Breaking Bob Grant Dead At 84 –Talk Radio Path Maker — Rest In Peace — Videos

Posted on January 2, 2014. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Computers, Culture, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, Fiscal Policy, Heroes, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Press, Psychology, Radio, Radio, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Reviews, Security, Talk Radio, Unemployment, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

bob_grantbob_grant

‘Bob Grant has died. Born March 14, 1929 he was an American radio host whose real name was Robert Ciro Gigante. Grant, who lived in Tom’s River, N.J., died on New Year’s Eve.He was a veteran of radio broadcasting in New York City, and Grant is considered to be a pioneer of the “conservative” and “confrontational” talk radio format who influenced many people after him.He began working in radio in the 1940s at WBBM in Chicago as a radio personality and television talk show host at KNX in Los Angeles, and as an actor. During the Korean War he served in the Naval Reserve. He became sports director at KABC in Los Angeles, where after some substitute appearances he inherited the talk show of Joe Pyne in 1964 and began to build a huge following. Grant hosted three shows on KABC in 1964 titled, “Open Line,” “Night Line,” and “Sunday Line.” Many people were avid listeners of his show and it helped the popularity of the format.He was the father of conservative talkradio.He was known to say: “Good afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen, and welcome to another hour of the free and open exchange of ideas and opinions in the belief that as American citizens you have the right to hear, and to be heard.”

Bob Grant on “Hannity & Colmes” discusses retiring 1.16.2006 (Sean Hannity)

Bob Grant Celebrates 40 Years on New York Radio

 

Bob Grant Interview: Media Coverage of Obama “Absolutely Sca

Bob Grant’s Emotional Monologue 9.23.2012

Bob Grant 40th Anniversary in New York City Show on WABC 9.20.2010

Howard Stern calls into Bob Grant’s last WOR show 1.13.2006

Bob Grant in “the History of Talk Radio” documentary 1996

Rush Limbaugh Roasts Bob Grant – September 15, 1991

Bob Grant makes fun of Michael Savage hyping his books

Bob Grant on filling in for Michael Savage

The Best of Bob Grant-2000’s Pt 1

The Best of Bob Grant 2007-2012 Pt 2

Bob Grant on CBS News discussing Rush Limbaugh’s prescription drug addiction 10.11.2003

Bob Grant Show-Day after September 11, 2001 (9.12.2001)

Bob Grant attacks ‘the Tea Party’ 1.6.2013

Bob Grant on taking over Joe Pyne’s Show the night of the Kennedy Assassination

WABC 77 New York – Bob Grant GAG (Get At Grant) Hour- Dec 1988

Bob Grant, Father of Conservative Talk Radio, Dead at 84

Veteran New York radio personality Bob Grant — widely credited with inventing the conservative talk-radio format — has died at the age of 84.

Grant, who lived in Tom’s River, N.J., passed away on New Year’s Eve, according to the Branchburg Funeral Home, which is handling the arrangements.

Grant began his career as a controversial talk show host in 1970, when he joined WMCA in New York and quickly bucked the liberal slant of many of the other hosts.

The gravel-voiced talker’s in-your-face opinions and regular telling off of callers often got him in hot water.

He opened his show stating: “Good afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen, and welcome to another hour of the free and open exchange of ideas and opinions in the belief that as American citizens you have the right to hear, and to be heard.”

He slammed uncouth politicians as “craven bootlickers.” He once said of the Second Coming of Jesus: “He’s not coming back. Look, I don’t believe he’s coming back. I think that’s a myth and I say it.”

Grant routinely signed off with the chant “Get Gaddafi,” in a taunt at Libyan dictator Muammar al-Gaddafi.

In 1973, he called Rep. Benjamin Rosenthal of New York a coward for cancelling an appearance on his show, leading Rosenthal to complain to the Federal Communications Commission.

The case went to the U.S. Court of Appeals and was ultimately thrown out after a judge decided Grant had offered Rosenthal equal time.

Grant left WMCA in 1977 to work for WOR, but was fired for controversial remarks he made in 1979.

“A caller phoned in to the show saying he was upset with a woman who was blaming the police for what happened to her sons. [This woman] was the public relations director or community relations director of WCBS newsradio,” he said.

“I stupidly asked the caller if he knew how she got that job. The caller said he didn’t know and I promptly and arrogantly said, “I will tell you how. She passed the gynecological and pigmentation test — that’s how! … WOR was forced to fire me even though I had given the radio giant the biggest overnight ratings they ever had.”

Grant returned to WMCA in 1980, where his producer was Steve Malzberg, now host of “The Steve Malzberg Show” on Newsmax TV.

“I had grown up listening to Bob Grant so this was a dream come true,” Malzberg said.

“He was an extremely nice guy, a wonderful and funny pioneer who overcame many attempts to turn him into a villain. He persevered and did what he love until the very end.”

In 1984, Grant was hired by WABC, which had switched formats from Top 40 music to all-talk. With its strong signal, Grant was heard by millions of listener in the Northeastern United States.

The station began billing him as “America’s most listened to talk radio personality.”

But Grant got in trouble with WABC in 1996 when he made a mean-spirited crack about Commerce Secretary Ron Brown whose plane had crashed in Croatia.

“My hunch is that [Brown] is the one survivor. I just have that hunch. Maybe it’s because, at heart, I’m a pessimist,” Grant said. Brown, along with 34 others on board, had been killed.

Grant then moved back to WOR and his show became nationally syndicated. His WOR run ended in 2006.

In 2007, he returned to WABC where he stayed for a year and a half, before leaving to host an Internet radio show titled “Straight Ahead!” He again returned to WABC in Sept. 2009, to host a Sunday talk show, retiring last summer because of poor health.

Grant’s family asks that memorial contributions may be made in his memory can be made to the Young America’s Foundation, 110 Elden Street, Herndon, VA 20170 or the New York Police and Fire Widows’ & Childrens’ Benefit Fund, Inc., 767 Fifth Ave., 2614C, New York, NY 10153.

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/Grant-radio-obituary-conservative/2014/01/02/id/544851

Bob Grant

Bob Grant (March 14, 1929 – December 31, 2013) was an American radio host whose real name was Robert Ciro Gigante. A veteran of broadcasting in New York City, Grant is considered a pioneer of the “conservative” and “confrontational” talk radio format.[2][3][4]

Career[edit]

Early work[edit]

Grant graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with a degree in journalism. He began working in radio in the 1940s at the news department at WBBM (AM) in Chicago, as a radio personality and television talk show host at KNX (AM) in Los Angeles, and as an actor. During the Korean War, he served in the Naval Reserve. [5] He later became sports director at KABC (AM) in Los Angeles, where after some substitute appearances he inherited the talk show of early controversialist Joe Pyne in 1964 and began to build a following. Grant hosted three shows on KABC (AM) in 1964 titled, “Open Line,” “Night Line,” and “Sunday Line.”[6]

Move to New York City (WMCA: 1970–1977)[edit]

Grant came to New York in 1970, where he hosted a talk show on WMCA as the “house conservative”, distinctively out of fashion with both the times and with some countercultural WMCA personalities, including Alex Bennett. His offbeat but combative style (along with Fairness Doctrine requirements of the era) won him seven years on WMCA, with a growing and loyal audience. His sign-off for many years was “Get Gaddafi”, which meant remove Muammar al-Gaddafi, the dictator of Libya, whose anti-Israeli stance was in opposition to Grant’s pro-Israeli feelings.

On March 8, 1973, Grant had scheduled New York Rep. Benjamin S. Rosenthal, who was leading a boycott of meat. Grant later learned that Rosenthal would not appear on his show, and in a discussion with a caller, Grant referred to Rosenthal as a “coward.” Rosenthal then filed a complaint with the F.C.C., and the issue went all the way up to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in Straus Communications v. Federal Communications Commission, United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, January 16, 1976, Wright, J.[7][8][9] The appeals court ultimately ruled in favor of WMCA and Grant, due to the fact that Grant offered the congressman an invitation to appear on his show, granting Rosenthal equal time.[9]

One of Grant’s most memorable regular callers was Ms. Trivia, who aired her “Beef of the Week”, a series of seemingly trivial complaints. Ms. Trivia was Grant’s guest at a Halloween Festival dinner held at Lauritano’s Restaurant in theBronx, where a young Ms. Trivia, not long out of her teens, revealed herself for the first time to a startled radio audience, many who had expected and assumed, based upon her articulation and intonation, that she would be an elderly, prudish woman. Instead, a statuesque and fashionable Ms. Trivia, wearing an elaborate Victorian costume, was the surprise guest seated next to Grant at the dais table along with several political figures from New York. The following day the majority of calls to the show were for the purpose of obtaining information about the mysterious Mm. Trivia, with Grant in his typical manner finally in exasperation hanging up on the callers, shouting, “THIS IS NOT Mm. TRIVIA’S SHOW!”[10]

A linguistic “hoax” trivia question originated on Grant’s WMCA show in 1975, “There are three words in the English language that end in -gry. Two of them are angry and hungry. What is the third?”[11] While at WMCA, Grant attracted attention in 1975 from a commentary he recorded titled, “How Long Will You Stand Aside.”[12] Grant also released an LP record in 1977 titled, “Let’s Be Heard,” which was a recording of a speech Grant gave before a synagogue in New York. Grant left WMCA in 1977.

WOR AND WWDB[edit]

In 1979, radio host Barry Farber, fought with WMCA station manager Ellen Straus to rehire Grant. Farber broadcast during the 4-7 P.M. weekday timeslot on WMCA. When asked by Straus at a meeting if Farber was willing to give up his airtime for Grant, Farber replied, “Yes he can have my time. I’d rather he have my time than no time at all.”[13] While away from WMCA, Grant went up the dial to New York’s WOR (AM) for a time, where he was fired for controversial remarks. Grant describes the remarks that got him fired from WOR:

I had done my nightly show on WOR and a caller phoned in to the show saying he was upset with a woman who was blaming the police for what happened to her sons. I had read the story the man was referring to and noted that the woman, who was very angry with the police, was the public relations director or community relations director of WCBS newsradio. I stupidly asked the caller if he knew how she got that job. The caller said he didn’t know and I promptly and arrogantly said, “I will tell you how. She passed the gynecological and pigmentation test — that’s how!” Not only did that turn off Roger Ailes, but WOR was forced to fire me even though I had given the radio giant the biggest overnight ratings they ever had.[14]

After being fired from WOR, Grant worked at WWDB in Philadelphia. Grant had gone back to WMCA after working at WWDB in Philadelphia. It was reported upon Grant’s departure that his ratings had slipped to number 23 out of 39 shows during the 4-7 P.M. weekday timeslot.[15]

WABC (1984–1996)[edit]

In 1984, WABC (AM) in New York City hired Grant to join their new talk station. He first hosted a show from 9-11pm, before moving to the 3-6pm afternoon time slot. The Bob Grant Show consistently dominated the ratings in the highly competitive afternoon drive time slot in New York City and at one point the radio station aired recorded promos announcing him as “America’s most listened to talk radio personality.” The gravel-voiced Grant reminded listeners during the daily introduction that the “program was unscripted and unrehearsed”.

Grant’s long stay at WABC ended when he was fired for a remark about the April 3, 1996 airplane crash involving Commerce Secretary Ron Brown. Grant remarked to caller named, Carl of Oyster Bay (Carl Limbacher, later of NewsMaxfame), “My hunch is that [Brown] is the one survivor. I just have that hunch. Maybe it’s because, at heart, I’m a pessimist.” When Brown was found dead, Grant’s comments were widely criticized, and several weeks later, after a media campaign, his contract was terminated.[16]

Return to WOR (1996–2006)[edit]

After being fired, Grant moved down the dial to WOR to host his show in the same afternoon drive-time slot. Grant’s age began to show while broadcasting at WOR. He was less engaging with the callers, and not as energetic during his broadcasts. For a time, the Bob Grant show went into national syndication, but has been a local only show since 2001. Grant and his WABC replacement Sean Hannity would sometimes throw jabs at each other. Hannity defeated Grant in the ratings from 2001–2006.[17][18]

Grant’s WOR run ended on January 13, 2006. Grant’s ratings were not to blame for his departure, according to the New York Post, which mentioned that the decision was reached because the station’s other shows had niche audiences to garner more advertising dollars.[19] On January 16, 2006, shortly after Grant’s last WOR show, Grant appeared on Sean Hannity’s radio show and TV program Hannity & Colmes, where his former competitor paid tribute to him. Having left his options open for “an offer he cannot refuse,” Grant returned to WOR in February 2006, doing one minute “Straight Ahead” commentaries which aired twice daily after news broadcasts until September 2006. On September 8, 2006 Grant again appeared on Hannity’s show to provide a post-retirement update, which led to premature rumors that Grant was returning to WABC.[20][21] Grant then made various isolated radio appearances. He appeared as a guest host on WFNY (now WXRK) on December 7, 2006, and was interviewed by attorney Anthony Macri for Macri’s WOR show on February 24, 2007.

Post-Retirement: Return to WABC and Internet broadcasting[edit]

His guest appearances became more frequent beginning in July 2007. On July 7, 2007, he guest hosted for John R. Gambling, and appeared on Mark Levin’s show (which is networked from WABC) on July 10. Grant, guest hosted for Jerry Agar on July 9, 10, 11 and re-appeared as a fill-in host again for John Gambling on August 20 and 21. Then, on August 22, while appearing on Hannity’s show, he announced that he was returning as a regular host to WABC, in the 8–10 PM slot that at the time was filled by Agar. It would later be revealed, on what was Agar’s final show a few hours later, that he would be starting effective immediately, as Grant took over the final segments of the show. His first full show on ABC since 1996 was on August 23. The story of Grant’s return, as reported by the New York Daily News, had been discovered only a couple of hours before Grant’s official announcement.

Grant’s stint lasted less than a year and a half, until his regular nightly show was pulled by WABC in late November 2008 as part of a programming shuffle stemming from the debut of Curtis Sliwa’s national show, and later Mark Levin’s show expanding to three hours, leaving no room for Grant.[22] Grant did his most recent AM radio work as guest host filling in for Michael Savage on January 21, 2009, Mark Levin on March 23, 2009, and Sean Hannity on July 31, 2009.[22]

During the week of July 6, 2009 Grant began hosting an Internet radio show titled Straight Ahead! which originally ran Monday through Friday from 8 to 9 a.m. Eastern time on UBATV.com.[23] As a webcast, the show differed from Grant’s radio shows, in that the viewer watched Grant as he did his broadcast. The first two months of Straight Ahead! were from inside Grant’s home, and were run with technical assistance from independent filmmaker Ryan O’Leary.[24]New York radio personalities Richard Bey and Jay Diamond were also brought on board to broadcast their own one hour shows. Grant mentioned that he did not get paid to do the UBATV show, but believes that Internet broadcasting is the future.[25][26]

Beginning in September 2009, Grant reduced Straight Ahead! from five days a week down to two (Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 to 11 a.m Eastern time). Grant also moved the show from his home to a professional studio. Due to a low number of callers to the show, Grant usually interviewed only guests for the hour. On January 13, 2010, Grant did his last UBATV show. Grant’s last UBATV show and his last WOR show both fell on the date of January 13.

On September 13, 2009, Grant returned to WABC for a third stint at the station, doing a weekly Sunday talk show from 12pm to 2pm. Grant’s return to AM broadcasting has allowed him to continue interacting with his fan base through greater listenership and participation than his previous internet radio show provided. At the close of his first show, he expressly thanked the management of the station for “inviting him back” and said he looked forward to continuing this joint venture every week for the foreseeable future. Grant issued a statement in October 2012 that his October 7 broadcast would be his last, but then rescinded that message after the show, labeling it a “mistake” and an attempt to grab attention. He then took off a short time for medical work, and when he returned to the air, it was for a shortened 1pm to 2pm Sunday show (current as of November 2012). Bob Grant’s last show on WABC was July 28, 2013 when he retired due to ill health.

Grant also prepares weekly columns for his website, www.BobGrantOnline.com. The site was originally sponsored by NewsMax. As of February 19, 2013, Grant has discontinued his editorials.

Characteristics of Grant’s radio shows[edit]

This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately(January 2010)

Grant’s political philosophy generally followed American conservatism, but with some lurches into populism, libertarianism, conspiracy theory, and unorthodoxy (such as being pro-choice and anti-Flag Desecration Amendment). Grant was known for using a number of catchphrases on his show, such as “You’re a fake, a phony, and a fraud!”,[27] “Straight ahead”, “Get off my phone!”, “Anything and everything is grist for our ever-grinding mill”, and his closing line, “Your influence counts. Use it.” His opening line was used as the title of his 1996 book, Let’s Be Heard, a title representing an abbreviated version of his original opener, “And let’s be heard! Good afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen, and welcome to another hour of the free and open exchange of ideas and opinions in the belief that as American citizens you have the right to hear, and to be heard.” Before his daily monologue, Grant would ask the rhetorical question, “And what’s on your mind today, hmmm?”, and would sometimes call women “chickie-poos”. He occasionally referred to women as “broads” and when certain undesirable, lacklustre or contentious women were combative he referenced them as “several miles of bad road”. One of his favorite put-downs was to refer to someone as a “cacazote”. During the 1988 presidential bid of Michael Dukakis, this term took on a natural segue as Grant often referred to him as “Dukacazote”. He also referred to feckless politicians as “craven bootlickers,” especially when elected officials would cave in to political pressures, and Grant accused them of “folding like a cheap camera”. Due to his Italian heritage, Grant frequently used Italian slang words to describe callers or other individuals calling them gavones (crude or uncultured persons), stunads (stupid, thick, dense) or chiacchorones (persons who talk excessively). During his second stint at WOR, Grant often closed his show with the phrase, “Somebody’s got to say these things, it has to be me!” As a resident of Manalapan, New Jersey in the late-1990s, he considered running for statewide office, but eventually decided against it.

Grant occasionally made on-air reference to an always unheard, ethereal Beatrice-like presence à la Dante’s Paradiso section in The Divine Comedy, “The Lady Josephine”, to whom he constantly paid obeisance. His son, Jeff Grant, a traffic reporter with a different station, would call in occasionally. Grant made frequent references to the REO Diner in Woodbridge, New Jersey, his regular haunt.

For many years Grant closed each show with the exclamation, “Get Khadafy!” This was apparently an allusion to the practice of Roman statesman Cato the Elder ending his speeches with a call for the destruction of Carthage even if he had not been discussing Carthage in the speech. When Khadafy was finally killed in the 2012 Libyan civil war, Grant praised the decision.

When once asked by the caller George the Atheist whether he believed in God, Grant replied, “What if I tell you, George, that sometimes I do and sometimes I don’t?” On his July 21, 2005 broadcast, Grant, a baptized and raised Roman Catholic, unequivocally stated to the same caller his opinion on the Second Coming of Jesus: “He’s not coming back. Look, I don’t believe he’s coming back. I think that’s a myth and I say it. I don’t trumpet it but if a person asks — and you know one thing for sure, I’ve been deadly honest, dead-on honest all the time I’ve been on the air talking to people and they ask me questions or they make a comment that elicits a response, they are going to get an honest response. It may always not be ‘correct’ but it’s honest.” Grant has since stated that he is not an atheist.

Like many hosts in the talk radio format, Grant had his battery of usual callers that added interest to the show. John from Staten Island, Jimmy from Brooklyn, Al from Chappaqua, Greg from Chatham, David from Irvington, Dorothy from Montclair, Hal from North Bergen (at the time an undercover FBI agent provocateur posing as a white supremacist, he later went rogue), patients rights activist Eddie Carbone, and the popular Frank from Queens were some of the frequent callers. A few quasi-fictitious characters (played by Grant) were also employed during the show such as, ‘Julian P. Farquar, Dexter Pogue, Rantz Greeb, Paul “needlenose” Monage, and Lucy Shagnasty.

Over the years, Grant has made a number of statements on his shows that critics have described as racist. For example, he was quoted in the Newsday of June 2, 1992, as saying “Minorities are the Big Apple’s majority, you don’t need the papers to tell you that, walk around and you know it. To me, that’s a bad thing. I’m a white person.” In his book, Grant defended this statement by writing that he did not intend to put down other races, but only intended to express that “no one likes to be in the minority,” and that America can only survive by retaining its “humane, west European culture.” Thus, he supports ending bilingualism and multiculturalism, two policies of which he has been highly critical.

On October 15, 2008, Grant said “Did you notice Obama is not content with just having several American flags, plain old American flags with the 50 states represented by 50 stars? He has the ‘O’ flag. [...] He had the flag painted over, and the ‘O’ for Obama. Now,…these things are symptomatic of a person who would like to be a potentate — a dictator.” The “O” flag to which Grant referred was, in fact, the state flag of Ohio.

Grant distinguished himself from other conservative talk show hosts by calling for Obama to release his long form birth certificate, prior to Obama releasing it.[28]

Although Grant is generally known as being a conservative, he has been a critic of hard-lined conservative advocates in primary races, including the Tea Party movement’s candidates. This has been a frequent debate topic between Grant and his callers over the past few years. During the fall election of 2010, Grant criticized candidates, such as Christine O’Donnell, Rand Paul, and Sharron Angle. Grant endorsed Charlie Crist over Marco Rubio on a July 10, 2010 broadcast for the Florida senate primary. On a May 8, 2011 broadcast, Grant informed his audience that he supported the moderate Jon Huntsman, Jr. for the Republican nomination for president, although he would later go on to supportMitt Romney.[29]

Influences and legacy[edit]

Being largely the innovator of his own particular talk radio style, Grant previously worked with the likes of Barry Gray and Joe Pyne. Pyne would often end each broadcast with “Straight Ahead” which is something Grant picked up, leading many to believe that Grant was the first host to frequently use that line.

Over the years, national radio talk personality Howard Stern has made differing remarks on his admiration for Grant as an early influence. Upon Stern’s arrival in New York, he cited Grant as an influence,[30] but as Stern’s stardom rose, Grant became the subject of ridicule on Stern’s show. During Stern’s prime, he denied being influenced by Grant or having respect for him.[31] Stern has also frequently criticized Grant for changing his act to appease management.[31]Grant told Paul D. Colford, author of the 1996 Stern bio, Howard Stern: King of All Media, about being approached at a public appearance by Ben Stern, Howard’s father, with a teenage Howard in tow. Father introduced son to Grant and told him of Howard’s desire to go into radio. “I looked at this big, gawky kid and I said to him, ‘Just be yourself,'” Grant recalled. Stern has denied Grant’s version of the story.[31] Soon after Grant’s firing from WABC, and before his first WOR show, Grant appeared as a call-in guest on Stern’s radio show. In more recent years, Stern began to praise Grant’s legacy,[32] and called in on his last WOR show in 2006.[33]

Glenn Beck now uses the catchphrase “Get off my phone!” as a spinoff of Grant’s earlier call-in talk show style, as do Tom Scharpling and Mark Levin; similarly, Sean Hannity often uses Grant’s phrase “Straight ahead.”

In 2002, industry magazine Talkers ranked Grant as the 16th greatest radio talk show host of all time.[34]

On March 28, 2007 Bob Grant was nominated for induction into the National Radio Hall of Fame.[35]

Radio & Records had planned to issue a Lifetime Achievement Award to Grant during its annual convention in March 2008; however, the award was revoked in January 2008 for “past comments by him that contradict our values and the respect we have for all members of our community.”[36] Several talk radio hosts have spoken out against the decision; Neal Boortz has stated:

I usually try not to miss the Radio & Records talk radio convention… Not this year. Maybe never again. R&R has succumbed to political correctness… I don’t call for boycotts. But I do think it would be wonderful to see talk show hosts refuse to appear at this convention… What we have seen here in this revocation of the award to Bob Grant is simple pandering to political correctness. Nothing more, nothing less.[37]

Sean Hannity, Opie and Anthony, Comedian Jim Norton, Lars Larson, Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Lionel and Howard Stern opposed the move as well, with Levin stating “I am disgusted with the mistreatment of Bob Grant. I am fed up with the censors, intimidators, and cowards in this business.”[this quote needs a citation] Don Imus deemed the award unimportant, offered to return awards he had received after treating them to his sledgehammer and block of wood, and called Grant’s comments “stupid”, although he also referred to Grant as a “legendary broadcaster.”[38]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Grant_(radio)

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Three Cheers for Phil Robertson — Duck Dynasty, Free Speech, and Religious Freedom Win One — GLAAD IS SAD — Live With It and Move On — Videos

Posted on December 28, 2013. Filed under: American History, Art, Art, Babies, Blogroll, Business, Comedy, Communications, Constitution, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Entertainment, Heroes, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, Microeconomics, People, Philosophy, Politics, Press, Radio, Rants, Raves, Religion, Rifles, Talk Radio, Television, Television, Vacations, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“Duck Dynasty” star Phil Robertson reinstated

 

A & E lifts suspension on ‘Duck Dynasty’

‘This Week’ Roundtable: ‘Duck Dynasty’ Debate

‘Duck Dynasty’ Reversal Shows GLAAD Has an Expiration Date

A few years ago, I couldn’t imagine a network disregarding GLAAD’s recommendations

By Brandon Ambrosino

Phil v. The Gays. With which will we side? Or rather, against which will we side? This is the question that society demands we answer. Are we anti-Phil or anti-gay or anti-GLAAD or anti-A&E or anti- … ?

Perhaps no other word sums up the Duck Dynasty fiasco as aptly as the word “anti.”

Whenever I hear that someone is anti-this or that, I immediately think of the old quip about MADD – are there any mothers for drunk driving? – and ask myself if anyone is really in favor of the particular thing being protested. Since GLAAD has recently taken a hard-line stance against Phil Robertson’s “anti-gay” comments, I’ve been asking myself a similar question about defamation: Who among us is for it? Most of us are decidedly against defamation, although we choose not to publicly participate in institutional demonstrations to prove how against it we are. But, of course, GLAAD is an institution, and therefore their criticism reverberates at systemic levels.

Founded in 1985 in the wake of the AIDS crisis, GLAAD was formed to protest skewed coverage of LGBT issues and “to put pressure on media organizations to end homophobic reporting.” The original name was an acronym for “Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation,” and although the organization has recently rebranded itself by deciding that the letters G-L-A-A-D aren’t actually going to stand for anything any more, their reputation for protesting defamatory speech is well known both within and without the LGBT community.

It goes without saying that GLAAD has done a great deal of good for the LGBT community, and for that they deserve our applause and honor. As they noted in their announcement heralding their name change, their work continues to educate and influence the greater culture. Historically they’ve been a symbol of inclusion and tolerance, and they’ve worked tirelessly to infuse these values into our controlling media discourses. Frankly, though, I don’t think their hasty reaction to Phil Robertson displayed our LGBT community’s best values.

Before many of us even learned that Phil Robertson was interviewed by GQ, GLAAD had already convinced us that Phil’s words were vile and offensive, and called upon A&E “to re-examine their ties to someone with such public disdain for LGBT people and families.” (I still wonder how many of us – commentators included – have read the actual story in GQ.) A&E offered its own kneejerk response to GLAAD’s kneejerk response, and placed Phil on “indefinite” hiatus, which then prompted some Evangelicals to offer up their own kneejerk response which had something to do with the freedom of speech and now – did I hear this correctly? – Chick-fil-A. In the end, after carefully reviewing all of the responses, A&E issued a final response explaining their decision to lift Phil’s suspension, which resulted in yet another predictable response from GLAAD. I’m not sure how we do it, but we manage to craft responses to our opponents without ever having actual conversations with them.

It isn’t shocking that a conservative Christian duck-hunter from Louisiana has opinions that GLAAD deemed “anti-gay,” and it isn’t shocking that A&E immediately kowtowed to GLAAD at the first drop of the word “homophobic.” What is shocking, however, is that A&E lifted Phil’s hiatus in spite of the fact that they knew GLAAD wasn’t going to be happy about it. A few years ago, I couldn’t imagine a network disregarding GLAAD’s recommendations. A&E is certainly setting a precedent – which makes me wonder about where we are today with queer politics.

In the ’80s and ’90s, GLAAD was necessary, if only because top media outlets needed to be reminded that journalistic ethics applied to AIDS coverage, too. But in 2014, how necessary is GLAAD? I don’t mean to suggest that the organization isn’t doing some good for our world – as I’ve already noted, they are! But as America edges closer and closer to unqualified and full inclusion of LGBT persons, I wonder if an organization whose raison d’etre is to find and shame instances of discrimination isn’t just a bit archaic.

If our goal is to progress beyond defamation against LGBT persons, then that means GLAAD has a sell-by date. To put it in a different, albeit cheekier way: Defamation is good for GLAAD’s business. To bankrupt our society of LGBT defamation would certainly put GLAAD out of work. It’s hard for me to imagine I’m the only one who’s wondered about this. In fact, GLAAD’s recent name-change only confirms that their leadership has been reexamining and revising their purposes moving forward. Again, I’m not suggesting our world doesn’t need GLAAD: There certainly is a place for them. But A&E’s latest reversal should make us question what exactly that place is.
http://ideas.time.com/2013/12/28/duck-dynasty-reversal-shows-glaad-has-an-expiration-date/

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

God Is Behind Going Duck Crazy — Duck Dynasty Phil Robertson Suspended From Show For Expressing Views On Gays — Will Not Inherit The Kingdom of God — I’m With Phil — Photos & Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

God Is Behind Going Duck Crazy — Duck Dynasty Phil Robertson Suspended From Show For Expressing Views On Gays — Will Not Inherit The Kingdom of God — I’m With Phil — Photos & Videos

Posted on December 19, 2013. Filed under: American History, Art, Art, Blogroll, Business, Comedy, Communications, Culture, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, Heroes, history, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Programming, Radio, Rants, Raves, Religion, Resources, Reviews, Security, Talk Radio, Technology, Television, Video, Wealth, Wisdom, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 

Merry-Christmas-Happy-New-Year

Pronk Pops Show 185: January 2, 2014

Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 184: December 19, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 183: December 17, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 182: December 16, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 181: December 13, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 180: December 12, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 179: December 11, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 178: December 5, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 177: December 2, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 176: November 27, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 175: November 26, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 174: November 25, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 173: November 22, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 172: November 21, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 171: November 20, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 170: November 19, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 169: November 18, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 168: November 15, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 167: November 14, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 166: November 13, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 165: November 12, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 164: November 11, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 163: November 8, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 162: November 7, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 161: November 4, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 160: November 1, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 159: October 31, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 158: October 30, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 157: October 28, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 156: October 25, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 155: October 24, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 154: October 23, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 153: October 21, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 152: October 18, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 151: October 17, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 150: October 16, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 149: October 14, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 148: October 11, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 147: October 10, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 146: October 9, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 145: October 8, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 144: October 7, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 143: October 4 2013

Pronk Pops Show 142: October 3, 2013

Pronk Pops Show 141: October 2, 2013

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 184

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 124-130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 98-100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 93

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 92

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 01-09

Segment 0: God Is Behind Going Duck Crazy — Duck Dynasty Phil Robertson Suspended From Show For Expressing Views On Gays — Will Not Inherit The Kingdom of God — I’m With Phil — Photos & Videos

 

Phil-Robertsonphil-robertson-meme_2A&E Networks 2012 Upfront - InsidePhil-Robertson5jpgphil_on_foundersA+E Networks 2013 Upfront-3Si-Robertson

Phil+Robertson_friends

phil_robertson_baseballxt0pn55t0rG_Phil_Robertson_football_photo

phil_robertson_quarterbackp_robertson_crusadephil_robertson_words

I am Second® – The Robertsons

Duck Dynasty : Phil’s Way of Life

Duck Dynasty: Unknown Facts About The Robertsons

The Best of Uncle Si

Duck Dynasty : Si Struck

Duck Dynasty: Si’s New Toy

Duck Dynasty: Si’s Dating Tips

Duck Dynasty : Hey

Uncle Si Robertson “ICY STARE” HILARIOUS DUCK DYNASTY ( 720P HD )

Duck Commanders Phil and Willie Robertson Interview – CONAN on TBS

The Robertson’s of Duck Dynasty Talk About How Their Faith in Jesus Turned Around Their Lives!!

Duck Commander Phil Robertson Talks About Why This Country Needs More Jesus

Duck Commander Phil Robertson from Duck Dynasty spoke to the congregation of Saddleback church in July on why people need Jesus and why the founders would agree — and I gotta say it was awesome. I watched it last night and knew I had to post it for you guys. Duck Commander’s message is really simple, that people need to love God and love each other and he delivers it beautifully. He really is a fantastic preacher.

‘Duck Dynasty’ star: Homosexuality wrong

Phil Robertson Duck Dynasty Suspended GQ Anti-Gay -Black Racist Comments Suspension

‘Duck Dynasty’ Star Makes Shocking ‘Gay is Sin’ Comment

Duck Dynasty dared to mention Jesus

‘Duck Dynasty’ star slammed over anti-gay rant

By Andrea Morabito

Phil Robertson, patriarch of the “Duck Dynasty” clan, is being slammed for controversial comments he made about homosexuality in an interview in the January issue of GQ.

“It seems like, to me, a vagina—as a man—would be more desirable than a man’s anus. That’s just me,” Robertson told the magazine. “I’m just thinking: There’s more there! She’s got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I’m saying? But hey, sin: It’s not logical, my man. It’s just not logical.”

When the reporter asked Robertson what he found sinful, he said “Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there. Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men.”

The self-proclaimed Bible-thumper then went on to paraphrase Corinthians: “Don’t be deceived. Neither the adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers—they won’t inherit the kingdom of God. Don’t deceive yourself. It’s not right.”

On Wednesday, GLAAD called Robertson’s statements “vile” and “littered with outdated stereotypes.”

“Phil and his family claim to be Christian, but Phil’s lies about an entire community fly in the face of what true Christians believe,” said GLAAD spokesperson Wilson Cruz. “He clearly knows nothing about gay people or the majority of Louisianans — and Americans — who support legal recognition for loving and committed gay and lesbian couples.

“Phil’s decision to push vile and extreme stereotypes is a stain on A&E and his sponsors who now need to reexamine their ties to someone with such public disdain for LGBT people and families.”

An A&E spokesman had no comment, but Robertson released his own statement responding to the controversy.

“I myself am a product of the 60s; I centered my life around sex, drugs and rock and roll until I hit rock bottom and accepted Jesus as my Savior,” he said. “My mission today is to go forth and tell people about why I follow Christ and also what the Bible teaches, and part of that teaching is that women and men are meant to be together.

“However, I would never treat anyone with disrespect just because they are different from me. We are all created by the Almighty and like Him, I love all of humanity. We would all be better off if we loved God and loved each other.”

“Duck Dynasty” has been a ratings phenomenon for A&E, drawing 11.8 million viewers to its fourth season premiere last August, the most-watched nonfiction series telecast in cable history.

Its fifth season premieres on Jan. 15.

http://nypost.com/2013/12/18/duck-dynasty-member-slammed-for-comments-on-homosexuality/

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Three Cheers for Phil Robertson —  Duck Dynasty, Free Speech, and Religious Freedom Win One — GLAAD IS SAD —  Live With It and Move On — Videos

Related Posts On Pronk Pops

The Pronk Pops Show 184, December 19, 2013, Segment 1: Bubbles Ben Bernanke Bumps Bubble of Quantitative Easing Down By $10 Billion Per Month — Near Zero Interest Rate Policy Will Continue Well Into 2014 –Last Press Conference — Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

The Day ObamaCare Died – American Pie Parody — Videos

Posted on November 2, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Culture, Diasters, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, Health Care, history, Illegal, Immigration, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Macroeconomics, media, Music, Music, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Unemployment, Unions, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

the_day_obamacare_died

The Day ObamaCare Died – American Pie Parody

Don McLean – American Pie better quality

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Obama Picks Theme Song — Smiling Faces Sometimes — Performed By The Undisputed Truth — for Relaunch of Obamacare’s HealthCare.gov Website! — Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Obama Picks Theme Song — Smiling Faces Sometimes — Performed By The Undisputed Truth — for Relaunch of Obamacare’s HealthCare.gov Website! — Videos

Posted on November 1, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Constitution, Culture, Diasters, Economics, Entertainment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Health Care, Heroes, history, Investments, IRS, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, Music, Music, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Psychology, Rants, Raves, Security, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Taxes, Unemployment, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

obama_smiling

The Undisputed Truth – Smiling Faces Sometimes

The Undisputed Truth – Smiling Faces.Live TV Performance 1975

The Undisputed Truth “Smiling Faces Sometimes” (1971)

The+Undisputed+Truth+theundisputedtruth

Smiling faces sometimes pretend to be your friend
Smiling faces show no traces of the evil that lurks within
Smiling faces, smiling faces sometimes
They don’t tell the truth uh
Smiling faces, smiling faces
Tell lies and I got proof

The truth is in the eyes
Cause the eyes don’t lie, amen
Remember a smile is just
A frown turned upside down
My friend let me tell you
Smiling faces, smiling faces sometimes
They don’t tell the truth, uh
Smiling faces, smiling faces
Tell lies and I got proof
Beware, beware of the handshake
That hides the snake
I’m telling you beware
Beware of the pat on the back
It just might hold you back
Jealousy (jealousy)
Misery (misery)
Envy

I tell you, you can’t see behind smiling faces
Smiling faces sometimes they don’t tell the truth
Smiling faces, smiling faces
Tell lies and I got proof

Smiling faces, smiling faces sometimes
They don’t tell the truth
Smiling faces, smiling faces
Tell lies and I got proof
(Smiling faces, smiling faces sometimes)
(Smiling faces, smiling faces sometimes)
I’m telling you beware, beware of the handshake
That hides the snake
Listen to me now, beware
Beware of that pat on the back
It just might hold you back
Smiling faces, smiling faces sometimes
They don’t tell the truth
Smiling faces, smiling faces
Tell lies and I got proof

Your enemy won’t do you no harm
Cause you’ll know where he’s coming from
Don’t let the handshake and the smile fool ya
Take my advice I’m only try’ to school ya

healthcare_gov

valerie_jarrett

Valerie Jarrett Picks Two Theme Songs  “What’s Going On” and

What’s Happening Brother  Performed By Marvin Gaye

Marvin Gaye “What’s Going On – What’s Happening Brother”

“What’s Going On”

Mother, mother
There’s too many of you crying
Brother, brother, brother
There’s far too many of you dying
You know we’ve got to find a way
To bring some lovin’ here today – Ya

Father, father
We don’t need to escalate
You see, war is not the answer
For only love can conquer hate
You know we’ve got to find a way
To bring some lovin’ here today

Picket lines and picket signs
Don’t punish me with brutality
Talk to me, so you can see
Oh, what’s going on
What’s going on
Ya, what’s going on
Ah, what’s going on

In the mean time
Right on, baby
Right on
Right on

Father, father, everybody thinks we’re wrong
Oh, but who are they to judge us
Simply because our hair is long
Oh, you know we’ve got to find a way
To bring some understanding here today
Oh

Picket lines and picket signs
Don’t punish me with brutality
Talk to me
So you can see
What’s going on
Ya, what’s going on
Tell me what’s going on
I’ll tell you what’s going on – Uh
Right on baby
Right on baby

What’s Happening Brother

Hey baby, what’cha know good
I’m just gettin’ back, but you knew I would
War is hell, when will it end,
When will people start gettin’ together again
Are things really gettin’ better, like the newspaper said
What else is new my friend, besides what I read
Can’t find no work, can’t find no job my friend
Money is tighter than it’s ever been
Say man, I just don’t understand
What’s going on across this land
Ah what’s happening brother,
Oh ya, what’s happening my man
Are they still gettin’ down where we used to go and dance
Will our ball club win the pennant,
do you think they have a chance
And tell me friend, how in the world have you been.
Tell me what’s out and I want to know what’s in.
What’s the deal man, what’s happening
What’s happening brother
Ah what’s happening brother
What’s happening my man
Ah what’s happening brother
What’s been shaken up and down the line
I want to know cause I’m slightly behind the time.
marvin-gaye-piano1
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Breaking News — Tom Clancy — Rest In Peace — Photos — Videos

Posted on October 2, 2013. Filed under: American History, Ammunition, Blogroll, Bomb, Book, Books, Communications, Culture, Diasters, Dirty Bomb, Drones, Employment, Entertainment, Federal Government, Fiction, Foreign Policy, Games, government spending, history, IRS, Islam, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, Movies, Music, Nuclear, People, Philosophy, Photos, Pistols, Politics, Psychology, Rants, Raves, Resources, Reviews, Rifles, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Taxes, Unemployment, Video, War, Wealth, Weapons, Weapons of Mass Destruction, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Tom Clancy And General Zinni Promote "Battle Ready"

clancy_books

the_hunt_for_red_October

Author-Tom-Clancy

orl-tom-clancy-1998-

 CLANCY-smoking

all_tom_clancy_books

Tom Clancy11

Author Tom Clancy dies at 66

Best-selling Author Tom Clancy Dead at 66

Author Tom Clancy, master of the modern day thriller, dead at 66

 

VIDEO – Worldwide Trend Topic Tom Clancy’s Dead WorldWideTT

US author Tom Clancy dies aged 66

Archive Tom Clancy on prophetic 9 11 plot

Tom Clancy Dead Tom Clancy dies in Baltimore age 66 Author Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell 1947-2013

Tom Clancy Dead Tom Clancy dies in Baltimore age 66 Author Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six 1947 2013

9/11 Tom Clancy Coverage of the WTC 7 Collapse CNN 5 35 PM 9 11 2001

Politika (1997) – Tom Clancy’s Fictional Interview on Boris Yeltsin

Tom Clancy on Government

Tom Clancy – Greek Island Interview – SSN – 1996

Tom Clancy, Dead or Alive: Discussion w/ ‘Chuck’ A. Horner, retired Air Force General

Tom Clancy – OP Center (Full movie)

Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell: Blacklist – All Cutscenes | Movie [HD]

The Hunt For Red October (1990) Trailer.flv

The Hunt for Red October (1/9) Movie CLIP – Another Possibility (1990) HD

The Hunt for Red October (2/9) Movie CLIP – Ryan’s Plan (1990) HD

The Sum of All Fears (1/9) Movie CLIP – Everyone Has Opinions (2002) HD

The Sum of All Fears (2/9) Movie CLIP – I Can’t Tell You That (2002) HD

The True Story The Hunt For Red October

Tom Clancy – Wiki Article

Published on May 21, 2013

Thomas Leo “Tom” Clancy, Jr. is an American author who is best known for his technically detailed espionage and military science storylines that are set during and in the aftermath of the Cold War, along with video games which bear his name for licensing and promotional purposes, although he did not actually work on them himself. His name is also a brand for similar movie scripts written by ghost writers and many series of non-fiction books on military subjects and merged biographies of key leaders. He is Vice Chairman of Community Activities and Public Affairs, as well as a part-owner of the Baltimore Orioles.

Personal life

Clancy was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended Loyola Blakefield in Towson, Maryland, graduating with the class of 1965. He then attended Loyola College in Baltimore, graduating in 1969. Before making his literary debut, he spent some time running an independent insurance agency. This agency thrived for a few years before joining a group of investors.

Clancy and his first wife Wanda married in 1969, separated briefly in 1995, and permanently separated in December 1996. Clancy filed for divorce in November 1997, which became final in January 1999.

In 1993, Tom Clancy joined a group of investors that included Peter Angelos and bought the Baltimore Orioles from Eli Jacobs. In 1998, he reached an agreement to purchase the Minnesota Vikings, but had to abandon the deal because of the divorce settlement cost.

On June 26, 1999, Clancy married freelance journalist Alexandra Marie Llewellyn, whom he had met in 1997. Llewellyn is the daughter of J. Bruce Llewellyn, and a family friend of Colin Powell, who originally introduced the couple to each other.

In 2008, the French video game manufacturer Ubisoft purchased the use of Clancy’s name for an undisclosed sum. It has been used in conjunction with video games and related products such as movies and books. Based on his interest in space, and his investment in the launch vehicle company Rotary Rocket, in 2007 Clancy was interviewed for the documentary film Orphans of Apollo.

Political views

Tom Clancy has been a lifetime supporter of conservative and Republican causes in America. His books bear dedications to conservative political figures, most notably Ronald Reagan. A week after the September 11, 2001 attacks, on The O’Reilly Factor, Clancy stated that left-wing politicians in the United States were partly responsible for September 11 due to their “gutting” of the Central Intelligence Agency. Clancy has also associated himself with General Anthony Zinni, a critic of the George W. Bush administration, and has been critical of former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld as well.

On September 11, 2001, Clancy was interviewed by Judy Woodruff on CNN. During the interview, he asserted “Islam does not permit suicide” (see Islam and suicide). Among other observations during this interview, Clancy cited discussions he had with military experts on the lack of planning to handle a hijacked plane being used in a suicide attack and criticized the news media’s treatment of the United States Intelligence Community. Clancy appeared again on PBS’s Charlie Rose, to discuss the implications of the day’s events with Richard Holbrooke, New York Times journalist Judith Miller, and Senator John Edwards, among others. Clancy was interviewed on these shows because his 1994 book Debt of Honor included a scenario where a disgruntled Japanese character crashes a fueled Boeing 747 into the U.S. Capitol dome during a State of the Union address, killing the President and most of Congress. This plot device bore strong similarities to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Clancy has been a Life Member of the National Rifle Association since 1978.

Bibliography

The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, Clear and Present Danger, and The Sum of All Fears have been turned into commercially successful films with actors Alec Baldwin, Harrison Ford, and Ben Affleck as Clancy’s most famous fictional

Tom Clancy, Best-Selling Novelist of Military Thrillers, Dies

at 66

By JULIE BOSMAN

Tom Clancy, whose complex, adrenaline-fueled military novels made him one of the world’s best-selling and best-known authors, died on Tuesday in a hospital in Baltimore. He was 66.

Ivan Held, the president of G. P. Putnam’s Sons, his publisher, did not provide a cause of death.

Mr. Clancy’s books were successfully transformed into blockbuster Hollywood films, including “Patriot Games,” “The Hunt for Red October“ and “Clear and Present Danger.”

His next book, “Command Authority,” is planned for publication on Dec. 3.

Seventeen of his novels were No. 1 New York Times best sellers, including his most recent, “Threat Vector,” which was released in December 2012.

Mr. Clancy was an insurance salesman when he sold his first novel, “The Hunt for Red October,” to the Naval Institute Press for only $5,000.

That publisher had never released a novel before, but the editors were taken with Mr. Clancy’s manuscript. They were concerned, however, that there were too many technical descriptions, so they asked him to make cuts. Mr. Clancy made revisions and cut at least 100 pages.

The book took off when President Ronald Reagan, who had received a copy, called it was “my kind of yarn” and said that he couldn’t put it down.

After the book’s publication in 1985, Mr. Clancy was praised for his mastery of technical details about Soviet submarines and weaponry. Even high-ranking members of the military took notice of the book’s apparent inside knowledge.

In an interview in 1986, Mr. Clancy said, “When I met Navy Secretary John Lehman last year, the first thing he asked me about the book was, ‘Who the hell cleared it?’ “

David Shanks, a Penguin executive who worked with Mr. Clancy for decades, called him “a consummate author, creating the modern-day thriller, and one of the most visionary storytellers of our time.”Born to a middle-class family in Baltimore on April 12, 1947, Mr. Clancy skipped over the usual children’s literature and became obsessed by naval history from a young age, reading journals and books whose intended audience was career military officers and engineering experts.

He absorbed details of submarine warfare, espionage, missile systems and covert plots between superpowers.

He attended Loyola College in Baltimore, where he majored in English, and graduated in 1969. While Mr. Clancy harbored ambitions to join the military, even joining the Army R.O.T.C., he was told that he was too nearsighted to qualify.

Mr. Clancy began working at a small insurance agency in rural Maryland that was founded by his wife’s grandfather.

After “The Hunt for Red October” was published, Mr. Clancy’s fame was fairly instant. Frequently posing for photographs in darkened aviator sunglasses, jeans and holding a cigarette, Mr. Clancy spoke of the laserlike focus required to succeed.

“I tell them you learn to write the same way you learn to play golf,” he said. “You do it, and keep doing it until you get it right. A lot of people think something mystical happens to you, that maybe the muse kisses you on the ear. But writing isn’t divinely inspired — it’s hard work.”

He followed “The Hunt for Red October” with “Red Storm Rising“ in 1986, “Patriot Games” in 1987, “The Cardinal of the Kremlin“ in 1988 and “Clear and Present Danger” in 1989.

The critical reception to his novels was gushing from the start. Reviewing “Red Storm Rising” in The New York Times in 1986, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt wrote that the book “far surpassed” Mr. Clancy’s debut novel.

“Red Storm Rising” is a “superpower thriller,” he wrote, “the verbal equivalent of a high-tech video game.” (Mr. Clancy would eventually venture into video games, which were easily adapted from his novels.)

Other critics questioned the unwaveringly virtuous nature of many of Mr. Clancy’s heroes, particularly his protagonist Jack Ryan.

“All the Americans are paragons of courage, endurance and devotion to service and country,” Robert Lekachman wrote in the Times in 1986. “Their officers are uniformly competent and occasionally inspired. Men of all ranks are faithful husbands and devoted fathers.”

Mr. Clancy was frequently accused of using classified information in his novels, a claim that amused him. While he spent time on military bases, visited the Pentagon and dined with high-level military officials, he insisted that he didn’t want to know any classified information.

“I hang my hat on getting as many things right as I can,” Mr. Clancy once said in an interview. “I’ve made up stuff that’s turned out to be real, that’s the spooky part.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/03/books/tom-clancy-best-selling-novelist-of-military-thrillers-dies-at-66.html?_r=1&

Tom Clancy

Thomas Leo “Tom” Clancy, Jr. (April 12, 1947 – October 1, 2013)[1][2] was an American author best known for his technically detailed espionage and military science storylines that are set during and in the aftermath of the Cold War, along with video games which bear his name for licensing and promotional purposes. His name was also a brand for similar movie scripts written by ghost writers and many series of non-fiction books on military subjects and merged biographies of key leaders. He was Vice Chairman of Community Activities and Public Affairs, as well as a part-owner, of the Baltimore Orioles.

Literary career

Clancy’s fiction works, The Hunt for Red OctoberPatriot GamesClear and Present Danger, and The Sum of All Fears, have been turned into commercially successful films with actors Alec BaldwinHarrison Ford, and Ben Affleck as Clancy’s most famous fictional character Jack Ryan, while his second most famous character John Clark has been played by actors Willem Dafoe and Liev Schreiber. All but two of Clancy’s solely written novels feature Jack Ryan or John Clark.

The first NetForce novel was adapted as a television movie, starring Scott Bakula and Joanna Going. The first Op-Center novel was released to coincide with a 1995 NBC television mini-series of the same name (Tom Clancy’s Op-Center) starring Harry Hamlin and a cast of stars. Though the mini-series did not continue, the book series did, but it had little in common with the first mini-series other than the title and the names of the main characters.

With the release of The Teeth of the Tiger, Clancy introduced Jack Ryan’s son and two nephews as main characters; these characters continue in his three latest novels, Dead or AliveLocked On and Threat Vector.

Clancy wrote several nonfiction books about various branches of the U.S. armed forces (see non-fiction listing, below). Clancy also branded several lines of books and video games with his name that are written by other authors, following premises or storylines generally in keeping with Clancy’s works. These are sometimes referred to by fans as “apostrophe” books; Clancy did not initially acknowledge that these series were being authored by others, only thanking the actual authors in the headnotes for their “invaluable contribution to the manuscript”.

By 1988, Clancy had earned $1.3 million for The Hunt for Red October and had signed a $3 million contract for his next three books.[3] By 1997, it was reported that Penguin Putnam Inc. (part of Pearson Education) would pay Clancy $50 million for world rights to two new books, and another $25 million to Red Storm Entertainment for a four-year book/multimedia deal.[4] Clancy followed this up with an agreement with Penguin’s Berkley Books for 24 paperbacks to tie in with the ABC television miniseries Tom Clancy’s Net Force aired in the fall/winter of 1998. The Op-Center universe has laid the ground for the series of books written by Jeff Rovin, which was in an agreement worth $22 million, bringing the total value of the package to $97 million.[4]

In 1993, Clancy joined a group of investors that included Peter Angelos and bought the Baltimore Orioles from Eli Jacobs. In 1998, he reached an agreement to purchase theMinnesota Vikings, but had to abandon the deal because of the divorce settlement cost.

On June 26, 1999, Clancy married freelance journalist Alexandra Marie Llewellyn, whom he had met in 1997.[5] Llewellyn is the daughter of J. Bruce Llewellyn, and a family friend ofColin Powell, who originally introduced the couple to each other.[6]

In 2008, the French video game manufacturer Ubisoft purchased the use of Clancy’s name for an undisclosed sum. It has been used in conjunction with video games and related products such as movies and books.[7] Based on his interest in space, and his investment in the launch vehicle company Rotary Rocket, in 2007 Clancy was interviewed for the documentary film Orphans of Apollo.

Political views

A longtime holder of conservative and Republican views, Clancy’s books bear dedications to American conservative political figures, most notably Ronald Reagan. A week after theSeptember 11, 2001 attacks, on The O’Reilly Factor, Clancy claimed that left-wing politicians in the United States were partly responsible for September 11 due to their “gutting” of the Central Intelligence Agency.[6]

In recent years, Clancy associated himself with General Anthony Zinni, a critic of the George W. Bush administration, and has been critical of former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld as well.[8]

On September 11, 2001, Clancy was interviewed by Judy Woodruff on CNN.[9] During the interview, he asserted “Islam does not permit suicide” (see Islam and suicide). Among other observations during this interview, Clancy cited discussions he had with military experts on the lack of planning to handle a hijacked plane being used in a suicide attack and criticized the news media’s treatment of the United States Intelligence Community. Clancy appeared again on PBS‘s Charlie Rose, to discuss the implications of the day’s events with Richard Holbrooke, New York Times journalist Judith Miller, and Senator John Edwards, among others.[10] Clancy was interviewed on these shows because his 1994 book Debt of Honor included a scenario where a disgruntled Japanese character crashes a fueled Boeing 747 into the U.S. Capitol dome during an address by the President to a joint session of Congress, killing the President and most of Congress. This plot device bore strong similarities to the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Clancy was also a Life Member of the National Rifle Association since 1978.[11]

Personal

Clancy was born in Baltimore, Maryland.[1] He attended Loyola Blakefield in Towson, Maryland, graduating with the class of 1965.[1] He then attended Loyola College (now Loyola University) in Baltimore, graduating in 1969.[1] Before making his literary debut, he spent some time running an independent insurance agency.

Clancy and his first wife Wanda married in 1969, separated briefly in 1995, and permanently separated in December 1996.[12] Clancy filed for divorce in November 1997,[13] which became final in January 1999.[14] In 1999, Clancy married freelance journalist Alexandra Marie Llewellyn.[15]

Clancy died October 1, 2013, after a brief illness at Johns Hopkins Hospital, near his Baltimore home. He was 66 and no cause of death was released. He is survived by four children and his second wife, Alexandra Marie Llewellyn.[16]

Bibliography

Works, by year of publication

The Hunt for Red October (1984)
Clancy’s first published novel. CIA analyst Jack Ryan assists in the defection of a respected Soviet naval captain, along with the most advanced ballistic missile submarine of the Soviet fleet. The movie (1990) stars Alec Baldwin as Ryan and Sean Connery as Captain Ramius. Captain Mancuso is introduced here. Nearly every book after has Mancuso in ever increasing command of U.S. submarine forces.
Red Storm Rising (1986)
War between NATO and USSR. The basis of the combat game of the same name, this book is not a member of the Ryan story series (although the protagonist of the story has many similarities with Jack Ryan). Cowritten with Larry Bond.
Patriot Games (1987)
Patriot Games chronologically predates the first book that Clancy wrote, The Hunt for Red October. Jack Ryan foils an attack in London on the Prince and Princess of Wales by the “Ulster Liberation Army”. The ULA then attacks Ryan’s Maryland home while he is hosting the Prince and Princess for dinner. The movie stars Harrison Ford as Ryan and Samuel L. Jackson as Robby Jackson.
The Cardinal of the Kremlin (1988)
The sequel to “The Hunt for Red October.” First appearance of John Clark and Sergey Golovko. Ryan leads a CIA operation which forces the head of the KGB to defect. Other elements include anti-satellite lasers and other SDI-type weapons, and the Soviet war in Afghanistan. Major Alan Gregory is introduced here. (He appears later, updating SAMsoftware in The Bear and the Dragon). Colonel Bondarenko also is introduced here. (He appears in later books offering advice to Golovko in “Executive Orders” and commanding the Russian Army defenses against China in its sequel “The Bear and the Dragon”.)
Clear and Present Danger (1989)
The President authorizes the CIA to use American military forces in a covert war against cocaine producers in Colombia. The operation is betrayed. Ryan meets John Clark as they lead a mission to rescue abandoned soldiers. Domingo “Ding” Chavez (Clark’s protege in later novels) is one of the rescued soldiers. The 1994 film stars Harrison Ford as Ryan, Willem Dafoe as Clark, and Raymond Cruz as Chavez.
The Sum of All Fears (1991)
Arab terrorists find a nuclear weapon that had been lost by Israel, and use it to attack the United States. This nearly triggers a war between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, due to the incompetence of the new President and his mistress with an anti-Ryan agenda. Ryan intervenes to avert the war. The 2002 film stars Ben Affleck as Ryan and Liev Schreiber as Clark, and changes the identity and motivation of the terrorists to neo-Nazis.
Without Remorse (1993)
Without Remorse takes place during the Vietnam War, when Jack Ryan was a teenager. Ex-SEAL John Clark (then John Kelly) fights a one-man war against drug dealers in Baltimore, attracting the attention of Jack’s father Emmett, a Baltimore police detective. He also helps plan and execute a raid on a prisoner-of-war camp in North Vietnam. Clark joins the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).
Debt of Honor (1994)
A secret cabal of extreme nationalists gains control of Japan (having acquired some nuclear weapons), and start a war with the U.S. Ryan, now National Security Advisor, and Clark and Chavez, agents in Japan, help win the war. The Vice President resigns in a scandal, and the President appoints Ryan to replace him. A vengeful, die-hard Japanese airline pilot then crashes a jetliner into the U.S. Capitol during a joint session of Congress attended by most senior U.S. government officials, including the President. Ryan thus becomes the new President through succession.
Executive Orders (1996)
This is the immediate sequel to Debt of Honor. President Ryan survives press hazing, an assassination attempt, and a biological warfare attack on the United States. Clark and Chavez trace the virus to a Middle Eastern madman, and the U.S. military goes to work.
SSN: Strategies for Submarine Warfare (1996)
Follows the missions of USS Cheyenne in a future war with China precipitated by China’s invasion of the disputed Spratly Islands. Also not a Ryan universe book, SSN is actually a loosely connected collection of “scenario” chapters in support of the eponymous video game.
Rainbow Six (1998)
Released to coincide with the video game of the same name. John Clark and Ding, who is now Clark’s son-in-law, lead an elite multi-national anti-terrorist unit that combats a worldwide genocide attempt by eco-terrorists. Ryan is the U.S. President and only mentioned or referred to as either ‘The President’ or ‘Jack’.
The Bear and the Dragon (2000)
War between Russia and China. Ryan recognizes the independence of Taiwan, Chinese police officers kill a Roman Catholic Cardinal, and the American armed forces help Russia defeat a Chinese invasion of Siberia.
Red Rabbit (2002)
In the early 1980s, CIA analyst Ryan aids in the defection of a Soviet officer who knows of a plan to assassinate Pope John Paul II.
The Teeth of the Tiger (2003)
Jack Ryan’s son, Jack Ryan, Jr., becomes an intelligence analyst, and then a field consultant, for The Campus, an off-the-books intelligence agency with the freedom to discreetly assassinate individuals “who threaten national security”, following the end of the Jack Ryan Sr. presidential administration. This book of the Jack Ryan series by Tom Clancy introduces Ryan’s son and two nephews as heirs to his spook-legacy.
Dead or Alive (2010, with Grant Blackwood)
The story picks up where The Teeth of the Tiger left off with Jack Ryan, Jr. and The Campus trying to catch a terrorist known as “The Emir”.
Against All Enemies (2011, with Peter Telep)
A terrorist bombing in Pakistan wipes out Max Moore’s entire CIA team. As the only survivor, the former Navy SEAL plunges deeper into the treacherous tribal lands to find the terrorist cell, but what he discovers there leads him to a much darker conspiracy in an unexpected part of the globe — the United States/Mexico border.
Locked On (Dec 2011, with Mark Greaney)
While Jack Ryan Jr. trains to become a field operative within The Campus, his father campaigns for re-election as President of the United States. A devout enemy of Jack Sr. launches a privately funded vendetta to discredit him, while a corrupt Pakistani general has entered into a deadly pact with a fanatical terrorist to procure nuclear warheads.
Search and Destroy (July 2012, with Peter Telep) (Cancelled)
Threat Vector (Dec 2012, with Mark Greaney)
Jack Ryan has only just moved back into the Oval Office when he is faced with a new international threat. An aborted coup in the People’s Republic of China has left President Wei Zhen Lin with no choice but to agree with the expansionist policies of General Su Ke Quiang. They have declared the South China Sea a protectorate and are planning an invasion of Taiwan. The Ryan administration is determined to thwart China’s ambitions, but the stakes are dangerously high as a new breed of powerful Chinese anti-ship missiles endanger the US Navy’s plans to protect the island. Meanwhile, Chinese cyber warfare experts have launched a devastating attack on American infrastructure.
Command Authority (December 2013, with Mark Greaney)
There is a new strong man in Russia but his rise to power is based on a dark secret hidden decades in the past. The clue to the mystery lies with a most unexpected source, President Jack Ryan.[17]

Novels not in a series

Jack Ryan/John Clark universe chronology

In the order in which they occur in the storyline (and when they occur):

  • Without Remorse (1969–70, 1973 – Starts late 1969, in Hurricane Camille’s aftermath. Continues the following spring, in 1970. Epilogue is titled “February 12, 1973″) Ryan briefly appears in this novel.
  • Patriot Games (1982, based on a reference to Ryan’s age, which is 31 at the beginning of the novel. This roughly fits with a reference to the Princess of Wales’s first child being a baby and a few months old, Prince William was born in 1982) Discrepancies include the reference to a van having a likely year of manufacture of 1984.
  • Red Rabbit (circa spring of 1982, based on references to living Leonid Brezhnev and Mikhail Suslov, both of whom died in 1982 (although Suslov died already in January of that year), as well as Jack Ryan, Jr.’s age in the novel, 6 months) Discrepancies with the estimate of 1982 include frequent references to “Transformers” which did not appear until 1984 and the fact that the Orioles played the Phillies in the World Series in 1983, not to mention that the World Series is played in the Fall, not the Spring. Also a reference to “Coke Classic” which did not debut until the summer of 1985.
  • The Hunt for Red October (1984)
  • The Cardinal of the Kremlin (1986) – “The first chapter is set in January and states that Ryan is 35 years old. It also has references to the other books set earlier. For example the Foleys have been in Moscow for almost four years. The book must begin (not including prologue which was set end of previous year) in January 1986.

Starting with the following novel, the series becomes distinctly different from real history as noted below.

  • Clear and Present Danger (1988) The book refers to Jack’s age as 40.
  • The Sum of All Fears (1990–1991) — Israel partially cedes sovereignty over Jerusalem to the Vatican and Saudi Arabia, and the city becomes a United Nations protectorate policed by Swiss Guards. Residents of Jerusalem can choose between either Vatican, Israeli or Islamic judicial law. Denver is devastated by a terrorist nuclear explosion. The book occurs after the Persian Gulf War and before the dissolution of the Soviet Union. It is implied that both events occur at the same time in the Ryan universe as in actual history (of the Soviet Union dissolution), 1991. In the earlier chapters it states that it had almost been two Novembers since President Fowler had been elected, making the beginning set in 1990. Interestingly, the video game Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six puts the atomic detonation in Denver as having occurred in 1989.
  • Debt of Honor (1995–1996) — The U.S. and Russia destroy all of their ballistic missiles. After crippling the U.S. economy and becoming a nuclear power, Japan invades and takes the Marianas Islands; the United States and Japan fight a brief war, which the Japanese lose (they are subsequently denuclearized); an embittered Japanese pilot and proponent of the war crashes a 747 into the United States Capitol Building immediately after Ryan’s confirmation vote for the Vice President, killing most of the House andSenate, the President, all nine Supreme Court justices, the senior military establishment (including the JCS), and most of the Cabinet; Ryan is left in charge of a gutted government. The end of the book occurs eleven months before 1997 presidential inauguration. Of interest, but not crucial to the plot of this or further books is that North and South Korea were said to be unified at some point between The Sum of All Fears and this book.
  • Executive Orders (1996) — Saddam Hussein is assassinatedIran and Iraq merge forming the United Islamic Republic; the UIR launches a biological attack on the U.S. using the Ebola virus; the United States launches the Second Persian Gulf War against the UIR and defeats them; the Ayatollah is killed in a smart-bomb attack by the U.S.
  • Rainbow Six (1999–2000) – events are based on the Sydney Olympics held in 2000, RAINBOW – an elite counter-terrorist force – is created and engages terrorists acrossEurope. Ecoterrorists plan to create a genetically-enhanced virus based on Ebola and cancer cells, which they plan to use to wipe out much of the world’s population.
  • The Bear and the Dragon (2002) — Russia is admitted to NATO; China and Russia fight a major war, in which the U.S. intervenes on its NATO ally’s side. It implies that theBritish Prime Minister is Tony Blair. Ryan has won re-election as president (2001). He resigns before the 2004 election making Robby Jackson president.
  • The Teeth of the Tiger (2006, based on the age of Jack Ryan, Jr.) The U.S. is now engaged in a global war on terrorism, in response to the September 11 attacks, which occurred in the Ryan universe as they did in the real world. It is mentioned that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq occurred in the Ryan universe continuity, and that the Jerusalem Treaty signed in The Sum of All Fears has failed as Israelis and Palestinians went back to fighting each other.
  • Dead or Alive (2007, based on Jack Ryan’s announcement that he would run against Ed Kealty for President “in the coming year”) — The Umayyad Revolutionary Council (the Ryan universe version of Al-Qaeda) and its leader “The Emir” (based on Osama bin Laden) plan a string of major attacks on the U.S. The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq continue, as in our timeline, and President Kealty is in the process of withdrawing U.S. troops from Iraq. A character also explicitly refers to the date as May 2010, in the process of decoding encrypted messages, but this must be seen as a contradiction, as Ed Kealty is president and is only president for one term. In accordance with the Jack Ryan continuity, Kealty must be president in the term 2005-2009.
  • Locked On (2008, based on Jack Ryan Sr.’s campaign for re-election). Jack Ryan is running for president again. Since it is only possible for Kealty to serve one term per the rules of the Constitution, that term must be from 2005 to 2009. The election happens in this book, too, making it only possible that the events take place in 2008. Jack Ryan Sr.’s opponent, Edward Kealty, tries to dig up dirt on him by going after John Clark. Meanwhile, a renegade Pakistani general steals nuclear weapons from his country and delivers them to rebel Dagestani forces. In the middle of all this, Jack Ryan Jr. and The Campus try to prevent the use of the lethal weapon and come to help Clark.
  • Threat Vector (2012). Ryan has been sworn in as president of the United States after having been elected the previous year. It also states that the events of this novel happen six months after the previous novel.
  • Command Authority To be released 12-3-2013

Op-Center universe

  1. Op-Center (1995)
  2. Mirror Image (1995)
  3. Games of State (1996)
  4. Acts of War (1996)
  5. Balance of Power (1998)
  6. State of Siege (1999)
  7. Divide and Conquer (2000)
  8. Line of Control (2001)
  9. Mission of Honor (2002)
  10. Sea of Fire (2003)
  11. Call to Treason (2004)
  12. War of Eagles (2005)

Net Force universe

  • Net Force (1999)
  • Hidden Agendas (1999)
  • Night Moves (1999)
  • Breaking Point (2000)
  • Point of Impact (2001)
  • CyberNation (2001)
  • State of War (2003)
  • Changing of the Guard (2003)
  • Springboard (2005)
  • The Archimedes Effect (2006)

Net Force Explorers universe

Power Plays series

  • Politika (novel, 1997)
    • Politika (video game) by Red Storm Entertainment
    • Politika (board game)
  • ruthless.com (novel, 1998)
    • ruthless.com (video game, 1998) by Red Storm Entertainment
  • Shadow Watch (novel, 1999) by Jerome Preisler
    • Shadow Watch (video game, 1999) by Red Storm Entertainment
  • Bio-Strike (novel, 2000) by Jerome Preisler
  • Cold War (novel, 2001) by Jerome Preisler
  • Cutting Edge (novel, 2002) by Jerome Preisler
  • Zero Hour (novel, 2003) by Jerome Preisler
  • Wild Card (novel, 2004) by Jerome Preisler

Ghost Recon universe

EndWar universe

H.A.W.X universe

  • Tom Clancy’s H.A.W.X by Grant Blackwood as David Michaels

Non-fiction

Guided Tour

Study in Command

Other

  • The Tom Clancy Companion — Edited by Martin H. Greenberg — Writings by Clancy along with a concordance of all his fiction novels, detailing characters and military units or equipment.

Video games

In 1996, Clancy co-founded the video game developer Red Storm Entertainment and ever since he has had his name on several of Red Storm’s most successful games. Red Storm was later bought by publisher Ubisoft Entertainment, which continued to use the Clancy name, though the extent of Clancy’s actual involvement with creation of the games and development of intellectual properties, if any, was unclear. This game series includes:

Board games

Achievements and awards

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d Clancy, Tom (October 31, 1997). “alt.books.tom-clancy”. groups.google.com. Retrieved 2012-03-20.
  2. Jump up^ A few sources, such as Who’s Who and “Tom Clancy”Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Retrieved March 20, 2012., give his birth date as March 12, 1947. He died Wednesday October 2, 2013.
  3. Jump up^ Anderson, Patrick (1 May 1988). “King of the Techno-thriller”New York Times Magazine.
  4. Jump up to:a b Quinn, Judy (24 August 1997). “$100M Mega-Deals for Clancy”Publishers Weekly 243 (34).[dead link]
  5. Jump up^ “Alexandra Llewellyn, Tom Clancy,” The New York Times, June 27, 1999.
  6. Jump up to:a b “Tom Clancy”. NNDB. 1999-06-26. Retrieved 2010-02-28.
  7. Jump up^ Mitchell, Richard (2008-03-25). “Clancy name bought by Ubisoft, worth big bucks. SOURCE: www.chatwave.in”. Xbox360fanboy.com. Retrieved 2010-02-28.
  8. Jump up^ Paperback Writer, The New Republic, May 25, 2004.
  9. Jump up^ 23 October 2007. “Tom Clancy on Sept 11 2001 & WTC 7 Collapse”. Youtube.com. Retrieved 2010-02-28.
  10. Jump up^ “An hour about the 9/11 attacks”. Charlierose.com. 2001-09-11. Retrieved 2010-02-28.
  11. Jump up^ LaPierre, Wayne (1994). Guns, Crime, and Freedom. HarperPerennial. p. xiii.ISBN 978-0-06-097674-3.
  12. Jump up^ Schindehette, Susan (15 June 1998). “Storm Rising”People Magazine 49 (23): 141.
  13. Jump up^ Jones, Brent (27 August 2008). “Reconsider Clancy case ruling”Baltimore Sun.
  14. Jump up^ “Case No. 04-C-03-000749 OC”. Circuit Court for Calvert County. Retrieved March 23, 2012.
  15. Jump up^ Kennedy, John R. (2013-10-02). “Author Tom Clancy dead at 66 – Okanagan”. Globalnews.ca. Retrieved 2013-10-02.
  16. Jump up^ “Tom Clancy, author of ‘Hunt for Red October’ and ‘Patriot Games,’ dead at 66″. NY Times. Retrieved 2 October 2013.
  17. Jump up^ “Command Authority by Tom Clancy”. Barnesandnoble.com. Retrieved 2013-10-02.
  18. Jump up^ Ryan, Michael E. (12 April 2000). “Shadow Watch”. Gamespot. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  19. Jump up^ Totilo, Stephen (May 12, 2011). “Ghost Recon: Future Soldier Will Rival the Shooter Heavyweights, but is Getting Far Out of the Way”. Kotaku. Retrieved May 12, 2011.
  20. Jump up^ “Tom Clancy’s Politika | Board Game”. BoardGameGeek. Retrieved 2011-12-19.
  21. Jump up^ “Washington Post”. Washington Post. 1997-06-01. Retrieved 2010-02-28.
  22. Jump up^ “Rensselaer Magazine: Summer 2004: At Rensselaer”. Rpi.edu. Retrieved 2010-02-28.
  23. Jump up^ “TC Post: Clancy Speaks Again Briefly”. Clancyfaq.com. 2000-06-25. Retrieved 2010-02-28.

External links

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

David Frost — Rest In Peace — Photos — Videos

Posted on September 5, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, Comedy, Communications, Crime, Culture, Diasters, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Entertainment, European History, Federal Government, Foreign Policy, history, Inflation, Investments, Islam, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Literacy, media, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Press, Programming, Rants, Raves, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Technology, Terrorism, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Sir Michael Parkinson & Sir David Frost Hold Media Conference

David_Frost

6398l

david_frost_richard_nixon

frostnixon

Richard Nixon, David Frost

dfrost_rnixon_movie_premiere

David-Frost-L-interviews-Russian-President-Vladimir-Putin

david-frost-south-bank-sky-arts-awards-03

web-frost_set

david_frost_dies

Sir David Frost – from Nixon to Al Jazeera

Published on Jan 25, 2013

04/12/2007 – Legendary TV presenter, interviewer, producer and author, Sir David Frost talks about his remarkable career in television.
Sir David Frost has been described as a “one man conglomerate”. He hosted and co-created That Was the Week it Was, has produced countless television programmes, has written 15 books, produced 8 films, he is a lecturer, a publisher and an impresario.

But he is perhaps best known for being one of the best television interviewers in the world. His Nixon Interviews, according to the New York Times achieved “the largest audience for a news interview in history”. Peter Morgan’s play, Frost/Nixon achieved great success in London and Broadway this year.

He is the only person to have interviewed the last seven Presidents of the United States (Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George Bush Senior, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush) and the last seven Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom (Harold Wilson, James Callaghan, Edward Heath, Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown).

Sir David now presents Frost Over The World weekly for Al Jazeera English with a variety of newsmakers from Hamad Karzai, President Lula of Brazil, Tony Blair, Mikhail Gorbachev and Benazir Bhutto after the assassination attempt, to Gerry Adams, Madeleine Albright, Gen. Wesley Clark, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Dame Helen Mirren and the first interview with Lewis Hamilton and continues to make Frost Tonight weekly for ITV. He is taking Through The Keyhole into its 21st year on the BBC, has recorded The Frost Years for Radio 4 and is Executive Producing a remake of the film, The Dam Busters with Universal and Peter Jackson.

50 Years of Frost – USA, February 2009

Look back at David Frost’s life

Remembering a TV Legend: Interviewer David Frost Dead at 74

David Frost, Known for Nixon Interview, Dies

Remembering David Frost

Sunrise : Remembering David Frost

Sir David Frost dies at the age of 74

[RIP Sir David] – Al Jazeera’s Sir David Frost dies aged 74 – 09/01/2013

Sir David Frost – Gillingham Boss Paul Scally Remembers

Sir David Frost Recalls TV Interviews & Spotting Political Stars [02.09.2013]

David Niven interviewed by David Frost 1972 – repeated on “David Frost End Of Year” Show 1983

Sir David Frost – from Nixon to Al Jazeera

Sir David Frost On TV Interviews & Henry Kissinger [02.09.2013]

The David Frost Show: John Lennon and Yoko Ono – January 13, 1972 – Complete Show

Sir David Frost on Richard Nixon

shah of iran interview with david frost 1979 contadora island panama full uncut version

H.I.M Shah of Iran last interview ,Panama (jan.1980) Part I

Charlotte Rampling on TV-am, 1983 – Part 1

Charlotte Rampling on TV-am, 1983 – Part 2

Charlotte Rampling on TV-am, 1983 – Part 3

David Frost interviews Prince Andrew on TV

The Woman Who Knew Too Much

Margaret Thatcher talking about sinking the Belgrano

David Frost interviews Margaret Thatcher about the sinking of the Belgrano

Thatcher Talks to David Frost 1995

Tony Blair Admits to David Frost the War in Iraq is a Disaster

sirhan sirhan Are The comments correct was there a second shooter ??????

David Frost Interview with Paul McCartney (1964, May 18)

John Lennon on The David Frost Show 1969 part 1

John Lennon on The David Frost Show 1969 part 2

Ringo Starr on the David Frost Show 1970

Enoch Powell Interview Frost On Friday 1969

David Frost interviews Truman Capote about love and sex

Maria Callas interview 1970

Joan Crawford 1970 interview (Part 1 of 4)

Joan Crawford 1970 interview (Part 2 of 4)

Joan Crawford 1970 interview (Part 3 of 4)

Joan Crawford 1970 interview (Part 4 of 4)

Groucho Marx David Frost Interview Clip 1

Brian Clough & Leeds United 1974 The David Frost Interview Part 1 1974

Brian Clough & Leeds United 1974 The David Frost Interview Part 2 1974

Paul Mccartney remembering John Lennon and his death {1997 interview}

Talking with David Frost (1997) – Wynton Marsalis

Elton John – One On One With David Frost 1999

China excerpt from: One on One with David Frost – George Bush: A President’s Story

Frost Over The World – George Clooney -18 Jan 08 – Hot Latest News

Frost over the World – George Clooney – 25 Jan 08 – Pt 3 – Hot Latest News

Frost Over The World – Henry Kissinger -18 Jan 08 – Hot Latest News

Frost over the World – Ron Howard – 17 Oct 08 – Hot Latest News

Frost over the World – Recep Tayyip Erdogan – 3 Apr 09 – Hot Latest News

Edward Lucas on ‘Frost over the World’ 2010

Sir David Frost Interviews Julian Assange- Wikileaks- AlJazeera Part 1of2

Sir David Frost Interviews Julian Assange- Wikileaks- AlJazeera Part 2of2

Sir David Frost Interview With Controversial Trader Alessio Rastani (Oct 2011)

The Frost Interview : Aishwarya Rai Bachchan (HD, 2012)

Paul McCartney – Entrevista a David Frost 2012 (Legendado) – Parte 1 de 3

Paul McCartney – Entrevista a David Frost 2012 (Legendado) – Parte 2 de 3

Paul McCartney – Entrevista a David Frost 2012 (Legendado) – Parte 3 de 3

Ron Paul Snr Advisor Doug Wead Interview with Frost – Mar 31 2012

David Frost – Commentator Piece from Last TW3 – ’63 – live

Frost On Satire 1-4

Frost On Satire 2-4

TW3 – That Was The Week That Was – shows up today’s UK TV dross

David Frost and Willie Rushton SHRED the then-Home Sec., on the Last TW3 – ’63 – live

Uploaded on Apr 23, 2011

That Was The Week That Was, also known as TW3, was a satirical television comedy programme that aired on BBC Television in 1962 and 1963.

Devised, produced and directed by Ned Sherrin, the programme was fronted by David Frost and cast members included improvising cartoonist Timothy Birdsall, political commentator Bernard Levin, and actors Lance Percival, who sidelined in topical calypsos, many improvised in response to suggestions from the audience, Kenneth Cope, Roy Kinnear, Willie Rushton (then known as ‘William’), Al Mancini, Robert Lang, David Kernan and Millicent Martin. The last two were also singers and the programme opened with a song – eponymously entitled That Was The Week That Was – sung by Martin to Ron Grainer’s theme tune and enumerating topics that had been in the past week’s news. Off-screen script-writers included John Albery, John Betjeman, John Bird, Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Peter Cook, Roald Dahl, Richard Ingrams, Gerald Kaufman, Frank Muir, Denis Norden, Bill Oddie, Dennis Potter, Eric Sykes, Kenneth Tynan, Keith Waterhouse and others.

The programme was groundbreaking in its lampooning of the establishment. Prime Minister Harold Macmillan was initially supportive of the programme, chastising the then Postmaster General Reginald Bevins (nominally in charge of broadcasting) for threatening to “do something about it”. During the Profumo affair, however, he became one of the programme’s chief targets for derision. After two successful seasons in 1962 and 1963, the programme did not return in 1964, as this was a General Election year and the BBC decided it would be unduly influential.

At the end of each episode, Frost would usually sign off with: “That was the week, that was.” At the end of the final programme he announced: “That was That Was The Week That Was…that was.”

Frost/Nixon

Frost Nixon Interview Clip 3 of 6 – Why Didnt You Stop It? Frost/Nixon http://www.FrostNixon.com

Frost Nixon Interview Clip 4 of 6 on ” There was no cover up of any criminal activities “

Frost Nixon Interview Clip 5 of 6 – And the whole thing wouldve gone away. Frost/Nixon

Book TV: Sir David Frost “Frost/Nixon”

Nixon interview with David Frost (1 of 6)

Nixon interview with David Frost (2 of 6)

Nixon interview with David Frost (3of 6)

Nixon interview with David Frost (4 of 6)

Nixon interview with David Frost (5 of 6)

Nixon interview with David Frost (6 of 6)

Muhammad Ali -Then And Now (Documentary with David Frost)

Elton John – One On One With David Frost 1999

David Frost interviews Frederick Forsyth on Al-Jazeera

Frost over the World – Gore Vidal – 23 May 08 – Hot Latest News

Shayan – Sir David Frost Interview

Sir David Frost in conversation with Chief Rabbi, Lord Sacks

British broadcaster David Frost dies aged 74

By Agence France-Presse
Sunday, September 1, 2013 12:07 EDT

British TV giant David Frost, who interviewed the world’s great and good in a half-century broadcasting career, has died aged 74 of a heart attack on board the Queen Elizabeth cruise liner, his family said Sunday.

Frost, celebrated for his 1977 talks with Richard Nixon that extracted an unexpected apology from the disgraced US president over the Watergate scandal, died Saturday.

Operator Cunard said the ship left its British home port of Southampton on Saturday on a 10-day Mediterranean.

“Sir David Frost died of a heart attack last night aboard the Queen Elizabeth where he was giving a speech,” his family said in a statement.

“His family are devastated and ask for privacy at this difficult time,” the statement said. “A family funeral will be held in the near future and details of a memorial service will be announced in due course.”

Frost’s interviewees read like a who’s who of the rich and famous, from big names in show business to world leaders, including South African anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela.

Frost was the only person to have interviewed the last eight British prime ministers and the last seven US presidents before Barack Obama, and the last person to have interviewed the last shah of Iran, the Mohammed Reza Pahlavi.

Other subjects included Mikhail Gorbachev, Vladimir Putin, Yasser Arafat, F. W. de Klerk, Jacques Chirac and Benazir Bhutto.

“Hello, good evening and welcome” became his catchphrase, starting off interviews with a friendly veneer that belied a blunt determination to extract information.

“His scrupulous and disarming politeness hid a mind like a vice,” said Menzies Campbell, former leader of Britain’s Liberal Democrats. “David Frost could do you over without you realising it until it was too late.”

The lengthy interviews with Nixon were crucial for both men — Nixon was hoping to salvage his reputation for history, while Frost wanted to add another feather to his cap of famous interviews .

In the end, Frost wrung a mea culpa from Nixon over Watergate, the dirty tricks scandal which prompted his resignation in 1974 and left a lasting scar on the US political landscape.

“I let down my friends, I let down the country,” the former president said.

Frost told BBC television in 2009: “We knew what we were trying to do … and in the end his ‘mea culpa’ went further than even we had hoped.

“At the end of that I think we were aware that something sort of historic had happened and we’d gone further than expected.”

The encounter was turned into a play entitled “Frost/Nixon”, which was adapted into a 2008 film with Michael Sheen playing Frost and Frank Langella as Nixon. It was nominated for five Oscars.

Outside world affairs, Front’s roster included Orson Welles, Tennessee Williams, Noel Coward, Elton John, Woody Allen, Muhammad Ali, the Beatles, Clint Eastwood, Anthony Hopkins, John Gielgud, Norman Mailer, Warren Beatty among countless others.

British Prime Minister David Cameron hailed Frost as “an extraordinary man — with charm, wit, talent, intelligence and warmth in equal measure.

“He made a huge impact on television and politics. The Nixon interviews were among the great broadcast moments — but there were many other brilliant interviews,” Cameron said in a statement.

“He could be — and certainly was with me — both a friend and a fearsome interviewer.”

The son of a Methodist minister, David Paradine Frost was born in Kent, southeast England, on April 7, 1939.

Fresh out of Cambridge University, he presented the BBC’s groundbreaking “That Was The Week That Was”, which took an unprecedented satirical look at the week’s news between 1962 and 1963.

A globetrotter, Frost revelled in the Concorde jet-set high life, presenting five programmes a week in the United States and three in Britain.

In 1983, he married Lady Carina Fitzalan-Howard, second daughter of the Duke of Norfolk — the premier duke in the English nobility. They had three sons.

A successful businessman, Frost was knighted in 1993, becoming Sir David.

The broadcaster wrote 17 books, produced several films and started two British television networks, London Weekend Television and TV-am.

He began working for Al Jazeera in 2006.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/09/01/british-broadcaster-david-frost-dies-aged-74/

David Frost, Interviewer Who Got Nixon to Apologize for Watergate, Dies at 74

By BRIAN STELTER

David Frost, the British broadcaster whose interviews of historic figures like Henry Kissinger, John Lennon and, most famously, Richard M. Nixon often made history in their own right, died on Saturday aboard the ocean liner Queen Elizabeth, where he was scheduled to give a speech. He was 74.

The cause was a heart attack, his family said.

Mr. Frost’s highly varied television career mirrored the growth of the medium, from the black-and-white TV of the 1960s to the cable news of today.

He knew how to make his guests “make news,” as the television industry saying goes, either through a sequence of incisive questions or carefully placed silences. He showcased both techniques during his penetrating series of interviews with President Nixon, broadcast in 1977, three years after Mr. Nixon was driven from office by the Watergate scandal, resigning in the face of certain impeachment.

Mr. Frost not only persuaded Mr. Nixon to end a self-imposed silence, he also extracted an apology from the former president to the American people.

The sessions, described as the most-watched political interviews in history, were recalled 30 years later in a play and a film, both named “Frost/Nixon.” In the film, Mr. Frost was portrayed by Michael Sheen and Mr. Nixon by Frank Langella.

Since 2006, Mr. Frost’s television home had been Al Jazeera English, one of the BBC’s main competitors overseas. Mr. Frost brought prestige to the news network, while it empowered him to conduct the kind of newsmaker interviews he most enjoyed.

“No matter who he was interviewing, he was committed to getting the very best out of the discussion, but always doing so by getting to know his guest, engaging with them and entering into a proper conversation,” Al Anstey, the managing director of Al Jazeera English, said by e-mail.

He was “always a true gentleman,” Mr. Anstey added, alluding to the charm that others said made Mr. Frost so successful in securing such a wide array of guests.

Among those guests in recent years were Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, the actor George Clooney and the tennis star Martina Navratilova. A new season of Mr. Frost’s program, “The Frost Interview,” began in July with the astronaut Buzz Aldrin. The season was to continue through mid-September.

One of his first interviews for Al Jazeera made headlines when his guest, Tony Blair, agreed with Mr. Frost’s assessment that the war in Iraq had, up until that point in 2006, “been pretty much of a disaster.” In a statement on Sunday, Mr. Blair said, “Being interviewed by him was always a pleasure, but also you knew that there would be multiple stories the next day arising from it.”

David Paradine Frost was born April 7, 1939, in Tenterden, England, to Mona and W. J. Paradine Frost. His father was a Methodist minister.

While a student, Mr. Frost edited both a student newspaper and a literary publication at Cambridge University, where he showed a knack for satire — something on which the BBC soon capitalized. In 1962, Mr. Frost became the host of “That Was the Week That Was,” a satirical look at the news on Saturday nights. While it lasted only two seasons in Britain, “TW3,” as it was known, was reborn briefly as a program on NBC, and it is remembered as a forerunner to “The Daily Show” and the “Weekend Update” segment on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.”

After “TW3,” Mr. Frost was the host of a succession of programs, from entertainment specials (“David Frost’s Night Out in London”) to more intellectually stimulating talk shows. While most of these were televised in Britain, Mr. Frost crossed the Atlantic constantly; he once said he had lost count of the number of times he had flown on the Concorde.

He filled in for Johnny Carson twice in 1968, and was subsequently offered a syndicated talk show, which premiered on a patchwork of stations across the United States a year later. That series came to an end in 1972.

His most memorable work happened several years later, when his interview with Mr. Nixon was broadcast around the world. At one point Mr. Frost asked about Mr. Nixon’s abuses of presidential power, prompting this answer: “Well, when the president does it, that means that it is not illegal.”

“Upon hearing that sentence, I could scarcely believe my ears,” Mr. Frost wrote in a 2007 book about the interview, published to coincide with the “Frost/Nixon” movie. Mr. Frost said his task then “was to keep him talking on this theme for as long as possible.”

By then, Mr. Frost and Mr. Nixon had already spoken on camera several times. And they continued to speak: the interviews, for which Mr. Nixon was paid $600,000 and a share of the profit for the broadcasts, were taped over four weeks for about two hours at a time and eventually totaled nearly 29 hours.

On the last day, Mr. Frost pressed Mr. Nixon to acknowledge the mistakes of the Watergate period. “Unless you say it, you’re going to be haunted for the rest of your life,” Mr. Frost said.

“That was totally ad-lib,” Mr. Frost recalled. “In fact, I threw my clipboard down just to indicate that it was not prepared in any way.” He added: “I just knew at that moment that Richard Nixon was more vulnerable than he’d ever be in his life. And I knew I had to get it right.”

Mr. Nixon apologized for putting “the American people through two years of needless agony,” adding, “I let the American people down and I have to carry that burden with me for the rest of my life.”

Mr. Frost, who was awarded a knighthood in 1993, had recently moved to a home close to Oxford, said Richard Brock, his executive producer at Al Jazeera. He also had a home in London.

Survivors include his second wife, Carina, and their three sons. His first wife, Lynne Frederick, a British actress, was the widow of Peter Sellers; they divorced in 1982. Mr. Frost was also once engaged to the American actress and singer Diahann Carroll.

In interviews, whenever Mr. Frost was asked about the highlight of his career, he cited the Nixon interview.

But Mr. Frost interviewed other presidents as well, including George H. W. Bush, whom he later praised as wise and determined.

“The Nixon interviews were among the great broadcast moments, but there were many other brilliant interviews,” Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain said in a statement on Sunday morning.

Barney Jones, a longtime colleague of Mr. Frost at the BBC, told the news organizationthat Mr. Frost had an interview with Mr. Cameron scheduled for September.

Mr. Jones marveled at Mr. Frost’s contacts, recounting a day when “he took me into my little office, scrabbled around in his contacts book, and five minutes later he was talking to George Bush. I couldn’t believe it.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/02/world/europe/david-frost-known-for-nixon-interview-dead-at-74.html?_r=0#h[]

David Frost

Sir David Paradine Frost, OBE (7 April 1939 – 31 August 2013) was an English journalist, comedian, writer, media personality and television host.

After graduating from Cambridge University, Frost rose to prominence in the UK when he was chosen to host the satirical programme That Was the Week That Was in 1962. His success on this show led to work as a host on US television. He became known for his television interviews with senior political figures, among them The Nixon Interviews with former United States President Richard Nixon in 1977, which were adapted into a stage play and film.

Frost was one of the “Famous Five” who were behind the launch of ITV breakfast station TV-am in 1983. For the BBC, he hosted the Sunday morning interview programme Breakfast with Frost from 1993 to 2005. He spent two decades as host of Through the Keyhole. From 2006 to 2012 he hosted the weekly programme Frost Over the World on Al Jazeera English and from 2012, the weekly programme The Frost Interview.

Frost died on 31 August 2013, aged 74, on board the cruise ship MS Queen Elizabeth, on which he had been engaged as a speaker.[1]

Early life

David Paradine Frost was born in Tenterden, Kent, on 7 April 1939, the son of a Methodist minister of Huguenot descent,[2] the Rev. Wilfred John “W. J.” Paradine Frost, and his wife, Mona (Aldrich); he had two elder sisters.[3][4] While living in Gillingham, Kent, he was taught in the Bible class of the Sunday school at his father’s church (Byron Road Methodist) by David Gilmore Harvey, and subsequently started training as a Methodist local preacher, which he did not complete.[citation needed]

Frost attended Barnsole Road Primary School in Gillingham, then Gillingham Grammar School and finally – while residing in RaundsWellingborough Grammar School. Throughout his school years he was an avid football and cricket player,[3] and was offered a contract with Nottingham Forest F.C.[5] For two years before going to university he was a lay preacher following his witnessing of an event presided over by the Christian evangelist Billy Graham.[2]

Frost studied at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, from 1958, graduating from the university with a degree in English. He was editor of both the university’s student paper, Varsity, and the literary magazine Granta. He was also secretary of the Footlights Drama Society,[3] which included actors such as Peter Cook and John Bird. During this period, Frost appeared on television for the first time in an edition of Anglia Television‘s Town And Gown, performing several comic characters. “The first time I stepped into a television studio”, he once remembered, “it felt like home. It didn’t scare me. Talking to the camera seemed the most natural thing in the world.”[6]

According to some accounts, Frost was the victim of snobbery from the group with which he associated at Cambridge, which has been confirmed by Barry Humphries.[7] Christopher Booker, while asserting that Frost’s one defining characteristic was ambition, commented that he was impossible to dislike.[8] According to the satirist John Wells, the Old-Etonian actor Jonathan Cecil congratulated Frost around this time for “that wonderfully silly voice” he used while performing, but then discovered that it was Frost’s real voice.[7]

After leaving university, Frost became a trainee at Associated-Rediffusion. Meanwhile, having already gained an agent, Frost performed in cabaret at the Blue Angel nightclub in Berkeley Square, London during the evenings.[2][9]

That Was the Week That Was (TW3)

Frost was chosen by writer and producer Ned Sherrin to host the satirical programme That Was the Week That Was, alias TW3 after Frost’s flat mate John Bird suggested Sherrin should see his act at The Blue Angel. The series, which ran for less than 18 months during 1962-63, was part of the satire boom in early 1960s Britain and became a popular programme.

The involvement of Frost in TW3 led to an intensification of the rivalry with Peter Cook who accused him of stealing material and dubbed Frost “the bubonic plagiarist”.[10] The new satirical magazine Private Eye also mocked him at this time. Frost visited the United States during the break between the two series of TW3 in the summer of 1963 and stayed with the producer of the New York production of Beyond The Fringe. Frost was unable to swim, but still jumped into the pool, and nearly drowned until he was saved by Peter Cook. At the memorial service for Cook in 1995, Alan Bennett recalled that rescuing Frost was the one regret Cook frequently expressed.[11]

For the first three editions of the second series in 1963, the BBC attempted to limit the team by scheduling repeats of The Third Man television series after the programme, thus preventing overruns. Frost took to reading synopses of the episodes at the end of the programme as a means of sabotage. After the BBC’s Director General Hugh Greene instructed that the repeats should be abandoned, TW3 returned to being open-ended.[12] More sombrely, on 23 November 1963, a tribute to the assassinated President John F. Kennedy, an event which had occurred the previous day, formed an entire edition of That Was the Week That Was.[13]

An American version of TW3 ran after the original British series had ended. Following a pilot episode on 10 November 1963, the 30-minute US series, also featuring Frost, ran on NBC from 10 January 1964 to May 1965. In 1985, Frost produced and hosted a television special in the same format, That Was the Year That Was, on NBC.

Post-TW3

Frost fronted various programmes following the success of TW3, including its immediate successor, Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life, which he co-chaired with Willie Rushton and poet P. J. Kavanagh. Screened on three evenings each week, this series was dropped after a sketch was found to be offensive to Catholics and another to the British royal family.[13] More successful was The Frost Report, broadcast between 1966 and 1967. The show launched the television careers of John Cleese, Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett, who appeared together in the Class sketch.

Frost signed for Rediffusion, the ITV weekday contractor in London, to produce a “heavier” interview-based show called The Frost Programme. Guests included Sir Oswald Mosley and Rhodesian premier Ian Smith. His memorable dressing-down of insurance fraudster Emil Savundra, regarded as the first example of “trial by television” in the UK, led to concern from ITV executives that it might affect Savundra’s right to a fair trial.[2] Frost’s introductory words for his television programmes during this period, “Hello, good evening and welcome”, became his catchphrase and were often mimicked.[1]

Frost was a member of a successful consortium, including former executives from the BBC, which bid for an ITV franchise in 1967. This became London Weekend Television, which began broadcasting in July 1968. The station began with a programming policy which was considered ‘highbrow‘ and suffered launch problems with low audience ratings and financial problems. A September 1968 meeting of the Network Programme Committee, which made decisions about the channel’s scheduling, was particularly fraught, with Lew Grade expressing hatred of Frost in his presence.[14][15] Frost, according to Kitty Muggeridge in 1967, had “risen without a trace.”[16]

He was involved in the station’s early years as a presenter. On 20 and 21 July 1969, during the British television Apollo 11 coverage, he presented David Frost’s Moon Party for LWT, a ten-hour discussion and entertainment marathon from LWT’s Wembley Studios, on the night Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Two of his guests on this programme were British historian A.J.P. Taylor and entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr.[17]

In the same period he began an intermittent involvement in the film industry. Setting up David Paradine Ltd in 1966,[13][18] he part-financed The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer (1970), in which the lead character was based partly on Frost, and gained an executive producer credit.

American career from 1968 to 1980

In 1968 he signed a contract worth £125,000 to appear on American television in his own show on three evenings each week, the largest such arrangement for a British television personality[6] at the time. From 1969 to 1972, Frost kept his London shows and fronted The David Frost Show on the Group W (U.S. Westinghouse Corporation) television stations in the United States.[19] His 1970 TV special, Frost on America, featured guests such as Jack Benny and Tennessee Williams.[20]

In a declassified transcript of a 1972 telephone call between Frost and Henry Kissinger, President Nixon‘s National Security Advisor and Secretary of State, Frost urged Kissinger to call chess grandmaster Bobby Fischer and urge him to compete in that year’s World Chess Championship.[21][22] During this call, Frost revealed that he was working on a novel.[22]

In 1977 The Nixon Interviews, a series of five 90-minute interviews with former US President Richard Nixon, were broadcast. Nixon was paid $600,000 plus a share of the profits for the interviews, which had to be funded by Frost himself after the US television networks turned down the programme, describing it as “checkbook journalism“. Frost’s company negotiated its own deals to syndicate the interviews with local stations across the US and internationally, creating what Ron Howard described as “the first fourth network.”[23]

Frost taped around 29 hours of interviews with Nixon over a period of four weeks. Nixon, who had previously avoided discussing his role in the Watergate scandal which had led to his resignation as President in 1974, expressed contrition saying “I let the American people down and I have to carry that burden with me for the rest of my life”.[24][25]

Following the 1979 Iranian Revolution Frost was the last person to interview Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the deposed Shah of Iran.[26] The interview took place in Panama in January 1980,[27] and was broadcast by ABC in the United States on 17 January.[28]

Frost was an organiser of the Music for UNICEF Concert at the United Nations General Assembly in 1979. Ten years later, he was hired as the anchor of the new American tabloid news program Inside Edition.. He was dismissed after only three weeks, and then-ABC News reporter Bill O’Reilly was recruited as his replacement.

After 1980

Frost was one of the “Famous Five” who launched TV-am in February 1983 but, like LWT in the late 1960s, the station began with an unsustainable “highbrow” approach. Frost remained a presenter after restructuring. Frost on Sunday began in September 1983 and continued until the station lost its franchise at the end of 1992. Frost had been part of an unsuccessful consortium, CPV-TV, with Richard Branson and other interests, which had attempted to acquire three ITV contractor franchises prior to the changes made by the Independent Television Commission in 1991. After transferring from ITV, his Sunday morning interview programme Breakfast with Frost ran on the BBC from January 1993 until 29 May 2005. For a time it ran on BSB before its later Sunday morning rebroadcast on BBC 1.[citation needed]

Frost hosted Through the Keyhole, which ran on several UK channels from 1987 until 2008 and also featured Loyd Grossman. Produced by his own production company, the programme was first shown in prime time and on daytime television in its later years.[13]

Frost worked for Al Jazeera English, presenting a live weekly hour-long current affairs programme, Frost Over The World, which started when the network launched in November 2006. The programme regularly made headlines with interviewees such as Tony Blair, President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan, Benazir Bhutto and President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua. The programme was produced by the former Question Time editor and Independent on Sunday journalist Charlie Courtauld. Frost was one of the first to interview the man who authored the Fatwa on Terrorism, Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri.[29]

During his career as a broadcaster Frost became one of Concorde‘s most frequent fliers, having flown between London and New York an average of 20 times per year for 20 years.[30][31]

In 2007, Frost hosted a discussion with Libya’s leader Muammar Gaddafi as part of the Monitor Group‘s involvement in the country.[32] In June 2010, Frost presented Frost on Satire, an hour-long BBC Four documentary looking at the history of television satire. Prominent satirists who were interviewed for the programme include Rory Bremner, Ian Hislop, John Lloyd, Chevy Chase, Bill Maher, Jon Stewart, Will Ferrell and Tina Fey.

Achievements

Frost interviewing Vladimir Putin for the BBC’s Breakfast with Frost in March 2000

Frost was the only person to have interviewed all eight British prime ministers serving between 1964 and 2010 (Harold Wilson, Edward Heath, James Callaghan, Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron) and all seven US presidents in office between 1969 and 2008 (Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush).[2]

He was a patron and former vice-president of the Motor Neurone Disease Association charity, as well as being a patron of the Alzheimer’s Research Trust, the Hearing Trust,[33] East Anglia‘s Children’s Hospices, the Home Farm Trust and the Elton John AIDS Foundation.[34][35][36]

After having been in television for 40 years, Frost was estimated to be worth £200 million by the Sunday Times Rich List in 2006,[37] a figure he considered a significant over-estimate in 2011.[10] The valuation included the assets of his main British company and subsidiaries, plus homes in London and the country.

Frost/Nixon

Frost/Nixon was originally a play written by Peter Morgan, developed from The Nixon Interviews which Frost had conducted with Richard Nixon in 1977. Frost/Nixon was presented as a stage production in London in 2006, and on Broadway in 2007. The play was adapted into a Hollywood motion picture starring Michael Sheen as Frost and Frank Langella as Nixon, both reprising their stage roles. The film was directed by Ron Howard and released in 2008. It was nominated for five Golden Globe awards: Best Motion Picture Drama, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Screenplay and Best Original Score,[38] and for five Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Editing.

In February 2009, Frost was featured on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation‘s international affairs programme Foreign Correspondent in a report titled “The World According To Frost”, reflecting on his long career and portrayal in the film Frost/Nixon.[39]

Personal life

Frost was known for several relationships with high profile women. In the mid-1960s, he dated British actress Janette Scott, between her marriages to songwriter Jackie Rae and singer Mel Tormé; in the early 1970s he was engaged to American actress Diahann Carroll; between 1972 and 1977 he had a relationship with British socialite Caroline Cushing; in 1981 he married Lynne Frederick, widow of Peter Sellers, but they divorced the following year.[3] He also had an 18-year intermittent affair with American actress Carol Lynley.[40]

On 19 March 1983, Frost married Lady Carina Fitzalan-Howard, daughter of the 17th Duke of Norfolk.[3] Over the next five years, they had three sons, Miles, Wilfred and George,[41] and for many years lived in Chelsea, with their weekend home at Michelmersh Court in Hampshire.[42]

Death

On 31 August 2013, Frost was aboard a Cunard Line cruise ship, the MS Queen Elizabeth, when he had a heart attack and died.[43][44] Cunard said that the vessel had left Southampton for a ten-day cruise in the Mediterranean ending in Rome.[45] British Prime Minister David Cameron paid tribute, saying: “He could be—and certainly was with me—both a friend and a fearsome interviewer.”[46] Michael Grade commented: “He was kind of a television renaissance man. He could put his hand to anything. He could turn over Richard Nixon or he could win the comedy prize at the Montreux Golden Rose festival.”[47]

Selected awards and honours

Bibliography

Non-fiction
  • To England with Love (1968). With Antony Jay.
  • The Presidential Debate, 1968 : David Frost talks with Vice-President Hubert H. Humphrey (and others) (1968).
  • The Americans (1970)
  • Billy Graham Talks with David Frost (1972)
  • “I Gave Them a Sword”: Behind the Scenes of the Nixon Interviews (1978). Reissued as Frost/Nixon in 2007.
  • David Frost’s Book of Millionaires, Multimillionaires, and Really Rich People (1984)
  • The World’s Shortest Books (1987)
  • An Autobiography. Part 1: From Congregations to Audiences (1993)
With Michael Deakin and illustrated by Willie Rushton
  • I Could Have Kicked Myself: David Frost’s Book of the World’s Worst Decisions (1982)
  • Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? (1983)
  • If You’ll Believe That (1986)
With Michael Shea
  • The Mid-Atlantic Companion, or, How to Misunderstand Americans as Much as They Misunderstand Us (1986)
  • The Rich Tide: Men, Women, Ideas and Their Transatlantic Impact (1986)

References

  1. ^ a b “Sir David Frost, broadcaster and writer, dies at 74″. BBC. 1 September 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d e Stuart Jeffries Obituary: Sir David Frost, The Guardian, 1 September 2013
  3. ^ a b c d e TimeLine Theatre Company, Chicago: Frost/Nixon Study Guide Retrieved 2 October 2011
  4. ^ Frost, famous for Nixon interview, dies | The Journal Gazette
  5. ^ Duff, Oliver (2 May 2005). “My Life in Media: Sir David Frost”. The Independent. Retrieved 11 August 2013.
  6. ^ a b Obituary: Sir David Frost, telegraph.co.uk, 1 September 2013
  7. ^ a b Humphrey Carpenter That Was Satire That Was: The Satire Boom of the 1960s, London: Victor Gollancz, 2000, p.207
  8. ^ Carpenter, p.207-8
  9. ^ Carpenter, p.208-9
  10. ^ a b Simon Hattenstone “The Saturday interview: David Frost”, The Guardian, 2 July 2011
  11. ^ Carpenter That Was Satire That Was, p.261
  12. ^ Carpenter That Was Satire That Was, p.270-1
  13. ^ a b c d Michael Leapman “Sir David Frost: Pioneering journalist and broadcaster whose fame often equalled that of his interviewees”, The Independent, 1 September 2013
  14. ^ David Frost An Autobiography: Part One From Congregation to Audiences, London: HarperCollins, 1993, p.382
  15. ^ “British TV History: The ITV Story: Part 10: The New Franchises”, Teletronic
  16. ^ “Broadcaster Frost rose from satire to friendly interviewer”, The Standard (Hong Kong), 2 September 2013
  17. ^ “ITV Moon Landing Coverage”. British TV History. Archived from the original on 23 July 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2008.
  18. ^ The Daily Telegraph obituary says ‘David Paradine Productions’ was established in 1968.
  19. ^ The David Frost Show
  20. ^ Zajacz, Rita. “FROST, DAVID”. The Museum of Broadcast Communications.
  21. ^ Harper, Lauren (19 July 2013). “Henry Kissinger Jokes About Making a Pawn of Bobby Fischer”. National Security Archive. Retrieved 2 August 2013. “The tournament was dramatic enough thanks to Fischer’s antics, but telephone conversation on 3 July 1972, capturing British journalist David Frost asking Kissinger to persuade the grandmaster to attend the championship adds more to the story. Kissinger had an intellectual interest in chess, and the Spassky-Fischer head-to-head alone would have likely piqued his interest in the match, but Frost wanted Kissinger to get involved to ensure Fischer’s participation.”
  22. ^ a b “Declassified transcript of phone call from David Frost to Henry Kissinger”. National Security Archive. 3 July 1972.
  23. ^ Stanley, Alessandra (2 2013). “AN APPRAISAL David Frost: Newsman, Showman, and Suave at Both”. The New York Times. Retrieved 2 September 2013.
  24. ^ “· David Frost Dies Aged 74″. Wall Street Journal. 1 September 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  25. ^ “David Frost, Who Interviewed Nixon, Is Dead at 74″. New York Times. 1 September 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  26. ^ “· Sir David Frost Dies Of Heart Attack On Ship”. Sky News. 1 September 2011. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  27. ^ “On Iran”, (Breakfast with Frost) BBC News, 12 December 2004
  28. ^ Gholam Reza Afkham The Life and Times of the Shah, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008, p.655 n.17:7
  29. ^ “Frost over the World – Rafael Moreno and Muhammad Tahir al-Qadri”. Youtube.com. Retrieved 26 October 2010.
  30. ^ Orlebar, Christopher (2004). The Concorde story. Osprey Publishing. p. 181. ISBN 978-1-85532-667-5.
  31. ^ Quest, Richard (3 October 2003). “Why Concorde mattered”. The Independent.
  32. ^ Overby, Peter (10 March 2011). “U.S. Firm Under Fire For Gadhafi Makeover Contract”. Npr.org. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  33. ^ “Hearing Trust”. Hearing Trust. Retrieved 26 October 2010.
  34. ^ “Our patrons”. Elton John AIDS Foundation. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  35. ^ CaritasData (2006). Who’s Who in Charities 2007. ISBN 1-904964-27-3.
  36. ^ “Patrons page at Alzheimer’s Research UK”. Alzheimersresearchuk.org. Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  37. ^ Beresford, Philip, ed. (2006). The “Sunday Times” Rich List 2006–2007: 5,000 of the Wealthiest People in the United Kingdom. A & C Black Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-7136-7941-7.
  38. ^ [1][dead link] (subscription required)
  39. ^ Corcoran, Mark (17 February 2009). “The World According to Frost”. ABC Online.
  40. ^ W. Lee Cozad, More Magnificent Mountain Movies: The Silverscreen Years, 1940-2004, page 219 (Sunstroke Media, 2006). ISBN 978-0-9723372-2-9
  41. ^ First Reaction byline (2 September 2013). “David Frost: tributes to TV’s ‘most illustrious inquisitor'”. The Week. Retrieved 2 September 2013.
  42. ^ “For sale: the stunning Hampshire home of Sir David Frost”. Daily Telegraph.
  43. ^ “Sir David Frost, broadcaster and writer, dies at 74″. BBC News. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  44. ^ Carter, Claire (1 September 2013). “Sir David Frost dies of heart attack”. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 2 September 2013.
  45. ^ Cruise company pays tribute to Sir David Frost | Meridian – ITV News
  46. ^ Al Jazeera host David Frost dies – Europe – Al Jazeera English
  47. ^ “David Frost dies aged 74″. The Guardian. Retrieved 1 September 2013.
  48. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 45117. pp. 6373–6374. 5 June 1970. Retrieved 11 August 2013.
  49. ^ The London Gazette: no. 53284. p. 7209. 23 April 1993. Retrieved 11 August 2013.
  50. ^ a b c d David Frost Speaker Profile

External links

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Powder — Videos

Posted on August 2, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Education, Energy, Entertainment, Farming, Films, liberty, Life, Movies, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

 

powder

Powder

Powder is a film about a boy nicknamed “Powder,” with incredible intellect, telepathy, and paranormal powers. It stars Sean Patrick Flanery in the title role, with Jeff Goldblum, Mary Steenburgen, Bradford Tatum, Lance Henriksen, and Brandon Smith in supporting roles. The film questions the limits of the human mind and body while also displaying our capacity for cruelty; it raises hope that humanity will advance to a state of better understanding.

Powder is a 1995 American drama film written and directed by Victor Salva and starring Sean Patrick Flanery in the title role, with Jeff Goldblum, Mary Steenburgen, Bradford Tatum and Lance Henriksen in supporting roles. It is about a boy nicknamed “Powder”, who has incredible intellect, telepathy and paranormal powers. The film questions the limits of the human mind and body while also displaying our capacity for cruelty, although it raises hope that humanity will advance to a state of better understanding.

Plot

Jeremy Reed, whose nickname is Powder, is an albino young man who has incredible intellect and is able to sense the thoughts of the people around him. Jeremy’s brain possesses a powerful electromagnetic charge, which causes electrical objects to function abnormally when he is around them, as well as when he becomes emotional. The electrical charge also prevents hair from growing on his body. Jeremy’s mother was struck by lightning while pregnant with him; she died shortly after the strike, but Jeremy survived. His father disowned him shortly after his premature birth, and he was raised by his grandparents. Jeremy lived in the basement and worked on their farm but never left their property, learning everything he knew from books. He is taken from his home when his grandfather is found dead of natural causes. Jessie Caldwell (Mary Steenburgen), a child services psychologist called in by Sheriff Doug Barnum, takes him to a boy’s home because he is now effectively a ward of the state.

Jessie enrolls him in high school, where Powder meets physics teacher Donald Ripley. Donald finds out that Powder has supernatural powers as well as the highest IQ in the history of mankind. While his abilities mark him as special, they also make him an outcast. On a hunting trip with his schoolmates, Powder is threatened with a gun by John Box (Bradford Tatum), an aggressive student who views him as a freak. Before John can fire, a gun goes off in the distance and everyone rushes to see that Harley Duncan, one of Doug’s deputy who is hunting with the boys, has shot a doe, which is now dying. Anguished by the animal’s death, Powder touches the deer and Harley, inducing in Harley what the students assume is a seizure. However, Harley admits to Doug that Powder had actually caused him to feel the pain and fear of the dying deer, and he cannot bring himself to take another life. Because of the experience, Harley removes all of his guns from his house although Doug allows him to remain as a sheriff’s deputy without a sidearm.

Doug enlists Powder to help speak to his dying wife through telepathy. Through Powder, the sheriff learns that his wife clings onto life because she didn’t want to leave without her wedding ring on her finger and without him reconciling with his estranged son, Steven. She tells him that Steven found the ring and it has been sitting in a silver box on her nightstand throughout the entire movie. Doug then places the ring on his wife’s finger and reconciles with Steven, letting his wife die peacefully.

Powder meets Lindsey Kelloway, a romantic interest, but their relationship is broken by Lindsey’s father. Before the interruption, he tells Lindsey that he can see the truth about people: that they are scared and feel disconnected from the rest of the world, but in truth are all connected to everything that exists. Powder goes back to the juvenile facility and packs away his belongings, planning to run away to his deceased grandparents’ farm. He pauses in the gym to stare at a male student washing, noticing the latter’s luxurious head of hair as well as body hair which he himself lacks, and is caught at it by John Box, who accuses him of homosexuality. John steals Jeremy’s hat and taunts him, but Powder reveals that John’s words mimic what his stepfather said before beating him when he was 12, further angering him. John and the other boys humiliate Powder, stripping him naked and taunting him. His powers begin to manifest by pulling at their metal buttons and any piercings. Eventually a large spherical electric burst erupts throwing Jeremy in a mud puddle and everyone else to the ground. His classmate John is found still, with his heart stopped. Powder uses an electric shock to revive him.

In the final scene Powder returns to the farm where he grew up, now in probate with the bank, and finds that all of his possessions have been removed. He is joined by Jessie, Donald and Doug, who persuade Powder to come with them to find a place where he will not be feared and misunderstood. Instead, a thunderstorm arrives and he runs into a field where a lightning bolt strikes him, and he disappears in a blinding flash of light.

Cast

Reception[edit]

Powder received generally mixed reviews from critics. It currently holds a rating of 47% (“Rotten”) on Rotten Tomatoes based on 19 reviews, as of May 2011. Caryn James of The New York Times described the film as “lethally dull” and said, “This intensely self-important film has no idea how absurd and unconvincing it is.”[1]

Since its release, the film has grossed approximately $31 million worldwide.

Controversy[edit]

The film’s production by Disney resulted in a controversy over the choice of director Victor Salva, who had been convicted of molesting a 12-year-old child actor in 1988. When Powder was released, the victim came forward again in an attempt to get others to boycott the film in protest at Disney’s hiring Salva. Since then, Disney has not picked up any more pictures by Salva.[2][3]

Remake[edit]

The film was remade by Bollywood under the title of Alag.

References[edit]

  1. ^ James, Caryn (October 27, 1995). “Powder (1995)”. The New York Times. Retrieved May 15, 2011.
  2. ^ Infamy that has no end, Chicago Tribune, October 29, 1995
  3. ^ Victim speaks out against molester, TimesDaily, October 25, 1995

External links[edit]

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Sterling Hayden Interviewed By Tom Synder — Photos and Videos

Posted on July 13, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, European History, history, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Movies, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Security, Talk Radio, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

sterlinghayden

TheAsphaltJungle

hayden-flaming-feather

sterling-hayden-drstrangelove-4

mcCluskeyMike

Tom Russell : Sterling Hayden

This song comes from Tom Russell’s 2011 release, ‘Mesabi’, available through Tom’s website – http://www.tomrussell.com – and the usual record outlets. Sterling Hayden (March 26, 1916 — May 23, 1986) was an American actor and author. For most of his career as a leading man, he specialized in westerns and film noir, such as Johnny Guitar, The Asphalt Jungle and The Killing. Later on he became noted as a character actor for such roles as Gen. Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). He also played the Irish policeman, Captain McCluskey, in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather in 1972, and the novelist Roger Wade in 1973’s The Long Goodbye. The quote at the beginning of the video comes from Hayden’s autobiography, “Wanderer” (1963).

Sterling Hayden- The Golden Hawk (1952) 1

The Asphalt Jungle-Doublecross scene

Sterling Hayden in Johnny Guitar (1954) – Coffee & Smoke Scene

“The Killing” Chess Club Scene (Stanley Kubrick, 1956)

Martin Scorsese introduces Johnny Guitar (USA, 1954) dir. Nicholas Ray

Johnny Guitar

Taste of Strangelove Number 2

Dr. Strangelove (4/8) Movie CLIP – Water and Commies (1964) HD

The Godfather (3/9) Movie CLIP – Killing Sollozzo and McCluskey (1972) HD

Sterling Hayden interview Part 1 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 2 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 3 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 4 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 5 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden interview Part 6 of six on the Tomorrow Show

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 1 of four on  Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder  5-29-1980

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 2 of four on Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder  5 29 1980

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 3 of four on Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder  5 29 1980

Sterling Hayden, 2nd interview of three, Part 4 of four on Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder

Sterling Hayden, 3rd interview of 3 Part 1 of three on  Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder

Sterling Hayden, 3rd interview of 3 Part 2 of three on  Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder

Sterling Hayden, 3rd interview of 3 (part 3 of 3) Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder 

Cinéma Cinémas – Sterling Hayden (suite & fin) 

Kansas Pacific (1953) STERLING HAYDEN

1954 – Suddenly – FRANK SINATRA & STERLING HAYDEN | Lewis Allen

Sterling Hayden – Top Gun (1955) Full Western 

Valerie 1957 Sterling Hayden Anita Ekberg Legendado

Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden (born Sterling Relyea Walter; March 26, 1916 – May 23, 1986) was an American actor and author. For most of his career as a leading man, he specialized in westerns and film noir, such as Johnny Guitar, The Asphalt Jungle and The Killing. Later on he became noted as a character actor for such roles as Gen. Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). He also played the Irish-American policeman, Captain McCluskey, in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather in 1972, and the novelist Roger Wade in 1973’s The Long Goodbye. He played the role of Leo Dalcò in Bernardo Bertolucci’s 1900 in 1976. At six feet five inches (196 cm),[1] he was taller than most actors.

Biography

Early life, education

He was born in Montclair, New Jersey, to George and Frances Walter, who named him Sterling Relyea Walter.[2][3] After his father died, he was adopted at the age of nine by James Hayden and renamed Sterling Walter Hayden. He grew up in coastal towns of New England,[4] and as a child lived in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Maine, where he attended Wassookeag School in Dexter, Maine.

Hayden was a genuine adventurer and man of action, not dissimilar from many of his movie parts. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and took a job as mate on a schooner.[5] His first voyage was to Newport Beach, California from New London, Connecticut.[4] Later, he was a fisherman on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, ran a charter yacht, and served as a fireman on eleven trips to Cuba aboard a steamer.[4] He skippered a trading schooner in the Caribbean after earning his master’s license, and in 1937 he served as mate on a world cruise of the schooner Yankee.[4] After serving as sailor and fireman on larger vessels and sailing around the world several times, he was awarded his first command aged 22, skippering the square rigger Florence C. Robinson 7,700 miles from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to Tahiti in 1938.[4][6][7]

Hollywood years and military service

Hayden became a print model and later signed a contract with Paramount Pictures, who dubbed the 6′ 5″ (1.96 m)[1] actor “The Most Beautiful Man in the Movies” and “The Beautiful Blond Viking God”. His first film, Virginia (1941), starred Madeleine Carroll, with whom he fell in love and married.

After two film roles, he left Hollywood and joined the Marines as a private, under the name “John Hamilton” (a pseudonym Hayden only used in the military). While at Parris Island he was recommended for Officer Candidate School. After graduation, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and was transferred to service as an undercover agent with William J. Donovan’s COI office. He remained there after it became the OSS.[8][9][10]

As OSS agent John Hamilton, his World War II service included sailing with supplies from Italy to Yugoslav partisans and parachuting into fascist Croatia. Hayden, who also participated in the Naples-Foggia campaign and established air crew rescue teams in enemy-occupied territory, became a first lieutenant on September 13, 1944, and a captain on February 14, 1945. He received the Silver Star (for gallantry in action in the Balkans and Mediterranean; “Lt. Hamilton displayed great courage in making hazardous sea voyages in enemy-infested waters and reconnaissance through enemy-held areas”), a Bronze Arrowhead device for parachuting behind enemy lines, and a commendation from Yugoslavia’s Marshal Tito. He left active duty on December 24, 1945.[10]

His great admiration for the bravery of the Communist partisans led to a brief membership in the Communist Party. He was apparently active in supporting an effort by the Communist-controlled motion picture painters’ union to absorb other film industry unions.[11] As the Red Scare deepened in U.S., he cooperated with the House Un-American Activities Committee, confessing his brief Communist ties and “naming names.”[2] His wife at that time, Betty de Noon, insisted that the ‘names’ her ex-husband provided were already in the hands of the Committee, which had a copy of the Communist Party’s membership list. In any event, Hayden subsequently repudiated his cooperation with the Committee, stating in his autobiography “I don’t think you have the foggiest notion of the contempt I have had for myself since the day I did that thing.”[2]

Personal life

Sterling Hayden often professed distaste for film acting, claiming he did it mainly to pay for his ships and voyages. In 1958, after a bitter divorce, he was awarded custody of his children. He defied a court order and sailed to Tahiti with all four children, Christian, Dana, Gretchen and Matthew.[12] The crew sailed from San Francisco Bay to Tahiti, where Hayden had planned to film a movie. Hayden also invited well known photographer Dody Weston Thompson along to document the trip and to help shoot location choices. Her South Seas folio is replete with fascinating photographs of the Hayden’s ship The Wanderer, on-deck photos of life aboard the ship, colorful prints of his children, Tahitian women and children, and of unique artifacts on shore. The film did not materialize, however, and according to Dody’s notes U.S. Camera printed these photographs of paradise in 1961.

Marin County Superior Court Judge Harold Haley would later order Hayden to repay Republic Pictures, who financed the trip with two promissory notes, nearly $50,000 for defaulting on an agreement to repay the debt.[13] In 1960, he married Catherine Devine McConnell. They had two sons, Andrew and David, and were married until his death in 1986. McConnell also had a son from her first marriage, to journalist Scott McConnell.

In the early 1960s, Hayden rented one of the pilot houses of the retired ferryboat Berkeley, docked in Sausalito, California where he resided while writing his autobiography Wanderer, which was first published in 1963. In it, he reminisces about turning points in his life:

“The sun beats down and you pace, you pace and you pace. Your mind flies free and you see yourself as an actor, condemned to a treadmill wherein men and women conspire to breathe life into a screenplay that allegedly depicts life as it was in the old wild West. You see yourself coming awake any one of a thousand mornings between the spring of 1954, and that of 1958 ‑ alone in a double bed in a big white house deep in suburban Sherman Oaks, not far from Hollywood.
“The windows are open wide, and beyond these is the backyard swimming pool inert and green, within a picket fence. You turn and gaze at a pair of desks not far from the double bed. This is your private office, the place that shelters your fondest hopes: these desks so neat, patiently waiting for the day that never comes, the day you’ll sit down at last and begin to write.
“Why did you never write? Why, instead, did you grovel along, through the endless months and years, as a motion‑picture actor? What held you to it, to something you so vehemently professed to despise? Could it be that you secretly liked it—that the big dough and the big house and the high life meant more than the aura you spun for those around you to see?
“‘Hayden’s wild,’ they said. ‘He’s kind of nuts‑but you’ve got to hand it to him. He doesn’t give a damn about the loot or the stardom or things like that—something to do with his seafaring, or maybe what he went through in the war . . .'”[2]:151

In the 1970s, after his appearance in The Godfather, he appeared several times on NBC’s Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder, where he talked about his career resurgence and how it had funded his travels and adventures around the world. Hayden bought a canal barge in the Netherlands in 1969, eventually moving it to the heart of Paris and living on it part of the time. He also shared a home in Wilton, Connecticut with his family and had an apartment in Sausalito.

Hayden wrote two acclaimed books: an autobiography, Wanderer (1962), and a novel Voyage (1976).

Sterling Hayden died of prostate cancer in Sausalito in 1986, age 70.[5]

Bibliography

Filmography

References in Popular Culture

In the film Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, 1975), two veteran CIA officers were reminiscing about their past. Higgins (Cliff Robertson) asked Mr. Wabash, “You served with Col. Donovan in the OSS, didn’t you, sir?” Wabash (John Houseman) replies, “I sailed the Adriatic with a movie star at the helm. It doesn’t seem like much of a war now, but it was.”

In 2011 the American singer-songwriter Tom Russell released the song “Sterling Hayden” on his album Mesabi.

Hayden, under his nom de guerre Lieutenant John Hamilton, and his role as an OSS agent play a secondary part in the 2012 novel Deaths Door: A Billy Boyle World War II mystery by author James R. Benn. Hayden/Hamilton assists in getting protagonist Billy Boyle through German-occupied Italy.[14]

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Hayden 1977, p. 224
  2. ^ a b c d Hayden 1998, pp. 65–66, 76, 354
  3. ^ United States Census for 1920, Montclair Town, Essex County, New Jersey, p. Sheet 6B
  4. ^ a b c d e “Sterling Hayden Gives Up Sailing, Settles For Movie Career, Family”. Toledo Blade (Google News). January 14, 1951. Retrieved October 8, 2009. [dead link]
  5. ^ a b Krebs, Albin (May 24, 1986). “Sterling Hayden Dead at 70; an Actor, Writer and Sailor”. The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved October 8, 2009.
  6. ^ Hayden 1977, pp. 225–227
  7. ^ “New in the News”, Boy’s Life, Feb 1939, p. 25
  8. ^ “Chef Julia Child, others, part of WWII spy network”. CNN.com. Associated Press. August 14, 2008. Archived from the original on August 22, 2008.
  9. ^ Schlesinger, Robert (August 20, 2008). “Arthur Schlesinger Jr.’s Not-So-Secret Career as a Spy”. US News and World Report. Retrieved October 8, 2009.
  10. ^ a b Schuon, Karl (1963). U. S. Marine Corps Biographical Dictionary. New York: Watts. pp. 99–100. OCLC 1360534.
  11. ^ Meroney, John, “Left in the Past”, LA Times Magazine, February 2012.
  12. ^ “HOLLYWOOD: To Break Out”. TIME (New York: Time Inc.). February 9, 1959. Retrieved July 6, 2010.
  13. ^ “Film Actor Handed $49,518 Judgment”. Reading Eagle (Reading, Pennsylvania). Associated Press. August 6, 1961. p. 12. Retrieved July 6, 2010.
  14. ^ Benn, James R. (2012). New York, New York: Soho Press. ISBN 978-1-61695-185-6. Missing or empty |title= (help)

References

  • Hayden, Sterling (1977). Wanderer. New York: Norton. ISBN 0-393-07521-4. Unknown parameter |refs= ignored (help)
  • Hayden, Sterling (1998). Wanderer. Dobbs Ferry: Sheridan House. ISBN 978-1-57409-048-2. Unknown parameter |refs= ignored (help)

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Sterling Hayden

Video clips

Background Articles and Videos

hayden-carroll-bahama

bahama-passage-1941-madeleine-carroll-sterling-hayden

487px-Madeleine_Carroll_in_1937

Bahama Passage 1941 – Madeleine Carroll – Sterling Hayden

Madeleine Carroll Tribute

Movie Legends – Madeleine Carroll (Reprise)

Alfred Hitchcock | The 39 Steps (1935) [Thriller]

Secret Agent (Alfred Hitchcock)

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Who Controls America — George Carlin — Videos

Posted on May 15, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, College, Communications, Diasters, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, High School, history, Inflation, Investments, Language, Law, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Religion, Resources, Security, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Technology, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , |

goerge_carlin

The Owners of the Country

Entropy fan

The Genius George Carlin

George Carlin: Brain Droppings

George Carlin Interview

george_carlin_nature

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Everybody Hurts–Videos

Posted on February 24, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, government, government spending, history, Language, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Psychology, Raves, Religion, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

everybody-hurts-640

R.E.M. – Everybody Hurts (Video)

REM – Everybody hurts (with lyrics)

“everybody hurts”-house video

The Corrs – Everybody Hurts (Unplugged)

Joe Cocker Everybody hurts

joe-cocker

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Argo — Takes Off — Videos

Posted on February 2, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, Films, history, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Psychology, Raves, Reviews, Strategy, Technology, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Argo  —  takes off

Raymond Thomas Pronk

bryan-cranston-cia-director-in-argo-with-ben-affleck-images.jpeg

CIA meeting with Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck) and Jack O’Donnell (Bryan Cranston)

Credit: the peoples movies

“Argo” is loosely based on the declassified true story of the escape from Iran of six U.S. embassy staff members orchestrated by CIA exfiltration specialist Tony Mendez (played by Ben Affleck) that saved real lives using a fake science fiction fantasy film as a cover story.

The film opens with the Nov. 4, 1979 seizure of the U.S. embassy in Tehran by several hundred militant Islamist students who take the embassy staff hostage. Fifty-two embassy staff were held for 444 days until President Jimmy Carter left office on Jan. 20, 1981. Six diplomats escaped from the embassy and were hiding in the home of the Canadian Ambassador Ken Taylor (Victor Garber).

Affleck and company have managed to seamlessly synthesize a thriller/comedy/suspense hybrid. When in Washington the film is a thriller as the CIA, State Department and White House react to the takeover of the U.S. embassy in Tehran. When in Los Angeles, the movie is a series of one-liners and inside jokes about the Hollywood scene. When in Tehran the movie is an intense edge-of-your seat suspense story.

Chris Terrio’s screenplay masters the massive details of these shifting scenes and city locations into a credible and convincing narrative with humor and wit. In a pivotal meeting of CIA and State Department operation officers exploring exfiltration scenarios, Mendez says, “Exfils are like abortions. You don’t wanna need one, but when you do, you don’t do it yourself.” The CIA and Mendez are tasked with the exfiltration operation.

Mendez comes up with a plan to get the six diplomats out of the country as part of a fake Canadian film production crew scouting for primitive lunar-like locations in Iran.

Mendez and his CIA supervisor, Jack O’Donnell (Bryan Cranston), enlist the help of an Oscar-winning film makeup artist, John Chambers (John Goodman), that the CIA has used in the past to create disguises. Chambers in turn contacts veteran film producer Lester Siegel (Alan Arkin) and together create a phony movie studio and publicity for a fake science fiction film called “Argo.”

In “Argo,” Affleck was outstanding both in front of the camera as Mendez and behind the camera as director. This is Affleck’s third and best feature film direction after two solid films, Gone Baby Gone (2007) and The Town (2010).

In January “Argo” won the Golden Globe awards for best drama and director, the Producers Guild of America Theatrical Motion Picture award and the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture award.

“Argo” takes off as a Hollywood blockbuster with worldwide box office receipts exceeding $190 million and seven Academy Award nominations including best picture, supporting actor (Alan Arkin), film editing (William Goldenberg), original score (Alexandre Desplat), sound editing (Erik Aadahl and Ethan Van der Ryn), sound mixing (John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Jose Antonio Garcia) and adapted screenplay (Chris Terrio).

“Argo” faces stiff competition from “Lincoln” for best picture and adapted screenplay. However, I believe “Argo” will win at least four Academy Awards for best editing, original score, sound editing and sound mixing at the 85th Academy Awards ceremony on Feb. 24.

For sheer excitement, humor and suspense, and outstanding ensemble acting by the entire cast, “Argo” is an entertaining must see movie and Oscar contender.

Film rating: A

Raymond Thomas Pronk is host of the Pronk Pops Show on KDUX web radio from 3-5 p.m. Fridays and author of the companion blog http://www.pronkpops.wordpress.com/

Trailer : Argo Official Trailer #1 (2012) Ben Affleck Thriller Movie HD

Argo Featurette (2012) – Ben Affleck Movie HD

DP/30: Argo, director/actor Ben Affleck

DP/30: Argo, screenwriter Chris Terrio

Ben Affleck, Tony Mendez Interview on ‘Argo': Director, Inspiration Discuss Film

Argo’s Real-Life Hero

Argo – Interview with Ben Affleck

Argo – Interview with Bryan Cranston

Ben Affleck On Best Director Snub – The Tonight Show with Jay Leno

Alan Arkin & John Goodman – Argo Interview with Tribute

Beyond The Trailer : Argo Movie Review 2012 : Beyond The Trailer

Argo Movie Review – Just Seen It

Argo – Movie Review by Chris Stuckmann

Argo – Movie Review

Argo – Movie Review

ARGO Press Conference | Festival 2012

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Go See Lincoln — Now — Now — Now –Videos

Silver Linings Playbook — Crazy Love — Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

The Boss’ Speech–Bruce Springsteen’s Keynote Speech at South By South West Festival, SXSW, Austin, Texas, March, 2012–Videos

Posted on March 17, 2012. Filed under: Communications, Culture, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Radio, Raves, Video, Wealth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Bruce Springsteen’s keynote speech at the SXSW Festival, Austin, Texas

Keynote speech at the South by South West Festival in Austin, Texas. Bruce comes in after 4 minutes. It’s almost an hour long, but if you have the time, definitely worth watching.

Bruce Springsteen – Dancing In The Dark

Bruce Springsteen – Born To Run

We Take Care Of Our Own – Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen-Jack of all trades

 

I’ll mow your lawn, clean the leaves out your drain

I’ll mend your roof to keep out the rain

 I’ll take the work that god provides

I’m a jack of all trades, honey, we’ll be alright

I’ll hammer the nails, and i’ll set the stone

 I’ll harvest your crops when they’re ripe and grown

 I’ll pull that engine apart and patch her up ’til she’s running right

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

A hurricane blows, brings a hard rain

 When the blue sky breaks, feels like the world’s gonna change

 We’ll start caring for each other like jesus said that we might

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

The banker man grows fatter, the working man grows thin

 It’s all happened before and it’ll happen again

 It’ll happen again, they’ll bet your life

 I’m a jack of all trades and, darling, we’ll be alright

Now sometimes tomorrow comes soaked in treasure and blood

Here we stood the drought, now we’ll stand the flood

 There’s a new world coming, i can see the light

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

So you use what you’ve got, and you learn to make do

 You take the old, you make it new

 If i had me a gun, i’d find the bastards and shoot ‘em on sight

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

 I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

Adele–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Eva Cassidy–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Doris Day–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Whitney Houston–Videos

Janis Ian–Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Sam & Dave–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Bob Seger–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Adele–Videos

Posted on February 13, 2012. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Economics, Entertainment, Language, Law, liberty, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Radio, Raves, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , |

“Mum loves me being famous! She is so excited and proud, as she had me so young and couldn’t support me, so I am living her dream, it’s sweeter for both of us. It’s her 40th birthday soon and I’m going to buy her 40 presents.”

She amazed us again….

Adele – Someone Like You

Adele – Turning Tables 

Adele- Don’t You Remember

Adele – Someone Like You (Live in Her Home) 

Adele – Make You Feel My Love (Live on Letterman) 

ADELE – ‘Make You Feel My Love’ 

Adele – One And Only 

Adele – Rumour Has It

ADELE – ‘Cold Shoulder’

Adele – Crazy For You

ADELE – ‘Hometown Glory’

Adele – He won’t go (with lyrics)

Adele – First Love 

Adele – Set Fire To The Rain (Live from the Tabernacle, London, 24 January 2011)

Adele – Set Fire To The Rain

Adele – I Can’t Make You Love Me

Adele – Rolling In The Deep

Adele – Chasing Pavements

Adele Turning Set Fire To Rain Live X Factor Rihanna You Da One Lyrics Grammy Nominations AMA 2012

Adele – Make You Feel My Love [Official Video] 

‘My life is full of drama and I won’t have time to worry about something as petty as what I look like. I don’t like going to the gym.

‘I like eating fine foods and drinking nice wine. Even if I had a really good figure, I don’t think I’d get my t**s and a** out for no one.

‘I love seeing Lady Gaga’s boobs and bum. I love seeing Katy Perry’s boobs and bum. Love it. But that’s not what my music is about. I don’t make music for eyes, I make music for ears.’

Background Articles and Videos

 Adele wins a Grammy for Best Pop Solo Performance

Adele 21 – Track By Track Interview

Adele — Exclusive WSJ Interview 

Adele – Ushi the (complete) interview

Adele – Interview (The Jonathan Ross Show – 3rd September 2011) 

ADELE – Live At The Royal Albert Hall DVD (Trailer) 

Adele & Amy Winehouse performing @ The BRIT Awards (2008) 

Adele (singer)

“…Adele Laurie Blue Adkins[2] (born 5 May 1988), better known mononymously as Adele, is an English recording artist and songwriter. Adele was offered a recording contract from XL Recordings after a friend posted her demonstration on Myspace in 2006. The next year she received the Brit Awards “Critics’ Choice” and won the BBC Sound of 2008. Her debut album, 19 was released in 2008 to much commercial and critical success in the UK. 19 was certified four times platinum in the UK.[3] Her career in the US was boosted by a Saturday Night Live appearance in late 2008. At the 2009 Grammy Awards, Adele received the awards for Best New Artist and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.[4][5] She has also won a total of 8 Grammy Awards and 1 Brit Award.

Adele released her second album, 21 in early 2011.[6][7] The album was well received critically and surpassed the success of her debut commercially.[8] 21 has been certified 14 times platinum in the UK;[3] in the US the album held the top position longer than any other album since 1993.[9][10] The success of 21 earned Adele numerous mentions in the Guinness Book Of World Records. The album won the Grammy for Album of the Year. She is the first artist to sell more than 3 million copies of an album in a year in the UK.[11] With her two albums and the first two singles from 21, “Rolling in the Deep” and “Someone Like You”, Adele became the first living artist to achieve the feat of two top five hits in both the UK Official Singles Chart and the Official Albums Chart simultaneously since the Beatles in 1964.[12][13] With her third release from the album, “Set Fire to the Rain”, becoming her third number one single in the US, Adele became the first artist in history to lead the Billboard 200 concurrently with three Billboard Hot 100 number ones.[14] 21 is the longest running number one album by a female solo artist on the UK Albums Chart[15] and is tied for the longest cumulative stay at number one by a female solo artist as well.[11] In 2011, Billboard named Adele artist of the year.[16]

Adele Website

http://www.adele.tv/

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Eva Cassidy–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Doris Day–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Whitney Houston–Videos

Janis Ian–Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Sam & Dave–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Bob Seger–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

http://seg.sharethis.com/getSegment.php?purl=http%3A%2F%2Fraymondpronk.wordpress.com%2Fwp-admin%2Fpost-new.php%3Fpost_type%3Dpost&jsref=&rnd=1329160789564

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Whitney Houston–Videos

Posted on February 13, 2012. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Culture, Economics, Entertainment, Films, history, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Whitney Houston – I Will Always Love You     Official Music Video

Whitney Houston – Where Do Broken Hearts Go (Medley) 

where do broken hearts go by whitney houston with lyrics

Whitney Houston sings at New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, NJ.

Whitney Houston – Memories (1982) 

Merv Griffin Show- Whitney Houston and Cissy Houston sings Sweet Baby/You Send Me/Aint No Way 1983

Whitney Houston   1985   Opening Act for Luther Vandross 

Whitney Houston – Saving all my love for you  – Peters Popshow – 1985 

Whitney Houston – Saving all my love for you  – Peters Popshow – 1985 

Whitney Houston – I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me) 

Whitney Houston – All At Once (1987)

Whitney Houston – Saving All My Love – HQ Live 

Whitney Houston – All The Man That I Need 

Whitney Houston  – Saving All My love For You (Live French Show)

Whitney Houston   One Moment In Time(Grammy Awards Live)

Whitney Houston – I Will Always Love You

Whitney Houston – Saving All My Love For You

Whitney Houston – How Will I Know 

Whitney Houston – So Emotional 

Whitney Houston – I’m Every Woman 

Whitney Houston – It’s Not Right But It’s Okay 

Whitney Houston – Exhale

Whitney Houston – All The Man That I Need

Whitney Houston – I Look To You

Whitney Houston – Run To You

Whitney Houston – I Wanna Dance With Somebody

Whitney Houston – Greatest Love Of All

Whitney Houston – I Have Nothing

Whitney Houston – Didn’t We Almost Have It All

Baclground Articles and Videos

Whitney Houston’s Death: 2012 Grammy Awards to Pay Tribute to Her Career

Whitney Houston – This is My Life – Part 1 

Whitney Houston – This is My Life – Part 2 

Whitney Houston – This Is My Life – Part 3 

Whitney Houston Rolling Stone Interview 1986

Whitney Houston MTV Interview (1988)

Whitney Houston on The Arsenio Hall Show (1990)

Whitney Houston on The Arsenio Hall Show (1992) Part 1 

Whitney Houston on The Arsenio Hall Show (1992) Part 2 

Whitney Houston on The Arsenio Hall Show (1992) Part 3

Whitney Houston – Barbara Walters Special 1993 – Part 1 

Whitney Houston – Barbara Walters Special 1993 – Part 2

Whitney Houston interview by Diane Sawyer

Whitney Houston UK Interview 1996 Rare

Whitney Houston Interview

Whitney Houston

“…Whitney Elizabeth Houston (August 9, 1963 – February 11, 2012) was an American recording artist, actress, producer, and model. In 2009, the Guinness World Records cited her as the most-awarded female act of all time.[1] Her awards include two Emmy Awards, six Grammy Awards, 30 Billboard Music Awards, and 22 American Music Awards, among a total of 415 career awards in her lifetime. Houston was also one of the world’s best-selling music artists, having sold over 170 million albums, singles and videos worldwide.[2][3] Inspired by prominent soul singers in her family, including her mother Cissy Houston, cousins Dionne Warwick and Dee Dee Warwick, and her godmother Aretha Franklin, Houston began singing with her New Jersey church’s junior gospel choir at age 11.[4] After she began performing alongside her mother in night clubs in the New York City area, she was discovered by Arista Records label head Clive Davis. Houston released seven studio albums and three movie soundtrack albums, all of which have diamond, multi-platinum, platinum or gold certification.

Houston is the only artist to chart seven consecutive No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hits (“Saving All My Love for You”, “How Will I Know”, “Greatest Love of All”, “I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)”, “Didn’t We Almost Have It All”, “So Emotional” and “Where Do Broken Hearts Go”). She is the second artist behind Elton John and the only female artist to have two number-one Billboard 200 Album awards (formerly “Top Pop Album”) on the Billboard magazine year-end charts. Houston’s 1985 debut album Whitney Houston became the best-selling debut album by a female act at the time of its release. The album was named Rolling Stone‘s best album of 1986, and was ranked at number 254 on Rolling Stone‘s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[5] Her second studio album Whitney (1987) became the first album by a female artist to debut at number one on the Billboard 200 albums chart.[5] Houston’s crossover appeal on the popular music charts as well as her prominence on MTV, starting with her video for “How Will I Know”,[6] influenced several African-American female artists to follow in her footsteps.[7][8]

Houston’s first acting role was as the star of the feature film The Bodyguard (1992). The film’s original soundtrack won the 1994 Grammy Award for Album of the Year. Its lead single “I Will Always Love You”, became the best-selling single by a female artist in music history. With the album, Houston became the first act (solo or group, male or female) to sell more than a million copies of an album within a single week period.[5] The album makes her the only female act in the top 10 list of the best-selling albums of all time, at number four. Houston continued to star in movies and contribute to their soundtracks, including the films Waiting to Exhale (1995) and The Preacher’s Wife (1996). The Preacher’s Wife soundtrack became the best-selling gospel album in history.[9] Three years after the release of her fourth studio album My Love Is Your Love (1998), she renewed her recording contract with Arista Records.[9] She released her fifth studio album Just Whitney in 2002, and the Christmas-themed One Wish: The Holiday Album in 2003. In 2009, Houston released her seventh studio album I Look to You. …”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WH1Ma50QUk&feature=related

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

Adele–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Eva Cassidy–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Doris Day–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Janis Ian–Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Sam & Dave–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Bob Seger–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Four High Definition HD Videos On Degas, Manet, Monet, Van Gogh, and Vermeer Posted To The A Pronk Studio Video Channel On YouTube–Videos–Give Them A View!

Posted on May 13, 2011. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Rants, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A PRONK STUDIO VIDEO

Degas

Manet Monet

Van Gogh and McLean

Vermeer And Cassidy

A PRONK STUDIO VIDEO

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Art Videos on youtube.com Channel: A PRONK STUDIO VIDEO

Impressionists

The Impressionists–Videos

Mary Cassatt Videos

Paul Cezanne Videos

Edgar Degas Videos

Paul Gauguin Videos

Edouard Manet Videos

Camille Pissarro Videos

Pierre-Auguste Renoir Videos

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Videos

Georges-Pierre Seurat Video

Vincent Van Gogh Videos

American Realists

Winslow Homer Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Ayn Rand’s Howard Roark–Individualist–Replies To Barack Obama–Collectivist–Videos

Posted on April 15, 2011. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Entertainment, Movies, Private Sector, Public Sector, Unions, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Howard Roark makes a case against Barack Obama Individual vs collectivism

 

Background Articles and Videos

 

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #1

 

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #2

 

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #3

 

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #4

 

Tactics for socialist takeover of nations 1 of 2: Fabianism & Leninism

 

Tactics for socialist takeover of nations 2 of 2: Fabianism & Leninism

 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Ayn Rand–Videos

The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and The Ideas of Ayn Rand

Yaron Brook On Capitalism and Atlas Shrugged–Videos

Jennifer Burns–Goddess of the Market: Ayn Rand and the American Right–Videos

Anne C. Heller–Ayn Rand And The World She Made–Videos

John Stossel On Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Minority Report–Videos

Posted on January 13, 2011. Filed under: Biology, Blogroll, Chemistry, Communications, Crime, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Employment, Entertainment, Federal Government, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Medicine, Movies, Music, People, Philosophy, Physics, Politics, Psychology, Raves, Religion, Resources, Science, Security, Talk Radio, Taxes, Technology, Transportation, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Minority Report – Precrime Intro

 

Minority Report Part 2

 

Minority Report Part 3

 

Minority Report Part 4

 

Minority Report Part 5

 

Minority Report Part 6

 

Minority Report Part 7

 

Minority Report Part 8

 

Minority Report Part 9

 

Minority Report Part 10

 

Minority Report Part 11

 

Minority Report Part 12

 

Minority Report Part 13

 

Minority Report Part 14

 

Minority Report Part 15

Minority Report

“…Minority Report is a 2002 American neo-noir[2] science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg and loosely based on the short story “The Minority Report” by Philip K. Dick. It is set primarily in Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia in the year 2054, where “PreCrime”, a specialized police department, apprehends criminals based on foreknowledge provided by three psychics called “precogs”. The cast includes Tom Cruise as PreCrime officer John Anderton, Colin Farrell as Department of Justice agent Danny Witwer, Samantha Morton as the senior precog Agatha, and Max von Sydow as Anderton’s superior Lamar Burgess. The film is a combination of whodunit, thriller, and science fiction.[3]

Spielberg has characterized the story as “fifty percent character and fifty percent very complicated storytelling with layers and layers of murder mystery and plot.”[4] The film’s central theme is the question of free will vs. determinism. It examines whether free will can exist if the future is set and known in advance. Other themes include the role of preventative government in protecting its citizenry, the role of media in a future state where electronic advancements make its presence nearly boundless, the potential legality of an infallible prosecutor, and Spielberg’s repeated theme of broken families.

The film was first optioned in 1992 as a sequel to another Dick adaptation, Total Recall, and started its development in 1997, after a script by John Cohen reached Spielberg and Cruise. Production suffered many delays due to Cruise’s Mission: Impossible II and Spielberg’s A.I. running over schedule, eventually starting in March 2001. During pre-production, Spielberg consulted numerous scientists in an attempt to present a more plausible future world than that seen in other science fiction films, and some of the technology designs in the film have proven prescient. Minority Report has a unique visual style. It uses high contrast to create dark colors and shadows, much like a film noir picture. The film’s overlit shots feature desaturated colors which were achieved by bleach-bypassing the film’s negative in post-production.

Minority Report was one of the best reviewed films of 2002. It received praise for its writing, visuals and themes, but earned some criticism for its ending which was considered inconsistent with the tone of the rest of the movie. The film was nominated for and won several awards. It received an Academy Award nomination for Best Sound Editing, and won four Saturn Awards, including Best Science Fiction Film and Best Direction. The film was a commercial success, earning over $358 million worldwide against an overall budget of $142 million (including advertising). Over four million DVDs were sold in its first few months of home release. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minority_Report_(film)

 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

1984-Videos

Boondock Saints–Videos

A Brave New World–Videos

Battle of Waterloo–Videos

Before The Fall or Napola–Videos

The Chronicles of Narnia–Videos

The Chronicles Of Narnia – Prince Caspian–Videos

The Fall of The Roman Empire–Videos

Dr. Strangelove–Videos

Gangs of New York–Videos

Ghostbusters–Videos

Ghostbusters 2–Videos

Rain Drops Keep Falling Upon My Head–40th Anniversity of The Release of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

Gattaca–Videos

Hitler: The Rise of Evil–Videos

Me and The Colonel–Videos

Minority Report–Videos

Outer Limits – Dead Man’s Switch –Videos

Pleasantville–Videos

Pulp Fiction–Videos

Richard The Lionheart–Videos

Saving Private Ryan–Video

The Hitler Gang–Videos

The Patriot–Videos

The Wave–Videos

 

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Gangs of New York–Videos

Posted on November 21, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Books, College, Communications, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Entertainment, Federal Government, Films, government, government spending, history, Immigration, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Movies, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Gangs of New York Part 1

 

 

Gangs of New York Part 2

 

Gangs of New York Part 3

 

Gangs of New York Part 4

 

Gangs of New York Part5

 

Gangs of New York Part 6

 

Gangs of New York Part 7

 

Gangs of New York Part 8

 

 

Gangs of New York Part 9

Gangs of New York Part 10

Gangs of New York Part 11

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades 

1984-Videos

Boondock Saints–Videos

A Brave New World–Videos

Battle of Waterloo–Videos

Before The Fall or Napola–Videos

The Chronicles of Narnia–Videos

The Chronicles Of Narnia – Prince Caspian–Videos

The Fall of The Roman Empire–Videos

Dr. Strangelove–Videos

Ghostbusters–Videos

Ghostbusters 2–Videos

Rain Drops Keep Falling Upon My Head–40th Anniversity of The Release of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

Gattaca–Videos

Hitler: The Rise of Evil–Videos

Me and The Colonel–Videos

Outer Limits – Dead Man’s Switch –Videos

Pleasantville–Videos

Pulp Fiction–Videos

Richard The Lionheart–Videos

Saving Private Ryan–Video

The Hitler Gang–Videos

The Patriot–Videos

The Wave–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Pulp Fiction–Videos

Posted on October 25, 2010. Filed under: Communications, Crime, Culture, Entertainment, Movies, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

Pulp fiction movie part 1 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 2 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 3 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 4 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 5 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 6 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 7  HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 8  HQ

 

 

Pulp fiction movie part 9 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 10 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 11 HQ

 

 

Pulp fiction movie part 12 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 13 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 14 HQ

 

Pulp fiction movie part 15 HQ

 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Movies

1984-Videos

A Brave New World–Videos

Battle of Waterloo–Videos

Before The Fall or Napola–Videos

The Chronicles of Narnia–Videos

The Chronicles Of Narnia – Prince Caspian–Videos

The Fall of The Roman Empire–Videos

Dr. Strangelove–Videos

Ghostbusters–Videos

Ghostbusters 2–Videos

Rain Drops Keep Falling Upon My Head–40th Anniversity of The Release of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

Gattaca–Videos

Hitler: The Rise of Evil–Videos

Me and The Colonel–Videos

Outer Limits – Dead Man’s Switch –Videos

Pleasantville–Videos

Pulp Fiction–Videos

Richard The Lionheart–Videos

Saving Private Ryan–Video

The Hitler Gang–Videos

The Patriot–Videos

The Wave–Videos

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

A History of Britain: Episodes 13 Victoria and Her Sisters, 14 Empire of Good Intentions, 15 The Two Winstons–Videos

Posted on October 5, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Books, College, Communications, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Entertainment, Films, government, government spending, history, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Religion | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 1

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 2

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 3

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 4

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 5

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 6

A History of Britain: Episode 13 Victoria and Her Sisters 7

A History of Britain:  Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 1

A History of Britain: Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 2

A History of Britain: Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 3

A History of Britain: Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 4

A History of Britain: Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 5

A History of Britain: Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 6

A History of Britain: Episode 14 Empire of Good Intentions 7

A History of Britain: Episode 15 The Two Winstons 1

A History of Britain: Episode 15 The Two Winstons 2

A History of Britain: Episode 15 The Two Winstons 3

A History of Britain: Episode 15 The Two Winstons 4

A History of Britain: Episode 15 The Two Winstons 5

A History of Britain: Episode 15 The Two Winstons 6

Background Articles and Videos

A History of Britain 

“…A History of Britain is a BBC documentary series written and presented by Simon Schama, first transmitted in the United Kingdom from 30 September 2000.

A study of the history of the British Isles, each of the 15 episodes allows Schama to examine a particular period and tell of its events in his own style. All the programmes are of 59 minutes’ duration and were broadcast over three series, ending 18 June 2002.

The series was produced in conjunction with The History Channel and the executive producer was Martin Davidson. The music was composed by John Harle, whose work was augmented by vocal soloists such as Emma Kirkby and Lucie Skeaping. Schama’s illustrative presentation was aided by readings from actors, including Lindsay Duncan, Michael Kitchen, Christian Rodska, Samuel West and David Threlfall. …”

“…The following summaries are taken from the BBC DVD.

1. “Beginnings”

Covering the period 3100 BC – 1000 AD. Simon Schama starts his story in the stone age village of Skara Brae, Orkney. Over the next four thousand years Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Danes, and Christian missionaries arrive, fight, settle and leave their mark on what will become the nations of Britain.

2. “Conquest”

Broadcast 7 October 2000 and covering 1000–87. 1066 is not the best remembered date in British history for nothing. In the space of nine hours whilst the Battle of Hastings raged, everything changed. Anglo-Saxon England became Norman and, for the next 300 years, its fate was decided by dynasties of Norman rulers.

3. “Dynasty”

Broadcast 14 October 2000 and covering 1087–1216. There is no saga more powerful than that of the warring dynasty – domineering father, beautiful, scheming mother and squabbling, murderous sons and daughters, (particularly the nieces). In the years that followed the Norman Conquest, this was the drama played out on the stage of British history.

 4. “Nations”

Broadcast 21 October 2000 and covering 1216–1348, this is the epic account of how the nations of Britain emerged from under the hammer of England’s “Longshanks” King Edward I, with a sense of who and what they were, which endures to this day.

5. “King death”

Broadcast 28 October 2000 and covering 1348–1500. It took only six years for the plague to ravage the British Isles. Its impact was to last for generations. But from the ashes of this trauma an unexpected and unique class of Englishmen emerged.

6. “Burning convictions”

Broadcast 4 November 2000 and covering 1500–58. Here Simon Schama charts the upheaval caused as a country renowned for its piety, whose king styled himself Defender of the Faith, turns into one of the most aggressive proponents of the new Protestant faith.

7. “The body of the Queen”

Broadcast 8 November 2000 and covering 1558–1603. This is the story of two queens: Elizabeth I, the consummate politician, and Mary, Queen of Scots, the Catholic mother. It is also the story of the birth of a nation.

8. “The British wars”

Broadcast 8 May 2001 and covering 1603–49. The turbulent civil wars of the early seventeenth century would culminate in two events unique to British history; the public execution of a king and the creation of a republic. Schama tells of the brutal war that tore the country in half and created a new Britain – divided by politics and religion and dominated by the first truly modern army, fighting for ideology, not individual leaders.

9. “Revolutions”

Broadcast 15 May 2001 and covering 1649–89. Political and religious revolutions racked Britain after Charles I’s execution, when Britain was a joyless, kingless republic led by Oliver Cromwell. His rule became so unpopular that for many it was a relief when the monarchy was restored after his death, but Cromwell was also a man of vision who brought about significant reforms.

10. “Britannia incorporated”

Broadcast 22 May 2001 and covering 1690–1750. As the new century dawned, relations between Scotland and England had never been worse. Yet half a century later the two countries would be making a future together based on profit and interest. The new Britain was based on money, not God.

 11. “The wrong empire”

Broadcast 29 May 2001 and covering 1750–1800. The series is the exhilarating and terrible story of how the British Empire came into being through its early settlements—the Caribbean through the sugar plantations (and helped by slavery), the land that later became the United States and India through the British East India Company–and how it eventually came to dominate the world. A story of exploration and daring, but also one of exploitation, conflict, and loss.

12. “Forces of nature”

Broadcast 28 May 2002 and covering 1780–1832. Britain never had the kind of revolution experienced by France in 1789, but it did come close. In the mid-1770s the country was intoxicated by a great surge of political energy. Re-discovering England’s wildernesses, the intellectuals of the “romantic generation” also discovered the plight of the common man, turning nature into a revolutionary force.

13. “Victoria and her sisters”

Broadcast 4 June 2002 and covering 1830–1910. As the Victorian era began, the massive advance of technology and industrialisation was rapidly reshaping both the landscape and the social structure of the whole country. To a much greater extent than ever before women would take a centre-stage role in shaping society.

14. “The empire of good intentions”

Broadcast 11 June 2002 and covering 1830–1925. This episode charts the chequered life of the liberal empire from Ireland to India – the promise of civilisation and material betterment and the delivery of coercion and famine.

15. “The two Winstons”

Broadcast 18 June 2002 and covering 1910–65. In the final episode, Schama examines the overwhelming presence of the past in the British twentieth century and the struggle of leaders to find a way to make a different national future. As towering figures of the twentieth century, Churchill and Orwell (through his 1984 character Winston Smith) in their different ways exemplify lives spent brooding and acting on that imperial past, and most movingly for us, writing and shaping its history. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_History_of_Britain_(TV_series)

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

A History of Britain: Episodes 1 Beginnings, 2 Conquest, 3 Dynasty, 4 Nations–Videos

A History of Britain: Episodes 5 King Death, 6 Burning Convictions, 7 The Body of The Queen, and 8 The British Wars–Videos

A History of Britain: Episodes 9 Revolutions, 10 Britannia Incorporated, 11 The Wrong Empire, 12 Forces of Nature–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

A History of Britain: Episodes 9 Revolutions, 10 Britannia Incorporated, 11 The Wrong Empire, 12 Forces of Nature–Videos

Posted on October 4, 2010. Filed under: Agriculture, Blogroll, Books, College, Communications, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Films, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Religion, Resources, Science, Taxes, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 1

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 2

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 3

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 4

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 5a

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 5b

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions  6

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions  7

A History of Britain: episode 9: Revolutions 8

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 1

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 2

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 3

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 4

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 5

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 6

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 7

A History of Britain: episode 10: Britannia Incorporated 8

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  1

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  2

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  3

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  4

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire 5

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  6

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  7

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  8a

A History of Britain: episode 11: The Wrong Empire  8b

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 1

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 2

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 3

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 4

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 5

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 6

A History of Britain: episode 12: Forces of Nature 7

Background Articles and Videos

A History of Britain 

“…A History of Britain is a BBC documentary series written and presented by Simon Schama, first transmitted in the United Kingdom from 30 September 2000.

A study of the history of the British Isles, each of the 15 episodes allows Schama to examine a particular period and tell of its events in his own style. All the programmes are of 59 minutes’ duration and were broadcast over three series, ending 18 June 2002.

The series was produced in conjunction with The History Channel and the executive producer was Martin Davidson. The music was composed by John Harle, whose work was augmented by vocal soloists such as Emma Kirkby and Lucie Skeaping. Schama’s illustrative presentation was aided by readings from actors, including Lindsay Duncan, Michael Kitchen, Christian Rodska, Samuel West and David Threlfall. …”

“…The following summaries are taken from the BBC DVD.

1. “Beginnings”

Covering the period 3100 BC – 1000 AD. Simon Schama starts his story in the stone age village of Skara Brae, Orkney. Over the next four thousand years Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Danes, and Christian missionaries arrive, fight, settle and leave their mark on what will become the nations of Britain.

2. “Conquest”

Broadcast 7 October 2000 and covering 1000–87. 1066 is not the best remembered date in British history for nothing. In the space of nine hours whilst the Battle of Hastings raged, everything changed. Anglo-Saxon England became Norman and, for the next 300 years, its fate was decided by dynasties of Norman rulers.

3. “Dynasty”

Broadcast 14 October 2000 and covering 1087–1216. There is no saga more powerful than that of the warring dynasty – domineering father, beautiful, scheming mother and squabbling, murderous sons and daughters, (particularly the nieces). In the years that followed the Norman Conquest, this was the drama played out on the stage of British history.

 4. “Nations”

Broadcast 21 October 2000 and covering 1216–1348, this is the epic account of how the nations of Britain emerged from under the hammer of England’s “Longshanks” King Edward I, with a sense of who and what they were, which endures to this day.

5. “King death”

Broadcast 28 October 2000 and covering 1348–1500. It took only six years for the plague to ravage the British Isles. Its impact was to last for generations. But from the ashes of this trauma an unexpected and unique class of Englishmen emerged.

6. “Burning convictions”

Broadcast 4 November 2000 and covering 1500–58. Here Simon Schama charts the upheaval caused as a country renowned for its piety, whose king styled himself Defender of the Faith, turns into one of the most aggressive proponents of the new Protestant faith.

7. “The body of the Queen”

Broadcast 8 November 2000 and covering 1558–1603. This is the story of two queens: Elizabeth I, the consummate politician, and Mary, Queen of Scots, the Catholic mother. It is also the story of the birth of a nation.

8. “The British wars”

Broadcast 8 May 2001 and covering 1603–49. The turbulent civil wars of the early seventeenth century would culminate in two events unique to British history; the public execution of a king and the creation of a republic. Schama tells of the brutal war that tore the country in half and created a new Britain – divided by politics and religion and dominated by the first truly modern army, fighting for ideology, not individual leaders.

9. “Revolutions”

Broadcast 15 May 2001 and covering 1649–89. Political and religious revolutions racked Britain after Charles I’s execution, when Britain was a joyless, kingless republic led by Oliver Cromwell. His rule became so unpopular that for many it was a relief when the monarchy was restored after his death, but Cromwell was also a man of vision who brought about significant reforms.

10. “Britannia incorporated”

Broadcast 22 May 2001 and covering 1690–1750. As the new century dawned, relations between Scotland and England had never been worse. Yet half a century later the two countries would be making a future together based on profit and interest. The new Britain was based on money, not God.

 11. “The wrong empire”

Broadcast 29 May 2001 and covering 1750–1800. The series is the exhilarating and terrible story of how the British Empire came into being through its early settlements—the Caribbean through the sugar plantations (and helped by slavery), the land that later became the United States and India through the British East India Company–and how it eventually came to dominate the world. A story of exploration and daring, but also one of exploitation, conflict, and loss.

12. “Forces of nature”

Broadcast 28 May 2002 and covering 1780–1832. Britain never had the kind of revolution experienced by France in 1789, but it did come close. In the mid-1770s the country was intoxicated by a great surge of political energy. Re-discovering England’s wildernesses, the intellectuals of the “romantic generation” also discovered the plight of the common man, turning nature into a revolutionary force.

13. “Victoria and her sisters”

Broadcast 4 June 2002 and covering 1830–1910. As the Victorian era began, the massive advance of technology and industrialisation was rapidly reshaping both the landscape and the social structure of the whole country. To a much greater extent than ever before women would take a centre-stage role in shaping society.

14. “The empire of good intentions”

Broadcast 11 June 2002 and covering 1830–1925. This episode charts the chequered life of the liberal empire from Ireland to India – the promise of civilisation and material betterment and the delivery of coercion and famine.

15. “The two Winstons”

Broadcast 18 June 2002 and covering 1910–65. In the final episode, Schama examines the overwhelming presence of the past in the British twentieth century and the struggle of leaders to find a way to make a different national future. As towering figures of the twentieth century, Churchill and Orwell (through his 1984 character Winston Smith) in their different ways exemplify lives spent brooding and acting on that imperial past, and most movingly for us, writing and shaping its history. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_History_of_Britain_(TV_series)

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

A History of Britain: Episodes 1 Beginnings, 2 Conquest, 3 Dynasty, 4 Nations–Videos

A History of Britain: Episodes 5 King Death, 6 Burning Convictions, 7 The Body of The Queen, and 8 The British Wars–Videos

A History of Britain: Episodes 13 Victoria and Her Sisters, 14 Empire of Good Intentions, 15 The Two Winstons–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

A History of Britain–Episodes 5 King Death, 6 Burning Convictions, 7 The Body of The Queen, and 8 The British Wars–Videos

Posted on October 3, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Quotations, Raves, Religion, Taxes, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

A History Of Britain: Episode 5 King Death 1

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 5 King Death 2

 

A History of Britain: Episode 5 King Death 3

 

A History of Britain: Episode 5 King Death 4

 

A History of Britain: Episode 5 King Death 5

 

A History of Britain: Episode 5 King Death 6

 

A History of Britain: Episode 6 Burning Convictions 1

 

A History of Britain: Episode 6 Burning Convictions 2

 

A History of Britain: Episode 6 Burning Convictions 3

 

A History of Britain: Episode 6 Burning Convictions 4

 

A History of Britain: Episode 6 Burning Convictions 5

 

A History of Britain: Episode 6 Burning Convictions 6

 

A History of Britain: Episode 7 The Body of The Queen 1

 

A History of Britain: Episode 7 The Body of The Queen 2

 

A History of Britain: Episode 7 The Body of The Queen 3

 

A History of Britain: Episode 7 The Body of The Queen 4

 

A History of Britain: Episode 7 The Body of The Queen 5

 

A History of Britain: Episode 7 The Body of The Queen 6

 

A History of Britain: Episode 8  The British Wars 1

 

A History of Britain: Episode 8  The British Wars 2

 

A History of Britain: Episode 8  The British Wars 3

 

A History of Britain: Episode 8  The British Wars 4

 

A History of Britain: Episode 8  The British Wars 5

 

A History of Britain: Episode 8  The British Wars 6

Background Articles and Videos

A History of Britain 

“…A History of Britain is a BBC documentary series written and presented by Simon Schama, first transmitted in the United Kingdom from 30 September 2000.

A study of the history of the British Isles, each of the 15 episodes allows Schama to examine a particular period and tell of its events in his own style. All the programmes are of 59 minutes’ duration and were broadcast over three series, ending 18 June 2002.

The series was produced in conjunction with The History Channel and the executive producer was Martin Davidson. The music was composed by John Harle, whose work was augmented by vocal soloists such as Emma Kirkby and Lucie Skeaping. Schama’s illustrative presentation was aided by readings from actors, including Lindsay Duncan, Michael Kitchen, Christian Rodska, Samuel West and David Threlfall. …”

“…The following summaries are taken from the BBC DVD.

1. “Beginnings”

Covering the period 3100 BC – 1000 AD. Simon Schama starts his story in the stone age village of Skara Brae, Orkney. Over the next four thousand years Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Danes, and Christian missionaries arrive, fight, settle and leave their mark on what will become the nations of Britain.

2. “Conquest”

Broadcast 7 October 2000 and covering 1000–87. 1066 is not the best remembered date in British history for nothing. In the space of nine hours whilst the Battle of Hastings raged, everything changed. Anglo-Saxon England became Norman and, for the next 300 years, its fate was decided by dynasties of Norman rulers.

3. “Dynasty”

Broadcast 14 October 2000 and covering 1087–1216. There is no saga more powerful than that of the warring dynasty – domineering father, beautiful, scheming mother and squabbling, murderous sons and daughters, (particularly the nieces). In the years that followed the Norman Conquest, this was the drama played out on the stage of British history.

 4. “Nations”

Broadcast 21 October 2000 and covering 1216–1348, this is the epic account of how the nations of Britain emerged from under the hammer of England’s “Longshanks” King Edward I, with a sense of who and what they were, which endures to this day.

5. “King death”

Broadcast 28 October 2000 and covering 1348–1500. It took only six years for the plague to ravage the British Isles. Its impact was to last for generations. But from the ashes of this trauma an unexpected and unique class of Englishmen emerged.

6. “Burning convictions”

Broadcast 4 November 2000 and covering 1500–58. Here Simon Schama charts the upheaval caused as a country renowned for its piety, whose king styled himself Defender of the Faith, turns into one of the most aggressive proponents of the new Protestant faith.

7. “The body of the Queen”

Broadcast 8 November 2000 and covering 1558–1603. This is the story of two queens: Elizabeth I, the consummate politician, and Mary, Queen of Scots, the Catholic mother. It is also the story of the birth of a nation.

8. “The British wars”

Broadcast 8 May 2001 and covering 1603–49. The turbulent civil wars of the early seventeenth century would culminate in two events unique to British history; the public execution of a king and the creation of a republic. Schama tells of the brutal war that tore the country in half and created a new Britain – divided by politics and religion and dominated by the first truly modern army, fighting for ideology, not individual leaders.

9. “Revolutions”

Broadcast 15 May 2001 and covering 1649–89. Political and religious revolutions racked Britain after Charles I’s execution, when Britain was a joyless, kingless republic led by Oliver Cromwell. His rule became so unpopular that for many it was a relief when the monarchy was restored after his death, but Cromwell was also a man of vision who brought about significant reforms.

10. “Britannia incorporated”

Broadcast 22 May 2001 and covering 1690–1750. As the new century dawned, relations between Scotland and England had never been worse. Yet half a century later the two countries would be making a future together based on profit and interest. The new Britain was based on money, not God.

 11. “The wrong empire”

Broadcast 29 May 2001 and covering 1750–1800. The series is the exhilarating and terrible story of how the British Empire came into being through its early settlements—the Caribbean through the sugar plantations (and helped by slavery), the land that later became the United States and India through the British East India Company–and how it eventually came to dominate the world. A story of exploration and daring, but also one of exploitation, conflict, and loss.

12. “Forces of nature”

Broadcast 28 May 2002 and covering 1780–1832. Britain never had the kind of revolution experienced by France in 1789, but it did come close. In the mid-1770s the country was intoxicated by a great surge of political energy. Re-discovering England’s wildernesses, the intellectuals of the “romantic generation” also discovered the plight of the common man, turning nature into a revolutionary force.

13. “Victoria and her sisters”

Broadcast 4 June 2002 and covering 1830–1910. As the Victorian era began, the massive advance of technology and industrialisation was rapidly reshaping both the landscape and the social structure of the whole country. To a much greater extent than ever before women would take a centre-stage role in shaping society.

14. “The empire of good intentions”

Broadcast 11 June 2002 and covering 1830–1925. This episode charts the chequered life of the liberal empire from Ireland to India – the promise of civilisation and material betterment and the delivery of coercion and famine.

15. “The two Winstons”

Broadcast 18 June 2002 and covering 1910–65. In the final episode, Schama examines the overwhelming presence of the past in the British twentieth century and the struggle of leaders to find a way to make a different national future. As towering figures of the twentieth century, Churchill and Orwell (through his 1984 character Winston Smith) in their different ways exemplify lives spent brooding and acting on that imperial past, and most movingly for us, writing and shaping its history. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_History_of_Britain_(TV_series)

 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

A History of Britain: Episodes 1 Beginnings, 2 Conquest, 3 Dynasty, 4 Nations–Videos

A History of Britain: Episodes 9 Revolutions, 10 Britannia Incorporated, 11 The Wrong Empire, 12 Forces of Nature–Videos 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

A History of Britain: Episodes 1 Beginnings, 2 Conquest, 3 Dynasty, 4 Nations–Videos

Posted on October 3, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Culture, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Technology, Transportation, Video, War | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

A History Of Britain: Episode 1 Beginnings 1

A History Of Britain: Episode 1 Beginnings 2

A History Of Britain: Episode 1 Beginnings 3

A History Of Britain: Episode 1 Beginnings 4

A History Of Britain: Episode 1 Beginnings 5

A History Of Britain: Episode 1 Beginnings 6

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 2 Conquest 1

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 2 Conquest 2

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 2 Conquest 3

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 2 Conquest 4

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 2 Conquest 5

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 2 Conquest 6

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 3 Dynasty 1

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 3 Dynasty 2

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 3 Dynasty 3

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 3 Dynasty 4

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 3 Dynasty 5

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 3Dynasty 6

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 4 Nations 1

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 4 Nations 2

 

A History Of Britain Episode 4 Nations 3

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 4  Nations 4

 

A History Of Britain:  Episode 4 Nations 5

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 4 Nations 6

 

A History Of Britain: Episode 4 Nations 7

Background Articles and Videos

A History of Britain 

“…A History of Britain is a BBC documentary series written and presented by Simon Schama, first transmitted in the United Kingdom from 30 September 2000.

A study of the history of the British Isles, each of the 15 episodes allows Schama to examine a particular period and tell of its events in his own style. All the programmes are of 59 minutes’ duration and were broadcast over three series, ending 18 June 2002.

The series was produced in conjunction with The History Channel and the executive producer was Martin Davidson. The music was composed by John Harle, whose work was augmented by vocal soloists such as Emma Kirkby and Lucie Skeaping. Schama’s illustrative presentation was aided by readings from actors, including Lindsay Duncan, Michael Kitchen, Christian Rodska, Samuel West and David Threlfall. …”

“…The following summaries are taken from the BBC DVD.

1. “Beginnings”

Covering the period 3100 BC – 1000 AD. Simon Schama starts his story in the stone age village of Skara Brae, Orkney. Over the next four thousand years Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Danes, and Christian missionaries arrive, fight, settle and leave their mark on what will become the nations of Britain.

2. “Conquest”

Broadcast 7 October 2000 and covering 1000–87. 1066 is not the best remembered date in British history for nothing. In the space of nine hours whilst the Battle of Hastings raged, everything changed. Anglo-Saxon England became Norman and, for the next 300 years, its fate was decided by dynasties of Norman rulers.

3. “Dynasty”

Broadcast 14 October 2000 and covering 1087–1216. There is no saga more powerful than that of the warring dynasty – domineering father, beautiful, scheming mother and squabbling, murderous sons and daughters, (particularly the nieces). In the years that followed the Norman Conquest, this was the drama played out on the stage of British history.

 4. “Nations”

Broadcast 21 October 2000 and covering 1216–1348, this is the epic account of how the nations of Britain emerged from under the hammer of England’s “Longshanks” King Edward I, with a sense of who and what they were, which endures to this day.

5. “King death”

Broadcast 28 October 2000 and covering 1348–1500. It took only six years for the plague to ravage the British Isles. Its impact was to last for generations. But from the ashes of this trauma an unexpected and unique class of Englishmen emerged.

6. “Burning convictions”

Broadcast 4 November 2000 and covering 1500–58. Here Simon Schama charts the upheaval caused as a country renowned for its piety, whose king styled himself Defender of the Faith, turns into one of the most aggressive proponents of the new Protestant faith.

7. “The body of the Queen”

Broadcast 8 November 2000 and covering 1558–1603. This is the story of two queens: Elizabeth I, the consummate politician, and Mary, Queen of Scots, the Catholic mother. It is also the story of the birth of a nation.

8. “The British wars”

Broadcast 8 May 2001 and covering 1603–49. The turbulent civil wars of the early seventeenth century would culminate in two events unique to British history; the public execution of a king and the creation of a republic. Schama tells of the brutal war that tore the country in half and created a new Britain – divided by politics and religion and dominated by the first truly modern army, fighting for ideology, not individual leaders.

9. “Revolutions”

Broadcast 15 May 2001 and covering 1649–89. Political and religious revolutions racked Britain after Charles I’s execution, when Britain was a joyless, kingless republic led by Oliver Cromwell. His rule became so unpopular that for many it was a relief when the monarchy was restored after his death, but Cromwell was also a man of vision who brought about significant reforms.

10. “Britannia incorporated”

Broadcast 22 May 2001 and covering 1690–1750. As the new century dawned, relations between Scotland and England had never been worse. Yet half a century later the two countries would be making a future together based on profit and interest. The new Britain was based on money, not God.

 11. “The wrong empire”

Broadcast 29 May 2001 and covering 1750–1800. The series is the exhilarating and terrible story of how the British Empire came into being through its early settlements—the Caribbean through the sugar plantations (and helped by slavery), the land that later became the United States and India through the British East India Company–and how it eventually came to dominate the world. A story of exploration and daring, but also one of exploitation, conflict, and loss.

12. “Forces of nature”

Broadcast 28 May 2002 and covering 1780–1832. Britain never had the kind of revolution experienced by France in 1789, but it did come close. In the mid-1770s the country was intoxicated by a great surge of political energy. Re-discovering England’s wildernesses, the intellectuals of the “romantic generation” also discovered the plight of the common man, turning nature into a revolutionary force.

13. “Victoria and her sisters”

Broadcast 4 June 2002 and covering 1830–1910. As the Victorian era began, the massive advance of technology and industrialisation was rapidly reshaping both the landscape and the social structure of the whole country. To a much greater extent than ever before women would take a centre-stage role in shaping society.

14. “The empire of good intentions”

Broadcast 11 June 2002 and covering 1830–1925. This episode charts the chequered life of the liberal empire from Ireland to India – the promise of civilisation and material betterment and the delivery of coercion and famine.

15. “The two Winstons”

Broadcast 18 June 2002 and covering 1910–65. In the final episode, Schama examines the overwhelming presence of the past in the British twentieth century and the struggle of leaders to find a way to make a different national future. As towering figures of the twentieth century, Churchill and Orwell (through his 1984 character Winston Smith) in their different ways exemplify lives spent brooding and acting on that imperial past, and most movingly for us, writing and shaping its history. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_History_of_Britain_(TV_series)

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

A History of Britain: Episodes 5 King Death, 6 Burning Convictions, 7 The Body of The Queen, and 8 The British Wars–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Serendipity–Videos

Posted on September 22, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

SERENDIPITY PART 1

SERENDIPITY PART 2

SERENDIPITY PART 3

SERENDIPITY PART 4

SERENDIPITY PART 5

SERENDIPITY PART 6

SERENDIPITY PART 7

SERENDIPITY PART 8

SERENDIPITY PART 9

Background Articles and Videos

Serendipity

“…Serendipity is a propensity for making fortunate discoveries while looking for something unrelated. The word has been voted as one of the ten English words that were hardest to translate in June 2004 by a British translation company.[1] However, due to its sociological use, the word has been imported into many other languages.[2]

Etymology

The first noted use of this word was by Horace Walpole (1717-92). In a letter to Mann (dated Jan. 28) he said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale “The Three Princes of Serendip,” whose heroes “were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of.” The name stems either from Serendip, an old name for Ceylon (modern Sri Lanka),or from Arabic Sarandib, or from Skt. Simhaladvipa which literally translates to “Dwelling-Place-of-Lions Island.” [3]

Role in science and technology

One aspect of Walpole’s original definition of serendipity that is often missed in modern discussions of the word is the “sagacity” of being able to link together apparently innocuous facts to come to a valuable conclusion. Thus, while some scientists and inventors are reluctant about reporting accidental discoveries, others openly admit its role; in fact serendipity is a major component of scientific discoveries and inventions. According to M.K. Stoskopf[4] “it should be recognized that serendipitous discoveries are of significant value in the advancement of science and often present the foundation for important intellectual leaps of understanding”.

The amount of benefit contributed by serendipitous discoveries varies extensively among the several scientific disciplines. Pharmacology and chemistry are probably the fields where serendipity is more common.

Most authors who have studied scientific serendipity both in a historical, as well as in an epistemological point of view, agree that a prepared and open mind is required on the part of the scientist or inventor to detect the importance of information revealed accidentally. This is the reason why most of the related accidental discoveries occur in the field of specialization of the scientist. About this, Albert Hofmann, the Swiss chemist who discovered LSD properties by unintentionally ingesting it at his lab, wrote

It is true that my discovery of LSD was a chance discovery, but it was the outcome of planned experiments and these experiments took place in the framework of systematic pharmaceutical, chemical research. It could better be described as serendipity.

The French scientist Louis Pasteur also famously said: “In the fields of observation chance favors only the prepared mind.”[5] This is often rendered as “Chance favors the prepared mind.” William Shakespeare expressed the same sentiment 250 years earlier in act 4 of his play Henry V: “All things are ready if our minds be so.”

History, of course, does not record accidental exposures of information which could have resulted in a new discovery, and we are justified in suspecting that they are many. There are several examples of this, however, and prejudice of preformed concepts is probably the largest obstacle. See for example [6] for a case where this happened (the rejection of an accidental discovery in the field of self-stimulation of the limbic system in humans).

Role in economics

M. E. Graebner describes serendipitous value in the context of the acquisition of a business as “windfalls that were not anticipated by the buyer prior to the deal”: i.e., unexpected advantages or benefits incurred due to positive synergy effects of the merger.[citation needed] Ikujiro Nonaka (1991,p. 94 November-December issue of HBR) points out that the serendipitous quality of innovation is highly recognized by managers and links the success of Japanese enterprises to their ability to create knowledge not by processing information but rather by “tapping the tacit and often highly subjective insights, intuitions, and hunches of individual employees and making those insights available for testing and use by the company as a whole”.

Serendipity is a key concept in Competitive Intelligence because it is one of the tools for avoiding Blind Spots (seeBlindspots analysis)[7]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serendipity

Serendipity

“…Serendipity is a 2001 romantic comedy, starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale. It was written by Marc Klein and directed by Peter Chelsom. The original music score is composed by Alan Silvestri. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serendipity_%28film%29

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Movies

1984-Videos

A Brave New World–Videos

Battle of Waterloo–Videos

Before The Fall or Napola–Videos

The Chronicles of Narnia–Videos

The Chronicles Of Narnia – Prince Caspian–Videos

Dr. Strangelove–Videos

Ghostbusters–Videos

Ghostbusters 2–Videos

Rain Drops Keep Falling Upon My Head–40th Anniversity of The Release of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

Gattaca–Videos

Hitler: The Rise of Evil–Videos

Me and The Colonel–Videos

Outer Limits – Dead Man’s Switch –Videos

Pleasantville–Videos

Richard The Lionheart–Videos

Saving Private Ryan–Video

The Hitler Gang–Videos

The Patriot–Videos

The Wave–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Rush Limbaugh–Videos

Posted on August 26, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Books, Climate, College, Comedy, Communications, Computers, Crime, Culture, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Entertainment, Farming, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, Health Care, history, Homes, Immigration, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, Medicine, Monetary Policy, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics, Programming, Psychology, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Resources, Reviews, Science, Security, Sports, Strategy, Talk Radio, Taxes, Technology, Transportation, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

“I want anyone who believes in life, liberty, pursuit of happiness to succeed. And I want any force, any person, any element of an overarching Big Government that would stop your success, I want that organization, that element or that person to fail. I want you to succeed.” 

Part 1 Rush Limbaugh: Obama is Destroying the Economy

Part 2 Rush Limbaugh: Obama is Destroying the Economy

Rush Limbaugh’s Letter to President Obama

Rush Limbaugh on Greta (1 of 5): Obama Destroying the Economy on Purpose

Rush Limbaugh on Greta (2 of 5): Obama Destroying the Economy on Purpose

Rush Limbaugh on Greta (3 of 5): Obama Destroying the Economy on Purpose

Rush Limbaugh on Greta (4 of 5): Obama Destroying the Economy on Purpose

Rush Limbaugh on Greta (5 of 5): Obama Destroying the Economy on Purpose

Rush Limbaugh on Illegal Immigration

Rush Limbaugh: Global Warming is a hoax.

Rush Limbaugh speaks about “climate change” 1/8/10

Part 1: Rush Limbaugh on H.R. 2454: The Cap & Tax Travesty

Part 2: Rush Limbaugh on H.R. 2454: The Cap & Tax Travesty

Rush Limbaugh – Today Show (Part 1 of 3)

Rush Limbaugh – Today Show (Part 2 of 3)

Rush Limbaugh – Today Show (Part 3 of 3)

Rush Limbaugh: Barbara Walters’ 10 Most Fascinating People

Rush Limbaugh on Hannity (1 of 4): Still Wants Obama to Fail

Rush Limbaugh on Hannity (2 of 4): Still Wants Obama to Fail

Rush Limbaugh on Hannity (3 of 4): Still Wants Obama to Fail

Rush Limbaugh on Hannity (4 of 4): Still Wants Obama to Fail

Limbaugh Rails Against McCain

Rush Limbaugh: Anatomy of a Smear

 

“Most people’s historical perspective begins with the day of their birth.”

Background Articles and Videos

Rush Limbaugh – How Talk Radio Works

Rush Limbaugh- Why Conservatives own talk radio

Rush Limbaugh Interviews Mark Levin Part 1

Rush Limbaugh Interviews Mark Levin Part 2

Rush Limbaugh: Interview with Ann Coulter Part 1

Rush Limbaugh: Interview with Ann Coulter Part 2

Rush Limbaugh interview with Jimmy Carter

Rush Limbaugh VS Donahue Pozner Pt1

Rush Limbaugh VS Donahue Pozner Pt2

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Mark Levin–Videos

Rush Limbaugh’s Brillant Idea On Health Care–A Firing Line Debate Between–Barach Obama, Harry Reid, and Nancy Pelosi Vs. Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin and Paul Ryan–Take The Presidential Challenge!

Rush Limbaugh On The Obama Depression–Man Child–Narcissist

Rush Limbaugh Will Be Returning To Television In The Near Future? Inquiring Minds Would Like To Know.

The Revolt of The American People–Susan’s, A Mother of 7, Call To Rush Limbaugh–Millions of Americans Cheering!–Videos

Rush Limbaugh–Ditto Heads Delights–Videos

Rush Buries Barack–Videos

Rush Right–Obama Destroying the Economy on Purpose–Limbaugh Lambastes Leftists!

Rush Limbaugh Challenges President Barack Obama to An Open Debate On His Talk Radio Show!

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Ghostbusters 2–Videos

Posted on August 24, 2010. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , |

Ghostbusters 2 part 1

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 2

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 3

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 4

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 5

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 6

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 7

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 8

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 9

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 10

 

Ghostbusters 2 part 11

 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

1984-Videos

A Brave New World–Videos

Battle of Waterloo–Videos

Before The Fall or Napola–Videos

The Chronicles of Narnia–Videos

The Chronicles Of Narnia – Prince Caspian–Videos

Dr. Strangelove–Videos

Ghostbusters–Videos

Rain Drops Keep Falling Upon My Head–40th Anniversity of The Release of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

Gattaca–Videos

Hitler: The Rise of Evil–Videos

Me and The Colonel–Videos

Outer Limits – Dead Man’s Switch –Videos

Pleasantville–Videos

Saving Private Ryan–Video

The Hitler Gang–Videos

The Patriot–Videos

The Wave–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Ghostbusters–Videos

Posted on August 24, 2010. Filed under: Culture, Entertainment, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Philosophy, Politics | Tags: , , , , |

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 1/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 2/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 3/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 4/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 5/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 6/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 7/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 8/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 9/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 10/11)

 

Ghostbusters – Movie 1 (Part 11/11)

 

 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

1984-Videos

A Brave New World–Videos

Battle of Waterloo–Videos

Before The Fall or Napola–Videos

The Chronicles of Narnia–Videos

The Chronicles Of Narnia – Prince Caspian–Videos

Dr. Strangelove–Videos

Rain Drops Keep Falling Upon My Head–40th Anniversity of The Release of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

Gattaca–Videos

Hitler: The Rise of Evil–Videos

Me and The Colonel–Videos

Outer Limits – Dead Man’s Switch –Videos

Pleasantville–Videos

Saving Private Ryan–Video

The Hitler Gang–Videos

The Patriot–Videos

The Wave–Videos

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Sandy Denny–Videos

Posted on July 22, 2010. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Music, People, Philosophy, Quotations, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Who knows where the time goes – Fairport Convention

sandy denny – who knows where the time goes

 

Sandy Denny – The Music Weaver

Sandy Denny – Fhir A Bhata

Strawbs and Sandy Denny – Sail Away To The Sea

Sandy Denny Fotheringay Eppie Moray

Fotheringay – The Way I Feel (vinyl 1970)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwAwA9Hh6tA&feature=related

 

Sandy Denny Percy’s song BBC-sessions Fairport Convention

Sandy Denny One more chance (live – 1977)

Sandy Denny

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Rd_gMrmf6g 

 

SANDY DENNY Lowlands of Holland (rare )

‘Easy to Slip’ ~ Sandy Denny


 

Fotheringay – Banks of the Nile (vinyl 1970)

The Quiet Joys of Brotherhood – Sandy Denny

Sandy Denny – Pretty Polly (Alternate Take)

SANDY DENNY ” S☮ Long ” ( rare audio )

Sandy Denny – Milk and Honey

Sandy Denny – The Optimist (vinyl 1971)

Sandy Denny – Late November (vinyl 1971)

Sandy Denny – Wretched Wilbur (vinyl 1971)

 

Sandy Denny – Crazy Lady Blues – Live 1971

Sandy Denny – Blackwaterside (vinyl 1971)

SANDY DENNY – LISTEN,LISTEN

Background Articles and Videos

Sandy Denny

“..Sandy Denny (6 January 1947 – 21 April 1978), born Alexandra Elene Maclean Denny, was an English singer and songwriter who has been described by Allmusic’s Richie Unterberger as “the pre-eminent British folk rock singer”.[1]

Denny is considered a founder of the British folk rock movement and perhaps its most important female singer, songwriter and personality. Over a ten year career Sandy Denny left an extensive legacy and remains influential. She is remembered for her pivotal involvement with the British folk rock scene, where, as a member of Fairport Convention, she moved the band away from west coast American cover versions and into performing traditional material and original compositions.

Denny is also remembered as a composer most notably on her solo albums which represent her claim to be Britain’s finest female singer-songwriter, as asserted by the Sunday Express, Uncut and Mojo.[2] Her composition, “Who Knows Where the Time Goes?”, has been covered by numerous artists as diverse as Judy Collins, Nina Simone and Cat Power and is now regarded as a classic. Famous also for her exceptional voice, it has been suggested that her effortless and smooth vocal delivery still sets the standard for many of today’s female folk-based singers.[3][4]

She is also noted for her duet with Robert Plant on the song “The Battle of Evermore” from Led Zeppelin’s fourth album released in 1971. She remains to this day the only guest vocalist on a Led Zeppelin album. …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Denny

Sandy Denny: A Short Biography

http://www.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/~zierke/sandy.denny/biography.html

Sandy Denny Official Web Site

http://sandydenny.org.uk/

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Posted on July 12, 2010. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, Entertainment, history, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Raves, Technology, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Breakin’ Up Is Hard To Do – Neil Sedaka

Neil Sedaka HAPPY BIRTHDAY SWEET 16

Oh! Carol – Neil Sedaka

Neil Sedaka “Calendar Girl” (Scopitone)

 

 

Captain and Tenille & Neil Sedaka – Love Will Keep Us Together

LITTLE DEVIL : Neil Sedaka Live in Vina del Mar Festival Chile 1980

ONE WAY TICKET (To The Blues -: Neil Sedaka Live in Vina del Mar Festival Chile 1980

‘STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN : Neil Sedaka Live in Vina del Mar Festival Chile 1980

Oh! Carol – Neil Sedaka

Laughter in the rain

Happy birthday sweet sixteen

Neil Sedaka – Bad Blood

Neil Sedaka – our last song together (live)

Neil Sedaka – Calendar Girl

Neil Sedaka – Solitaire

NEIL SEDAKA (Live) – Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Neil Sedaka – Is This The Way To Amarillo


Neil Sedaka – The Hungry Years


Neil Sedaka New Appearance LUNCH WILL KEEP US TOGETHER + BREAKING UP IS HARD TO DO

CALENDAR GIRL – NEIL SEDAKA

♫♪ CLASSICALLY SEDAKA LIVE Chopin Etude No 3 in E Major

♫♪ CLASSICALLY SEDAKA LIVE – Chopin’s Fantaisie Impromptu

♫♪ CLASSICALLY SEDAKA LIVE – Rachmaninov Rhapsody & Variations

♫♪ CLASSICALLY SEDAKA LIVE – Verdi’s ‘Sempre Libera’

♫♪ CLASSICALLY SEDAKA LIVE ♫♪♫♪ CLaire De Lune – Debussy

♫♪ CLASSICALLY SEDAKA Beethoven Fur Elise & Liszt Liebestraume

Waking Up Is Hard To Do – Neil Sedaka

Background Articles and Videos

Neil Sedaka

“…Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter. His career has spanned over 50 years, during which time he has written many songs for himself and others, often working with lyricists Howard Greenfield and Phil Cody.

Sedaka was born in Brooklyn, New York. His father, Mac Sedaka, a taxi driver, was the son of Turkish Jewish immigrants (“Sedaka” is a variant of tzedaka — Hebrew for charity); his mother, Eleanor (Appel) Sedaka, was of Polish-Russian Jewish descent. He grew up in an apartment in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn.[1] He is the cousin of singer Eydie Gorme. [citation needed]

He demonstrated musical aptitude in his second-grade choral class, and when his teacher sent a note home suggesting he take piano lessons, his mother took a part-time job in an Abraham & Straus department store for six months to pay for a second-hand upright. He took to the instrument immediately. In 1947, he auditioned successfully for a piano scholarship to the Juilliard School of Music’s Preparatory Division for Children, which he attended on Saturdays. He also maintained an interest in popular music, and when he was 13, a neighbor heard him playing and introduced him to her 16-year-old son, Howard Greenfield, an aspiring poet and lyricist. The two began writing together.

The best-known Billboard Hot 100 hits of his early career are “The Diary” (#14, 1958), a song that he offered to Little Anthony and the Imperials; “Oh! Carol” (#9, 1959); “You Mean Everything to Me” (#17, 1960); “Calendar Girl” (#4, 1960); “Stairway to Heaven” (#9, 1960); “Run Samson Run” (top 30, 1960); “Little Devil” (#11, 1961); “Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen” (#6, 1961); “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do” (#1, 1962); and “Next Door to an Angel” (#5, 1962). “Oh! Carol” refers to Sedaka’s Brill Building compatriot and former girlfriend Carole King. King responded with her answer song, “Oh, Neil” and, by using the same chord progression, “Will You Love Me Tomorrow”. A Scopitone exists for “Calendar Girl”.

A similar sharing came earlier with Sedaka and singer Connie Francis. As Francis explains at her concerts, she began searching for a new hit after her 1958 single “Who’s Sorry Now?”. She was introduced to Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, who played every ballad they had written for her. Francis began writing her diary while the two played the last of their songs. After they finished, Francis told them they wrote beautiful ballads but that they were too intellectual for the young generation. Sedaka suggested to Greenfield a song they had written that morning for a girl group. Greenfield protested because the song had been promised to the girl group, but Sedaka insisted on playing “Stupid Cupid”. Francis told them they had just played her new hit. Francis’ song reached #14 on the Billboard charts.

While Francis was in writing her diary, Sedaka asked her if he could read what she had written. After she refused, Sedaka was inspired to write “The Diary”, his first hit single. Sedaka and Greenfield wrote many of Connie Francis’ hits such as “Fallin'” and “Where the Boys Are”.

In 1961, Sedaka began to record some of his hits in Italian. At first he published “Esagerata” and “Un Giorno Inutile”, local versions of “Little Devil” and “I Must Be Dreaming”. Other recordings were to follow, such as “Tu Non Lo Sai” (“Breaking Up Is Hard to Do”), “Il Re Dei Pagliacci” (“King of Clowns”), “I Tuoi Capricci” (“Look Inside Your Heart”), and “La Terza Luna” (“Waiting For Never”) to name only a few. Sedaka also recorded in Spanish, German, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Japanese.

Between 1960 and 1962, Sedaka had eight Top 40 hits, but he was one of many American performers of the era whose popularity declined due to the British Invasion and the evolution of the Rock and Pop genres of music. His commercial success declined rapidly after 1964: he scored only two minor hits in 1965, and none of his 1966 singles charted. His RCA contract was not renewed when it ended in 1967, and he was left without a record label.

Although Sedaka’s stature as a recording artist was at a low ebb in the late 1960s, he was able to maintain his career through songwriting. Thanks to the fact that his publisher, Aldon Music, was acquired by Screen Gems, two of his songs were recorded by The Monkees, and other hits in this period written by Sedaka included The Cyrkle’s version of “We Had a Good Thing Goin'” and “Workin’ on a Groovy Thing”, a Top 40 R&B hit for Patti Drew in 1968 and a US Top 20 hit for The 5th Dimension in 1969. Also, “Make the Music Play” was included on Frankie Valli’s charting album Timeless.

On an episode of the quiz show I’ve Got a Secret in 1965, Sedaka’s secret was that he was to represent the United States in classical piano at the Tchaikovsky competition in Moscow, and he played “Fantasie Impromptu” on the show. Panelist Henry Morgan made a point that the Russians, at least older ones, hated rock and roll. Sedaka’s participation in the competition, which Van Cliburn had won in 1958, was canceled by the USSR because of Sedaka’s rock and roll connection.[original research?]

Sedaka also made an appearance in the 1968 movie “Playgirl Killer”, with a scene of him performing a song called “The Waterbug” …”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Sedaka

Neil Sedaka interviewed at CBS News

Neil Sedaka Plays Chopin on I’ve Got a Secret!

“Words and Music with Lich” Interviews Neil Sedaka

Neil Sedaka Should’ve Never Let You Go (with Dara Sedaka)

Neil Sedaka & Don Kirshner – The Brill Building Days…

GUYS NAMED NEIL FROM BROOKLYN NEW YORK

Neil Sedaka sings “Yiddishe Mama” on the Chabad “To Life!” Telethon

NEIL SEDAKA Dinosaur Pet – From the new album ‘Waking Up Is Hard To Do’

Live It All Again, NEIL SEDAKA The 2009 Salsa Song

 

NEIL SEDAKA Looking Back at the Hits


 

Related Posts On Pronk Palisades

Abba–Videos

The Animals–Videos

Joan Baez–Videos

The Beach Boys–Videos

The Beatles–Videos

Bee Gees–Videos

The Byrds–Videos

Mariah Carey–Videos

Johnny Cash–Videos

Ray Charles–Videos

Joe Cocker–Videos

Nat King Cole–Videos

Judy Collins–Videos

Perry Como–Videos

Sam Cooke–Videos

Sandy Denny–Videos

John Denver–Videos

Celine Dion–Videos

The Doors–Videos

Bob Dylan–Videos

Eagles–Video

Marianne Faithfull–Videos

Roberta Flack–Videos

Aretha Franklin–Videos

Marvin Gaye-Videos

Michael Jackson and Jackson Five–Videos

Elton John–Videos

Janis Joplan–Videos

The Kinks–Videos

Led Zeppelin–Videos

Little Richard–Videos

The Lovin’ Spoonful–Videos

The Mamas and Papas–Videos

Barry Manilow–Videos

Johnny Mathis–Videos

Don McLean–Videos

Bette Midler–Videos

Joni Mitchell–Videos

Olivia Newton-John–Videos

Roy Orbison–Videos

The Platters–Videos

Elvis Presley–Videos

Queen–Videos

Otis Redding–Videos

Lionel Richie–Videos

The Righteous Brothers–Videos

The Rolling Stones–Videos

Linda Ronstadt–Videos

Neil Sedaka–Videos

Diana Ross and The Supremes–Videos

Carly Simon–Videos

Simon & Garfunkel–Videos

Frank Sinatra–Videos

Dusty Springfield–Videos

Bruce Springsteen–Videos

Rod Stewart–Videos

Barbra Streisand–Videos

Songs

Singers and Songs: Musical Artists–Videos

Donna Summer–Videos

Switchfoot–Videos

James Taylor–Videos

Tina Turner–Videos

Shania Twain–Videos

Village People–Videos

Hayley Westenra–Videos

Steve Winwood–Videos

Stevie Wonder–Videos

Tammy Wynette–Videos

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

« Previous Entries

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 613 other followers