2,000 U.S. Soldiers Killed In Action and 17,644 Wounded In Action in Afghanistan War

Posted on September 30, 2012. Filed under: Blogroll, Communications, Law, liberty, Life, Links, media, People, Philosophy, Rants, Strategy, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , |

“Those who don’t know history are destined to repeat it.”

Edmund Burke

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

George Santayana, Reason in Common Sense, The Life of Reason, Vol.1

Pete Seeger: Where Have All the Flowers Gone? 

Suicide bomber kills 13, including 3 Nato troops 

US military death toll hits 2,000 after shootout in Wardak Afghanistan 

“Insider attacks” kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan

 

US Troop Deaths in Afghanistan Hit 2,000 

US military death toll in Afghanistan reaches 2,000

US toll in Afghan war hits 2,000 

NYT 2003 KIA In Afghanistan

Green-On-Blue Attacks In Afghanistan Can Have An Effect On When Troops Come Home

Inside The Taliban [National Geographic]

Afghanistan: War Without an End 

Afghanistan -The Battle For Helmand : Documentary

U.S. Military Death Toll in Afghan War Reaches New Milestone 

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)

OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) U.S. CASUALTY STATUS
FATALITIES AS OF: September 27, 2012, 10 a.m. EDT
OEF U.S. Military Casualties Total Deaths KIA Non-Hostile WIA
Afghanistan Only*** 1,996 1,657 339 17,644

Operation Enduring Freedom

http://icasualties.org/OEF/Index.aspx

Media Ignores Afghan War….

US military deaths in Afghanistan hit 2,000 after 11 years of war

By Patrick Quinn

“…KABUL – U.S. military deaths in the Afghan war have reached 2,000, a cold reminder of the human cost of an 11-year-old conflict that now garners little public interest at home as the United States prepares to withdraw most of its combat forces by the end of 2014.

The toll has climbed steadily in recent months with a spate of attacks by Afghan army and police — supposed allies — against American and NATO troops. That has raised troubling questions about whether countries in the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan will achieve their aim of helping the government in Kabul and its forces stand on their own after most foreign troops depart in little more than two years.

On Sunday, a U.S. official confirmed the latest death, saying that an international service member killed in an apparent insider attack by Afghan forces in the east of the country late Saturday was American. A civilian contractor with NATO and at least two Afghan soldiers also died in the attack, according to a coalition statement and Afghan provincial officials. The U.S. official spoke on condition of anonymity because the nationality of those killed had not been formally released. Names of the dead are usually released after their families or next-of-kin are notified, a process that can take several days. The nationality of the civilian was also not disclosed.

In addition to the 2,000 Americans killed since the Afghan war began on Oct. 7, 2001, at least 1,190 more coalition troops from other countries have also died, according to iCasualties.org, an independent organization that tracks the deaths.

According to the Afghanistan index kept by the Washington-based research centre Brookings Institution, about 40 per cent of the American deaths were caused by improvised explosive devices. The majority of those were after 2009, when President Barack Obama ordered a surge that sent in 33,000 additional troops to combat heightened Taliban activity. The surge brought the total number of American troops to 101,000, the peak for the entire war.

According to Brookings, hostile fire was the second most common cause of death, accounting for nearly 31 per cent of Americans killed.

Tracking deaths of Afghan civilians is much more difficult. According to the U.N., 13,431 civilians were killed in the Afghan conflict between 2007, when the U.N. began keeping statistics, and the end of August. Going back to the U.S.-led invasion in 2001, most estimates put the number of Afghan civilian deaths in the war at more than 20,000.

The number of American dead reflects an Associated Press count of those members of the armed services killed inside Afghanistan since the U.S.-led invasion began. Some other news organizations use a count that also includes those killed outside Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, the global anti-terror campaign led by then-President George W. Bush.

The 2001 invasion targeted al-Qaida and its Taliban allies shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States, which claimed nearly 3,000 lives.

Victory in Afghanistan seemed to come quickly. Kabul fell within weeks, and the hardline Taliban regime was toppled with few U.S. casualties.

But the Bush administration’s shift toward war with Iraq left the Western powers without enough resources on the ground, so by 2006 the Taliban had regrouped into a serious military threat.

Obama deployed more troops to Afghanistan, and casualties increased sharply in the last several years. But the American public grew weary of having its military in a perpetual state of conflict, especially after the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq at the end of last year. That war, which began with a U.S.-led invasion in 2003 to oust Saddam Hussein, cost the lives of nearly 4,500 U.S. troops, more than twice as many as have died in Afghanistan so far.

“The tally is modest by the standards of war historically, but every fatality is a tragedy and 11 years is too long,” said Michael O’Hanlon, a fellow at the Brookings. “All that is internalized, however, in an American public that has been watching this campaign for a long time. More newsworthy right now are the insider attacks and the sense of hopelessness they convey to many. “

Attacks by Afghan soldiers or police — or insurgents disguised in their uniforms — have killed 52 American and other NATO troops so far this year.

The so-called insider attacks are considered one of the most serious threats to the U.S. exit strategy from the country. In its latest incarnation, that strategy has focused on training Afghan forces to take over security nationwide — allowing most foreign troops to go home by the end of 2014.

Although Obama has pledged that most U.S. combat troops will leave by the end of 2014, American, NATO and allied troops are still dying in Afghanistan at a rate of one a day. …”

http://news.yahoo.com/us-military-deaths-afghanistan-hit-2-000-11-131020733.html

United States Forces casualties in the war in Afghanistan

“…As of September 30, 2012, there have been at least 2,000[1] U.S. military casualties in the war in Afghanistan and additional 118 fatalities in the broader Operation Enduring Freedom outside Afghanistan. 1,657 of these casualties inside Afghanistan have been the result of hostile action. 17,644 American servicemembers have been wounded in action during the war.[2] In addition there are 1,173 U.S. civilian contractor fatalities.[3]

At the end of May 2010, the number of American fatalities was reported to have reached 1,000.[4][5] By June 2011, the total number went up to 1,610. More than two-thirds of those deaths have occurred since the American military presence in Afghanistan was doubled under President Barack Obama in 2009.

The highest number of American fatalities recorded in a single incident occurred on August 6, 2011, in which a transport helicopter was shot down killing 30 Americans, including 22 Navy SEALs.[6][7]

Numbers of fatalities

As of September 27, 2012, the United States’ Department of Defense official statistics lists 1,996 servicemembers as having died in Afghanistan. Of these, 1,657 are due to hostile action and 339 non-hostile.[8]

In addition, another 116 soldiers are reported to have died as part of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF); 48 are confirmed to have died in Africa, Southeast Asia or Cuba in support of OEF – Horn of Africa, OEF – Philippines, OEF – Trans Sahara, and in the detainment of prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.[9] 40 fatalities incurred outside the war zone while supporting combat operations in Afghanistan, making a total of 1,797 United States servicemen killed in the war in Afghanistan. Of the 40, four died due to hostile action; a Marine and a civilian DoD employee killed by terrorist gunmen in Kuwait and two military airmen killed by a lone wolf terrorist in Germany.[10][5]

Many veterans have committed suicide as a result of physiological problems developed during their service. [11] More than 50000 up to the begin of 2012.

The iCasualties.org figure of 2,035 is higher than the Department of Defense’s officially stated figure, although according to the website all of the names listed at iCasualties.org have been confirmed by the Department of Defense.[12]

Casualties by month and year

 All Fatalities

U.S. fatalities by month
Year J F M A M J J A S O N D Total
2001 - - - - - - - - - 2 2 3 7
2002 10 1 9 4 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 30
2003 4 1 8 2 1 2 1 4 1 3 6 0 33
2004 9 2 3 1 8 4 2 3 4 5 7 1 49
2005 2 1 5 18 4 26 2 15 11 4 2 3 93
2006 1 7 7 1 11 18 9 10 6 10 7 1 88
2007 0 12 3 8 11 12 13 18 8 9 11 6 111
2008 7 1 7 5 16 28 20 22 27 16 1 3 153
2009 14 15 13 6 12 24 44 51 37 59 17 18 310
2010 30 31 24 19 34 60 65 55 42 50 53 33 496
2011 24 18 29 46 35 47 37 70 42 31 18 15 412
2012 26 10 18 34 39 29 41 39 17 - - - 253

Grand Total: 2,035

U.S. all fatalities in Afghanistan only

Source: [1]

Note: Table omits the deaths of 92 soldiers killed in support of operations in Afghanistan in other countries.

Killed in action only

U.S. KIA (hostile) in Afghanistan only by month
Year J F M A M J J A S O N D Total
2001 - - - - - - - - - 0 1 3 4
2002 1 0 9 4 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 20
2003 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 3 1 3 5 0 17
2004 0 1 2 1 6 3 0 2 3 3 3 0 24
2005 2 0 5 1 3 25 2 12 9 3 2 2 66
2006 1 6 6 1 1 14 7 8 5 9 6 1 65
2007 0 2 1 5 10 11 13 13 7 7 10 4 83
2008 7 1 6 5 14 23 16 17 26 15 1 2 133
2009 12 15 11 3 9 20 39 47 35 47 15 15 268
2010 27 30 22 14 31 49 54 54 31 48 48 32 440
2011 20 17 25 43 30 39 32 66 38 26 18 13 367
2012 15 11 12 31 34 22 37 36 16 - - - 214

Grand Total: 1,703

These totals are U.S. KIA (hostile) in Afghanistan only

Source: [2]

Note: Table omits the deaths of four troops killed in action in support of operations in Afghanistan in other countries. These are the marine and the civilian Department of Defence employee killed in Kuwait in October 2002 and January 2003, respectively, and the two airman killed in Germany in 2011. Friendly fire deaths are included in the table.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Forces_casualties_in_the_war_in_Afghanistan

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 621 other followers

%d bloggers like this: