Archive for January, 2013

The Coming Obama Recession — Real Recession — Real Recovery Needed –Videos

Posted on January 30, 2013. Filed under: Agriculture, American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, Inflation, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Monetary Policy, Money, Natural Gas, Oil, People, Philosophy, Politics, Public Sector, Radio, Raves, Regulations, Resources, Security, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Taxes, Unemployment, Unions, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom |

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JobLossesJan2013

http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2013/02/january-employment-report-157000-jobs.html

Table 1.1.1. Percent Change From Preceding Period in Real Gross Domestic Product

[Percent] Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

Last Revised on: January 30, 2013 – Next Release Date February 28, 2013

Line 2010 2011 2012
I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV
1 Gross domestic product 2.3 2.2 2.6 2.4 0.1 2.5 1.3 4.1 2.0 1.3 3.1 -0.1
2 Personal consumption expenditures 2.5 2.6 2.5 4.1 3.1 1.0 1.7 2.0 2.4 1.5 1.6 2.2
3 Goods 5.2 3.3 3.8 7.9 5.4 -1.0 1.4 5.4 4.7 0.3 3.6 4.6
4 Durable goods 5.5 10.5 7.2 15.2 7.3 -2.3 5.4 13.9 11.5 -0.2 8.9 13.9
5 Nondurable goods 5.1 0.1 2.2 4.5 4.6 -0.3 -0.4 1.8 1.6 0.6 1.2 0.4
6 Services 1.2 2.3 1.9 2.3 2.0 1.9 1.8 0.3 1.3 2.1 0.6 0.9
7 Gross private domestic investment 19.8 14.6 16.4 -5.9 -5.3 12.5 5.9 33.9 6.1 0.7 6.6 -0.6
8 Fixed investment -0.9 14.5 -1.0 7.6 -1.3 12.4 15.5 10.0 9.8 4.5 0.9 9.7
9 Nonresidential 2.1 12.3 7.7 9.2 -1.3 14.5 19.0 9.5 7.5 3.6 -1.8 8.4
10 Structures -23.0 13.1 -2.2 9.3 -28.2 35.2 20.7 11.5 12.9 0.6 0.0 -1.1
11 Equipment and software 14.7 12.0 11.9 9.2 11.1 7.8 18.3 8.8 5.4 4.8 -2.6 12.4
12 Residential -11.4 23.1 -28.6 1.5 -1.4 4.1 1.4 12.1 20.5 8.5 13.5 15.3
13 Change in private inventories
14 Net exports of goods and services
15 Exports 5.9 9.6 9.7 10.0 5.7 4.1 6.1 1.4 4.4 5.3 1.9 -5.7
16 Goods 9.9 11.9 9.0 11.2 5.7 3.7 6.2 6.0 4.0 7.0 1.1 -7.9
17 Services -2.2 4.5 11.1 7.4 5.8 5.1 6.1 -8.8 5.2 1.1 4.0 -0.1
18 Imports 10.4 20.2 13.9 0.0 4.3 0.1 4.7 4.9 3.1 2.8 -0.6 -3.2
19 Goods 12.2 24.7 14.1 1.1 5.2 -0.7 2.9 6.3 2.0 2.9 -1.2 -2.7
20 Services 2.4 1.2 12.9 -5.0 -0.6 4.2 13.8 -1.7 9.0 2.3 2.6 -5.4
21 Government consumption expenditures and gross investment -3.1 2.8 -0.3 -4.4 -7.0 -0.8 -2.9 -2.2 -3.0 -0.7 3.9 -6.6
22 Federal 0.6 9.7 3.7 -4.1 -10.3 2.8 -4.3 -4.4 -4.2 -0.2 9.5 -15.0
23 National defense -3.7 7.3 7.2 -6.1 -14.3 8.3 2.6 -10.6 -7.1 -0.2 12.9 -22.2
24 Nondefense 10.1 14.6 -3.1 0.0 -1.7 -7.5 -17.4 10.2 1.8 -0.4 3.0 1.4
25 State and local -5.5 -1.4 -2.9 -4.6 -4.7 -3.2 -2.0 -0.7 -2.2 -1.0 0.3 -0.7
Addendum:
26 Gross domestic product, current dollars 3.9 4.1 4.6 4.5 2.2 5.2 4.3 4.2 4.2 2.8 5.9 0.5

Peter Schiff on Negative 4th QTR GDP “The Temporary Euphoria Of The Stimulus

Marc Faber ‘Correction is Overdue’

GDP Drops -0.1% In 4th Quarter – State Of The Economy – America In Crisis!

Surprise Q4 fall in US GDP

Rick Santelli Reacts To Negative Fourth Quarter GDP Growth: ‘We Have Become

The Economy Shrank 0.1% Last Quarter – That’s Not Good IMO – John D. Villarreal

Carney: GDP report not “good news” 

US GDP drop dents FTSE’s good form–  IG’s Afternoon Market Headlines 30.01.13

 

US economy shrinks for first time since 2009. 

John Williams: We’re Going to be in a New Recession in 2013 

Marc Faber. – US Economy 100% Chance of Another Recession

Recession Risks: UK heads for triple-dip as GDP shrinks

Background Articles and Videos

EMBARGOED UNTIL RELEASE AT 8:30 A.M. EST, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2013

BEA 13-02

* See the navigation bar at the right side of the news release text for links to data tables, contact personnel and their telephone numbers, and supplementary materials.

<!—-><!—-><!—->

Lisa S. Mataloni: (202) 606-5304 (GDP) gdpniwd@bea.gov
Andrew Hodge: (202) 606-5564 (Profits) cpniwd@bea.gov
Recorded message: (202) 606-5306
Brent Moulton: (202) 606-9606 (Annual Revision)
Bob Kornfeld: (202) 606-9285
Ralph Stewart: (202) 606-2649 (News Media)
Jeannine Aversa: (202) 606-2649 (News Media)
National Income and Product Accounts Gross Domestic Product, 4th quarter and annual 2012 (advance estimate)
      Real gross domestic product -- the output of goods and services produced by labor and property
located in the United States -- decreased at an annual rate of 0.1 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012
(that is, from the third quarter to the fourth quarter), according to the "advance" estimate released by the
Bureau of Economic Analysis.  In the third quarter, real GDP increased 3.1 percent.

      The Bureau emphasized that the fourth-quarter advance estimate released today is based on
source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency (see the box on page 4
and the "Comparisons of Revisions to GDP" on page 5).  The "second" estimate for the fourth quarter,
based on more complete data, will be released on February 28, 2013.

      The decrease in real GDP in the fourth quarter primarily reflected negative contributions from
private inventory investment, federal government spending, and exports that were partly offset by
positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment,
and residential fixed investment.  Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, decreased.

	The downturn in real GDP in the fourth quarter primarily reflected downturns in private
inventory investment, in federal government spending, in exports, and in state and local government
spending that were partly offset by an upturn in nonresidential fixed investment, a larger decrease in
imports, and an acceleration in PCE.

      Final sales of computers added 0.15 percentage point to the fourth-quarter change in real GDP
after adding 0.11 percentage point to the third-quarter change.  Motor vehicle output added 0.04
percentage point to the fourth-quarter change in real GDP after subtracting 0.25 percentage point from
the third-quarter change.

_____________
      FOOTNOTE.  Quarterly estimates are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, unless otherwise
specified.  Quarter-to-quarter dollar changes are differences between these published estimates.  Percent
changes are calculated from unrounded data and are annualized.  "Real" estimates are in chained (2005)
dollars.  Price indexes are chain-type measures.

      This news release is available on www.bea.gov along with the Technical Notes and Highlights
related to this release.
_____________

      The price index for gross domestic purchases, which measures prices paid by U.S. residents,
increased 1.3 percent in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of 1.4 percent in the third.
Excluding food and energy prices, the price index for gross domestic purchases increased 1.1 percent in
the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of 1.2 percent in the third.

      Real personal consumption expenditures increased 2.2 percent in the fourth quarter, compared
with an increase of 1.6 percent in the third.  Durable goods increased 13.9 percent, compared with an
increase of 8.9 percent.  Nondurable goods increased 0.4 percent, compared with an increase of 1.2
percent.  Services increased 0.9 percent, compared with an increase of 0.6 percent.

      Real nonresidential fixed investment increased 8.4 percent in the fourth quarter, in contrast to a
decrease of 1.8 percent in the third.  Nonresidential structures decreased 1.1 percent; it was unchanged
in the third quarter.  Equipment and software increased 12.4 percent in the fourth quarter, in contrast to a
decrease of 2.6 percent in the third.  Real residential fixed investment increased 15.3 percent, compared
with an increase of 13.5 percent.

      Real exports of goods and services decreased 5.7 percent in the fourth quarter, in contrast to an
increase of 1.9 percent in the third.  Real imports of goods and services decreased 3.2 percent, compared
with a decrease of 0.6 percent.

      Real federal government consumption expenditures and gross investment decreased 15.0 percent
in the fourth quarter, in contrast to an increase of 9.5 percent in the third.  National defense decreased
22.2 percent, in contrast to an increase of 12.9 percent.  Nondefense increased 1.4 percent, compared
with an increase of 3.0 percent.  Real state and local government consumption expenditures and gross
investment decreased 0.7 percent, in contrast to an increase of 0.3 percent.

      The change in real private inventories subtracted 1.27 percentage points from the fourth-quarter
change in real GDP after adding 0.73 percentage point to the third-quarter change.  Private businesses
increased inventories $20.0 billion in the fourth quarter, following increases of $60.3 billion in the third
and $41.4 billion in the second.

      Real final sales of domestic product -- GDP less change in private inventories -- increased 1.1
percent in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of 2.4 percent in the third.

Gross domestic purchases

      Real gross domestic purchases -- purchases by U.S. residents of goods and services wherever
produced -- increased 0.1 percent in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of 2.6 percent in the
third.

Disposition of personal income

      Current-dollar personal income increased $256.2 billion (7.9 percent) in the fourth quarter,
compared with an increase of $72.7 billion (2.2 percent) in the third.  The acceleration in personal
income primarily reflected a sharp acceleration in personal dividend income, an upturn in personal
interest income, and an acceleration in wage and salary disbursements.   The sharp acceleration in
personal dividend income reflected accelerated and special dividends that were paid by many companies
in the fourth quarter in anticipation of changes in individual income tax rates.  The upturn in personal
interest income primarily reflected an upturn in interest rates for Treasury Inflation Protected Securities.
The acceleration in wages and salaries reflected the pattern of monthly Bureau of Labor Statistics
employment, hours, and earnings data for the fourth quarter, as well as a judgmental estimate of
accelerated compensation in the form of bonus payments and other irregular pay in the fourth quarter.

      Personal current taxes increased $21.0 billion in the fourth quarter, compared with an increase of
$10.0 billion in the third.

      Disposable personal income increased $235.2 billion (8.1 percent) in the fourth quarter,
compared with an increase of $62.7 billion (2.1 percent) in the third.  Real disposable personal income
increased 6.8 percent, compared with an increase of 0.5 percent.

      Personal outlays increased $95.0 billion (3.3 percent) in the fourth quarter, compared with an
increase of $88.6 billion (3.1 percent) in the third.  Personal saving -- disposable personal income less
personal outlays -- was $570.0 billion in the fourth quarter, compared with $429.8 billion in the third.
The personal saving rate -- personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income -- was 4.7
percent in the fourth quarter, compared with 3.6 percent in the third.  For a comparison of personal
saving in BEA’s national income and product accounts with personal saving in the Federal Reserve
Board’s flow of funds accounts and data on changes in net worth, go to
www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/Nipa-Frb.asp.

Current-dollar GDP

      Current-dollar GDP -- the market value of the nation's output of goods and services -- increased
0.5 percent, or $18.0 billion, in the fourth quarter to a level of $15,829.0 billion.  In the third quarter,
current-dollar GDP increased 5.9 percent, or $225.4 billion.

2012 GDP

	Real GDP increased 2.2 percent in 2012 (that is, from the 2011 annual level to the 2012 annual
level), compared with an increase of 1.8 percent in 2011.

      The increase in real GDP in 2012 primarily reflected positive contributions from personal
consumption expenditures (PCE), nonresidential fixed investment, exports, residential fixed investment,
and private inventory investment that were partly offset by negative contributions from federal
government spending and from state and local government spending. Imports, which are a subtraction in
the calculation of GDP, increased.

      The acceleration in real GDP in 2012 primarily reflected a deceleration in imports, upturns in
residential fixed investment and in private inventory investment, and smaller decreases in state and local
government spending and in federal government spending that were partly offset by decelerations in
PCE, exports, and nonresidential fixed investment.

      The price index for gross domestic purchases increased 1.7 percent in 2012, compared with an
increase of 2.5 percent in 2011.

      Current-dollar GDP increased 4.0 percent, or $600.3 billion, in 2012, compared with an increase
of 4.0 percent, or $576.8 billion, in 2011.

      During 2012 (that is, measured from the fourth quarter of 2011 to the fourth quarter of 2012) real
GDP increased 1.5 percent.  Real GDP increased 2.0 percent during 2011.  The price index for gross
domestic purchases increased 1.5 percent during 2012, compared with an increase of 2.5 percent during
2011.

______________
      BOX.  Information on the assumptions used for unavailable source data is provided in a technical note
that is posted with the news release on BEA's Web site.  Within a few days after the release, a detailed
"Key Source Data and Assumptions" file is posted on the Web site.  In the middle of each month, an
analysis of the current quarterly estimate of GDP and related series is made available on the Web site;
click on Survey of Current Business, "GDP and the Economy."  For information on revisions, see
"Revisions to GDP, GDI, and Their Major Components."
______________

      BEA's national, international, regional, and industry estimates; the Survey of Current Business;
and BEA news releases are available without charge on BEA's Web site at www.bea.gov. By visiting the
site, you can also subscribe to receive free e-mail summaries of BEA releases and announcements.

                                         *          *          *

                           Next release -- February 28, 2013, at 8:30 A.M. EST for:
                        Gross Domestic Product:  Fourth Quarter and Annual 2012 (Second Estimate)

Release Dates in 2013

           		2012: IV and 2012 annual    	2013: I     	2013: II          2013: III

Gross Domestic Product
Advance..........		January 30            	April 26	July 31		  October 30
Second...........		February 28          	May 30          August 29	  November 26
Third............ 		March 28                June 26     	September 26	  December 20

Corporate Profits
Preliminary......		........                May 30          August 29	  November 26
Revised.......... 		March 28                June 26         September 26	  December 20

                                        Comparisons of Revisions to GDP

     Quarterly estimates of GDP are released on the following schedule:  the "advance" estimate, based on
source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency, is released near the end of the
first month after the end of the quarter; as more detailed and more comprehensive data become available,
the "second" and "third" estimates are released near the end of the second and third months, respectively.
The "latest"” estimate reflects the results of both annual and comprehensive revisions.

     Annual revisions, which generally cover the quarters of the 3 most recent calendar years, are usually carried
out each summer and incorporate newly available major annual source data.  Comprehensive (or benchmark)
revisions are carried out at about 5-year intervals and incorporate major periodic source data, as well as
improvements in concepts and methods that update the accounts to portray more accurately the evolving U.S.
economy.

The table below shows comparisons of the revisions between quarterly percent changes of current-dollar
and of real GDP for the different vintages of the estimates.  From the advance estimate to the second estimate (one
month later), the average revision to real GDP without regard to sign is 0.5 percentage point, while from the
advance estimate to the third estimate (two months later), it is 0.6 percentage point.  From the advance estimate to
the latest estimate, the average revision without regard to sign is 1.3 percentage points.  The average revision
(with regard to sign) from the advance estimate to the latest estimate is 0.2 percentage point, which is larger
than the average revisions from the advance estimate to the second or to the third estimates.  The larger average
revisions to the latest estimate reflect the fact that comprehensive revisions include major improvements, such as
the incorporation of BEA’s latest benchmark input-output accounts.  The quarterly estimates correctly indicate the
direction of change of real GDP 97 percent of the time, correctly indicate whether GDP is accelerating or
decelerating 72 percent of the time, and correctly indicate whether real GDP growth is above, near, or below trend
growth more than four-fifths of the time.

                           Revisions Between Quarterly Percent Changes of GDP: Vintage Comparisons
                                                     [Annual rates]

       Vintages                                   Average         Average without     Standard deviation of
       compared                                                    regard to sign      revisions without
                                                                                         regard to sign

____________________________________________________Current-dollar GDP_______________________________________________

Advance to second....................               0.2                 0.6                  0.4
Advance to third.....................                .1                  .7                   .4
Second to third......................                .0                  .3                   .2

Advance to latest....................                .3                 1.2                  1.0

________________________________________________________Real GDP_____________________________________________________

Advance to second....................               0.1                 0.5                  0.4
Advance to third.....................                .1                  .6                   .5
Second to third......................                .0                  .2                   .2

Advance to latest....................                .2                 1.3                  1.0

NOTE.  These comparisons are based on the period from 1983 through 2009.

Recovery Shows a Soft Spot

GDP Shrinks 0.1% on Government Cuts, but Consumer, Business Spending Offer Hope

By JOSH  MITCHELL

“…The U.S. economy shrank for the first time in more than three years in the fourth quarter, underscoring the halting nature of the recovery. But the strength of consumer spending and business investment suggested that the economy will grow, albeit slowly, this year.

Gross domestic product—the broadest measure of goods and services churned out by the economy—fell at a 0.1% annual rate in the fourth quarter of 2012, according to the government’s initial estimate out Wednesday.

The details weren’t as discouraging as the headline. The drop, a surprise, was driven by a sharp fall in government spending and by businesses putting fewer goods on warehouse shelves, as well as by a decline in exports. The mainstays of the domestic private economy—housing, consumer spending and business investment in equipment and software—were stronger.

to the economy, even though it expected a return to moderate growth in the months ahead.

The U.S. joined other advanced economies in reporting contractions in the final months of last year. The U.K., Germany, Spain and Belgium have said their economies shrank in the fourth quarter, and several more euro-zone members in coming weeks are expected to report their own declines. Budget cuts appear to be a leading factor driving the contractions in many of those nations.

Deficit cutting in advanced economies is an important reason why global growth is expected to barely improve this year. The International Monetary Fund last week projected global growth of just 3.5% this year, a slight pickup from the estimated 3.2% growth in 2012, due partly to budget tightening in the U.S. and Europe. The International Monetary Fund expects advanced economies to expand just 1.4% this year, compared with 5.5% growth among developing economies.

[image]

Wednesday’s GDP report portrayed an economy stuck in low gear. For 2012, the economy grew 2.2%, up from the 1.8% growth of 2011, but still below the roughly 3% pace notched during healthier times.

For now, the economy is riding largely on the backs of consumers. Consumer spending, adjusted for inflation, increased at a 2.2% rate in the fourth quarter, up from 1.6% in the third. That included a jump in spending on durable goods, which are big-ticket items such as cars and refrigerators.

One thing that is helping consumers: They are starting to see substantial income gains after years of stagnation. The GDP report showed after-tax income rose at a rate of 6.8%, adjusted for inflation, the fastest pace since the recession.

One company benefiting from stronger consumer spending is Nando’s Peri-Peri USA, a closely held chain of chicken restaurants in the Washington, D.C., area. Same-store sales rose roughly 5% in the final months of 2012 compared with a year ago, said Chief Executive Burton Heiss.

Mr. Heiss said he believes consumers are feeling more secure as housing and other parts of the economy improve. Higher home prices, for example, might be giving consumers the confidence to spend more freely on going out. Mr. Heiss added that the strength seems to be continuing: Sales have picked up slightly since the start of the year.

U.S. companies stepped up investment in equipment and software during the quarter, with business investment rising at a rate of 8.4%, the strongest pace in a year. That defied expectations that companies would pull back due to worries over the “fiscal cliff” budget dispute in Washington.

Still, those factors weren’t strong enough to overcome declines in federal spending and exports and slower inventory growth.

The slower inventory investment was the biggest factor behind the contraction. Businesses essentially sold items from warehouse shelves, rather than placing new orders with manufacturers.

That may have been due to inventory accumulating too quickly last summer and some businesses becoming extra cautious about restocking. The upside is that with inventory levels now depleted, many businesses will be forced to replenish, possibly boosting growth in the current quarter.

Meanwhile, government spending, which has been a drag on growth for more than two years, declined for the ninth time in 10 quarters. The biggest cuts came in military spending, which tumbled at a rate of 22.2%, the largest drop since 1972. But state and local spending also fell, dashing hopes of stabilization after a rare increase in the third quarter.

Military analysts said the decline likely was a result of pressure on the Pentagon from a number of areas.

Among them: reductions in spending on the war in Afghanistan as it winds down, a downturn in planned military spending, a constraint placed on the Pentagon budget because the federal government is operating on short-term resolutions that limit spending growth, as well as concern that further cuts may be in the pipeline.

Pentagon officials already have imposed tighter controls on military spending to deal with the challenges.

David Berteau, a former Defense Department official who now heads the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said he was surprised by the sharp drop and predicted that persistent uncertainty about the defense budget would continue to be a drag on the national economy.

“Is this a blip in the data or is it a trend?” he said. “I think you’re seeing a trend.”

The effect of defense cuts on the economy in the fourth quarter likely raises the stakes of looming budget fights between the White House and congressional Republicans. The White House said the GDP report showed the need for Congress to avoid “self-inflicted wounds” and reach a deal.

Companies tied to the defense industry already are bracing for cuts.

Noel McCormick, president of McCormick Stevenson, a small engineering firm in Clearwater, Fla., that designs weapons for major defense contractors, said big clients have told him they may resort to layoffs and cut spending if cuts happen.

That would have a “tremendous” impact on McCormick’s 12-person company, he said, likely causing it to cut back as well.

“There is a great deal of angst associated in the coming months,” Mr. McCormick said.

—Sudeep Reddy, Jon Hilsenrath, Ben Casselman and Dion Nissenbaum contributed to this article.

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America’s Dilemma: Citizenship or Deportation?—President Barack Obama’s Speech On Illegal Immigration in Las Vegas–January 29, 2013–Videos

Posted on January 30, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Immigration, Inflation, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Programming, Quotations, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Resources, Security, Strategy, Taxes, Technology, Unemployment, Video, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Obama-Time-to-fix-immigration

President Obama Las Vegas speech on comprehensive immigration reform on Jan. 29

Credit: http://www.upi.com

reagan

FULL SPEECH – US President Obama Immigration Reform from LAS VEGAS 1/29/2013

1984 – Ronald Reagan on Amnesty

Sessions Warns Washington Elites Against Rush To Amnesty

Amnesty – Not the Solution: Talk Border

Immigration: The real Third Rail of politics on TalkBorder

Talk Border: Safe Borders, Not Racism

Immigration by the Numbers — Off the Charts 

Immigration, World Poverty and Gumballs – Updated 2010

David Meir-Levi on Talk Border 

Martin Sieff on TalkBorder.com

Lou Barletta on Talk Border 

Michael Cutler, INS Special Agent

Charles Faddis, CIA (Ret), speaks with Michael Cutler, INS (Ret) on National Security and more in one part of a three-part interview for The United States of Common Sense, hosted by Charles Faddis..

Michael Cutler, a Fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, an advisor to the 911 Families for a Secure America, and a consultant, retired in 2002 after a distinguished career with the INS of over 30 years, including 26 as a Special Agent. In 1991, he was promoted to the position of Senior Special Agent and was assigned to the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force and worked with members of other federal and state law enforcement agencies as well as law enforcement organizations of other countries. The task force’s investigations of aliens involved in major drug trafficking organizations ultimately resulted in the seizure of their assets and prosecutions for a wide variety of criminal violations.

Mr. Cutler has testified as an expert witness at nine Congressional hearings on issues relating to the enforcement of immigration laws having been called by members of both political parties. Mr. Cutler also furnished testimony to the Presidential Commission on the Terrorist Attacks of September 11. Mr. Cutler has appeared on numerous television and radio programs including the OReilly Radio Factor, OReillys No Spin Zone, Fox News and the Lou Dobbs Tonight Program on CNN to discuss the enforcement of immigration laws and has participated in various public debates and panel discussions on issues involving the enforcement and administration of immigration laws. Among the areas of concern that he is able to speak about authoritatively are the nexus between immigration and national security, the impact of immigration on the criminal justice system, strategies to combat illegal immigration, and why amnesty for illegal aliens is wrong.

Roy talks about ICE lawsuit with FNC’s Neil Cavuto

The Dangers of Unlimited Legal & Illegal Immigration

Stop Amnesty for Illegal Immigrants – Expert Reveals the True Cost of Amnesty

Path to illegal citizenship: The high cost of Illegal and legal lImmigration for U.S. Citizens 

Why Oppose the DREAM Act?

 

The E-Verify Solution for Illegal Hiring 

How Many Illegal Aliens Are in the US?  – Walsh – 2

How Many Illegal Aliens Are in the United States? Presentation by James H. Walsh, Associate General Counsel of the former INS – part 2.
Census Bureau estimates of the number of illegals in the U.S. are suspect and may represent significant undercounts.  The studies presented by these authors show that the numbers of illegal aliens in the U.S. could range from 20 to 38 million.

America’s dilemma: citizenship or deportation?

By Raymond Thomas Pronk            

“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” – Albert Einstein

President Barack Obama flew to Las Vegas last week to give a speech at a local school outlining his views and principles for comprehensive immigration reform. “Right now, we have 11 million undocumented immigrants in America; 11 million men and women from all over the world who live their lives in the shadows.  Yes, they broke the rules.  They crossed the border illegally.  Maybe they overstayed their visas.  Those are facts.  Nobody disputes them.  But these 11 million men and women are now here,” Obama said.

Why are there more than 11 million illegal aliens in the United States? Simply, the federal government under both Democratic and Republican progressive presidents has refused to vigorously enforce existing immigration law as set forth in federal statutes and regulations and failed to control and secure U.S. borders against a massive invasion of illegal aliens. These presidents betrayed their oath of office to defend and protect the Constitution.

In a debate with Democratic presidential candidate Walter Mondale in 1984, President Ronald Reagan said, “I believe in the idea of amnesty for those who have put down roots and lived here, even though some time back they may have entered illegally.”

On Nov. 6, 1986, Congress enacted the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), also known as the Simpson-Mazzoli Act, to reform immigration law and control the number of illegal immigrants entering the country. Reagan signed the bill.

Under this law approximately three million illegal aliens who had continuously resided in the U.S. before Jan.1, 1982 were granted legal status and eventually citizenship — amnesty for illegal aliens.

Since then the federal government has failed to control and secure the borders and by so doing, the 1986 law by granting amnesty created a strong magnet or incentive for future illegal aliens. Both Reagan and the American people were double-crossed by progressive Democrats and Republicans in Congress who really wanted open borders and unlimited illegal immigration.

The American people are asking for immigration law enforcement and secure borders and not Obama’s comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship. Americans favor limited controlled legal immigration but oppose open borders with unlimited illegal immigration. So-called “undocumented workers” or more accurately illegal aliens should, as required by federal law, be removed from their place of work and deported to their country of origin.

Why? First, aliens broke into the country illegally when they entered the U.S. without a valid visa or over stayed their visas and did not return to the country of origin. Second, aliens broke the law when they either stole identities of U.S. citizens or purchased fraudulent documents such as driver’s licenses and Social Security cards in order to obtain employment in the U.S. Third, aliens broke the law when they worked in the U.S. without having the legal status to do so. Fourth, many employers broke the law when they knowingly hired illegal aliens. You do not reward criminal behavior by granting a pathway to citizenship. The rule of law requires federal government enforcement of immigration law by deporting illegal aliens.

When you multiple these crimes by millions, you are dealing with a crime wave and mass invasion that has been sanctioned by the progressive ruling elites in Washington D.C. from both the Democratic and Republican parties who favor open borders and token enforcement of existing federal immigration law.

Why did these ruling elites ignore the will of the American people? The Democratic Party favors open borders and a pathway to citizenship or amnesty for illegal aliens because they believe the overwhelming majority of these illegal aliens will, when they become citizens, vote for Democratic candidates.

Progressive Republicans likewise favored open borders and amnesty for illegal aliens because many of the businesses that employ illegal aliens also contribute to the campaigns of Republican candidates.

Both political parties could care less that millions of American citizens are unemployed as a direct result of policies that encouraged massive illegal immigration. Staying in power, not the welfare of the American people, was and is the top priority of these politicians.

The 11 million illegal aliens and their dependents should be given the choice to either voluntarily return to their country of origin by a certain date or face deportation under existing federal immigration law. With over 25 million American citizens seeking permanent full time jobs, this would immediately reduce the number of unemployed citizens by millions.

Most Americans would agree with two of Obama’s principles of comprehensive immigration reform namely “to stay focused on enforcement” and “to bring our legal immigration system into the 21st century.”  However, most Americans would not agree with Obama to first give the 11 million plus illegal aliens a pathway to citizenship or amnesty for illegal aliens before first controlling and securing the borders and enforcing existing immigration law.

There is a saying in Texas, “Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.”

“You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.” — Abraham Lincoln

Raymond Thomas Pronk is host of the Pronk Pops Show on KDUX web radio from 3-5 p.m. Fridays and author of the companion blog http://www.pronkpops.wordpress.com/

Background Articles and Videos

Opinion: Will Obama Poison Immigration Reform?

Reagan on immingration 2 

Numbers USA – Immigration By the Numbers – Part 1

Numbers USA – Immigration By the Numbers – Part 2 of 2

E-Verify: Employment Verification 

How Many Illegal Aliens Are in the US?  – Walsh – 1 

How Many Illegal Aliens Are in the US?  – Walsh – 2

How Many Illegal Aliens Are in the United States? Presentation by James H. Walsh, Associate General Counsel of the former INS – part 2.

Census Bureau estimates of the number of illegals in the U.S. are suspect and may represent significant undercounts.  The studies presented by these authors show that the numbers of illegal aliens in the U.S. could range from 20 to 38 million.

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
______________________
For Immediate Release                          January 29, 2013
REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT
ON COMPREHENSIVE IMMIGRATION REFORM
Del Sol High School
Las Vegas, Nevada

11:40 A.M. PST

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  (Applause.)  Thank you!  Thank you so much.  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Las Vegas!  (Applause.)  And it is good to be among so many good friends.

Let me start off by thanking everybody at Del Sol High School for hosting us.  (Applause.)  Go Dragons!  Let me especially thank your outstanding principal, Lisa Primas.  (Applause.)

There are all kinds of notable guests here, but I just want to mention a few.  First of all, our outstanding Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Janet Napolitano, is here.  (Applause.)  Our wonderful Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar.  (Applause.)  Former Secretary of Labor, Hilda Solis.  (Applause.)  Two of the outstanding members of the congressional delegation from Nevada, Steve Horsford and Dina Titus.  (Applause.)  Your own mayor, Carolyn Goodman.  (Applause.)

But we also have some mayors that flew in because they know how important the issue we’re going to talk about today is.  Marie Lopez Rogers from Avondale, Arizona.  (Applause.)  Kasim Reed from Atlanta, Georgia.  (Applause.)  Greg Stanton from Phoenix, Arizona.  (Applause.)  And Ashley Swearengin from Fresno, California.  (Applause.)

And all of you are here, as well as some of the top labor leaders in the country.  And we are just so grateful.  Some outstanding business leaders are here as well.  And of course, we’ve got wonderful students here, so I could not be prouder of our students.  (Applause.)

Now, those of you have a seat, feel free to take a seat.  I don’t mind.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I love you, Mr. President!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  (Applause.)

Now, last week, I had the honor of being sworn in for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)  And during my inaugural address, I talked about how making progress on the defining challenges of our time doesn’t require us to settle every debate or ignore every difference that we may have, but it does require us to find common ground and move forward in common purpose.  It requires us to act.

I know that some issues will be harder to lift than others.  Some debates will be more contentious.  That’s to be expected.  But the reason I came here today is because of a challenge where the differences are dwindling; where a broad consensus is emerging; and where a call for action can now be heard coming from all across America.  I’m here today because the time has come for common-sense, comprehensive immigration reform.  (Applause.)  The time is now.  Now is the time.  Now is the time.  Now is the time.

AUDIENCE:  Sí se puede!  Sí se puede!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now is the time.

I’m here because most Americans agree that it’s time to fix a system that’s been broken for way too long.  I’m here because business leaders, faith leaders, labor leaders, law enforcement, and leaders from both parties are coming together to say now is the time to find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as the land of opportunity.  Now is the time to do this so we can strengthen our economy and strengthen our country’s future.

Think about it — we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants.  That’s who we are — in our bones.  The promise we see in those who come here from every corner of the globe, that’s always been one of our greatest strengths.  It keeps our workforce young.  It keeps our country on the cutting edge.  And it’s helped build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known.

After all, immigrants helped start businesses like Google and Yahoo!.  They created entire new industries that, in turn, created new jobs and new prosperity for our citizens.  In recent years, one in four high-tech startups in America were founded by immigrants.  One in four new small business owners were immigrants, including right here in Nevada — folks who came here seeking opportunity and now want to share that opportunity with other Americans.

But we all know that today, we have an immigration system that’s out of date and badly broken; a system that’s holding us back instead of helping us grow our economy and strengthen our middle class.

Right now, we have 11 million undocumented immigrants in America; 11 million men and women from all over the world who live their lives in the shadows.  Yes, they broke the rules.  They crossed the border illegally.  Maybe they overstayed their visas.  Those are facts.  Nobody disputes them.  But these 11 million men and women are now here.  Many of them have been here for years.  And the overwhelming majority of these individuals aren’t looking for any trouble.  They’re contributing members of the community.  They’re looking out for their families.  They’re looking out for their neighbors.  They’re woven into the fabric of our lives.

Every day, like the rest of us, they go out and try to earn a living.  Often they do that in a shadow economy — a place where employers may offer them less than the minimum wage or make them work overtime without extra pay.  And when that happens, it’s not just bad for them, it’s bad for the entire economy.  Because all the businesses that are trying to do the right thing — that are hiring people legally, paying a decent wage, following the rules — they’re the ones who suffer.   They’ve got to compete against companies that are breaking the rules.  And the wages and working conditions of American workers are threatened, too.

So if we’re truly committed to strengthening our middle class and providing more ladders of opportunity to those who are willing to work hard to make it into the middle class, we’ve got to fix the system.

We have to make sure that every business and every worker in America is playing by the same set of rules.  We have to bring this shadow economy into the light so that everybody is held accountable — businesses for who they hire, and immigrants for getting on the right side of the law.  That’s common sense.  And that’s why we need comprehensive immigration reform.  (Applause.)

There’s another economic reason why we need reform.  It’s not just about the folks who come here illegally and have the effect they have on our economy.  It’s also about the folks who try to come here legally but have a hard time doing so, and the effect that has on our economy.

Right now, there are brilliant students from all over the world sitting in classrooms at our top universities.  They’re earning degrees in the fields of the future, like engineering and computer science.  But once they finish school, once they earn that diploma, there’s a good chance they’ll have to leave our country.  Think about that.

Intel was started with the help of an immigrant who studied here and then stayed here.  Instagram was started with the help of an immigrant who studied here and then stayed here.  Right now in one of those classrooms, there’s a student wrestling with how to turn their big idea — their Intel or Instagram — into a big business.  We’re giving them all the skills they need to figure that out, but then we’re going to turn around and tell them to start that business and create those jobs in China or India or Mexico or someplace else?  That’s not how you grow new industries in America.  That’s how you give new industries to our competitors.   That’s why we need comprehensive immigration reform.  (Applause.)

Now, during my first term, we took steps to try and patch up some of the worst cracks in the system.

First, we strengthened security at the borders so that we could finally stem the tide of illegal immigrants.  We put more boots on the ground on the southern border than at any time in our history.  And today, illegal crossings are down nearly 80 percent from their peak in 2000.  (Applause.)

Second, we focused our enforcement efforts on criminals who are here illegally and who endanger our communities.  And today, deportations of criminals is at its highest level ever.  (Applause.)

And third, we took up the cause of the DREAMers — (applause) — the young people who were brought to this country as children, young people who have grown up here, built their lives here, have futures here.  We said that if you’re able to meet some basic criteria like pursuing an education, then we’ll consider offering you the chance to come out of the shadows so that you can live here and work here legally, so that you can finally have the dignity of knowing you belong.

But because this change isn’t permanent, we need Congress to act — and not just on the DREAM Act.  We need Congress to act on a comprehensive approach that finally deals with the 11 million undocumented immigrants who are in the country right now.  That’s what we need.  (Applause.)

Now, the good news is that for the first time in many years, Republicans and Democrats seem ready to tackle this problem together.  (Applause.)  Members of both parties, in both chambers, are actively working on a solution.  Yesterday, a bipartisan group of senators announced their principles for comprehensive immigration reform, which are very much in line with the principles I’ve proposed and campaigned on for the last few years.  So at this moment, it looks like there’s a genuine desire to get this done soon, and that’s very encouraging.

But this time, action must follow.  (Applause.)  We can’t allow immigration reform to get bogged down in an endless debate.  We’ve been debating this a very long time.  So it’s not as if we don’t know technically what needs to get done.  As a consequence, to help move this process along, today I’m laying out my ideas for immigration reform.  And my hope is that this provides some key markers to members of Congress as they craft a bill, because the ideas I’m proposing have traditionally been supported by both Democrats like Ted Kennedy and Republicans like President George W. Bush.  You don’t get that matchup very often.  (Laughter.)  So we know where the consensus should be.

Now, of course, there will be rigorous debate about many of the details, and every stakeholder should engage in real give and take in the process.  But it’s important for us to recognize that the foundation for bipartisan action is already in place.  And if Congress is unable to move forward in a timely fashion, I will send up a bill based on my proposal and insist that they vote on it right away.  (Applause.)

So the principles are pretty straightforward.  There are a lot of details behind it.  We’re going to hand out a bunch of paper so that everybody will know exactly what we’re talking about.  But the principles are pretty straightforward.

First, I believe we need to stay focused on enforcement.  That means continuing to strengthen security at our borders.  It means cracking down more forcefully on businesses that knowingly hire undocumented workers.  To be fair, most businesses want to do the right thing, but a lot of them have a hard time figuring out who’s here legally, who’s not.  So we need to implement a national system that allows businesses to quickly and accurately verify someone’s employment status.  And if they still knowingly hire undocumented workers, then we need to ramp up the penalties.

Second, we have to deal with the 11 million individuals who are here illegally.  We all agree that these men and women should have to earn their way to citizenship.  But for comprehensive immigration reform to work, it must be clear from the outset that there is a pathway to citizenship.  (Applause.)

We’ve got to lay out a path — a process that includes passing a background check, paying taxes, paying a penalty, learning English, and then going to the back of the line, behind all the folks who are trying to come here legally.  That’s only fair, right?  (Applause.)

So that means it won’t be a quick process but it will be a fair process.  And it will lift these individuals out of the shadows and give them a chance to earn their way to a green card and eventually to citizenship.  (Applause.)

And the third principle is we’ve got to bring our legal immigration system into the 21st century because it no longer reflects the realities of our time.  (Applause.)  For example, if you are a citizen, you shouldn’t have to wait years before your family is able to join you in America.  You shouldn’t have to wait years.  (Applause.)

If you’re a foreign student who wants to pursue a career in science or technology, or a foreign entrepreneur who wants to start a business with the backing of American investors, we should help you do that here.  Because if you succeed, you’ll create American businesses and American jobs.  You’ll help us grow our economy.  You’ll help us strengthen our middle class.

So that’s what comprehensive immigration reform looks like:  smarter enforcement; a pathway to earned citizenship; improvements in the legal immigration system so that we continue to be a magnet for the best and the brightest all around the world.  It’s pretty straightforward.

The question now is simple:  Do we have the resolve as a people, as a country, as a government to finally put this issue behind us?  I believe that we do.  I believe that we do.  (Applause.)  I believe we are finally at a moment where comprehensive immigration reform is within our grasp.

But I promise you this:  The closer we get, the more emotional this debate is going to become.  Immigration has always been an issue that enflames passions.  That’s not surprising.  There are few things that are more important to us as a society than who gets to come here and call our country home; who gets the privilege of becoming a citizen of the United States of America.  That’s a big deal.

When we talk about that in the abstract, it’s easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of “us” versus “them.”  And when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of “us” used to be “them.”  We forget that.  (Applause.)

It’s really important for us to remember our history.  Unless you’re one of the first Americans, a Native American, you came from someplace else.  Somebody brought you.  (Applause.)

Ken Salazar, he’s of Mexican American descent, but he points that his family has been living where he lives for 400 years, so he didn’t immigrate anywhere.  (Laughter.)

The Irish who left behind a land of famine.  The Germans who fled persecution.  The Scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west.  The Polish.  The Russians.  The Italians.  The Chinese.  The Japanese.  The West Indians.  The huddled masses who came through Ellis Island on one coast and Angel Island on the other.  (Applause.)  All those folks, before they were “us,” they were “them.”

And when each new wave of immigrants arrived, they faced resistance from those who were already here.  They faced hardship.  They faced racism.  They faced ridicule.  But over time, as they went about their daily lives, as they earned a living, as they raised a family, as they built a community, as their kids went to school here, they did their part to build a nation.

They were the Einsteins and the Carnegies.  But they were also the millions of women and men whose names history may not remember, but whose actions helped make us who we are; who built this country hand by hand, brick by brick.  (Applause.)  They all came here knowing that what makes somebody an American is not just blood or birth, but allegiance to our founding principles and the faith in the idea that anyone from anywhere can write the next great chapter of our story.

And that’s still true today.  Just ask Alan Aleman.  Alan is here this afternoon — where is Alan?  He’s around here — there he is right here.  (Applause.)  Alan was born in Mexico.  (Applause.)  He was brought to this country by his parents when he was a child.  Growing up, Alan went to an American school, pledged allegiance to the American flag, felt American in every way — and he was, except for one:  on paper.

In high school, Alan watched his friends come of age — driving around town with their new licenses, earning some extra cash from their summer jobs at the mall.  He knew he couldn’t do those things.  But it didn’t matter that much.  What mattered to Alan was earning an education so that he could live up to his God-given potential.

Last year, when Alan heard the news that we were going to offer a chance for folks like him to emerge from the shadows — even if it’s just for two years at a time — he was one of the first to sign up.  And a few months ago he was one of the first people in Nevada to get approved.  (Applause.)  In that moment, Alan said, “I felt the fear vanish.  I felt accepted.”

So today, Alan is in his second year at the College of Southern Nevada.  (Applause.)  Alan is studying to become a doctor.  (Applause.)  He hopes to join the Air Force.  He’s working hard every single day to build a better life for himself and his family.  And all he wants is the opportunity to do his part to build a better America.  (Applause.)

So in the coming weeks, as the idea of reform becomes more real and the debate becomes more heated, and there are folks who are trying to pull this thing apart, remember Alan and all those who share the same hopes and the same dreams.  Remember that this is not just a debate about policy.  It’s about people.  It’s about men and women and young people who want nothing more than the chance to earn their way into the American story.

Throughout our history, that has only made our nation stronger.  And it’s how we will make sure that this century is the same as the last:  an American century welcoming of everybody who aspires to do something more, and who is willing to work hard to do it, and is willing to pledge that allegiance to our flag.

Thank you.  God bless you.  And God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

END                12:05 P.M. PST

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Roku 2 XS Streaming Player–Videos

Posted on January 27, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Rants, Raves, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

ROKU

roku-logo

hbb06roku2xs-2

roku-2-xs-1

roku2_xs_backRoku-Announces-Mobile-App-Updates

roku2xsandremote600

ROKU  Channel Store

Roku 2 XS: Review (Apple TV vs Roku)

Cut Cable TV and Replace It With Cheaper Alternatives (Roku, Off-Air Digital TV)

SoldierKnowsBest:        Review: Roku 2 Streaming Player

ROKU Review. All Available ROKU Channels Demo

Roku How-To:  Add Private Channel

Cord Cutters: Play YouTube videos on your Roku, AirPlay-styl

YouTube on Roku 2

Roku’s Web-to-TV Streaming Gets $45 Million Boost

Time Warner Cable Teams Up with Roku

OTT #5: Secret Roku Channels

Cord Cutters: Roku Tips and Tricks

Roku 2 vs Roku

Roku Streaming Player | Roku 2 XS 1080p Streaming Player Review

Roku 2 XS: Review (Apple TV vs Roku)

ROKU  BOX OPEN AND RUN THROUGH 

Roku 2 XS 1080p Streaming Player Unboxing

Background Articles and Videos

roku_2_hookup

Which Wireless Router to Buy? 

REVIEW: The Roku 3 Blows Away The Apple TV

Business InsiderBy Steve Kovach | Business Insider – 2 hours 33 minutes ago

There’s no shortage of devices with so-called smart TV functions.

You have the Apple TV that connects to your iTunes content. The Boxee that lets you record network TV on a virtual online DVR. TV makers like Samsung and LG have streaming apps built directly into their web-connected TV sets. And so on.

But at their core, none of these devices revolutionize television the way many are hoping Apple will if it ever launches its rumored television set. Most of these gadgets, the current Apple TV box included, function largely the same. You get access to the standard library of streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, plus the option to buy and rent movies and TV shows.

That’s about it.

What’s most important in today’s streaming devices is the interface, an interface that lets you find what you want to watch as quickly as possibly and jump in. You also need plenty of good content to enjoy.

The newest box from Roku, the Roku 3, achieves both these things better than any other device I’ve used, making the $99.99 streaming box  the best you can buy today.

 

New LookThe Roku 3 interface is a complete overhaul of the last one, and it’s so good I’m going to have trouble going back to my clunky Apple TV.

Unlike the Apple TV which can make you click through as many as four or five menus before you’re able to jump into the thing you want to watch, every detail in the Roku 3′s user interface is designed to minimize your effort.

Scrolling vertically lets you cycle through apps or menu options in an infinite loop so there’s no need to navigate back to the top of a list. (If you’ve used Apple TV’s menus before, you know this can be a pain.)  Scrolling horizontally lets you dive deeper into your selection, meaning you can launch the app you want or get more information on a specific piece of content. These are tiny details, but they feel so natural that the interface almost disappears. I haven’t seen anyone pull that off on the television screen yet.

 

But the best feature by a longshot is search, which lets you look up content by actor, director, title, etc. and provides you with a list of all streaming sources you can watch the video on. For example, a search for “South Park” gives you the option to stream the show on Netflix, Hulu, or purchase individual episodes.

There’s no clicking through endless menus and search options. There’s no hoping what you want to watch is on Hulu or Netflix or Amazon or whatever else before you search that individual app. You just search for the stuff you want and the Roku finds it for you wherever it lives. It’s such an essential and simple feature that I’m shocked it’s not standard on all streaming devices by now.

Content SelectionBecause Roku is open to third-party developers, you have a much larger content selection than you get on Apple TV. The Roku has all the standard stuff Apple TV has like Netflix, Hulu, and sports services like MLB.tv. But you also get a lot of stuff the Apple TV doesn’t have yet like HBO GO, Amazon Instant, Spotify, and Pandora.

Plus there are several casual games like Angry Birds and other streaming video apps to choose from in Roku’s virtual store.

If you want to buy or rent videos, there’s Vudu, a virtual store with a selection about as good as Apple’s. You can stream purchased videos directly to your Roku and they remain tied to your account so you can access them whenever you want. It also has several shows available the day after the air, which can come in handy for those who no longer subscribe to cable.

That was my biggest problem with the Roku 3. Over the years I’ve purchased a ton of movies and TV shows through iTunes, meaning I’m already locked into Apple’s system. The Roku 3 is so good I regret doing that. If you’re like me, you’ll have to repurchase a lot of your favorite content through Vudu if you decide to switch to the Roku.

 

Yes, Apple TV is slowly letting more apps onto its platform. Hulu Plus finally got the green light last year. HBO GO is reportedly coming soon and you can now use AirPlay to beam videos from the the iPhone or iPad version to your Apple TV. And there’s increased talk that Apple will open Apple TV to third-party developers soon, meaning even more content could be on the way.

But as it stands now, Roku simply offers you more content options for the same price as the Apple TV.

The HardwareThe Roku 3 does have a few hardware advances worth mentioning, especially when it comes to the remote control. In fact, the remote is probably the biggest hardware innovation the Roku 3 offers: a headphone jack on the side that automatically mutes your TV and pumps the audio to your headphones instead.

It’s perfect if you want to watch TV in bed without disturbing your partner. It’s perfect if you only have one TV and want to share the living room with someone who’d rather be reading instead of listening to some gory “Game of Thrones” battle. Like the user interface, the headphone jack is a simple detail that was perfectly executed and solves a common annoyance on our TVs that no one has really tried to tackle before. If you’ve ever had to compete for the sound waves in your living room, you know what I’m talking about.

The remote also has built-in motion controls for gaming, sort of like the remote on the Wii video game console. But I found it’s not as accurate as the remote on the Wii. When playing Angry Birds Space, for example, the cursor didn’t always match up perfectly to where I pointed the remote, so I had to keep resetting the position to match what I was seeing on the screen. It was a minor annoyance, but definitely worth noting in case you think the Roku would make a good gaming machine.

Other than the remote, there’s not much different with the Roku 3. It looks very similar to the last version, a small squarish device that can fit in the palm of your hand. But it does has a faster processor so apps and games run slightly smoother than before. It also has a dual-band WiFi chip for faster wireless speeds, but you’ll need a special router to take advantage of that. (I think you’re better off plugging the Ethernet cable directly into the Roku if you can.)

Finally, there’s a USB port so you can plug in an external hard drive or thumb drive and play video files that you’ve made yourself or downloaded from somewhere else.

The new hardware features are nice, but there’s no need to upgrade from the second-generation Roku unless you really, really want that new remote with the headphone jack. All those great software features I mentioned? You’ll get them in a software update soon if you haven’t already.

If you don’t have a Roku, the hardware upgrades are definitely more versatile than what you get with the Apple TV.

ConclusionAs I said in the intro, no streaming box can offer you some sort of revolution in web-based video watching. But the Roku is the best at working with what is out there already. You get access to more streaming services and content than the Apple TV has, plus an incredible interface that helps you find what you want better than anything else out there.

It’s that good.

Unless you already have a lot of content purchased through iTunes, the Roku 3 is the best choice.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/review-roku-3-trumps-apple-212048996.html

Roku

“…Roku (IPA: /ˈɹoku/ pronounced “roh koo”)[2] is an American, privately held, consumer electronics company that sells home digital media products. The company is based in Saratoga, California.[3] Roku manufactures a variety of digital media receivers that allow customers to access internet streamed video or audio services through televisions. This includes subscription-based services as well as services that are available through the receiver free of charge.

Company profile

The company was founded in October 2002, by ReplayTV founder Anthony Wood. Roku means “six” in Japanese, a reference to the six companies Wood has launched.

Legacy products

Roku’s consumer products line-up included:

  • Roku SoundBridge, a network music player
  • SoundBridge Radio, a network music player with built-in speakers and subwoofer, AM‑FM receiver, volume-ramping alarm clock, preset buttons, SD slot and headphone jack
  • PhotoBridge HD1000, a system for displaying images on a high-definition television, as well as streaming MPEG video. The unit has four card readers on the front and can read from Memory Stick, MultiMediaCard, SD Memory Card, SmartMedia Card, CompactFlash Card type II.

Roku also produced:

  • the BrightSign solid-state media player, designed to drive HD displays in a retail environment.

Roku’s audio products did not use internal storage but rely on Wi-Fi or Ethernet to stream digital audio over a network, either from Internet radio or a computer attached to the same network. Roku introduced the Radio Roku Internet radio directory in August 2007. Radio Roku provides a directory of Internet stations, accessible from a web browser or from SoundBridge players.

Digital video player

On May 20, 2008, Roku announced the first Netflix Internet video streaming receiver box, the Roku DVP. The NXP-powered device runs Linux.[4]

The XD/S has HDMI and component output for high-definition video on new and older televisions.

Prior to Autumn 2010, three versions of the Roku DVP were available: the Roku SD, HD, and HD-XR.[5] The Roku SD only streams standard definition (SD) content.[6] The Roku HD streams both SD and HD (720p) content.[7] The Roku SD and HD both have an Ethernet connection and built in 802.11g Wi‑Fi compatible with wireless B, G, and N routers.[8] Their third box was the Roku HD-XR, which streams both SD and HD (720p and 1080p) content, has built in dual-band 802.11n WiFi support, and has a USB port on the back.[9]

In 2010, Roku revamped its lineup of devices: the revised HD is the basic model of the line, offering 720p resolution, 802.11g WiFi reception (as well as an Ethernet connection), and an HDMI output. The middle of the line, the XD, adds 1080p resolution (if channel programmers provide it), an enhanced remote with replay capabilities, and single-band wireless N WiFi. The flagship XD|S offers the same feature set as the XD but also adds component video and optical audio outputs, dual-band wireless N, and a USB port for playing videos, photos, and music (USB Playback Support is available as of February 1, 2011).[10][11]

On July 20, 2011, Roku updated its product lineup with three new boxes, each in the same price range as before. However, the Ethernet connection and remote with motion control for games are available only on the XS model.[12][13] The Roku Game Remote uses Hillcrest Labs’ Freespace motion control technology, so users can control games with natural gestures.[14] The Netflix application was revamped for the Roku 2 HD, Roku 2 XD and Roku 2 XS. The current models now provide the option of subtitles, when the program provides this aid.[15]

On October 29, 2012, the feature “Roku Search” was added. This feature allows users to search movie and TV show titles, actors and directors for multiple services on Roku such as Netflix, Amazon Instant Video and HBO Go. The feature is only available on Roku 2, Roku Streaming Stick, Roku LT and HD, due to technical constraints on earlier models.[16]

Feature comparison

Model Intro­duced Dis­con­tin­ued Video Outputs Video Resolutions Op­ti­cal Au­dio Out Network USB Blue­tooth​‡ Pro­cess­or Chan­nel Mem­o­ry Ex­pan­sion mi­cro­SD card
Com­pos­ite, S-​Vid­e­o Com­pon­ent, HDMI 480i / 480p 720p / 1080p Eth­er­net 802.11 Wi­re­less
First Generation
Roku DVP (N1000) May 2008 Oct 2009 Both Both Both 720p Yes Yes b/g No No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[17][18][19][20] 64 MiB[20] No
Roku SD (N1050) Oct 2009 Sep 2010 Com­pos­ite Nei­ther 480i Nei­ther No Yes b/g No No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[20][21] 64 MiB[20] No
Roku HD (N1100) Nov 2009 Sep 2010 Both Both Both 720p Yes Yes b/g No No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[20][21] 64 MiB[20] No
Roku HD-XR (N1101) Oct 2009 Sep 2010 Both Both Both Both Yes Yes a/b/g/n dual-​band Yes No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[20][21] 256 MiB[20] No
Roku HD (2000C) Sep 2010 Jul 2011 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both 720p No Yes b/g No No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[20] 64 MiB[20] No
Roku XD (2050N, 2050X) Sep 2010 Jul 2011 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both Both No Yes b/g/n No No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[20][22] 64 MiB[20] No
Roku XDS (2100X) Sep 2010 Jul 2011 Com­pos­ite Both​† Both Both Yes Yes a/b/g/n dual-​band Yes No PNX­8935 400 MHz​[19][20][23] 256 MiB[20] No
Second Generation
Roku LT (2400X, 2450X) Nov 2011 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both 720p No No b/g/n No No BCM­2835 400 MHz​[24][20] 256 MiB[20] No
Roku HD (2500X) Apr 2012 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both 720p No No b/g/n No No BCM­7208 400 MHz​[25] 256 MiB[25] No
Roku 2 HD (3000X) Jul 2011 Apr 2012 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both 720p No No b/g/n No Yes BCM­2835 600 MHz​[20][26] 256 MiB[20] Yes
Roku 2 XD (3050X) Jul 2011 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both Both No No b/g/n No Yes BCM­2835 600 MHz​[20][26] 256 MiB[20] Yes
Roku 2 XS (3100X) Jul 2011 Com­pos­ite HDMI Both Both No Yes b/g/n Yes Yes BCM­2835 600 MHz​[20][26][27] 256 MiB[20] Yes
Roku Stream­ing Stick (3400X) Oct 2012 Nei­ther MHL only 480p Both No No b/g/n dual-​band No Yes BCM­2835 600 MHz​[20][26] 256 MiB[20] No
  • ‡ The Bluetooth module is for the game remote.
  • † The com­pon­ent video connector on the Roku XDS (2100X) is a nonstandard 3.5mm connector and a proprietary adapter cable, which is sold separately, is effectively required to use this.[28]

Also see Roku’s product comparison table.

 Online Roku channels

Content on the Roku DVP is provided by Roku partners, and are identified using the “channel” vernacular. Each separate channel supports content from one partner though some content partners have more than one channel. Users can add or remove different channels from the Roku Channel Store. In May 2011, Roku stated the DVP had over one million viewers and had delivered 15 million channel downloads. Both on-demand content and live streaming are supported by the devices. For live TV streams, Roku supports Apple HLS (HTTP Live Streaming) adaptive streaming technology. The primary movie channels which are available on Roku in the U.S. market are suppressed in Canada.

Service creation for Roku Player

The Roku is an open-platform device with a freely available SDK that enables anyone to create new channels.[29] The channels are written in a Roku-specific language called BrightScript, a scripting language the company calls “similar to Visual Basic”.[30]

Developers who wish to test their channels before a general release, or who wish to limit viewership, can create “private” channels that require a code be entered by the user in the account page of the Roku website. These private channels, which are not part of the official Roku Channel Store, are not reviewed or approved by Roku.[31]

There is a NDK (Native Developer Kit) available, though it has added restrictions – see Roku developer question “How do I develop games for Roku?”[30]

Services listing

Partial list of services currently available through the Roku Channel Store.[32][33]

Free channels

  • Abacus.fm
  • Air 1
  • Allrecipes.com
  • Amazing Facts
  • Amazon Cloud Player†
  • Amateurlogic
  • Angie’s List
  • Animoto
  • The Autism Channel
  • Blastro
  • blinkx
  • blip.tv
  • blubrry
  • Break.com
  • Bridges TV
  • BYUtv
  • CatholicTV
  • CBN TV
  • CBSSports.com
  • CDNTwo
  • CNBC Real-Time
  • CNET TV
  • Comic Vine
  • Crackle
  • Crunchyroll
  • Daystar Television Network
  • Democracy Now!
  • Disney.com[34]
  • Drive-In Classics
  • Cowboy Classics
  • EWTN (6 channel multiplex)
  • Euronews
  • Fandango
  • FirstRun.tv
  • Flickr
  • Flixster
  • Flixsie
  • Fox Business
  • Fox News Channel
  • Free Speech TV
  • Giant Bomb
  • Gospel Broadcasting Network
  • Havoc Television
  • HisChannel
  • The Highway Girl
  • HuffPost Live
  • ifood.tv
  • inmoo.com
  • Jewelry Television
  • Jewish Life Television
  • KLAS-TV News
  • K-LOVE Radio
  • Kung Fu Theater
  • Liberty Bell Radio
  • Life+Health Network
  • Liquidation Channel
  • Moonlight Movies
  • Mormon Channel
  • Moviefone
  • MusiClouds[35]
  • NASA TV
  • NBC News
  • Newgrounds
  • NRA Life of Duty
  • NTDTV
  • Omniverse TV
  • PEBN
  • Picasa
  • Plex
  • Popcornflix
  • PopSugar
  • Positive Peak Radio & TV
  • Proud Television
  • Radio Paradise
  • Radio Time
  • Revision3
  • Roku Newscaster
  • Roku Search†
  • Roxwel
  • Sail TV
  • Screened
  • SEC Digital Network
  • ShopNBC
  • SHOUTcast Radio
  • Slacker
  • Smithsonian Channel
  • SnagFilms
  • Spacevidcast
  • Streamin’ Garage
  • StuffWeLike
  • Sunimi
  • Syfy (clips only)
  • Tagesschau (Germany)
  • techpodcasts.com
  • TED Talks
  • Tested
  • TomorrowsWorld[36]
  • TBN (8 channel multiplex)
  • TWiT Netcast Network
  • United States Hockey League
  • Vevo†
  • Vimeo
  • Wall Street Journal Live
  • Weather Underground
  • WISC News
  • WTHR News[37]

Channels with both free and premium programming

  • Bigstar.tv
  • Classical TV[38]
  • Dream TV
  • EZTakes
  • Live365
  • MHz Networks
  • MP3tunes
  • Pandora Radio
  • Pub-D-Hub Classics

 Premium channels

  • 3ABN (9 channel multiplex)
  • Amazon Instant Video (U.S.only)
  • Ameba (U.S. and Canada only)
  • BabyFirstTV
  • TheBlazeTV
  • ChannelLive.TV
  • DishWorld
  • Epix ♦
  • Fandor[39]
  • FlickStream.tv
  • FlixFling (U.S. and Canada)
  • Flix Universe
  • HBO Go ♦
  • Hulu Plus (U.S. only)
  • Hope Channel (5 channel multiplex)
  • Major League Soccer
  • Midwest Cage Championship (MCC)
  • MLB.TV
  • Mobile Tribe
  • MOG
  • Movie Vault
  • MyTV (Arabic)
  • Netflix (U.S. and UK only)
  • NBA League Pass
  • NHL Gamecenter Live
  • Pets.TV
  • RaceFansTV
  • Rdio (U.S. and Canada only)
  • Skitter TV
  • SpiritClips from Hallmark [40]
  • SportSkool (Multiple channels)
  • Spotify†(Coming soon to Roku LT and HD models)
  • UFC
  • Wealth TV
  • Weather4Us
  • Weiss Money Network
  • Wieder.TV (German)
  • Vudu†

 Games

  • 5000†
  • Angry Birds (including special editions)†
  • Blackjack
  • Castle Warriors†
  • Danger Derby†
  • Downhill Bowling 2†
  • Dracula’s Coffin†
  • Fieldrunners†
  • Four in a Row
  • Frisbee Forever†
  • Galaga†
  • Jeopardy!†
  • Letter Mix
  • Letter Mix-KJ
  • Mah jongg
  • Mahjong Fruits†
  • Marble Puzzle
  • Mouse About†
  • Muffin Knight†
  • Pac-Man Championship Edition†
  • Reversi
  • Rogue†
  • Rope Rescue†
  • Storm in a Tea Cup†
  • Super Crossfire†
  • Super Stickman Golf†
  • Texas hold ‘em
  • Video Poker
  • Wheel of Fortune†
  • You Don’t Know Jack†

♦: Currently only available to cable and satellite subscribers of this service, no stand alone subscription is available. †: Only available on Roku 2, Roku Streaming Stick, Roku LT and HD models

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roku

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Passion + Persistence + Practice = Performance–Videos

Posted on January 24, 2013. Filed under: Art, Blogroll, Communications, Culture, liberty, Life, People, Philosophy, Sports | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

people_awesome 
PEOPLE ARE AWESOME

PEOPLE ARE AWESOME 2013

100 GREATEST HITS OF YOUTUBE IN 4 MINUTES

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Grilled Over 4 Deaths and Poor Security in Benghazi and Arms Shipments or Transfers From Libya To Turkey Bound For Syria–Denies There Was Any Shipment–Ask The Central Intelligence Agency–Videos

Posted on January 23, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Diasters, Economics, Education, Federal Government, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Resources, Talk Radio, Unemployment, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

rand_paul

Hillary Rodham Clinton, Ron Johnson, Jeff Flake, John McCain, John Barrasso, Rand Paul

Benghazi-testimony-Rand-Paul-tells-Hillary-Clinton-I-would-have-relieved-you-of-your-post

Clinton, Biden, Cuomo, Kerry in 2016, What’s the difference?

Dinah Washington: What Difference A Day Makes

O’Reilly on Hillary Benghazi Testimony: If Any Politician Should Be Advertising Teflon, It’s

Chairman Royce on Fox News “Special Report with Bret Baier” on Sec Clinton testimony

012313 – Sen. Rand Paul on the Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer discussing Benghazi h

Explosive: Sen. Rand Paul To Hillary Clinton – I Would Have Fired You

John McCain Confronts Hillary Clinton On Benghazi: Your Answers ‘Are Not

Marco Rubio Grills Hillary Clinton About Benghazi Testimony

GOP Rep.: Clinton let Benghazi consulate “become a death trap”

[HIGHLIGHTS] Hillary Clinton Testifies On Libya Benghazi Attack [FULL]

LATEST NEWS : Clinton on Benghazi: No delays in decision making

Death And Deceit In Benghazi – Did Obama Amind Try Hide The Truth? – W Bret Bair

Glenn Beck Analyzes U.S. Consulate Attack in Benghazi, Libya

Lebanon seizes 150 tons of Libyan arms en route to Syrian rebels

Benghazi-Gate: Connection between CIA and al-Qaeda in Libya and Syria, with Turkey

CNBC: Benghazi is not about Libya! “It’s An NSC Operation Moving Arms & Fighters Into Syria”

SYRIA CRISIS: US ADMITS arms sent to Syria find ISLAMIST EXTREMISTS [WEST FU

Syrian opposition getting ‘daily shipments’ of arms

LATEST NEWS : Clinton on Benghazi: No delays in decision making

Murder Of Chris Stevens In Benghazi Attack Ordered By American Military Leadership

Benghazi Lies

OBAMA CONFRONTED ON BENGHAZI – Stutters Through Response

Top AFRICOM Leader General Carter Ham Was Never Ordered to Save US Men in Ben

President Obama Comments on the Attack in Benghazi, Libya

Michael Scheuer: Mrs Clinton Has Blood on her Hands Everywhere

FMR CIA Chief on ‘Benghazi-Gate’: “The Democrats Are Very Good At Watching People Die”

Benghazi-Gate: Ex-CIA Michael Scheuer “Obama’s Benghazi Cover-up Worse than

Michael Scheuer Slams CNN Host Over Libya: ‘You’re Just Carrying the Water for Mr. Obama

Sen. Rand Paul on Benghazi: ‘Where in the hell were the Marines?’

Clinton Grilled on Benghazi Attacks in Congressional Inquiry

By Paul Stanley

“…An emotional and frustrated Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton traded barbs with legislators on Capitol Hill in her appearances Wednesday before Senate and House committees searching for answers in the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012, that killed a U.S. ambassador and three security personnel.

Clinton’s day began first thing on Wednesday morning when she appeared before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and will end later in the day before the House committee.

“I take responsibility,” Clinton told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. “Nobody is more committed to getting this right. I am determined to leave the State Department and our country safer, stronger and more secure.”

But soon after making her statement claiming responsibility, Sen. Rob Johnson (R-Wis.) seemed to back Clinton in a corner when he suggested “a simple phone call” to sources in Benghazi might have determined there was no protest at the American Embassy. “Why wasn’t that known?” asked Johnson.

Clinton initially said it was not policy to make inquiries before the FBI investigation was completed, but fired back at the GOP senator when she was pressed on the issue. “With all due respect, what difference at this point does it make?” she said. “We have four dead Americans. It’s our job to figure out what happened and make sure it never happens again. People were tying in real time to get to the information.”

She also said the deaths were extremely “personal” to her.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) also pressed the secretary on why additional security was not in place. He also revealed that he had met with Ambassador Chris Stevens approximately two months before his death and that he expressed “his deep and grave concerns about security in Benghazi.”

Clinton said those concerns never reached her desk.

“I did not see these requests. They did not come to me. I did not approve them. I did not deny,” she said.

However, a review by an independent board concluded that “systemic failures” resulted in the consulate being at risk to attacks and that no organized protest were planned or were in place at the time of the attacks.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), the son of former presidential candidate and House member Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), further pressed Clinton by criticizing her for not reading the cables requesting more security. “Had I been president and found out you did not read the cables from Benghazi and from Ambassador Stevens, I would have relieved you of your post,” said Paul. “I think it’s inexcusable.”

However, neither members of the House or Senate asked Clinton why the initial attacks were blamed on an amateur video that insulted Islam.

Clinton’s appearance was postponed for several weeks due to her health. She is expected to step down from her post in the coming days and will most likely be replaced by Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.), and who, like Clinton, ran unsuccessfully for the White House.

Prior to her being appointed as Secretary of State during President Obama’s first term, Clinton served as the first lady when her husband, former President Bill Clinton, served two terms in the White House. She went on to be elected as a U.S. Senator from New York prior to serving as the nation’s top diplomat.

She is also mentioned as a potential 2016 Democratic presidential nominee. …”

Angry Clinton Explodes at Questioning on Libya Protest: ‘We Have Four Dead Americans…What Difference at This Point Does It Make?’

Madeleine Morgenstern

“…Secretary of State Hillary Clinton erupted at Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) during his questioning Wednesday over whether there were protests in Benghazi, Libya before the deadly assault on the U.S. diplomatic mission.

Johnson was insisting that the American people were “misled” about protests that supposedly occurred over an anti-Islam video, similar to those that had taken place at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo hours earlier on Sept. 11, 2012. It was later determined there had been no protests in Benghazi and the assault was labeled a terrorist attack.

“Do you disagree with me that a simple phone call to those evacuees to determine what happened would have ascertained immediately that there was no protest?” Johnson asked Clinton during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing. “That was a piece of information that could have been easily, easily obtained, within hours if not days.”

“Senator, when you’re in these positions, the last thing you want to do is interfere with any other process going on — ” Clinton started to answer.

” — I realize that’s a good excuse,” Johnson cut in.

“Well, no, it’s the fact,” Clinton said sharply, adding that there are questions being raised “even today” about what precisely happened in Benghazi.

She continued, “Now, we have no doubt they were terrorists, they were militants, they attacked us, they killed our people. But what was going on and why they were doing what they were doing, is still — ”

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/01/23/clinton-explodes-at-gop-senators-libya-questioning-we-have-four-dead-americans-what-difference-at-this-point-does-it-make/

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Inverted Yield Curves As Predictor of Coming Recession When Fed Compressed Short Term Fed Funds Rate To Near Zero Interest Rate Policy (ZIRP) Since December 16, 2008–Videos

Posted on January 22, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Macroeconomics, media, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Raves, Resources, Taxes, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

WSJYieldCurve

Inverted Yield Curve

What is a Yield Curve?

What is a yield curve? – MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials

Yield Curve analysis

Treasury Bond Prices and Yields 

The basics of bonds – MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials 

Bonds basics part two – MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials

Jim Grant: Honey, I Shrunk the Yield Curve!!

Yield Curve and Predicted GDP Growth, December 2012

December 28, 2012

Covering November 24–December 14, 2012

Highlights

December

November

October

3-month Treasury bill rate (percent)

0.07

0.09

0.10

10-year Treasury bond rate (percent)

1.69

1.67

1.79

Yield curve slope (basis points)

162

158

169

Prediction for GDP growth (percent)

0.6

0.6

0.6

Probability of recession in 1 year (percent)

8.6

9.2

8.2

 

Overview of the Latest Yield Curve Figures

Over the past month, the yield curve has gotten slightly steeper, with long rates edging up and short rates edging down. The three-month Treasury bill fell to 0.07 percent (for the week ending December 14) down from November’s 0.09 percent, itself just down from October’s 0.10 percent. The ten-year rate, at 1.69 percent, is up a scant two basis points from November’s 1.67 percent, but still remains a full ten points below October’s 1.79 percent. The slope increased to 162 basis points, up four basis points from November’s 158, but still down from the 169 basis points seen in October.

The steeper slope was not enough to have an appreciable change in projected future growth, however. Projecting forward using past values of the spread and GDP growth suggests that real GDP will grow at about a 0.6 percent rate over the next year, even with both October and November. The strong influence of the recent recession is still leading towards relatively low growth rates. Although the time horizons do not match exactly, the forecast comes in on the more pessimistic side of other predictions but like them, it does show moderate growth for the year.

yield_curve_predicted_GDP_growth

 

The slope change had a bit more impact on the probability of a recession. Using the yield curve to predict whether or not the economy will be in recession in the future, we estimate that the expected chance of the economy being in a recession next December is 8.6 percent, down from November’s 9.2 percent, and up a bit from October’s 8.2 percent. So although our approach is somewhat pessimistic with regard to the level of growth over the next year, it is quite optimistic about the recovery continuing. We’re not sure if that lower chance of a recession counts as a gift from Santa, but we’ll take it.

recession_probability_from_yield_curve

 

The Yield Curve as a Predictor of Economic Growth

The slope of the yield curve—the difference between the yields on short- and long-term maturity bonds—has achieved some notoriety as a simple forecaster of economic growth. The rule of thumb is that an inverted yield curve (short rates above long rates) indicates a recession in about a year, and yield curve inversions have preceded each of the last seven recessions (as defined by the NBER). One of the recessions predicted by the yield curve was the most recent one. The yield curve inverted in August 2006, a bit more than a year before the current recession started in December 2007. There have been two notable false positives: an inversion in late 1966 and a very flat curve in late 1998.

More generally, a flat curve indicates weak growth, and conversely, a steep curve indicates strong growth. One measure of slope, the spread between ten-year Treasury bonds and three-month Treasury bills, bears out this relation, particularly when real GDP growth is lagged a year to line up growth with the spread that predicts it.

yield_curve_spread_real_GDP_growth

 

yield_spread_lagged_real GDP_growth

Predicting GDP Growth

We use past values of the yield spread and GDP growth to project what real GDP will be in the future. We typically calculate and post the prediction for real GDP growth one year forward.

Predicting the Probability of Recession

While we can use the yield curve to predict whether future GDP growth will be above or below average, it does not do so well in predicting an actual number, especially in the case of recessions. Alternatively, we can employ features of the yield curve to predict whether or not the economy will be in a recession at a given point in the future. Typically, we calculate and post the probability of recession one year forward.

Of course, it might not be advisable to take these numbers quite so literally, for two reasons. First, this probability is itself subject to error, as is the case with all statistical estimates. Second, other researchers have postulated that the underlying determinants of the yield spread today are materially different from the determinants that generated yield spreads during prior decades. Differences could arise from changes in international capital flows and inflation expectations, for example. The bottom line is that yield curves contain important information for business cycle analysis, but, like other indicators, should be interpreted with caution. For more detail on these and other issues related to using the yield curve to predict recessions, see the CommentaryDoes the Yield Curve Signal Recession?” Our friends at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York also maintain a website with much useful information on the topic, including their own estimate of recession probabilities.

http://www.clevelandfed.org/research/data/yield_curve/

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Conflict of Visions–Obama v. Reagan–Videos

Posted on January 22, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, College, Communications, Cult, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, People, Philosophy, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Religion, Strategy, Talk Radio, Tax Policy, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Barack H. Obama

barack-obama-flag_close_up

Barack Obama 2013 Inauguration Speech

Inauguration 2013: Highlights From Obama’s Speech

Krauthammer: Obama Just Declared That The Era Of ‘Big Government Is Back’

Fox News Panel Reacts To Obama’s Inaugural Address: ‘Call To Arms For A Liberal

Fox Panel Discussion: Media Acting as Cheerleaders for Obama in Inaugural Coverage

Ronald Reagan

ronald_reagan_close_up

C-SPAN: President Reagan 1981 Inaugural Address

President Ronald Reagan – First Inaugural Address

Conflict of Visions

Which vision would you follow, Obama’s or Reagan’s?

Presidents of the United States in their Inaugural Addresses to the American people set forth their vision for the country.

In Thomas Sowell’s book, “The   Conflict of Visions,” there are two categories of visions, the unconstrained and the constrained. Those with an unconstrained vision believe in human reason and that important decisions should be made by the whole society and   government bureaucrats and experts. Those with a constrained vision believe in tradition and accumulated wisdom and decisions should be made by   individuals about what immediately concerns them such as their life and property.

President Barack H. Obama’s second Inaugural address illustrates the collectivist’s unconstrained vision while the late President Ronald Reagan first Inaugural address illustrates the   individualist’s constrained vision.

inaugural-swearing-in-obama

President Barack H. Obama’s second Inaugural, Jan. 21, 2013         Credit: http://www.latinopost.com

Obama’s unconstrained vision

Collective action

“But we have always understood that when times change, so must we; that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. For the American people can no more meet the demands of today’s world by acting alone than American soldiers could have met the forces of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. No single person can train all the math and science teachers we’ll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. Now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people.”

Crisis and a world without boundaries

“This generation of Americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. A decade of war is now ending. An economic recovery has begun. America’s possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands: youth and drive; diversity and openness; an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. My fellow Americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it — so long as we seize it together.”

Constantly changing government, tax code, schools, and citizens

“We understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time. We must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, and reach higher. But while the means will change, our purpose endures: a nation that rewards the effort and determination of every single American. That is what this moment requires. That is what will give real meaning to our creed.”

Our journey

“It is now our generation’s task to carry on what those pioneers began. For our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law — for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity; until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm.”

Reagan_1981

President Ronald Reagan’s first Inaugural, Jan. 20, 1981    Credit: http://www.inaugural.senate.gov

Reagan’s constrained vision

Government is the problem

“In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. From time to time we’ve been tempted to believe that society has become too complex to be managed by self-rule, that government by an elite group is superior to government for, by, and of the people. Well, if no one among us is capable of governing himself, then who among us has the capacity to govern someone else? All of us together, in and out of government, must bear the burden. The solutions we seek must be equitable, with no one group singled out to pay a higher price.” 

Crisis and limits

“These United States are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. We suffer from the longest and one of the worst sustained inflations in our national history. It distorts our economic decisions, penalizes thrift and crushes the struggling young and the fixed-income elderly alike. It threatens to shatter the lives of millions of our people. ”

“You and I, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. Why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we’re not bound by that same limitation? We must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. And let there be no misunderstanding: We are going to begin to act, beginning today. “

Unemployment, the tax system and deficit spending

“Idle industries have cast workers into unemployment, human misery, and personal indignity. Those who do work are denied a fair return for their labor by a tax system which penalizes successful achievement and keeps us from maintaining full productivity.”

“But great as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. For decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children’s future for the temporary convenience of the present. To continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals.”

Administration’s objective

“Well, this administration’s objective will be a healthy, vigorous, growing economy that provides equal opportunities for all Americans, with no barriers born of bigotry or discrimination. Putting America back to work means putting all Americans back to work. Ending inflation means freeing all Americans from the terror of runaway living costs. All must share in the productive work of this ‘new beginning,’ and all must share in the bounty of a revived economy. With the idealism and fair play which are the core of our system and our strength, we can have a strong and prosperous America, at peace with itself and the world.”

Since my political philosophy is libertarianism, I naturally selected Reagan’s constrained vision.

The most famous vision for the future was given by Abraham Lincolns in his second Inaugural Address on March 4, 1865 when he said just weeks before his assassination on April 14 and as the Civil War was winding down:

“With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation’s wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.”

Raymond Thomas Pronk is host of the Pronk Pops Show on KDUX web radio from 3-5 p.m. Fridays and author of the companion blog http://www.pronkpops.wordpress.com/

Background Articles and Videos

G. Edward Griffin – The Collectivist Conspiracy

6 Collectivism & Individualism   G  Edward Griffin   FMNN eTV   Full Video

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #1

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #2

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #3

G. Edward Griffin- On Individualism v Collectivism #4

G. Edward Griffin: Individualism & Capitalism vs. Collectivism & Monopolies

TAKE IT TO THE LIMITS: Milton Friedman on Libertarianism

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell and a Conflict of Visions

Thomas Sowell – Obama Going Forward

Thomas Sowell – Our Intellectual-In-Chief

Uncommon Knowledge with Thomas Sowell

Transcript And Audio: Barack Obama’s Second Inaugural Address

The remarks of President Obama, as released by The White House and prepared for delivery:

Vice President Biden, Mr. Chief Justice, Members of the United States Congress, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens:

Each time we gather to inaugurate a president, we bear witness to the enduring strength of our Constitution. We affirm the promise of our democracy. We recall that what binds this nation together is not the colors of our skin or the tenets of our faith or the origins of our names. What makes us exceptional — what makes us American — is our allegiance to an idea, articulated in a declaration made more than two centuries ago:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Today we continue a never-ending journey, to bridge the meaning of those words with the realities of our time. For history tells us that while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing; that while freedom is a gift from God, it must be secured by His people here on Earth. The patriots of 1776 did not fight to replace the tyranny of a king with the privileges of a few or the rule of a mob. They gave to us a Republic, a government of, and by, and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed.

For more than two hundred years, we have.

Through blood drawn by lash and blood drawn by sword, we learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half-slave and half-free. We made ourselves anew, and vowed to move forward together.

Together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce; schools and colleges to train our workers.

Together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play.

Together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life’s worst hazards and misfortune.

Through it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society’s ills can be cured through government alone. Our celebration of initiative and enterprise; our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, are constants in our character.

But we have always understood that when times change, so must we; that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. For the American people can no more meet the demands of today’s world by acting alone than American soldiers could have met the forces of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. No single person can train all the math and science teachers we’ll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. Now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people.

This generation of Americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. A decade of war is now ending. An economic recovery has begun. America’s possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands: youth and drive; diversity and openness; an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. My fellow Americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it — so long as we seize it together.

For we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. We believe that America’s prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. We know that America thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work; when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. We are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else, because she is an American, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of God but also in our own.

We understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time. We must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools, and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, and reach higher. But while the means will change, our purpose endures: a nation that rewards the effort and determination of every single American. That is what this moment requires. That is what will give real meaning to our creed.

We, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. But we reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. For we remember the lessons of our past, when twilight years were spent in poverty, and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. We do not believe that in this country, freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few. We recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us, at any time, may face a job loss, or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. The commitments we make to each other — through Medicare, and Medicaid, and Social Security — these things do not sap our initiative; they strengthen us. They do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great.

We, the people, still believe that our obligations as Americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. Some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires, and crippling drought, and more powerful storms. The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition; we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries — we must claim its promise. That is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure — our forests and waterways; our croplands and snowcapped peaks. That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.

We, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. Our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the flames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage. Our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. The knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. But we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well.

We will defend our people and uphold our values through strength of arms and rule of law. We will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully — not because we are naïve about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. America will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe; and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crisis abroad, for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. We will support democracy from Asia to Africa; from the Americas to the Middle East, because our interests and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom. And we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice — not out of mere charity, but because peace in our time requires the constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes: tolerance and opportunity; human dignity and justice.

We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths — that all of us are created equal — is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall; just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone; to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth.

It is now our generation’s task to carry on what those pioneers began. For our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law — for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity; until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for, and cherished, and always safe from harm.

That is our generation’s task — to make these words, these rights, these values — of Life, and Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness — real for every American. Being true to our founding documents does not require us to agree on every contour of life; it does not mean we will all define liberty in exactly the same way, or follow the same precise path to happiness. Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time — but it does require us to act in our time.

For now decisions are upon us, and we cannot afford delay. We cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or substitute spectacle for politics, or treat name-calling as reasoned debate. We must act, knowing that our work will be imperfect. We must act, knowing that today’s victories will be only partial, and that it will be up to those who stand here in four years, and forty years, and four hundred years hence to advance the timeless spirit once conferred to us in a spare Philadelphia hall.

My fellow Americans, the oath I have sworn before you today, like the one recited by others who serve in this Capitol, was an oath to God and country, not party or faction — and we must faithfully execute that pledge during the duration of our service. But the words I spoke today are not so different from the oath that is taken each time a soldier signs up for duty, or an immigrant realizes her dream. My oath is not so different from the pledge we all make to the flag that waves above and that fills our hearts with pride.

They are the words of citizens, and they represent our greatest hope.

You and I, as citizens, have the power to set this country’s course.

You and I, as citizens, have the obligation to shape the debates of our time — not only with the votes we cast, but with the voices we lift in defense of our most ancient values and enduring ideals.

Let each of us now embrace, with solemn duty and awesome joy, what is our lasting birthright. With common effort and common purpose, with passion and dedication, let us answer the call of history, and carry into an uncertain future that precious light of freedom.

Thank you, God Bless you, and may He forever bless these United States of America.

http://www.npr.org/2013/01/21/169903155/transcript-barack-obamas-second-inaugural-address

Ronald Reagan
naugural Address
January 20, 1981

Senator Hatfield, Mr. Chief Justice, Mr. President, Vice President Bush, Vice President Mondale, Senator Baker, Speaker O’Neill, Reverend Moomaw, and my fellow citizens:

To a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. The orderly transfer of authority as called for in the Constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. In the eyes of many in the world, this every 4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle.

Mr. President, I want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. By your gracious cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any other, and I thank you and your people for all your help in maintaining the continuity which is the bulwark of our Republic.

The business of our nation goes forward. These United States are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. We suffer from the longest and one of the worst sustained inflations in our national history. It distorts our economic decisions, penalizes thrift, and crushes the struggling young and the fixed-income elderly alike. It threatens to shatter the lives of millions of our people.

Idle industries have cast workers into unemployment, human misery, and personal indignity. Those who do work are denied a fair return for their labor by a tax system which penalizes successful achievement and keeps us from maintaining full productivity.

But great as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. For decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children’s future for the temporary convenience of the present. To continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals.

You and I, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. Why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we’re not bound by that same limitation? We must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. And let there be no misunderstanding: We are going to begin to act, beginning today.

The economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. They will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. They will go away because we as Americans have the capacity now, as we’ve had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom.

In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. From time to time we’ve been tempted to believe that society has become too complex to be managed by self-rule, that government by an elite group is superior to government for, by, and of the people. Well, if no one among us is capable of governing himself, then who among us has the capacity to govern someone else? All of us together, in and out of government, must bear the burden. The solutions we seek must be equitable, with no one group singled out to pay a higher price.

We hear much of special interest groups. Well, our concern must be for a special interest group that has been too long neglected. It knows no sectional boundaries or ethnic and racial divisions, and it crosses political party lines. It is made up of men and women who raise our food, patrol our streets, man our mines and factories, teach our children, keep our homes, and heal us when we’re sick—professionals, industrialists, shopkeepers, clerks, cabbies, and truck drivers. They are, in short, “We the people,” this breed called Americans.

Well, this administration’s objective will be a healthy, vigorous, growing economy that provides equal opportunities for all Americans, with no barriers born of bigotry or discrimination. Putting America back to work means putting all Americans back to work. Ending inflation means freeing all Americans from the terror of runaway living costs. All must share in the productive work of this “new beginning,” and all must share in the bounty of a revived economy. With the idealism and fair play which are the core of our system and our strength, we can have a strong and prosperous America, at peace with itself and the world.

So, as we begin, let us take inventory. We are a nation that has a government—not the other way around. And this makes us special among the nations of the Earth. Our government has no power except that granted it by the people. It is time to check and reverse the growth of government, which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed.

It is my intention to curb the size and influence of the Federal establishment and to demand recognition of the distinction between the powers granted to the Federal Government and those reserved to the States or to the people. All of us need to be reminded that the Federal Government did not create the States; the States created the Federal Government.

Now, so there will be no misunderstanding, it’s not my intention to do away with government. It is rather to make it work–work with us, not over us; to stand by our side, not ride on our back. Government can and must provide opportunity, not smother it; foster productivity, not stifle it.

If we look to the answer as to why for so many years we achieved so much, prospered as no other people on Earth, it was because here in this land we unleashed the energy and individual genius of man to a greater extent than has ever been done before. Freedom and the dignity of the individual have been more available and assured here than in any other place on Earth. The price for this freedom at times has been high, but we have never been unwilling to pay that price.

It is no coincidence that our present troubles parallel and are proportionate to the intervention and intrusion in our lives that result from unnecessary and excessive growth of government. It is time for us to realize that we’re too great a nation to limit ourselves to small dreams. We’re not, as some would have us believe, doomed to an inevitable decline. I do not believe in a fate that will fall on us no matter what we do. I do believe in a fate that will fall on us if we do nothing. So, with all the creative energy at our command, let us begin an era of national renewal. Let us renew our determination, our courage, and our strength. And let us renew our faith and our hope.

We have every right to dream heroic dreams. Those who say that we’re in a time when there are not heroes, they just don’t know where to look. You can see heroes every day going in and out of factory gates. Others, a handful in number, produce enough food to feed all of us and then the world beyond. You meet heroes across a counter, and they’re on both sides of that counter. There are entrepreneurs with faith in themselves and faith in an idea who create new jobs, new wealth and opportunity. They’re individuals and families whose taxes support the government and whose voluntary gifts support church, charity, culture, art, and education. Their patriotism is quiet, but deep. Their values sustain our national life.

Now, I have used the words “they” and “their” in speaking of these heroes. I could say “you” and “your,” because I’m addressing the heroes of whom I speak—you, the citizens of this blessed land. Your dreams, your hopes, your goals are going to be the dreams, the hopes, and the goals of this administration, so help me God.

We shall reflect the compassion that is so much a part of your makeup. How can we love our country and not love our countrymen; and loving them, reach out a hand when they fall, heal them when they’re sick, and provide opportunity to make them self-sufficient so they will be equal in fact and not just in theory?

Can we solve the problems confronting us? Well, the answer is an unequivocal and emphatic “yes.” To paraphrase Winston Churchill, I did not take the oath I’ve just taken with the intention of presiding over the dissolution of the world’s strongest economy.

In the days ahead I will propose removing the roadblocks that have slowed our economy and reduced productivity. Steps will be taken aimed at restoring the balance between the various levels of government. Progress may be slow, measured in inches and feet, not miles, but we will progress. It is time to reawaken this industrial giant, to get government back within its means, and to lighten our punitive tax burden. And these will be our first priorities, and on these principles there will be no compromise.

On the eve of our struggle for independence a man who might have been one of the greatest among the Founding Fathers, Dr. Joseph Warren, president of the Massachusetts Congress, said to his fellow Americans, “Our country is in danger, but not to be despaired of . . . . On you depend the fortunes of America. You are to decide the important questions upon which rests the happiness and the liberty of millions yet unborn. Act worthy of yourselves.”

Well, I believe we, the Americans of today, are ready to act worthy of ourselves, ready to do what must be done to ensure happiness and liberty for ourselves, our children, and our children’s children. And as we renew ourselves here in our own land, we will be seen as having greater strength throughout the world. We will again be the exemplar of freedom and a beacon of hope for those who do not now have freedom.

To those neighbors and allies who share our freedom, we will strengthen our historic ties and assure them of our support and firm commitment. We will match loyalty with loyalty. We will strive for mutually beneficial relations. We will not use our friendship to impose on their sovereignty, for our own sovereignty is not for sale.

As for the enemies of freedom, those who are potential adversaries, they will be reminded that peace is the highest aspiration of the American people. We will negotiate for it, sacrifice for it; we will not surrender for it, now or ever.

Our forbearance should never be misunderstood. Our reluctance for conflict should not be misjudged as a failure of will. When action is required to preserve our national security, we will act. We will maintain sufficient strength to prevail if need be, knowing that if we do so we have the best chance of never having to use that strength.

Above all, we must realize that no arsenal or no weapon in the arsenals of the world is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women. It is a weapon our adversaries in today’s world do not have. It is a weapon that we as Americans do have. Let that be understood by those who practice terrorism and prey upon their neighbors.

I’m told that tens of thousands of prayer meetings are being held on this day, and for that I’m deeply grateful. We are a nation under God, and I believe God intended for us to be free. It would be fitting and good, I think, if on each Inaugural Day in future years it should be declared a day of prayer.

This is the first time in our history that this ceremony has been held, as you’ve been told, on this West Front of the Capitol. Standing here, one faces a magnificent vista, opening up on this city’s special beauty and history. At the end of this open mall are those shrines to the giants on whose shoulders we stand.

Directly in front of me, the monument to a monumental man, George Washington, father of our country. A man of humility who came to greatness reluctantly. He led America out of revolutionary victory into infant nationhood. Off to one side, the stately memorial to Thomas Jefferson. The Declaration of Independence flames with his eloquence. And then, beyond the Reflecting Pool, the dignified columns of the Lincoln Memorial. Whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of America will find it in the life of Abraham Lincoln.

Beyond those monuments to heroism is the Potomac River, and on the far shore the sloping hills of Arlington National Cemetery, with its row upon row of simple white markers bearing crosses or Stars of David. They add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom.

Each one of those markers is a monument to the kind of hero I spoke of earlier. Their lives ended in places called Belleau Wood, The Argonne, Omaha Beach, Salerno, and halfway around the world on Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Pork Chop Hill, the Chosin Reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called Vietnam.

Under one such marker lies a young man, Martin Treptow, who left his job in a small town barbershop in 1917 to go to France with the famed Rainbow Division. There, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire.

We’re told that on his body was found a diary. On the flyleaf under the heading, “My Pledge,” he had written these words: “America must win this war. Therefore I will work, I will save, I will sacrifice, I will endure, I will fight cheerfully and do my utmost, as if the issue of the whole struggle depended on me alone.”

The crisis we are facing today does not require of us the kind of sacrifice that Martin Treptow and so many thousands of others were called upon to make. It does require, however, our best effort and our willingness to believe in ourselves and to believe in our capacity to perform great deeds, to believe that together with God’s help we can and will resolve the problems which now confront us.

And after all, why shouldn’t we believe that? We are Americans.
God bless you, and thank you.


Note: The President spoke at 12 noon from a platform erected at the West Front of the Capitol. Immediately before the address, the oath of office was administered by Chief Justice Warren E. Burger.

In his opening remarks, the President referred to Rev. Donn D. Moomaw, senior pastor, Bel Air Presbyterian Church, Los Angeles, California.

The address was broadcast live on radio and television.

Obama’s Second Inaugural

By Yuval Levin
“…President Obama’s second inaugural address was an exceptionally coherent and deeply revealing speech. Its cogency was impressive: Recent inaugurals, and especially those of reelected presidents, have inclined toward the laundry list far more than this speech did. Obama made an argument, and one that holds together and advances a discernible worldview. It was in that sense a very successful speech, and while it may not be memorable in the sense of containing lines so eloquent or striking that they will always be associated with this moment and this president, it is a speech that will repay future re-reading because it lays out an important strand of American political thought rather clearly.But because it does so, it is also revealing of the shallowness, confusion, and error of that strand of American political thought — that is, of the progressive worldview in our politics.This speech was about as compact yet comprehensive an example of the contemporary progressive vision as we’re likely to get from a politician. It had all the usual elements. Its point of origin was a familiar distorted historical narrative of the founding — half of Jefferson and none of Madison — setting us off on a utopian “journey” in the course of which the founding vision is transformed into its opposite in response to changing circumstances, with life becoming choice, liberty becoming security, and the pursuit of happiness transmuted into a collective effort to guarantee that everyone has choice and security. The ideals of the Declaration of Independence are praised mostly for their flexibility in the face of their own anachronism, as their early embodiment in a political order (that is, the Constitution) proves inadequate to a changing world and must be gradually but thoroughly replaced by an open-ended commitment to meeting social objectives through state action.The only alternative to state action, in this vision of things, is the preposterously insufficient prospect of individual action. “For the American people can no more meet the demands of today’s world by acting alone than American soldiers could have met the forces of fascism or communism with muskets and militias,” the president said.

No single person can train all the math and science teachers we’ll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. Now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people.

The individual acting alone or the entire nation acting through its government, those are the only options we have. The space between the individual and the state is understood to be empty at best, and at worst to be filled with dreadful vestiges of intolerance and backwardness that must be cleared out to enable the pursuit of justice.

Our history is more or less a tale of an increasing public awareness of these facts. As we grew to understand that only common public action would suffice in an ever-changing world:

Together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce; schools and colleges to train our workers.

Together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play.

Together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life’s worst hazards and misfortune.

That modern economy and that free market are simply constants to be taken for granted — they will keep on humming, the only question is whether they will be placed under any restraints or direction. “Our celebration of initiative and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, are constants in our character,” the president said, so we need not worry about how to sustain them but only about how to contain them.

And as we grew to understand the virtues of such common efforts of containment and direction of the modern economy, we also advanced the struggle against those vestiges of backwardness that have raised obstacles to inclusion, scoring victories for justice in “Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall.” Never mind the 50 million human beings deemed insignificant because they were unwanted and snuffed out over the last four decades in the cause of choice. Indeed, the freedom to remorselessly exterminate these innocents, rather than the struggle to protect the life and dignity of the weak who dared by their existence and their neediness to disrupt the plans of the strong, is somehow given a place of honor in the register of social progress.

Having been delivered along the arc of that progress to this point, we should have a pretty good idea of what we ought to do next: the same thing but more so. After all, the logic of the narrative carries its own direction — toward a series of utopian if sometimes nonetheless remarkably trivial near-term goals (“our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote”) and a longer-term ideal of permanent universal political activism striving for an ever-more-perfect balance of moral individualism and economic collectivism.

As it is both moved by a hunger for justice and embodied in the American story (as its champions understand it), this course is taken to plainly occupy the moral high ground, and opposition to it can really only be explained by bad faith, bad motives, or bad reasoning. Thus, even as the advocates of this way of thinking style themselves pragmatists, they deem their opponents worse than wicked.

The president probably didn’t even quite see that his second inaugural was almost certainly the most partisan inaugural address in American history — more partisan than one delivered on the brink of civil war, or in the midst of it, or after the most poisonous and bitterly contested election in our history. He accused his political opponents of rabid (even stupid) radical individualism, of desiring to throw the elderly and the poor onto the street, of wanting to leave the parents of disabled children with no options, of believing that freedom should be reserved for the lucky and happiness for the few, and of putting dogma and party above country. Because it has exceedingly high expectations of politics, this view treats the failure to achieve its own goals as evidence of misconduct by others and of the inadequacy of the system we have. As White House communications director Dan Pfeiffer put it to the Washington Post this week, “There’s a moment of opportunity now that’s important. What’s frustrating is that we don’t have a political system or an opposition party worthy of the opportunity.”

The first thing to say about this vision is that it is a serious set of ideas and in some important respects an appealing one. It seeks to put American politics on a modern idealistic foundation rather than the modern skeptical foundation on which our constitutional order has put it, and it understands the liberal society as a set of utopian objectives grounded in a set of rational ideals. That’s certainly one way to understand the liberal society, and it is a way with deep roots in American thought. I’ve always thought that describing the progressive worldview as some kind of German implant undersells it and distorts it. It is surely that in part, but it is also the working out of a strain of American liberalism that has been with us from the beginning. The progressives claim to a connection to Jefferson is not unfounded. But it is incomplete and ill-informed.

The progressives used to know this. Herbert Croly understood that his claim to be applying to economic power the logic of the limits and restraints that Jefferson applied to political power was at least a little preposterous. He was not wrong to say that Jeffersonianism is in some tension with the Constitution — Jefferson surely thought so himself. But he was wrong to say that it pointed toward the sort of philosophical collectivism that the modern left is after. He was using a version of American history to make his case for change more palatable. But today’s progressives simply believe their own history and their own self-portrait. They really believe that the case for equality, for greater inclusion and civil rights, and for some protection from risk in the face of our tumultuous economy can only be grounded in the progressive worldview. Indeed, they take that view to be pragmatic common sense in light of a changing world, rather than a utopian ideology, and they therefore don’t grasp the radical inadequacy of the vision they’re espousing.

By espousing that vision more clearly than usual, the president’s speech revealed that inadequacy. It did so first and foremost by showing that (quite ironically, given how it praises itself for keeping up with change) progressivism today is highly anachronistic. As David Brooks astutely noted today:

The Progressive Era, New Deal and Great Society laws were enacted when America was still a young and growing nation. They were enacted in a nation that was vibrant, raw, underinstitutionalized and needed taming.

We are no longer that nation. We are now a mature nation with an aging population. Far from being underinstitutionalized, we are bogged down with a bloated political system, a tangled tax code, a byzantine legal code and a crushing debt.

In fact, in my opinion the lumbering and bogged-down character of our economy is the chief threat to the very economic security (not to mention prosperity) that the progressives say they are after. But Obama’s speech expressed no grasp of our current situation.

It is for that reason that he relied so heavily on straw men and absurd caricatures of his opponents’ positions. At one point, almost despite himself, the president stumbled upon the kind of thinking those opponents now actually offer, though he quickly picked himself up and continued to march in the opposite direction. In the middle of a case about how inequality calls for common action, he said:

We understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time. We must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools, and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, and reach higher. But while the means will change, our purpose endures: a nation that rewards the effort and determination of every single American. That is what this moment requires. That is what will give real meaning to our creed.

We, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. But we reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.

This is roughly the case for Paul Ryan’s budget. But the president opposes that approach, and in making this argument he pointed to some obvious objections to the rest of his speech without answering them. What programs are so inadequate that he is willing to see them reformed? Where is he willing to change the means to continue achieving the ends? What hard choices does he have in mind to reduce the deficit and the cost of health care? What does it mean to “reject the belief” that we are forced into a choice between the young and the old when we have massive government programs that compel exactly that choice and yet the president refuses to change them?

In fact, it is precisely the vision laid out in the rest of the president’s speech that has brought us to this difficult moment. Our foremost domestic challenges now almost all have to do with mitigating the enormous damage done to our economic dynamism, our social fabric, and our fiscal prospects by the public exertions most directly attributable to the sort of progressivism Obama laid out. This generation and the next one (at least) will spend their political energies trying to pick up the pieces of the Great Society and to construct alternatives to its foremost achievements that are better suited to the kind of country we are and want to be. And today’s progressives are very poorly suited to that task, because they do not see the problem, and they have a rather peculiar notion of the kind of country we are and want to be.

For conservatives to do better, it would be helpful to understand the left’s failings, and this speech is not a bad place to start. Look at the vision it lays out. It denies the relevance of our constitutional system, the value of civil society, the social achievement that is our culture of individual initiative and economic dynamism, the dignity of every life whether wanted by others or not, and the unsustainability of the liberal welfare state.

A coherent alternative would need to answer each of these errors and to put forward a political vision and program that champions the constitutional system and its underlying worldview, lifts up civil society as a key source of our strength, sustains the moral preconditions for democratic capitalism, protects every life, and transforms the institutions of the liberal welfare state into a robust safety net that guards the vulnerable and gives everyone a chance to benefit from and participate in our dynamic economy rather than shielding them from it. It is not hard to imagine such a combination of ideas because that combination, in its various forms, is what American conservatism stands for. It probably wouldn’t hurt to let the voting public know that. …”

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/338366/obama-s-second-inaugural-yuval-levin#

Morning Bell: Obama’s Second Inaugural Address, Translated

Amy Payne

“…Members of Congress—who are about to debate raising the debt ceiling tomorrow—should have paid attention yesterday. The President was very clear that he sees no urgency about reducing the debt and cutting the deficit. In fact, in his second inaugural address, President Barack Obama was honest about his intentions to grow government in order to remake our country along his progressive vision.

To sell his agenda, the President borrowed imagery and terminology from America’s first principles. But he twisted the American founding idea of “We the people” into the liberal “It takes a village.”

His rhetoric on the issues only thinly disguised his true meaning. Let’s translate some of his key points.

Obama on “we the people”: “For the American people can no more meet the demands of today’s world by acting alone than American soldiers could have met the forces of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. No single person can train all the math and science teachers we’ll need to equip our children for the future. Or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores.”

Translation: In case you didn’t hear me the first time, you didn’t build that.

He may have surrounded these words with lip service to the Constitution and America’s promise of freedom, but the President revisited his core message here: It takes a taxpayer-subsidized village to build things. According to his philosophy, entrepreneurs don’t create jobs—the government does.

Obama on the fiscal crisis: “We, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it….We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. But we reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.”

Translation: I will continue to push for more tax increases instead of reforming Medicare and Social Security.

On this point, the President followed up his promise that he will not negotiate on the debt ceiling by digging in his heels on taxes and entitlement programs. The “hard choices” he refers to on health care and the deficit are more tax increases—because he “reject[s] the belief” that entitlements must be reformed if they are going to stay around for the next generation.

The debt limit showdown continues this week: The House will vote tomorrow on a plan that would extend the debt ceiling for three months while forcing Congress—specifically, the Senate—to pass a budget. If they do not pass a budget by April 15 under this plan, Members of Congress would stop getting paid. If House Republicans so much as blink, the President and his allies will steamroll them.

Obama on green energy: “We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. Some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires, and crippling drought, and more powerful storms. The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But American cannot resist this transition.”

Translation: I will continue to increase regulations on the energy sources we use and throw taxpayer money into “green” energy companies.

Despite the ever-growing Green Graveyard of companies like Solyndra that took taxpayer money only to go bankrupt, the President clings to this unworkable and expensive policy. And his linking of climate change to “more powerful storms” points to a renewed push for policies like a carbon tax to punish people for using energy—a policy that would harm the economy and produce no tangible environmental benefits.

Obama on foreign policy: “We, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war….We will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully. Not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear.”

Translation: The terrorists are on the run, and I still think we can negotiate with nuclear bullies like Iran.

Even as Obama pulls troops from Iraq and Afghanistan, the hostage crisis in Algeria shows that al-Qaeda is alive and well. Though Iran continues to rebuff international inspectors and basically do whatever it wants, Obama seems perpetually optimistic that more talks with this hostile regime—and others like it—could make them change their behavior.

The President said yesterday that “fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges.” Though the plans he laid out are not new, they definitely require a response if we are to preserve the founding principles we cherish, including our individual right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Congress has been warned, and by the President no less, that he is in no mood to compromise. If they give in, a liberal agenda like we’ve never known before will be implemented, while needed reforms to our entitlement programs will not take place. Holding the line is more important now than ever. …”

http://blog.heritage.org/2013/01/22/obama-second-inaugural-address-translated/

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Obama’s SAD (Spending Addiction Disorder)–Cure–Cut Spending–Balance The Budget–Freeze Debt Ceiling–Videos

Posted on January 18, 2013. Filed under: Agriculture, American History, Babies, Banking, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, Immigration, Inflation, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Programming, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Tax Policy, Unemployment, Unions, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

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U.S. National Debt

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

Obama On Debt, Guns- Full Press Conference

FLASHBACK: Obama Campaigning In ’04: Deficit Is “An Enormous Problem”

Lou Dobbs on irony of Obama’s new debt ceiling stance

Deficits, Debts and Unfunded Liabilities: The Consequences of Excessive Government

National Debt: 16 trillion visualized (with short lecture to the irresponsible)

EXPERT Peter Schiff Says Economic Collapse Is Comming And Is HERE NOW

Obama: I’ll Take Responsibility To Raise The Debt Ceiling! – Cavuto

Debt Limit Showdown Just Around The Corner | Ed Butowsky

Judge Napolitano: President Obama Absolutely Cannot Use the 14th Amendment to R

Reuters Today: Bernanke pleads for higher debt ceiling

 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE
                                                  STAR - TREASURY FINANCIAL DATABASE
             TABLE 1.  SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS, OUTLAYS AND THE DEFICIT/SURPLUS BY MONTH OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT (IN MILLIONS)

                                                        ACCOUNTING DATE:  12/12

   PERIOD                                                                     RECEIPTS                OUTLAYS    DEFICIT/SURPLUS (-)
+  ____________________________________________________________  _____________________  _____________________  _____________________
   PRIOR YEAR

     OCTOBER                                                                   163,072                261,539                 98,466
     NOVEMBER                                                                  152,402                289,704                137,302
     DECEMBER                                                                  239,963                325,930                 85,967
     JANUARY                                                                   234,319                261,726                 27,407
     FEBRUARY                                                                  103,413                335,090                231,677
     MARCH                                                                     171,215                369,372                198,157
     APRIL                                                                     318,807                259,690                -59,117
     MAY                                                                       180,713                305,348                124,636
     JUNE                                                                      260,177                319,919                 59,741
     JULY                                                                      184,585                254,190                 69,604
     AUGUST                                                                    178,860                369,393                190,533
     SEPTEMBER                                                                 261,566                186,386                -75,180

       YEAR-TO-DATE                                                          2,449,093              3,538,286              1,089,193

   CURRENT YEAR

     OCTOBER                                                                   184,316                304,311                119,995
     NOVEMBER                                                                  161,730                333,841                172,112
     DECEMBER                                                                  269,501                269,760                    260

       YEAR-TO-DATE                                                            615,546                907,913                292,367
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Global Gun Grappers–We Do Not Trust Them–Forewarned Is Forearmed–Videos

Posted on January 12, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Crime, Economics, Foreign Policy, government, government spending, history, Law, liberty, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Pistols, Politics, Psychology, Raves, Rifles, Security, Video, War, Wealth, Weapons | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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“When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.”

“The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”

~Thomas Jefferson

Stop Democide Now!

Rwanda Genocide full documentary, PBS Documentary

Gregory Stanton: The Eight Stages of Genocide

Maafa 21 (2009) Full Length

Black Genocide Praised by Obama Supporters Paid for by Tax Payers: MAAFA21

The Second Amendment Of The United States Constitution – Gun Ban Control

The Great American Gun ban: The UN Small Arms Treaty

Mainstream Media Caught Spreading Disinformation On Gun Ban Control Redhanded

Anti-gun politicians get OWNED 

What Is An “Assault Rifle”? – You’ve Probably Been Lied To 

Assault Rifle vs. Sporting Rifle

Chuck Woolery on Assault Weapons

 Penn & Teller on the 2nd Amendment

Penn and Teller – Suzanna’s Gun Encounter Story

Penn & Teller: Bullshit! – Gun Control

GOP Senator Cruz: New Gun Control Proposals Are ‘Unconstitutional’

The Gun Grabbers’ Worst Nightmare…A Law-Abiding Citizen with a Gun

Georgia Mom Shoots Home Intruder Six Times in the face and neck after Being Cornered

Mom Shoots Intruder 911 Call

Gun bans – Don’t think it can happen, watch

Innocents Betrayed – The True Story of Gun Control

Warning: Graphic Violence. This disturbing video clearly demonstrates the consequences of centralizing government power and disarming citizens. Genocide always follows, leaving millions of innocent victims dead.

Romney, Obama gun control stance

Barrack Obama on Gun Control and Second Amendment

UN Gun Grabbers

Obama’s Secret Gun Control plan! Dick Morris TV: Lunch ALERT!

U.N. Small Arms Treaty a Threat to the Second Amendment

Gun Owners Outed by Newspaper Speak Out on Hannity Show!

Michael Savage – Feinstein Gun Grabber and General Schwarzkopf Passing – 12/27/12

Obama Will Use Children as Props for Gun Control Announcement! Megyn Kelly 

Watch President Obama Announce Proposals for Sweeping Gun Control Legislation

President Obama demands tightened gun control laws

Glenn Beck On Gun Ban Control_ Anti-Gun Sentiment Rising In The Country 

Impeachment? Don’t Hold Your Breath 2 + With Kids as Human Shields, Obama Will

Obama’s agenda The UN Gun Grab Treat

Alex Jones Piers Morgan Part 1. 1776 Will Commence Again’ If Guns Taken Away

  Background Articles and Videos

Dr. Michael Savage Talks About Gun Control

Sneaky Democrats Attempt Stealth Gun Control

Glenn Beck Warns Of Food Riots, Martial Law and Gun confiscation

Glenn Beck Buy Farmland and Guns! GET READY FOR A FIGHT !

Obama Unveils New Gun Control Ban

Judge Napolitano Reacts to Biden’s Remarks About Obama Considering Executive Orders

Rand Paul on Gun Control Executive Order: Obama is Not ‘King’ – CBN News 1/14/20

‘This Week’ Tackles Gun Violence: “So Much Anxiety Out in America, They Also Fear T

Gun control is evil and always ends in DEMOCIDE!

Global gun grabbers

Ask the experts. Common sense gun control works.

Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, Mussolini, Mao Tse-tung, Kim Il-sung, Castro, Pol Pot, Idi Amin and Qaddafi all confiscated the guns owned by their country’s people. Once they were disarmed of their pistols, rifles and other weapons, the people became defenseless against the tyranny of these political leaders.

This enabled democide—death by government. R.J. Rummel defines democide as “the murder of any person or people by a government, including genocide, politicide and mass murder.” There have been several dozen democides in the 20th century with deaths totaling more than 262 million from 1900 to 1999, according to Rummel’s estimates.

The big three democides of the 20th century were the People’ Republic of China from 1949-1987 when more than 76 million were killed, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics from 1917-1987 when more than 61 million were murdered, and the German Third Reich from 1938 to 1945 when nearly 21 million were slaughtered, according to Rummel’s estimates on his website, http://www.hawaii.edu/powerkills/20TH.HTM.

The American colonists formed local militias to defend themselves from American Indian attacks. The American Revolution started when King George III’s army, the Redcoats, garrisoned in Boston, attempted to confiscate the guns, ammunition and military stores of the American colonists in nearby Concord, Mass., and attempted to capture Samuel Adams and John Hancock. The Battles of Lexington and Concord were fought on April 19, 1775 against a British army of about 700 soldiers. The Redcoats retreated from Concord to Boston, when they were outnumbered by about 1,700 first responders—the militia minutemen.

 Minuteman_statue_-_Old_North_Bridge

The Minute Man, dedicated in 1885 to mark the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Concord, features an inscription from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Concord Hymn” reading, “By the rude bridge that arched the flood, their flag to April’s breeze unfurled, here once the embattled farmers stood and fired the shot heard ‘round the world.”

Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Minuteman_statue_3_-_Old_North_Bridge.jpg

The ratification of the United States Constitution by the states required the addition of 10 amendments, the Bill of Rights. The Second Amendment as ratified reads as follows: “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” During the ratification convention in Virginia on June 5, 1788, Patrick Henry said this about the right to keep and bear arms to protect against political oppression:

 “Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined.”

Progressive elements of the Democratic and Republican Parties are using the recent mass murder in Newtown, Conn.’s Sandy Hook Elementary School of 20 students and six adults to advance their political agendas and careers by infringing upon the rights of the American people to keep and bear arms.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo in his State of the State address called for the “toughest assault weapons ban in the nation” including the limiting of magazine capacities to 10 cartridges. Cuomo emotionally said, “No one hunts with an assault rifle. No one needs 10 bullets to kill a deer. End the madness.” Many Americans who own guns use them not for hunting but for self-defense against well-armed attacks by criminals, gangs, drug users and cartels, home invaders, illegal aliens, the mentally disturbed, rapists, corrupt politicians, terrorists or tyrants.

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein announced that she will introduce legislation this month that would require gun owners to register and be fingerprinted, outlaw a number of semi-automatic rifles, handguns and shotguns, and any weapon that can accept a magazine or large-capacity ammunition feeding device capable of accepting more than 10 rounds.  Feinstein said, “It will ban the sale, the transfer, the importation and the possession. Not retroactively, but prospectively. It will ban the same for big clips, drums or strips of more than 10 bullets.”

When the assault weapons ban ended after 10 years on Sept. 13, 2004, advocates of the ban such as the ban’s author Feinstein and Sarah Brady were predicting a surge in murders and crime. Instead violent crimes and murder rates have fallen to 41-year and 48-year lows, respectively, according to the FBI’s “Crime in the United States” annual volumes.

The Center of American Progress (CAP), an influential Democratic progressive think tank, also supports the Feinstein bill and is recommending 13 gun policies to the White House. The CAP wish list is a progressive’s dream for it includes the requirement of universal criminal background checks for all gun sales, modernizing data systems to track gun sales, banning military-grade assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines, closing loopholes that currently enable about 40 percent of sales by private sellers to occur without any questions being asked and the adding of convicted stalkers and suspected terrorists to the list of those barred from purchasing firearms.

On Jan. 16 Obama announced that he was implementing 23 executive actions and orders pertaining to the banning of guns and control of gun sales and ownership. Obama’s plan would reinstate and strengthen the Federal Assaults Weapon ban passed in 1994 that outlawed military style semiautomatic weapons that fire one round per trigger pull and automatically eject the shell casing and reload the chamber. The plan would also reinstate the ban on magazines that held more than ten rounds. After ten years, Congress allowed both bans to expire in 2004.

The highlights of Obama’s plan includes the following: (1) Require criminal background checks for all gun sales, (2) Take four executive actions to ensure information on dangerous individuals is available to the background check system, (3) Reinstate and strengthen the assault weapons ban, (4) Restore the 10-round limit on ammunition magazines, (4) Protect police by finishing the job of getting rid of armor-piercing bullets, (5) Give law enforcement additional tools to prevent and prosecute gun crime, (6) End the freeze on gun violence research, (7) Make our schools safer with more school resource officers and school counselors, safer climates and better emergency response plans, (8) Help ensure that young people get the mental health treatment they need and (9) Ensure health insurance plans cover mental health benefits.

With 288 members of Congress having the National Rifle Association’s pro-gun A rating based on their voting records on gun-related issues and promoting and protecting the Second Amendment, only a few, if any, items in Obama’s plan will actually be enacted into law by Congress. Neither Cuomo’s nor Feinstein’s nor Obama’s proposed legislation would have prevented or stopped the Newtown school mass murderer who stole the guns from his mother before killing her.

 Obama_children

Credit: http://images.smh.com.au/2013/01/17/3958541/729-obama-2-620×349.jpg

The use of four children and their letters by the president as propaganda props and pawns to gain support for his plan, illustrates the length a progressive president will go to disarm law-abiding Americans who want to protect their own children and families from harm. No American favors more gun violence; however, attempts by progressive politicians to make it more difficult for law-abiding Americans to purchase the firearms, magazines and ammunition they want for self-defense clearly violates and infringes upon their Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.

Gov. Rick Perry said, “The piling on by the political left and their cohorts in the media, to use the massacre of little children to advance a pre-existing political agenda that would not have saved those children, disgusts me, personally. The Second Amendment to the Constitution is a basic right and cannot nor will not be abridged by the executive power of this or any other president.” Texas Republican Rep. John Otto introduced a bill, H.B. No. 553, The Second Amendment Protection Act, co-sponsored by fellow Republican representative Jim Pitts and Drew Darby, that would make Obama’s 23 executive actions invalid and his gun control mandates null and void in Texas.

The Supreme Court ruled in the District of Columbia v. Heller landmark decision that the Second Amendment protects the right to handguns for self-defense. The court pointed out that handguns are the type of firearms that are overwhelmingly chosen by American society for that lawful purpose.” The most popular handguns today for self-defense are semi-automatic pistols. These pistols are designed to have detachable magazines and typically hold between seven to 15 rounds depending upon whether the magazine has a single or double stack and the caliber of the gun.

Progressive gun grabbers of both political parties in the U.S. are using the mass murder tragedy in Newtown to infringe upon the right of law-abiding Americans to bear and hold arms. The American people are responding by the massive purchase of firearms and ammunition that are setting sales records across the nation. The progressive ruling elites fear the people, as they rightly should. Thomas Jefferson said, “When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny,” and “The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”

 Raymond Thomas Pronk is host of the Pronk Pops Show on KDUX web radio from 3-5 p.m. Fridays and author of the companion blog http://www.pronkpops.wordpress.com/

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James Grant On Trillion Dollar Coin–Cut Spending–Videos

Posted on January 11, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, history, Inflation, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Raves, Tax Policy, Taxes, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , |

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Jim Grant: Trillion-Dollar Coin Not the Answer “The United States Is Truly Submerging.

Trillion-Dollar Coin: Absurd or Absurdly Right?

Magic Trillion Dollar Coin May Be Used To Pay Off The National Debt

The Trillion Dollar Coin

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Faber and Schiff on Investments in 2013–Bullish On Gold–Bearish On Bonds–Prices Rising–Inflation–Videos

Posted on January 11, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Economics, Energy, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, government, government spending, history, Inflation, Investments, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, Monetary Policy, Money, Natural Gas, Oil, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Resources, Security, Tax Policy, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

Peter Schiff Interviews Marc Faber On What Will Happen in 2013 – CNBC 1_10_2013

Peter Schiff 2013 – The CPI is nothing but Government Propaganda!

Inflation Propaganda Exposed

he CPI is no longer a tool to accurately measure inflation, but an instrument of propaganda the government uses to hide accelerating inflation from the public and financial markets. Modest CPI increases over the past several years do not reflect an absence of inflation, but a design flaw in the index that fails to fully capture the magnitude of price increases. Central bankers drawing economic conclusions regarding inflation and monetary policy based on this highly flawed data point are making a major policy error.

Note: Prices for the twenty items in our basket rose 44.3% during a ten-year period despite an official rise in the CPI of just 27.5% during the same time frame. But that is using official government numbers to evidence those price increases. However, judging by the inaccuracy of government numbers on other items, such as newspapers and health insurance, the actual rate of increase of the prices of the goods in our basket was likely much higher than what the government claimed!

Peter Schiff 2013 – Big Government is very expensive, if you want it you have to pay for it

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Bang Bang He Shot Me Down–Videos

Posted on January 9, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, liberty, Life, Links, media, Music, People, Technology, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , |

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Nancy Sinatra Bang Bang 

Nancy Sinatra – These Boots Are Made for Walkin’

NANCY SINATRA  – Sugar Town           1967

NANCY SINATRA   something stupid – 1967 

Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood – Jackson

Nancy Sinatra sings “God Knows I Love You” 

Nancy Sinatra – Wishin’ And Hopin’

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David Bowie is Back–Where Are We Now?–Happy Birthday–Videos

Posted on January 8, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Culture, liberty, Life, Links, Music, People, Video, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

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David Bowie: Where Are We Now? Full Video 

David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”

David Bowie – Let’s Dance

David Bowie – Heroes (live) 

David Bowie – Life On Mars?

David Bowie – Sound and Vision 

A documentary, which takes you on a journey of Bowie’s revolutionary career, struggle with his personal life and his achievements and successes. Features interviews with Bowie, Iman his wife, his musical contemporaries including Iggy Pop, Moby and Trent Razor. Exclusive footage of live performances of the showman’s best and music and film to showcase 30 years of his career. Highlights Bowie’s interests, passions and involvement with the arts. One not to be missed!

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The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born—Videos

Posted on January 7, 2013. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government, government spending, history, Inflation, Investments, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Natural Gas, Oil, People, Philosophy, Politics, Public Sector, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Tax Policy, Taxes, Technology, Unemployment, Unions, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 1 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 2 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 3 of 6

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The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 5 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 6 of 6

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Worldwide Aeros Corp New Prototype Airship–Videos

Posted on January 5, 2013. Filed under: Airships, Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, government spending, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Politics, Transportation, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

airship2

Construction is complete on behemoth airship; first flight planned

By W.J. HenniganJanuary 4, 2013, 1:36 p.m.
 

“…A massive cargo-carrying airship has taken shape inside one of the 17-story wooden blimp hangars at the former military base in Tustin.

According to aircraft maker Worldwide Aeros Corp., construction is complete on a 36,000-pound blimp-like aircraft designed for the military to carry tons of cargo to remote areas around the world.

The Montebello company hopes to have a first flight in the coming months and to demonstrate cargo-carrying capability shortly thereafter.

“This is truly the beginning of a vertical global transportation solution for perhaps the next 100 years,” Chief Executive Igor Pasternak said in a statement.

Worldwide Aeros, a company of about 100 employees, built the prototype under a contract of about $35 million from the Pentagon and NASA.

The Aeroscraft is a zeppelin with a 230-foot rigid skeleton made of aluminum and carbon fiber. It’s a new type of hybrid aircraft that combines airplane and airship technologies and doesn’t need a long runway to take off or land because it has piston engines that allow it to move vertically and a new high-tech buoyancy control system.

Ultimately, the company wants to be able to carry up to 66 tons. …”

http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-aeros-airship-tustin-20130104,0,799208.story 

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U.S. Economy Still Stagnating with No Change in Unemployment U-3 Rate of 7.8% With Only 155,000 New Jobs Created in December 2012–12.2 Million Unemployed–Videos

Posted on January 4, 2013. Filed under: Babies, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Demographics, Economics, Employment, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, government spending, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Unemployment, Video, War, Wealth, Weather, Wisdom | Tags: , , |

sgs-emp

Wall Street wavers after jobs report

Boring Jobs Data Has Hidden Positives, Fueling Optimism

US unemployment rate holds steady in December at 7.8%

U.S. Morning Call: Investors looking for upbeat jobs report

Employment Level

143,305,000

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

employment level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142153(1) 141644 140721 140652 140250 140005 139898 139481 138810 138421 138665 138025
2010 138439(1) 138624 138767 139296 139255 139148 139167 139405 139388 139097 139046 139295
2011 139253(1) 139471 139643 139606 139681 139405 139509 139870 140164 140314 140771 140896
2012 141608(1) 142019 142020 141934 142302 142448 142250 142164 142974 143328 143277 143305
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Civilian Labor Force

155,511,000

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

civilian_labor_force

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154232(1) 154526 154142 154479 154742 154710 154505 154300 153815 153804 153887 153120
2010 153455(1) 153702 153960 154577 154110 153623 153709 154078 153966 153681 154140 153649
2011 153244(1) 153269 153358 153478 153552 153369 153325 153707 154074 154010 154096 153945
2012 154356(1) 154825 154707 154451 154998 155149 154995 154647 155056 155576 155319 155511
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Labor Participation Rate

63.6%

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

civilian_labor_participation_rate

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.1 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.9 63.8 63.6 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.6

Unemployment Level

12,206,000

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

unemployment_level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12079 12881 13421 13826 14492 14705 14607 14819 15005 15382 15223 15095
2010 15016 15078 15192 15281 14856 14475 14542 14673 14577 14584 15094 14354
2011 13992 13798 13716 13872 13871 13964 13817 13837 13910 13696 13325 13049
2012 12748 12806 12686 12518 12695 12701 12745 12483 12082 12248 12042 12206

Unemployment Rate U-3

7.8%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

unemployment_rate

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 8.9 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.9 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.9 7.8 7.8

Unemployment Rate U-6

14.4%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

unemployment_rate_U_6

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.1 15.7 15.9 16.4 16.5 16.5 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.0 17.1 16.6 16.5 16.5 16.5 16.8 16.7 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.8 16.0 15.8 16.1 16.0 16.1 16.3 16.0 15.5 15.2
2012 15.1 15.0 14.5 14.5 14.8 14.8 14.9 14.7 14.7 14.5 14.4 14.4

Background Articles and Videos

The Unemployment Game Show: Are You *Really* Unemployed?

Trapped in Unemployment

Decades of high unemployment likely

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed                   USDL-13-0001
until 8:30 a.m. (EST) Friday, January 4, 2013

Technical information:
 Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- DECEMBER 2012

Nonfarm payroll employment rose by 155,000 in December, and the unemployment 
rate was unchanged at 7.8 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 
today. Employment increased in health care, food services and drinking places, 
construction, and manufacturing.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------
   |                                                                 |
   |      Revision of Seasonally Adjusted Household Survey Data      |
   |                                                                 |
   | Seasonally adjusted household survey data have been revised     |
   | using updated seasonal adjustment factors, a procedure done at  |
   | the end of each calendar year. Seasonally adjusted estimates    |
   | back to January 2008 were subject to revision. The unemployment |
   | rates for January 2012 through November 2012 (as originally     |
   | published and as revised) appear in table A, along with         |
   | additional information about the revisions.                     |
   |                                                                 |
    -----------------------------------------------------------------

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons, at 12.2 million, was little changed
in December. The unemployment rate held at 7.8 percent and has been at
or near that level since September. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult women
(7.3 percent) and blacks (14.0 percent) edged up in December, while
the rates for adult men (7.2 percent), teenagers (23.5 percent),
whites (6.9 percent), and Hispanics (9.6 percent) showed little or no
change. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.6 percent (not seasonally
adjusted), little changed from a year earlier. (See tables A-1, A-2,
and A-3.)

In December, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27
weeks or more) was essentially unchanged at 4.8 million and accounted
for 39.1 percent of the unemployed. (See table A-12.)

The civilian labor force participation rate held at 63.6 percent in
December. The employment-population ratio, at 58.6 percent, was 
essentially unchanged over the month. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons
(sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers), at 7.9
million, changed little in December. These individuals were working
part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were
unable to find a full-time job. (See table A-8.)

In December, 2.6 million persons were marginally attached to the labor
force, essentially unchanged from a year earlier. (These data are not
seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force,
wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime
in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because
they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.
(See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 1.1 million discouraged
workers in December, little changed from a year earlier. (These data
are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not
currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available
for them. The remaining 1.5 million persons marginally attached to the
labor force in December had not searched for work in the 4 weeks
preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family
responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 155,000 in December. In
2012, employment growth averaged 153,000 per month, the same as the
average monthly gain for 2011. In December, employment increased in
health care, food services and drinking places, construction, and
manufacturing. (See table B-1.)

Health care employment continued to expand in December (+45,000). Job
gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+23,000), in
hospitals (+12,000), and in nursing and residential care facilities
(+10,000). In 2012, health care employment rose by 338,000.

In December, employment in food services and drinking places rose by
38,000. In 2012, the industry added an average of 24,000 jobs a month,
essentially the same as in 2011.

Construction added 30,000 jobs in December, led by employment
increases in construction of buildings (+13,000) and in residential
specialty trade contractors (+12,000).

In December, manufacturing employment rose by 25,000, with small gains
in a number of component industries. In 2012, factory employment
increased by 180,000; most of the growth occurred during the first
quarter.

Employment in retail trade changed little in December, after
increasing by 143,000 over the prior 3 months. Within the industry,
employment in clothing and accessories stores fell by 19,000,
following gains that totaled 55,000 over the prior 3 months. Elsewhere
in retail trade, employment in automobile dealers and in food and
beverage stores continued to trend up in December.

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging,
transportation and warehousing, financial activities, professional and
businesses services, and government, showed little change over the
month.

In December, the average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm
payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours. The manufacturing
workweek edged up by 0.1 hour to 40.7 hours, and factory overtime was
unchanged at 3.3 hours. The average workweek for production and
nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1
hour to 33.8 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

Average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls
rose by 7 cents to $23.73. Over the year, average hourly earnings have
risen by 2.1 percent. In December, average hourly earnings of private-
sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 6 cents to
$19.92. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for October was revised
from +138,000 to +137,000, and the change for November was revised
from +146,000 to +161,000.

____________
The Employment Situation for January is scheduled to be released on
Friday, February 1, 2013, at 8:30 a.m. (EST).

  ------------------------------------------------------------------ 
 |                                                                  |
 |            Revisions in the Establishment Survey Data            |
 |                                                                  |
 | With the release of January 2013 data on February 1, 2013, the   |
 | Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey will introduce        |
 | revisions to nonfarm payroll employment, hours, and earnings     |
 | data to reflect the annual benchmark adjustment for March 2012   |
 | and updated seasonal adjustment factors. Not seasonally adjusted |
 | data beginning with April 2011 and seasonally adjusted data      |
 | beginning with January 2008 are subject to revision.             |
 |                                                                  |
  ------------------------------------------------------------------ 

  ------------------------------------------------------------------ 
 |                                                                  |
 |             Upcoming Changes to the Household Survey             |
 |                                                                  |
 | Effective with the release of The Employment Situation for       |
 | January 2013, scheduled for February 1, 2013, new population     |
 | controls will be used in the monthly household survey estima-    |
 | tion process. These new controls reflect the annual updating of  |
 | intercensal population estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau.      |
 | Historical data will not be revised to incorporate the new       |
 | controls; consequently, household survey data for January 2013   |
 | will not be directly comparable with that for December 2012 or   |
 | earlier periods. A table showing the effects of the new controls |
 | on the major labor force series will be included in the January  |
 | 2013 release.                                                    |
 |                                                                  |
  ------------------------------------------------------------------ 

         Revision of Seasonally Adjusted Household Survey Data

At the end of each calendar year, BLS routinely updates the seasonal
adjustment factors for the labor force series derived from the Current
Population Survey (CPS), or household survey. As a result of this
process, seasonally adjusted data for January 2008 through November
2012 were subject to revision.

Table A shows the unemployment rates for January 2012 through November
2012, as first published and as revised. The rates changed by one-
tenth of a percentage point in 2 of the 11 months and were unchanged
in the remaining 9 months. Revised seasonally adjusted data for other
major labor force series beginning in December 2011 appear in table B.

An article describing the seasonal adjustment methodology for the
household survey data and revised data for January 2012 through
November 2012 is available at www.bls.gov/cps/cpsrs2013.pdf.

Historical data for the household series contained in the A tables of
this release can be accessed at www.bls.gov/cps/cpsatabs.htm. Revised
historical seasonally adjusted monthly and quarterly data for
additional series are available on the Internet at
ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/special.requests/lf/.

Table A.  Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates in 2012 and changes
due to revision, January - November 2012

         Month            As first           As          Change
                          computed         revised

January ...............      8.3             8.3          0.0
February ..............      8.3             8.3           .0
March .................      8.2             8.2           .0
April .................      8.1             8.1           .0
May ...................      8.2             8.2           .0
June ..................      8.2             8.2           .0
July ..................      8.3             8.2          -.1
August ................      8.1             8.1           .0
September .............      7.8             7.8           .0
October ...............      7.9             7.9           .0
November ..............      7.7             7.8           .1

HOUSEHOLD DATA Table B. Employment status of the civilian population by sex and age, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]

Employment status, sex, and age20112012Dec.Jan.Feb.Mar.Apr.MayJuneJulyAug.Sept.Oct.Nov.Dec.TOTAL Civilian noninstitutional population(1)240,584242,269242,435242,604242,784242,966243,155243,354243,566243,772243,983244,174244,350Civilian labor force153,945154,356154,825154,707154,451154,998155,149154,995154,647155,056155,576155,319155,511Participation rate64.063.763.963.863.663.863.863.763.563.663.863.663.6Employed140,896141,608142,019142,020141,934142,302142,448142,250142,164142,974143,328143,277143,305Employment-population ratio58.658.558.658.558.558.658.658.558.458.758.758.758.6Unemployed13,04912,74812,80612,68612,51812,69512,70112,74512,48312,08212,24812,04212,206Unemployment rate8.58.38.38.28.18.28.28.28.17.87.97.87.8 Men, 20 years and over Civilian noninstitutional population(1)108,290108,087108,188108,289108,396108,503108,613108,727108,851108,973109,096109,206109,308Civilian labor force79,42079,20379,30179,31379,10379,37379,43279,37679,08579,43679,67979,56879,695Participation rate73.373.373.373.273.073.273.173.072.772.973.072.972.9Employed73,05073,13873,17973,23873,14573,23073,29973,28873,09773,61273,84573,82173,949Employment-population ratio67.567.767.667.667.567.567.567.467.267.667.767.667.7Unemployed6,3706,0656,1236,0755,9586,1436,1336,0895,9885,8255,8345,7475,746Unemployment rate8.07.77.77.77.57.77.77.77.67.37.37.27.2 Women, 20 years and over Civilian noninstitutional population(1)115,602117,082117,170117,260117,353117,448117,546117,648117,760117,869117,980118,079118,170Civilian labor force68,81569,42069,77569,58069,58069,77769,77769,67369,80069,81370,04169,90770,059Participation rate59.559.359.559.359.359.459.459.259.359.259.459.259.3Employed63,44664,08064,45764,42264,45464,65364,61664,43764,71664,93465,01464,98864,954Employment-

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Schiff on Cliff–Debt Downgrade–$1.5 Trillion Deficit Coming Soon–Videos

Posted on January 3, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Diasters, Economics, Education, Employment, Energy, European History, Federal Government, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Food, government, government spending, history, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Rants, Raves, Resources, Tax Policy, Taxes, Video, War, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , |

peter_schiff

kicking_can_down_the_road

can

Congress Sells America Down the River to Avoid the Fiscal Cliff

greece_can_kicking

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Spending Addiction Disorder (SAD) Rampant in Democratic and Republican Parties–The Collapse of The American Dream–Videos

Posted on January 3, 2013. Filed under: Banking, Blogroll, Communications, Economics, Federal Government Budget, Fiscal Policy, Monetary Policy, Money, Tax Policy | Tags: , , , , , |

how_congress_spends_your_money

The bar chart comes directly from the Monthly Treasury Statement published by the U. S. Treasury Department. <<< Click on the chart for more info.
The “Debt Total” bar chart is generated from the Treasury Department’s “Debt Report” found on the Treasury Direct web site. It has links to search the debt for any given date range, and access to debt interest information. It is a direct source to government provided budget information.

“Deficit” vs. “Debt”—Suppose you spend more money this month than your income. This situation is called a “budget deficit”. So you borrow (ie; use your credit card). The amount you borrowed (and now owe) is called your debt. You have to pay interest on your debt. If next month you spend more than your income, another deficit, you must borrow some more, and you’ll still have to pay the interest on your debt (now larger). If you have a deficit every month, you keep borrowing and your debt grows. Soon the interest payment on your loan is bigger than any other item in your budget. Eventually, all you can do is pay the interest payment, and you don’t have any money left over for anything else. This situation is known as bankruptcy.

“Reducing the deficit” is a meaningless soundbite. If the DEFICIT is any amount more than ZERO, we have to borrow more and the DEBT grows.

Each year since 1969, Congress has spent more money than its income. The Treasury Department has to borrow money to meet Congress’s appropriations. Here is a direct link to the Congressional Budget Office web site’s deficit analysis. We have to pay interest* on that huge, growing debt; and it cuts into our budget big time.

http://www.federalbudget.com/

The table below summarizes the failed 10 year record of both political parties in controlling government spending that have produced massive fiscal-year deficits and an ever increasing national debt.

Summary of Tax Receipts and Spending Outlays of the United States Government for Fiscal Years 2002-2012[in million of dollars]
Fiscal Year Tax Receipts Spending Outlays Deficits (+)  or Surplus (-)
2002 1,853,225 2,011,016 157,791
2003 1,782,108 2,159,246 377,139
2004 1,879,783 2,292,628 412,845
2005 2,153,350 2,472,095 318,746
2006 2,406,675 2,654,873 248,197
2007 2,567,672 2,729,199 161,527
2008 2,523,642 2,978,440 454,798
2009 2,104,358 3,520,082 1,415,724
2010 2,161,728 3,455,931 1,294,204
2011 2,302,495 3,601,109 1,298,614
2012 2,449,093 3,538,286 1,089,193
Source: Department of the Treasury, Final Monthly Treasury Statements of Receipts and Outlays of the United States Government for Fiscal Years 2002-2012, table 1.

U.S. National Debt Tax

http://www.usdebtclock.org/

Government Explained

Congress Sells America Down the River to Avoid the Fiscal Cliff

Funding Government by the Minute

The Fiscal Cliff – Federal Spending Per Capita from 1900-2012.

Government Debt and You

Brother, Can You Spare A Trillion?: Government Gone Wild! 

Got a Government Jones? The 12 Steps for Overcoming Addiction to Government

HOW The PHONY FIAT FEDERAL RESERVE Bankster SYSTEM “MONEY” Is CREATED

FIAT EMPIRE:  Why the Federal Reserve Violates the U.S. Constitution

Milton Friedman on the Federal Reserve and the Great Depression

Hyperinflation: The Fall of the American Dollar

The Dollar Collapse Revisited and a Bull Market in US Treasuries w/Peter Schiff! 

Federal Reserve Balance Sheet Illustrated

The Collapse of The American Dream Explained in Animation 

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Trillion Dollar Bet –Long Term Capital Management (LTCM)–Videos

Posted on January 2, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Economics | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

trillion_dollar_bet

Trillion Dollar Bet 1

LTCM team:John Meriwether, the famed bond trader from Salomon Brothers, at its helm. Also on board were Nobel-prize winning economists Myron Scholes and Robert Merton, as well as David Mullins, a former vice-chairman of the Federal Reserve Board who had quit his job to become a partner at LTCM. These credentials convinced 80 founding investors to pony up the minimum investment of $10 million apiece, including Bear Sterns President James Cayne and his deputy.

Trillion Dollar Bet 2

Trillion Dollar Bet 3

Trillion Dollar Bet 4

Trillion Dollar Bet 5

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The Birth of the Speculator–Videos

Posted on January 2, 2013. Filed under: Blogroll, Business, Communications, Economics, history, Inflation, Investments, Law, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Technology, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , |

The Birth of the Speculator P1

The Birth of the Speculator P2

The Birth of the Speculator P3

The Birth of the Speculator P4

The Birth of the Speculator P5

The Birth of the Speculator P6

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Michael Masters–Financial Market Reform–Videos

Posted on January 2, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, Energy, history, Inflation, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Monetary Policy, Money, Natural Gas, Nuclear Power, Oil, People, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Rants, Raves, Regulations, Security, Strategy, Unemployment, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , |

michael_mastersl

5th OPEC International Seminar – Michael Masters 

Michael Masters
Chairman, Better Markets Inc
Michael W Masters is the founder and Managing Member of Masters Capital Management, an investment management firm. He is also a Partner in Masters Capital Nanotechnology, a venture capital fund. Mr Masters, an expert on the topic of commodities speculation and financial reform, has testified before many Congressional committees and government agencies, including the House Energy Subcommittee, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission. Recently, he participated in joint SEC-CFTC roundtable discussions on a variety of security-based swaps issues. Speaking out about the far-reaching harmful effects of unregulated commodities speculation and the need for financial reform, Mr Masters has made numerous appearances in media outlets around the world. He has also addressed consumer and corporate groups, and has served as an expert panellist before international and investor groups. He is the founder of Better Markets, a Washington, DC-based non-profit, non-partisan organization established to promote transparency and accountability in the financial markets for the public interest. He was the 2004 winner of the “Open Your Heart” award from Hedge Funds Care and is a 1989 graduate of the University of Tennessee.

The OPEC International Seminar is now regarded as one of the premier events on the world energy calendar, bringing together Ministers from OPEC Member Countries and other oil-producing countries, heads of intergovernmental organizations, chief executives of national and international oil companies, other industry leaders, renowned academics, analysts and media.

The 5th OPEC International Seminar, held in Vienna’s historic Hofburg Palace on 13–14 June 2012, focussing on the theme ‘Petroleum: Fuelling Prosperity, Supporting Sustainability’. The latest in the series of Seminars, which began in 2001, provided fresh impetus to key industry issues and developed existing and new avenues of dialogue and cooperation.

Derivatives still a ticking time bomb! Sept 2011

Derivatives Warning – Michael Greenberger interview

This is a collection of soundbites from Prof. Michael Greenberger from the University of Maryland School of Law who was interviewed for a PBS FRONTLINE program concerning Brooksley Born, former chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, who attempted to regulate the secretive, multitrillion-dollar derivatives market whose crash helped trigger the 2008 financial collapse.

Hearing on Energy Price Manipulation – Greenberger Testimony

The Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations holds a hearing, “Energy Speculation: Is Greater Regulation Necessary to Stop Price Manipulation?”  Professor Michael Greenberger, Director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security at University of Maryland, gives opening testimony.

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 1 of 6 

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 2 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 3 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 4 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 5 of 6

The Wizard, The Warning and The Education of Brooksley Born 6 of 6

Background Articles and Videos

CRUDE OIL TRADING FRAUD kills crude oil trading speculator

TRADING OIL FUTURES for the married man or TRADING OIL FUTURES for the

A CRUDE OIL FUTURE or A Crude Oil Future Contract = 1000 barrels of oil

Chose an OIL FUTURES CHART from a variety of oil futures chart selections available

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97% Owned–Video

Posted on January 2, 2013. Filed under: American History, Banking, Blogroll, Business, College, Communications, Economics, Education, government, government spending, history, History of Economic Thought, Inflation, Language, Law, liberty, Life, Links, Macroeconomics, media, Microeconomics, Monetary Policy, Money, People, Philosophy, Politics, Raves, Video, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , |

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97% Owned – Monetary Reform documentary

97% owned present serious research and verifiable evidence on our economic and financial system. This is the first documentary to tackle this issue from a UK-perspective and explains the inner workings of Central Banks and the Money creation process.

When money drives almost all activity on the planet, it’s essential that we understand it. Yet simple questions often get overlooked, questions like; where does money come from? Who creates it? Who decides how it gets used? And what does this mean for the millions of ordinary people who suffer when the monetary, and financial system, breaks down?

Produced by Queuepolitely and featuring Ben Dyson of Positive Money, Josh Ryan-Collins of The New Economics Foundation, Ann Pettifor, the “HBOS Whistleblower” Paul Moore, Simon Dixon of Bank to the Future and Nick Dearden from the Jubliee Debt Campaign.

Political philosopher John Gray, commented, “We’re not moving to a world in which crises will never happen or will happen less and less.  We are in a world in which they happen several times during a given human lifetime and I think that will continue to be the case”
If you have decided that crisis as a result of the monetary system is not an event you want to keep revisiting in your life-time then this documentary will equip you with the knowledge you need, what you do with it is up to you.

Background Articles and Videos

The American Dream – Understanding Money and the Banking System

Money, Banking and the Federal Reserve

The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of The World by Niall Ferguson Epsd 1-5

The Ascent of Money:  A Financial History of The World by Niall Ferguson Epsd 6

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