 10, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 325: September 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 324: September 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 323: September 5, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 322: September 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 321: September 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 320: August 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 319: August 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 318: August 27, 2014 

Pronk Pops Show 317: August 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 316: August 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 315: August 18, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 314: August 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 313: August 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 312: August 13, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 311: August 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 310: August 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 309: August 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 308: August 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 307: August 1, 2014 

Pronk Pops Show 306: July 31, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 305: July 30, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 304: July 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 303: July 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 302: July 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 301: July 23, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 300: July 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 299: July 21, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 298: July 18, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 297: July 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 296: July 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 295: July 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 294: July 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 293: July 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 292: July 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 291: July 7, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 290: July 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 289: July 2, 2014

Story 1: All Fifty States Should Institute A Mandatory  21-Day Quarantine For American Citizens Coming From Ebola Infected Countries and Isolation in A Hospital If You Have Any of Ebola Symptoms and Stop Issuing Visas and Ban Travelers From Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — Send In The Clowns — Hillary Clinton Big Government Collectivist On Minimum Wages and Job Creation — Videos

Judy Collins Send in the Clowns

Hillary Clinton: Corporations and Businesses Dont Create Jobs

Good Intentions 2 of 3 Minimum Wage, Licensing, and Labor Laws with Walter Williams

Milton Friedman on Minimum Wage

MILTON FRIEDMAN-what alinsky never told obama…

Milton Friedman ~ The Escape From Collectivism

Milton Friedman vs Bill Clinton (1999)

G. Edward Griffin – The Collectivist Conspiracy

Santa Monica Tea Party – Yaron Brook – Reclaiming the Moral High Ground

 

 

Understand Quarantine and Isolation

People can be infected with dangerous diseases in a number of ways. Some germs, like those causing malaria, are passed to humans by animals. Other germs, like those that cause botulism, are carried to people by contaminated food or water. Still others, like the ones causing measles, are passed directly from person to person. These diseases are called “contagious”.

Contagious diseases that pose a health risk to people have always existed. While the spread of many of these diseases has been controlled through vaccination and other public health efforts, avian influenza (“bird flu”) and terrorist acts worldwide have raised concerns about the possibility of a disease risk. That makes it important for people to understand what can and would be done to protect the public from the spread of dangerous contagious diseases.

The CDC applies the term “quarantine” to more than just people. It also refers to any situation in which a building, conveyance, cargo, or animal might be thought to have been exposed to a dangerous contagious disease agent and is closed off or kept apart from others to prevent disease spread.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the U.S. government agency responsible for identifying, tracking, and controlling the spread of disease. With the help of the CDC, state and local health departments have created emergency preparedness and response plans. In addition to early detection, rapid diagnosis, and treatment with antibiotics or antivirals, these plans use two main traditional strategies —quarantine and isolation— to contain the spread of illness. These are common health care practices to control the spread of a contagious disease by limiting people’s exposure to it.

The difference between quarantine and isolation can be summed up like this:

  • Isolation applies to persons who are known to be ill with a contagious disease.
  • Quarantine applies to those who have been exposed to a contagious disease but who may or may not become ill.

Definitions

Infectious disease: a disease caused by a microorganism and therefore potentially infinitely transferable to new individuals. May or may not be communicable. Example of non communicable is disease caused by toxins from food poisoning or infection caused by toxins in the environment, such as tetanus.

Communicable disease: an infectious disease that is contagious and which can be transmitted from one source to another by infectious bacteria or viral organisms.

Contagious disease: a very communicable disease capable of spreading rapidly from one person to another by contact or close proximity.

Related Links

http://www.bt.cdc.gov/preparedness/quarantine/

 

States clarify new Ebola quarantine guidelines

New Jersey releasing quarantined nurse

Nurse Under Ebola Quarantine Alleges Poor Treatment

States clarify new Ebola quarantine guidelines

Quarantine: An Effective Public Health Tool

When Do We Quarantine or Isolate for Ebola?

What it Means to be Quarantined Isolated

Experimental Drugs Currently Treating Ebola Caution

Treatment for Ebola Patients

Why Women Are More Likely to Get Ebola & How to Protect Them

How We Can Bury Family Who Die from Ebola

The Ebola virus The Search for a Cure BBC Full Documentary 2014

Dallas nurses facing the 21-day Ebola countdown

Ebola: The lessons learned in Dallas

Nurse: ‘Worst day of my life’ when Ebola patient died

Ebola nurses ostracized after caring for virus patient

 

“US’ HOMELAND SECURITY”, “EBOLA QUARANTINE ZONES” AND “FEMA DETENTION CAMPS”!

Ebola Truth Shock! New WHO Reports Says Ebola Has ’42-Day Incubation Period’

Public Health Service – Disease & Its Control – Immigrants, Ellis Island & Quarantine 1930s

SNL Cold Open Ridicules Obama on Ebola – ” Probably One of My Greatest Accomplishments

Understand Quarantine and Isolation: Questions & Answers

Questions & Answers

When someone is known to be ill with a contagious disease, they are placed in isolation and receive special care, with precautions taken to protect uninfected people from exposure to the disease.

When someone has been exposed to a contagious disease and it is not yet known if they have caught it, they may be quarantined or separated from others who have not been exposed to the disease. For example, they may be asked to remain at home to prevent further potential spread of the illness. They also receive special care and observation for any early signs of the illness.

How long can quarantine and isolation last? What is done to help the people who experience isolation or quarantine?

The list of diseases for which quarantine or isolation is authorized is specified in an Executive Order of the President. This list currently includes cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, plague, smallpox, yellow fever, viral hemorrhagic fevers (Lassa, Marburg, Ebola, Crimean-Congo, South American, and others not yet isolated or named), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and influenza caused by novel or reemergent influenza viruses that are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic.

Isolation

Isolation would last for the period of communicability of the illness, which varies by disease and the availability of specific treatment. Usually it occurs at a hospital or other health care facility or in the person’s home. Typically, the ill person will have his or her own room and those who care for him or her will wear protective clothing and take other precautions, depending on the level of personal protection needed for the specific illness.

In most cases, isolation is voluntary; however, federal, state and local governments have the authority to require isolation of sick people to protect the public.

Quarantine

Modern quarantine lasts only as long as necessary to protect the public by (1) providing public health care (such as immunization or drug treatment, as required) and (2) ensuring that quarantined persons do not infect others if they have been exposed to a contagious disease.

Modern quarantine is more likely to involve limited numbers of exposed persons in small areas than to involve large numbers of persons in whole neighborhoods or cities.

Quarantined individuals will be sheltered, fed, and cared for at home, in a designated emergency facility, or in a specialized hospital, depending on the disease and the available resources. They will also be among the first to receive all available medical interventions to prevent and control disease, including:

  • Vaccination.
  • Antibiotics.
  • Early and rapid diagnostic testing and symptom monitoring.
  • Early treatment if symptoms appear.

The duration and scope of quarantine measures would vary, depending on their purpose and what is known about the incubation period (how long it takes for symptoms to develop after exposure) of the disease-causing agent.

Examples

A few hours for assessment. Passengers on airplanes, trains or boats believed to be infected with or exposed to a dangerous contagious disease might be delayed for a few hours while health authorities determine the risk they pose to public health. Some passengers may be asked to provide contact information and then released while others who are ill are transported to where they can receive medical attention. There have been a few instances where state and local public health authorities have imposed a brief quarantine at a public gathering, such as a shelter, while investigating if one or more people may be ill.

Enough time to provide preventive treatment or other intervention. If public health authorities determine that a passenger or passengers on airplanes, trains or boats are sick with a dangerous contagious disease, the other passengers may be quarantined in a designated facility where they may receive preventive treatment and have their health monitored.

For the duration of the incubation period. If public health officials determine that one or more passenger on airplanes, trains or boats are infected with a contagious disease and that passengers sitting nearby may have had close contact with the infected passenger(s), those at risk might be quarantined in a designated facility, observed for signs of illness and cared for under isolation conditions if they become ill.

When would quarantine and isolation be used and by whom?

If people in a certain area were potentially exposed to a contagious disease, this is what would happen: State and local health authorities would let people know that they may have been exposed and would direct them to get medical attention, undergo diagnostic tests, and stay at home, limiting their contact with people who have not been exposed to the disease. Only rarely would federal, state, or local health authorities issue an “order” for quarantine and isolation.

However, both quarantine and isolation may be compelled on a mandatory basis through legal authority as well as conducted on a voluntary basis.

States have the authority to declare and enforce quarantine and isolation within their borders. This authority varies widely, depending on state laws. It derives from the authority of state governments granted by the U.S. Constitution to enact laws and promote regulations to safeguard the health and welfare of people within state borders.

Further, at the national level, the CDC may detain, medically examine or conditionally release persons suspected of having certain contagious diseases. This authority applies to individuals arriving from foreign countries, including Canada and Mexico, on airplanes, trains, automobiles, boats or by foot. It also applies to individuals traveling from one state to another or in the event of “inadequate local control.”

The CDC regularly uses its authority to monitor passengers arriving in the United States for contagious diseases. In modern times, most quarantine measures have been imposed on a small scale, typically involving small numbers of travelers (airline or cruise ship passengers) who have curable diseases, such as infectious tuberculosis or cholera. No instances of large-scale quarantine have occurred in the U.S. since the “Spanish Flu” pandemic of 1918-1919.

Based on years of experience working with state and local partners, the CDC anticipates that the need to use its federal authority to involuntarily quarantine a person would occur only in rare situations—for example, if a person posed a threat to public health and refused to cooperate with a voluntary request.

Definitions

For more information, see the CDC’s “Fact Sheet on Legal Authorities for Isolation/Quarantine”.

Infectious disease: a disease caused by a microorganism and therefore potentially infinitely transferable to new individuals. May or may not be communicable. Example of non communicable is disease caused by toxins from food poisoning or infection caused by toxins in the environment, such as tetanus.

Communicable disease: an infectious disease that is contagious and which can be transmitted from one source to another by infectious bacteria or viral organisms.

Contagious disease: a very communicable disease capable of spreading rapidly from one person to another by contact or close proximity.

http://www.bt.cdc.gov/preparedness/quarantine/qa.asp

 

White House Pushes Back on State Ebola Quarantines

COLLEEN MCCAIN NELSON,
MELANIE GRAYCE WEST and
BETSY MCKAY

The White House pushed back against the governors of New York, New Jersey, Illinois and other states that instituted procedures to forcibly quarantine medical workers returning from West Africa, deepening an emotional debate brought on by recent Ebola cases in the U.S.

A senior administration official said Sunday that new federal guidelines under development would protect Americans from imported cases of the disease but not interfere with the flow of U.S. health workers to and from West Africa to fight the epidemic there.

“We have let the governors of New York, New Jersey and other states know that we have concerns with the unintended consequences… [that quarantine] policies not grounded in science may have on efforts to combat Ebola at its source,” the official said.

Betsy McKay joins the News Hub with the latest on the spread of the Ebola virus and efforts to contain it in the U.S. Photo: University of Texas at Arlington/AP.

It wasn’t clear what action the Obama administration could take to end the quarantines.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday night gave the first new details about how his state’s quarantine would work, noting that individuals would be allowed to stay in their homes for 21 days. State and local health-care workers would check on quarantined people twice a day to monitor for Ebola symptoms. Those with symptoms would be taken to a hospital. People whose jobs won’t compensate them during their quarantine would be paid by the state.

Travelers who have had no direct contact with Ebola patients wouldn’t be subject to confinement at home, but they would be consulted twice-daily by health officials over the three-week period.

New York officials said the new protocols still went further than those recommended by the federal government.

“My personal practice is to err on the side of caution,” said Mr. Cuomo. Asked if he got White House pressure to shape the policy, Mr. Cuomo said: “I have had none.”

The New York quarantine policy appears designed to strike a different tone from New Jersey, where Kaci Hickox, a 33-year-old Doctors Without Borders nurse, has been held in a tent in a Newark hospital for three days under conditions that she said Sunday were “really inhumane.”

New Jersey state officials said late Sunday night that they wouldn’t change their protocols, which allowed for home quarantine. A New Jersey resident who has no symptoms but has come into contact with someone with Ebola would be quarantined at home. Non-residents would be transported to their homes if feasible, or quarantined in New Jersey if not.

Ms. Hickox, who lives in Maine, has retained lawyers to challenge her quarantine. One of those lawyers, Norman Siegel, a prominent civil rights attorney, said the quarantine policy infringed on her constitutional rights.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie held firm on his decision to quarantine returning health-care workers. “I absolutely have no second thoughts about it,” he said on Fox News.

Mr. Cuomo’s announcement on Sunday was made with New York Mayor Bill de Blasio , who had criticized how Ms. Hickox was treated. “State governments have the right to make decisions. But this hero coming back from the front, having done the right thing, was treated with disrespect,” Mr. de Blasio told reporters.

Mr. Christie said Saturday that “I’m sorry if in any way she was inconvenienced, but inconvenience that could occur from having folks that are symptomatic and ill out amongst the public is a much, much greater concern of mine. So certainly nothing was done intentionally to try to inconvenience her or try to make her uncomfortable.”

Although Mr. Cuomo’s policy appears different from New Jersey’s handling of a quarantine case, the White House declined to comment on the New York measures beyond reiterating the principles guiding its own decision-making.

Ebola has killed nearly 5,000 people in West Africa. Nine people have been treated for the virus in the U.S., four of whom either became ill or were infected here. One died.

President Barack Obama convened a meeting of top public health and national security advisers on Sunday to discuss the issue.

Federal, state and local officials are grappling with ways to quell anxiety and protect the public. The different approaches they are taking reflect the layered public health system in the U.S. State and local authorities hold most quarantine powers, while the federal government’s power is more limited, according to legal experts.

The federal government technically could find an argument for challenging state decisions to impose quarantines, said Polly Price, professor at Emory University School of Law. “I could see an argument that there are interstate ramifications,” she said, such as economic disruption. But she said she thought it unlikely, given the political environment and public anxiety over Ebola.

In most cases, the federal government can’t override state quarantines. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has powers at ports of entry to the U.S., and can quarantine people who are traveling between states and have infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Ebola, which can’t be spread through the air, isn’t considered as infectious.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, left, and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie announced a mandatory quarantine for “high risk” people returning to the U.S. through airports in New York and New Jersey. ENLARGE
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, left, and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie announced a mandatory quarantine for “high risk” people returning to the U.S. through airports in New York and New Jersey. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Craig Spencer, a New York doctor diagnosed Thursday with Ebola after his return from West Africa, appeared to have played a part in the quarantine moves by New Jersey and New York. He was reported in serious but stable condition Sunday at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan.

The Christie administration believes it would win any legal challenge because state law is clear on the government’s ability to quarantine people in public-health emergencies, said a New Jersey state official familiar with the new policy.

During a campaign stop in Florida Sunday, Mr. Christie said that no federal officials had reached out to him about revising the mandatory quarantine.

Christie administration officials knew that public-health experts would disagree with their decision but decided they wanted a broad, tough policy that would calm people’s fears, a Christie official said.

Mr. Cuomo said last week that he consulted with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before launching the mandatory-quarantine policy, but Christie administration officials didn’t, a Christie spokesman said.

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, said Sunday that the administration is considering a risk-based monitoring system that would elevate the required supervision of health-care workers returning from West African nations.

But he said the protocols would stop short of a mandatory, 21-day isolation of health-care workers that several states have imposed, which risks deterring volunteers heading to Africa to fight the disease.

Related Video

Ebola is a highly contagious virus, but only if you come into contact with certain bodily fluids of those infected. What do scientists know about how it’s transmitted? WSJ’s Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer.

“You fashion what you do with them according to the risk,” Dr. Fauci said Sunday morning on NBC. “One of the ways you can mitigate against this issue is by…different types of monitoring.”

Supervision would ratchet up from passive monitoring—individuals regularly taking their temperatures—to “direct active” monitoring, where those who are deemed high-risk are checked by medical workers, he said on NBC.

Scientists say that people who aren’t showing symptoms of Ebola don’t transmit the disease, and Dr. Fauci said other steps besides a mandatory quarantine could ensure public safety. Telling health-care workers that upon returning from West Africa “you still have 21 days out of your life where you can’t move, I think, will have unintended negative consequences,” he said.

Legal experts disagreed on Ms. Hickox’s ability to successfully challenge her quarantine.

Lawrence Gostin, a Georgetown University professor who leads the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, and is offering help to Ms. Hickox, said she has two main ways to contest her quarantine. The policy in New Jersey applies to a class of people and there “was no individualized assessment of her individual risk,” he said.

The second possible avenue is to argue she wasn’t quarantined in a humane health environment.

“Because this is not a prison sentence, the person has not been convicted. It’s civil and so you’re not supposed to punish them,” said Mr. Gostin.

Mr. Gostin said this was the first time in his memory where such a quarantine was implemented.

But Michael C. Dorf, a professor at Cornell University Law School, said there may not be a sound legal case to challenge a quarantine. The state laws used to implement mandatory quarantines in New York, New Jersey and Illinois are clear and “there is no serious doubt about the affirmative power of either the states and the federal government to quarantine,” Mr. Dorf said

 

http://online.wsj.com/articles/christie-defends-mandatory-ebola-quarantine-for-health-care-workers-1414335046?mod=WSJ_hpp_sections_health

 

Army major general, troops quarantined after Ebola aid trip

By Barbara Starr,

Army Major General Darryl A. Williams, commander of U.S. Army Africa, and approximately 10 other personnel are now in “controlled monitoring” in Italy after returning there from West Africa over the weekend, according to multiple U.S. military officials.

The American personnel are effectively under quarantine, but Pentagon officials declined to use that terminology.

Williams’ plane was met on the ground by Italian authorities “in full CDC gear,” the official said, referring to the type of protective equipment worn by U.S. health care workers.

There is no indication at this time any of the team have symptoms of Ebola.

Ebola outbreak: Get up to speed with the latest developments

They will be monitored for 21 days at a “separate location” at the U.S. military installation at Vicenza Italy, according to U.S. military officials. Senior Pentagon officials say it is not a “quarantine,” but rather “controlled monitoring.” However, the troops are being housed in an access controlled location on base, and are not allowed to go home for the 21 day period while they undergo twice daily temperature checks.

It is not clear yet if they will be allowed visits from family members.

4 issues raised at the House Ebola hearing

Williams and his team have been in West Africa for 30 days, to set up the initial U.S. military assistance there and have traveled extensively around Liberia. The team was in treatment and testing areas during their travels.

Speaking to reporters two weeks ago while he was still overseas in Liberia, Williams spoke of the extensive monitoring that he was given.

U.S. troops join Ebola fight

“We measure, while we’re here — twice a day, are monitoring as required by the recent guidance that was put out while we’re here in Liberia. I — yesterday, I had my temperature taken, I think, eight times, before I got on and off aircraft, before I went in and out of the embassy, before I went out of my place where I’m staying,” William said during the October 16 press conference.

Boy under evaluation in New York; nurse ordered released

“As long as you exercise basic sanitation and cleanliness sort of protocols using the chlorine wash on your hands and your feet, get your temperature taken, limiting the exposure, the — no handshaking, those sorts of protocols, I think the risk is relatively low.”

Officials could not explain why the group was being put under into controlled monitoring, which is counter to the Pentagon policy. The current DOD policy on monitoring returning troops says “as long as individuals remain asymptomatic, they may return to work and routine daily activities with family members.”

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said Monday that the Defense Department “has not issued a policy related to their workers that have spent time in West Africa.”

“I know that there was this decision that was made by one commanding officer in the Department of Defense, but it does not reflect a department-wide policy that I understand is still under development,” Earnest said.

The Pentagon has, though, published plans that detail how it will handle troops who are deployed to the region — including potential quarantines.

Jessica L. Wright, the undersecretary of Defense for personnel and readiness, issued an Oct. 10 memo that said troops who have faced an elevated risk of exposure to Ebola will be quarantined for 21 days — and that those who haven’t faced any known exposure will be monitored for three weeks.

Wright’s memo also lays out the Pentagon’s plans to train troops before they’re sent to West Africa and to monitor them during their deployment to the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak.

Pressed again during his briefing Monday, Earnest said it’s up to the Defense Department to announce its policies for troops that return from the region.

“We are seeing this administration put in place the policies that we believe are necessary to protect the American people and to protect the American troops,” he said. “And we’re going to let science drive that process. And as soon as we have a policy to announce on this, we’ll let you know.”

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/27/politics/soldiers-monitored-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 354-356

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 346-353

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 338-345

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 328-337

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 319-327

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 307-318

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 296-306

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 287-295

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 277-286

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShow 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 124-130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 98-100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 93

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 92

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 01-09

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Economic Consequences of the Minimum Wage — Videos

Posted on March 10, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Books, Communications, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, government, government spending, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Microeconomics, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Unemployment, Unions, Wealth | Tags: , , |

min_wage

Minimum-Wage

minimum-wage_chart

us_federal_minimum_wage

IB-unemployment-FEB-2013-chart-1_HIGHRES

Does the Minimum Wage Hurt Workers?

Dan Mitchell Explains Why Boosting the Minimum Wage Is Bad for Low-Skilled Workers

John Stossel – The Minimum Wage and Consequences

John Stossel – The State Against Blacks

Good Intentions 2of3 Minimum Wage, Licensing, and Labor Laws with Walter Williams

John Stossel – Real World Effects Of Minimum Wage

Increasing Minimum Wage Good or Bad for Small Business?

The Truth about the Minimum Wage

Milton Friedman on Minimum Wage

[yourtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ca8Z__o52sk]

Power of the Market – Minimum Wage

The Job-Killing Impact of Minimum Wage Laws

Both Sides of The Minimum Wage Debate

Walter E Williams – Davis Bacon Sellout

Williams with Sowell – Minimum Wage

Walter E Williams – Minimum Wage as a Racist Tool

Walter Williams: Up From the Projects

State Against Blacks – Conservative Dr. Walter Williams

Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers: 2011

In 2011, 73.9 million American workers age 16 and over were paid at hourly rates, representing 59.1 percent of all wage and salary workers.1 Among those paid by the hour, 1.7 million earned exactly the prevailing Federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. About 2.2 million had wages below the minimum.2 Together, these 3.8 million workers with wages at or below the Federal minimum made up 5.2 percent of all hourly-paid workers. Tables 1 through 10 present data on a wide array of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics for hourly-paid workers earning at or below the Federal minimum wage. The following are some highlights from the 2011 data.

  • Minimum wage workers tend to be young. Although workers under age 25 represented only about one-fifth of hourly-paid workers, they made up about half of those paid the Federal minimum wage or less. Among employed teenagers paid by the hour, about 23 percent earned the minimum wage or less, compared with about 3 percent of workers age 25 and over. (See table 1 and table 7.)
  • About 6 percent of women paid hourly rates had wages at or below the prevailing Federal minimum, compared with about 4 percent of men. (See table 1.)
  • About 5 percent of White hourly-paid workers earned the Federal minimum wage or less, compared with about 6 percent of Blacks and about 3 percent of Asians. Among hourly-paid workers of Hispanic ethnicity, about 5 percent earned the minimum wage or less. (See table 1.)
  • Among hourly-paid workers age 16 and over, about 11 percent of those who had less than a high school diploma earned the Federal minimum wage or less, compared with about 5 percent of those who had a high school diploma (with no college) and about 2 percent of college graduates. (See table 6.)
  • Never-married workers, who tend to be young, were more likely than married workers to earn the Federal minimum wage or less (about 9 percent versus about 2 percent). (See table 8.)
  • Part-time workers (persons who usually work less than 35 hours per week) were more likely than full-time workers to be paid the Federal minimum wage or less (about 13 percent versus about 2 percent). (See table 1 and table 9.)
  • By major occupational group, the highest proportion of hourly-paid workers earning at or below the Federal minimum wage was in service occupations, at 13 percent. About 6 in 10 workers earning the minimum wage or less in 2011 were employed in service occupations, mostly in food preparation and serving related jobs. (See table 4.)
  • The industry with the highest proportion of workers with hourly wages at or below the Federal minimum wage was leisure and hospitality (22 percent). About one-half of all workers paid at or below the Federal minimum wage were employed in this industry, primarily in restaurants and other food services. For many of these workers, tips and commissions supplement the hourly wages received. (See table 5.)
  • The states with the highest proportions of hourly-paid workers earning at or below the Federal minimum wage were Georgia, Mississippi, and Texas (all between 8 and 10 percent). The states with the lowest percentage of workers earning at or below the Federal minimum wage were Oregon, California, Washington, and Alaska (all under 2 percent). It should be noted that some states have minimum wage laws establishing standards that exceed the Federal minimum wage. (See table 2 and table 3.)
  • The proportion of hourly-paid workers earning the prevailing Federal minimum wage or less declined from 6.0 percent in 2010 to 5.2 percent in 2011. This remains well below the figure of 13.4 percent in 1979, when data were first collected on a regular basis. (See table 10.)

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). These data on minimum wage earners are derived from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly nationwide survey of households. Data in this summary are 2011 annual averages.

1 Data are for wage and salary workers age 16 and over and refer to earnings on a person’s sole or principal job. Hourly earnings for hourly-paid workers do not include overtime pay, commissions, or tips received. All self-employed persons are excluded whether or not their businesses are incorporated.

2 The presence of a sizable number of workers with wages below the Federal minimum does not necessarily indicate violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, as there are exemptions to the minimum wage provisions of the law. The estimates of the numbers of minimum and subminimum wage workers presented in the accompanying tables pertain to workers paid at hourly rates; salaried and other non-hourly workers are excluded. As such, the actual number of workers with earnings at or below the prevailing Federal minimum is undoubtedly understated. Research has shown that a relatively small number and share of salaried workers and others not paid by the hour have earnings that, when translated into hourly rates, are at or below the minimum wage. However, BLS does not routinely estimate hourly earnings for non-hourly workers because of data concerns that arise in producing these estimates.


Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers: 2011, Tables 1 – 10

Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers: 2011 (PDF)

Table 1. Employed wage and salary workers paid hourly rates with earnings at or below the prevailing Federal minimum wage by selected characteristics, 2011 annual averages
Characteristic Number of workers
(in thousands)
Percent distribution Percent of workers paid hourly rates
Total paid hourly rates At or below minimum wage Total paid hourly rates At or below minimum wage At or below minimum wage
Total At minimum wage Below minimum wage Total At minimum wage Below minimum wage Total At minimum wage Below minimum wage
AGE AND SEX
Total, 16 years and over 73,926 3,829 1,677 2,152 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 5.2 2.3 2.9
16 to 24 years 14,436 1,896 893 1,003 19.5 49.5 53.2 46.6 13.1 6.2 6.9
16 to 19 years 3,936 899 491 408 5.3 23.5 29.3 19.0 22.8 12.5 10.4
25 years and over 59,490 1,933 784 1,149 80.5 50.5 46.8 53.4 3.2 1.3 1.9
Men, 16 years and over 36,457 1,433 648 785 49.3 37.4 38.6 36.5 3.9 1.8 2.2
16 to 24 years 7,290 787 388 399 9.9 20.6 23.1 18.5 10.8 5.3 5.5
16 to 19 years 1,872 373 212 161 2.5 9.7 12.6 7.5 19.9 11.3 8.6
25 years and over 29,167 647 260 387 39.5 16.9 15.5 18.0 2.2 0.9 1.3
Women, 16 years and over 37,469 2,395 1,029 1,366 50.7 62.5 61.4 63.5 6.4 2.7 3.6
16 to 24 years 7,147 1,109 505 604 9.7 29.0 30.1 28.1 15.5 7.1 8.5
16 to 19 years 2,064 526 279 247 2.8 13.7 16.6 11.5 25.5 13.5 12.0
25 years and over 30,323 1,286 524 762 41.0 33.6 31.2 35.4 4.2 1.7 2.5
RACE, SEX, AND HISPANIC OR LATINO ETHNICITY
White (1) 59,314 3,006 1,258 1,748 80.2 78.5 75.0 81.2 5.1 2.1 2.9
Men 29,743 1,108 484 624 40.2 28.9 28.9 29.0 3.7 1.6 2.1
Women 29,571 1,898 774 1,124 40.0 49.6 46.2 52.2 6.4 2.6 3.8
Black or African American (1) 9,523 577 324 253 12.9 15.1 19.3 11.8 6.1 3.4 2.7
Men 4,252 222 117 105 5.8 5.8 7.0 4.9 5.2 2.8 2.5
Women 5,271 356 208 148 7.1 9.3 12.4 6.9 6.8 3.9 2.8
Asian (1) 3,037 99 36 63 4.1 2.6 2.1 2.9 3.3 1.2 2.1
Men 1,425 41 13 28 1.9 1.1 0.8 1.3 2.9 0.9 2.0
Women 1,612 58 23 35 2.2 1.5 1.4 1.6 3.6 1.4 2.2
Hispanic or Latino (1) 13,264 720 340 380 17.9 18.8 20.3 17.7 5.4 2.6 2.9
Men 7,703 326 154 172 10.4 8.5 9.2 8.0 4.2 2.0 2.2
Women 5,561 394 186 208 7.5 10.3 11.1 9.7 7.1 3.3 3.7
FULL- AND PART-TIME STATUS AND SEX
Full-time workers (2) 53,594 1,274 522 752 72.5 33.3 31.1 34.9 2.4 1.0 1.4
Men 29,292 501 205 296 39.6 13.1 12.2 13.8 1.7 0.7 1.0
Women 24,302 773 317 456 32.9 20.2 18.9 21.2 3.2 1.3 1.9
Part-time workers (2) 20,199 2,545 1,153 1,392 27.3 66.5 68.8 64.7 12.6 5.7 6.9
Men 7,103 932 443 489 9.6 24.3 26.4 22.7 13.1 6.2 6.9
Women 13,096 1,615 711 904 17.7 42.2 42.4 42.0 12.3 5.4 6.9
Footnotes:
(1) Estimates for the above race groups (White, Black or African American, and Asian) do not sum to totals because data are not presented for all races. Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race.
(2) The distinction between full- and part-time workers is based on hours usually worked. These data will not sum to totals because full- or part-time status on the principal job is not identifiable for a small number of multiple jobholders. Full time is 35 hours or more per week; part time is less than 35 hours.

NOTE: Data exclude all self-employed persons whether or not their businesses are incorporated.

http://www.bls.gov/cps/minwage2011tbls.htm#1

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

Series Id: LNS14000012
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title: (Seas) Unemployment Rate – 16-19 yrs.
Labor force status: Unemployment rate
Type of data: Percent or rate
Age: 16 to 19 years

unemployment_teenagers

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
1948 8.5 10.0 10.5 9.5 7.0 9.3 9.7 9.6 8.8 8.5 9.1 8.5
1949 10.0 10.6 11.9 13.2 13.4 13.8 14.3 15.0 14.6 15.8 14.0 15.4
1950 15.2 15.2 14.3 12.0 13.3 12.2 11.2 10.7 10.9 10.3 9.5 11.1
1951 8.5 8.1 8.3 7.9 6.7 8.3 8.7 8.2 8.3 7.7 9.5 7.6
1952 9.3 8.3 8.2 7.6 8.9 8.4 8.8 8.5 8.9 8.4 8.2 7.6
1953 6.9 6.7 6.7 7.1 6.4 6.9 7.3 7.4 7.3 9.7 8.6 11.8
1954 12.1 13.5 13.0 13.6 13.4 10.5 12.9 14.0 14.0 12.2 11.4 12.6
1955 11.7 11.3 11.0 10.7 10.9 10.8 10.4 11.5 11.3 11.0 11.7 11.0
1956 10.6 11.4 11.5 10.9 11.9 12.2 11.2 10.1 9.8 10.1 12.6 9.7
1957 11.6 10.5 11.2 11.1 11.4 11.7 11.8 11.5 11.0 10.9 13.4 13.1
1958 14.4 14.6 14.7 17.2 16.3 15.4 17.9 16.0 17.9 16.0 15.9 14.9
1959 14.0 12.9 13.6 15.0 14.3 13.9 14.5 16.1 14.9 15.8 15.1 15.3
1960 14.6 13.1 15.6 14.2 13.9 14.6 13.9 15.3 14.5 16.1 14.7 16.4
1961 17.1 17.4 17.1 16.4 15.8 16.6 17.3 17.1 18.0 16.9 16.0 15.3
1962 16.2 16.0 15.1 15.1 14.2 13.6 13.9 14.1 14.5 14.3 16.3 14.4
1963 15.8 17.7 17.1 16.8 18.7 17.2 18.1 16.1 17.4 17.1 17.7 16.3
1964 16.7 15.8 16.3 17.0 16.4 16.8 14.7 16.7 15.7 15.8 15.6 17.1
1965 16.8 16.7 15.8 16.2 14.8 15.3 14.5 13.9 14.7 14.5 13.0 13.3
1966 13.0 12.4 13.1 13.0 13.6 13.0 12.9 12.4 12.8 12.6 11.8 12.1
1967 11.9 12.9 11.6 12.1 12.8 12.9 13.0 13.4 12.9 13.7 13.8 13.0
1968 12.0 12.9 12.7 11.8 12.5 13.9 13.8 12.0 12.0 11.8 12.2 12.7
1969 12.0 11.9 12.3 12.0 12.4 12.2 12.8 12.2 12.6 12.6 11.6 11.8
1970 13.5 13.3 13.4 14.7 14.2 16.3 14.7 15.7 16.2 16.7 17.4 17.1
1971 16.8 16.3 16.9 16.3 16.8 17.7 17.7 16.8 16.7 16.9 16.9 16.9
1972 16.9 18.0 17.2 16.5 15.3 15.9 15.6 16.5 16.3 15.8 15.7 15.6
1973 13.7 15.3 14.3 15.5 14.9 13.8 14.3 14.0 14.7 14.4 15.0 14.6
1974 14.6 14.9 14.9 14.3 15.4 16.3 16.8 14.9 17.0 17.2 17.8 18.2
1975 19.5 19.4 19.9 19.9 20.4 20.9 20.7 20.7 19.5 19.8 19.0 19.8
1976 19.6 19.0 18.9 19.5 18.6 18.5 18.3 19.6 18.6 19.0 19.2 19.1
1977 18.9 18.4 18.6 18.0 17.8 18.8 17.5 17.4 18.0 17.2 17.2 15.5
1978 16.7 17.2 17.3 16.6 16.0 15.4 16.5 15.7 16.4 16.1 16.3 16.7
1979 16.1 16.1 15.9 16.3 16.1 15.7 15.6 16.5 16.5 16.5 15.9 16.2
1980 16.5 16.6 16.3 16.2 18.6 18.9 19.1 18.9 18.0 18.4 18.5 17.6
1981 19.1 19.3 19.2 18.8 19.1 19.8 18.6 18.8 19.7 20.3 21.3 21.1
1982 22.0 22.6 21.8 22.8 22.8 22.9 24.0 23.7 23.6 23.7 24.1 24.1
1983 23.1 22.8 23.5 23.4 22.8 24.0 22.8 22.9 21.7 21.4 20.2 19.9
1984 19.5 19.4 19.8 19.2 18.7 18.2 18.8 18.7 19.2 18.6 17.7 18.8
1985 18.8 18.3 18.2 17.5 18.5 18.5 20.2 17.9 17.9 20.0 18.3 19.1
1986 18.1 18.8 18.2 19.2 18.6 19.2 18.4 18.0 18.4 17.7 18.1 17.5
1987 17.7 18.0 17.9 17.3 17.4 16.5 15.8 15.9 16.2 17.3 16.6 16.0
1988 16.1 15.6 16.6 16.0 15.3 14.2 14.8 15.4 15.5 15.1 13.9 14.8
1989 16.4 15.0 13.9 14.6 14.8 15.7 14.2 14.6 15.2 15.0 15.5 15.3
1990 14.8 15.0 14.3 14.7 15.0 14.3 15.0 16.3 16.4 16.5 17.1 17.4
1991 18.6 17.4 18.3 17.8 18.8 18.5 19.4 18.9 18.8 19.1 19.0 20.3
1992 19.2 20.1 20.3 18.5 20.1 23.0 20.8 19.9 21.0 18.3 20.5 19.8
1993 19.9 19.7 19.7 19.5 19.8 19.9 18.4 18.4 18.2 18.7 18.5 17.9
1994 18.3 18.0 18.0 19.1 18.0 17.6 17.6 17.3 17.5 17.5 15.6 17.0
1995 16.5 17.4 16.1 17.5 17.5 17.1 18.2 17.3 17.6 17.4 17.5 18.0
1996 17.7 16.8 17.1 17.1 16.8 16.2 17.1 16.8 15.6 16.3 16.8 16.6
1997 16.8 17.1 16.4 15.9 16.0 16.8 17.1 16.1 16.1 15.1 14.8 14.0
1998 13.9 14.5 14.8 13.5 14.8 14.9 14.6 14.7 15.0 15.7 14.7 13.5
1999 15.2 13.9 14.2 14.2 13.3 13.9 13.4 13.3 14.8 13.8 13.9 13.4
2000 12.7 13.8 13.3 12.6 12.8 12.3 13.4 14.0 13.0 12.8 13.0 13.2
2001 13.8 13.7 13.8 13.9 13.4 14.2 14.4 15.6 15.2 16.0 15.9 17.0
2002 16.5 16.0 16.6 16.7 16.6 16.7 16.8 17.0 16.3 15.1 17.1 16.9
2003 17.2 17.2 17.8 17.7 17.9 19.0 18.2 16.6 17.6 17.2 15.7 16.2
2004 17.0 16.5 16.8 16.6 17.1 17.0 17.8 16.7 16.6 17.4 16.4 17.6
2005 16.2 17.5 17.1 17.8 17.8 16.3 16.1 16.1 15.5 16.1 17.0 14.9
2006 15.1 15.3 16.1 14.6 14.0 15.8 15.9 16.0 16.3 15.2 14.8 14.6
2007 14.8 14.9 14.9 15.9 15.9 16.3 15.3 15.9 15.9 15.4 16.2 16.8
2008 17.8 16.6 16.1 15.9 19.0 19.2 20.7 18.6 19.1 20.0 20.3 20.5
2009 20.7 22.2 22.2 22.2 23.4 24.7 24.3 25.0 25.9 27.1 26.9 26.6
2010 26.0 25.4 26.2 25.5 26.6 26.0 26.0 25.7 25.8 27.2 24.6 25.1
2011 25.5 24.0 24.4 24.7 24.0 24.7 24.9 25.2 24.4 24.1 23.9 22.9
2012 23.4 23.7 25.0 24.9 24.4 23.7 23.9 24.5 23.7 23.7 23.6 23.5
2013 23.4 25.1

Federal Minimum Wage Rates, 1955–2012

Value of the
minimum wage
Value of the
minimum wage
Value of the
minimum wage
Year Current
dollars
Constant
(1996)
dollars1
Year Current
dollars
Constant
(1996)
dollars1
Year Current
dollars
Constant
(1996)
dollars1
1955 $0.75 $4.39 1983 3.35 5.28 2011 7.25 5.06
1956 1.00 5.77 1984 3.35 5.06 2012 7.25 4.97
1957 1.00 5.58 1985 3.35 4.88
1958 1.00 5.43 1986 3.35 4.80
1959 1.00 5.39 1987 3.35 4.63
1960 1.00 5.30 1988 3.35 4.44
1961 1.15 6.03 1989 3.35 4.24
1962 1.15 5.97 1990 3.80 4.56
1963 1.25 6.41 1991 4.25 4.90
1964 1.25 6.33 1992 4.25 4.75
1965 1.25 6.23 1993 4.25 4.61
1966 1.25 6.05 1994 4.25 4.50
1967 1.40 6.58 1995 4.25 4.38
1968 1.60 7.21 1996 4.75 4.75
1969 1.60 6.84 1997 5.15 5.03
1970 1.60 6.47 1998 5.15 4.96
1971 1.60 6.20 1999 5.15 4.85
1972 1.60 6.01 2000 5.15 4.69
1973 1.60 5.65 2001 5.15 4.56
1974 2.00 6.37 2002 5.15 4.49
1975 2.10 6.12 2003 5.15 4.39
1976 2.30 6.34 2004 5.15 4.28
1977 2.30 5.95 2005 5.15 4.14
1978 2.65 6.38 2006 5.15 4.04
1979 2.90 6.27 2007 5.85 4.41
1980 3.10 5.90 2008 6.55 4.77
1981 3.35 5.78 2009 7.25 5.30
1982 3.35 5.78 2010 7.25 5.22
1. Adjusted for inflation using the CPI-U (Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers).
Source: U.S. Department of Labor. Web: http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/flsa/.

Information Please® Database, © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wage and Hour Division (WHD)

History of Federal Minimum Wage Rates Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, 1938 – 2009

The table of federal minimum wage rates under the Fair Labor Standards Act, 1938 – 2009 is also available in a PDF Version. In order to view and/or print PDF documents you must have a PDF viewer (e.g., Adobe Acrobat Reader v5 or later) available on your workstation.

Minimum hourly wage of workers in jobs first covered by

Effective Date 1938 Act 1 1961 Amendments 2 1966 and Subsequent
Amendments3
Nonfarm Farm
Oct 24, 1938 $0.25
Oct 24, 1939 $0.30
Oct 24, 1945 $0.40
Jan 25, 1950 $0.75
Mar 1, 1956 $1.00
Sep 3, 1961 $1.15 $1.00
Sep 3, 1963 $1.25
Sep 3, 1964 $1.15
Sep 3, 1965 $1.25
Feb 1, 1967 $1.40 $1.40 $1.00 $1.00
Feb 1, 1968 $1.60 $1.60 $1.15 $1.15
Feb 1, 1969 $1.30 $1.30
Feb 1, 1970 $1.45
Feb 1, 1971 $1.60
May 1, 1974 $2.00 $2.00 $1.90 $1.60
Jan. 1, 1975 $2.10 $2.10 $2.00 $1.80
Jan 1, 1976 $2.30 $2.30 $2.20 $2.00
Jan 1, 1977 $2.30 $2.20
Jan 1, 1978 $2.65 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Jan 1, 1979 $2.90 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Jan 1, 1980 $3.10 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Jan 1, 1981 $3.35 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Apr 1, 19904 $3.80 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Apr 1, 1991 $4.25 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Oct 1, 1996 $4.75 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Sep 1, 19975 $5.15 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Jul 24, 2007 $5.85 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Jul 24, 2008 $6.55 for all covered, nonexempt workers
Jul 24, 2009 $7.25 for all covered, nonexempt workers

Where to Obtain Additional Information

This publication is for general information and is not to be considered in the same light as official statements of position contained in the regulations.

For additional information, visit our Wage-Hour website: http://www.wagehour.dol.gov and/or call our Wage-Hour toll-free information and helpline, available 8am to 5pm in your time zone, 1-866-4USWAGE (1-866-487-9243).

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Santa Obama’s $9 Minimum Wage: Good Propaganda, Bad Economics–Videos

Posted on February 19, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Demographics, Diasters, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government spending, history, History of Economic Thought, Inflation, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, Narcissism, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Resources, Talk Radio, Technology, Unemployment, Unions, Video | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Santa Obama’s $9 minimum wage: good propaganda, bad economics

By Raymond Thomas Pronk

Presidential economic policies like the proverbial “road to hell” are often paved with good intentions.

In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said:

“Even with the tax relief we’ve put in place, a family with two kids that earns the minimum wage still lives below the poverty line. That’s wrong. Tonight, let’s declare that in the wealthiest nation on Earth, no one who works full time should have to live in poverty and raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour. This single step would raise the incomes of millions of working families. It could mean the difference between groceries or the food bank; rent or eviction; scraping by or finally getting ahead. For businesses across the country, it would mean customers with more money in their pockets.”

Why not increase the minimum wage to $18 per hour and win America’s war on poverty?

What are the economic consequences or impact of a $9 minimum wage on young high school and college students seeking employment? A decidedly negative impact if economic history is any guide.

The large increase in teenage unemployment is partly driven by the increase in the minimum wage. When the minimum wage rate was increased in July 2008 from $5.85 to $6.55 there was an upward spike in the teenage unemployment rate to greater than 20 percent. When the minimum wage was again increased in July 2009 from $6.55 to its current rate of $7.25, there was another upward spike in the teenage unemployment rate to greater than 25 percent. This rising trend of upward spikes in teenage unemployment rates after an increase in the minimum wage is reflected in the following chart.

Unemployment rate or percent of 16-19 years from 1948 to present

             unemployment_rate_1948_present_16_19-years_edited           

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor

David Neumark, professor of economics at the University of California, Irvine and William L. Wascher, deputy director in the Division of Research and Statistics at the Federal Reserve Board, in their book, “Minimum Wages,” provide a comprehensive review of the evidence on the economic effects of minimum wage laws. They concluded that such laws reduce employment opportunities for less-skilled workers, tend to reduce their earnings and are not very effective in reducing poverty.

If Congress passes an increase in the minimum wage to $9 as proposed by Obama, young, inexperienced, low-skill workers, especially blacks and Hispanics, will again be hurt for they will not be hired by businesses who cannot afford to pay them the higher mandated minimum wage. This will be reflected in yet another spike upward in the teenage unemployment rate that might exceed 30 percent.

Furthermore, young American citizens, especially blacks and Hispanics, will face stiff competition from the more than 11 million illegal aliens who predominantly seek low-skilled jobs. Obama and progressives in both the Democratic and Republican parties want to grant these illegal aliens immediate legal status to work in the U.S.

Obama is repeating the past economic policy mistakes of progressive presidents from both political parties such as Hoover, Roosevelt, Truman, Johnson, Nixon, Carter and the Bushes in mandating higher than free market wage rates. These well-intentioned but massive government interventionist economic policies lead to prolonged depressions and recessions with high unemployment rates, especially for young, inexperienced, low skilled and minority workers.

Thirty years ago the black economist, Walter E. Williams, explored the effects of federal and state government intervention into the economy, including minimum wage laws, in the PBS documentary, Good Intentions, based upon his 1982 book, “The State Against Blacks.” Those favoring a rise in the federal minimum wage would be well advised to view this video together with “Milton Friedman on the Minimum Wage” on YouTube before advocating an increase in the minimum wage.

For young American citizens an entry-level job paying a lower competitive market wage rate is preferable to no job at a higher government mandated minimum wage.

Good intentions are not enough. Results measured in jobs created count.

Raymond Thomas Pronk is host of the Pronk Pops Show on KDUX web radio from 3-5 p.m. Fridays and author of the companion blog http://www.pronkpops.wordpress.com/

Digital Age-Why is Coolidge the Forgotten President?-Amity Shlaes

Sumner’s Explanation of The Forgotten Man – Revised for the 21st Century

Sumner’s Explanation of The Forgotten Man – Revised for the 21st
Century

By Joshua Lyons 9/25/09

As soon as A observes something which seems to him to be wrong,  from which X is suffering, A talks it over  with B, and A and B then propose to get a law passed – with the praise of Y – to remedy  the evil and help X.

Their law always proposes to determine  what C shall do for X or, in the better case,  what A, B and C shall do for  X.

As for A and B, who get a  law to make themselves do for X what they are willing to do for  him, we have nothing to say except that they might better have done it without  any law, but C is forced to comply with the new law.

All this  is done while Y looks on with glee and proclaims that  A and B are so good for helping poor  X.

A is the  politician
B is the humanitarian, special interest, do-gooder, reformer, social speculator, etc.
C is The Forgotten Man (i.e. you, me, us)
X is the downtrodden, the oppressed, the little guy, the misunderstood, etc.
Y is the Mainstream Media

In other words…
As soon as THE POLITICIAN observes something which seems to him to be wrong, from which THE DOWNTRODDEN is suffering, THE POLITICIAN talks it over with THE HUMANITARIAN, and THE POLITICIAN and THE HUMANITARIAN then propose to get a law passed – with the praise of THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA – to remedy the evil and help THE DOWNTRODDEN.

Their law always proposes to determine what THE FORGOTTEN MAN shall do for THE DOWNTRODDEN or, in the
better case, what THE POLITICIAN, THE HUMANITARIAN and THE FORGOTTEN MAN shall do for THE DOWNTRODDEN.

As for THE POLITICIAN and THE HUMANITARIAN, who get a law to make themselves do for THE DOWNTRODDEN what they are willing to do for him, we have
nothing to say except that they might better have done it without any law, but THE FORGOTTEN MAN is forced to comply with the new law.

All this is done while THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA looks on with glee and proclaims that THE POLITICIAN and THE HUMANITARIAN are so good for helping poor THE DOWNTRODDEN.

The preceding commentary was based on William Graham Sumner’s explanation of The Forgotten Man.

http://forgottenmenblog.blogspot.com/2009/09/sumners-explanation-of-forgotten-man.html

MinimumWage

food-stamps-minimum-wage-graph-1970-2010-no-population

The Truth about the Minimum Wage

Obama: “Raise Minimum Wage to $9 an Hour” – SOTU 2013

More on Minimum Wage

Obama’s $9/Hour SOTU Minimum Wage 

 Milton Friedman on Minimum Wage

Power of the Market – Minimum Wage

Williams with Sowell – Minimum Wage

The Job-Killing Impact of Minimum Wage Laws

“Good Intentions” by Dr. Walter Williams

Dr. Walter Williams’ 1982 PBS documentary “Good Intentions” based on his book, “The State Against Blacks”. The documentary was very controversial at the time it was released and led to many animosities and even threats of murder.

In “Good Intentions”, Dr. Williams examines the failure of the war on poverty and the devastating effect of well meaning government policies on blacks asserting that the state harms people in the U.S. more than it helps them. He shows how government anti-poverty programs have often locked people into poverty making the points that:

- being forced to attend 3rd rate public schools leave students unprepared for working life
– minimum wages prevent young people from obtaining jobs at an early age
– licensing and labor laws have had the effect of restricting entrance of blacks into the skilled trades and unions
– the welfare system creates perverse incentives for the poor to make bad choices they otherwise would not

Dr. Williams presents the following solutions to these problems:

Failing Public Schools – Give parents greater control over their children’s education by setting up a tuition tax credit or voucher system to broaden competition in turn revitalizing both public and non-public schools

Minimum Wages – Remove the minimum wage from youngsters to give more young people the chance to learn the world of work at an early age instead spending their free time idle an possibly falling into the habits of the street

Restrictive Labor Laws, Jobs Programs – Eliminate government roadblocks that prevent new entrepreneurs from starting their own business

Welfare Programs – Enact a compassionate welfare system such as a negative income tax which would remove dependency and dis-incentives for the poor to get themselves out of poverty

Scholars interviewed in the documentary include Donald Eberle, Charles Murray, and George Gilder.

Good Intentions 1 of 3 Introduction and Public Schools with Walter Williams

Good Intentions 2 of 3 Minimum Wage, Licensing, and Labor Laws with Walter

Good Intentions 3 of 3 The Welfare System and Conclusions with Walter Williams 

Government Intervention and Individual Freedom | Walter Williams

Obama: “Time to Pass Immigration Reform” – State of the Union 2013 

Contrasting Views of the Great Depression | Robert P. Murphy

 

Why You’ve Never Heard of the Great Depression of 1920 | Thomas E. Woods, Jr.

Uncommon Knowledge: The Great Depression with Amity Shlaes

Calvin Coolidge: The Best President You’ve Never Heard Of – Amity Shlaes

Amity Shlaes, Author, “Coolidge”

Keep Cool With Coolidge, Not Obama: Obama Reveals His True Hatred of Business

Obama Wants $9 Minimum Wage…

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 624 other followers